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Sample records for affinity chromatographic techniques

  1. Functional chromatographic technique for natural product isolation†

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Eichhorst, Nicole; Engelder, Pearce; Mesa, Celestina; Kithsiri Wijeratne, E. M.; Gunaherath, G. M. Kamal B.; Leslie Gunatilaka, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product discovery arises through a unique interplay between chromatographic purification and biological assays. Currently, most techniques used for natural product purification deliver leads without a defined biological action. We now describe a technique, referred to herein as functional chromatography, that deploys biological affinity as the matrix for compound isolation. PMID:25588099

  2. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  3. Detection and quantification of affinity ligand leaching and specific antibody fragment concentration within chromatographic fractions using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Thillaivinayagalingam, Pranavan; Newcombe, Anthony R; O'Donovan, Kieran; Francis, Richard; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2007-12-01

    Rapid analyses of chromatographic steps within a biopharmaceutical manufacturing process are often desirable to evaluate column performance, provide mass balance data and to permit accurate calculations of yields and recoveries. Using SPR (surface plasmon resonance) biosensor (Biacore) technology, we have developed a sandwich immunoassay to quantify polyclonal anti-digoxin Fab fragments used for the production of the FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved biotherapeutic DigiFab. The results show that specific Fab may be quantified in all affinity process streams and accurate yield and mass balance data calculated. Control experiments using sheep Fab and Fc indicate that the assay is specific to DigiFab. The quantification of potential leached ligand within chromatographic fractions may also be technically challenging, particularly when low-molecular-mass ligands are covalently coupled with an affinity absorbent. Typical methods to assess ligand leakage such as DDMA (digoxin-dicarboxymethoxylamine; digoxin analogue) often involve the use of labelled ligands and relatively complex and labour-intensive analytical techniques. Using the same analytical methodologies, an assay to detect leached or eluted ligand off the column was developed. The results indicate minimal levels of leached ligand in all chromatographic fractions, with total levels of leached DDMA calculated to be 1.52 microg. This is less than 0.01% of the total amount of DDMA coupled with the laboratory-scale affinity column. The SPR methods described in the present study may be applicable for the rapid in-process analysis of specific polyclonal Fab fragments (within a polyclonal mixture) and to rapidly assess leakage of small molecule ligands covalently attached to chromatographic supports.

  4. Preparation of dye-ligand affinity chromatographic packings based on monodisperse poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) beads and their chromatographic properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feiyan; Zhu, Yan; Jia, Zhishen

    2006-11-17

    Monodisperse porous particles, poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate), P(GMA-EDMA) beads with diameter of 7 microm were prepared by a single-step swelling and polymerization method. The polymer particles were advantaged through immobilization of Procion Bule MX-R, which was incubated by epichlorohydrin via the epoxide groups on the particles surface. The Procion Bule MX-R-immobilized P(GMA-EDMA) beads were mechanically stable and acted as the rigid matrix for column chromatography in HPLC mode. The chromatographic properties of the dye-ligand affinity chromatographic stationary phase for biopolymers separation are discussed. This affinity column has advantages of enabling biopolymer separation, high efficiency and low backpressure. Lysozyme and BSA were fast separated within 10min using this affinity column. The column was also used for the purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white.

  5. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  6. Techniques of preparing plant material for chromatographic separation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Romanik, G; Gilgenast, E; Przyjazny, A; Kamiński, M

    2007-03-10

    This paper discusses preparation techniques of samples of plant material for chromatographic analysis. Individual steps of the procedures used in sample preparation, including sample collection from the environment or from tissue cultures, drying, comminution, homogenization, leaching, extraction, distillation and condensation, analyte enrichment, and obtaining the final extracts for chromatographic analysis are discussed. The techniques most often used for isolation of analytes from homogenized plant material, i.e., Soxhlet extraction, ultrasonic solvent extraction (sonication), accelerated solvent extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, supercritical-fluid extraction, steam distillation, as well as membrane processes are emphasized. Sorptive methods of sample enrichment and removal of interferences, i.e., solid-phase extraction, and solid-phase micro-extraction are also discussed.

  7. Targeting Anti-Cancer Active Compounds: Affinity-Based Chromatographic Assays

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Seidl, Claudia; Moaddel, Ruin; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Affinity-based chromatography assays encompass the use of solid supports containing immobilized biological targets to monitor binding events in the isolation , identification and/or characterization of bioactive compounds. This powerful bioanalytical technique allows the screening of potential binders through fast analyses that can be directly performed using isolated substances or complex matrices. An overview of the recent researches in frontal and zonal affinity-based chromatography screening assays, which has been used as a tool in the identification and characterization of new anti-cancer agents, is discussed. In addition, a critical evaluation of the recently emerged ligands fishing assays in complex mixtures is also discussed. PMID:27306095

  8. Efficient wheat germ agglutinin purification with a chitosan-based affinity chromatographic matrix.

    PubMed

    Baieli, María F; Urtasun, Nicolás; Miranda, María V; Cascone, Osvaldo; Wolman, Federico J

    2012-01-01

    An efficient affinity chromatographic matrix based on chitosan for wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) purification was developed. The matrices assayed consisted of chitosan mini-spheres cross-linked with epichlorhydrin 45, 250 or 500 mM. The maximum adsorption capacity of pure WGA - calculated from the corresponding isotherms - was between 43.2 and 48.9 mg/g at pH 5.0 and between 16.6 and 27.6 mg/g at pH 8.5. However, the adsorption of agglutinin from wheat germ extract was higher at pH 8.5. In addition, 0.5 g of mini-spheres cross-linked with epichlorhydrin 250 mM adsorbed 94.5% of the WGA present in 5 mL of the concentrated extract. Acetic acid was able to elute 100% of the adsorbed WGA. The purity of the WGA obtained was greater than 95% and the purification factor was 56.8. The matrix was able to maintain an efficient performance of the purification process for three consecutive cycles. A new method to monitor the purification process by RP-HPLC was developed.

  9. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  10. [Advancement of colloidal gold chromatographic technique in screening of ochratoxin A].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-lu; Wang, Yu-ting; Kong, Wei-jun; Yang, Mei-hua; Zhao, Ming; Ou-Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic secondary metabolite mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, existing in a variety of foodstuffs and Chinese medicines. OTA is difficult to be detected in practice because of the characteristics such as trace amounts, toxicity, existing in complex matrices. In the numerous detection technologies, colloidal gold chromatographic techniques are highly sensitive, specific, cost-effective and user-friendly, and are being used increasingly for OTA screening. Recently, with the development of aptamer technology and its application in chromatographic technique, a newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique has been developed. This review elaborates the structures and principles of both traditional and newly colloidal gold chromatographic techniques, focuses on newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique, summarizes and compares their use in rapid detection of OTA. Finally, in order to provide a reference for better research of related work, the development trends of this novel technique are prospected.

  11. Bovine lactoferrin purification from whey using Yellow HE-4R as the chromatographic affinity ligand.

    PubMed

    Baieli, María Fernanda; Urtasun, Nicolás; Miranda, María Victoria; Cascone, Osvaldo; Wolman, Federico Javier

    2014-03-01

    The worldwide production of whey increases by around 186 million tons each year and it is generally considered as a waste, even when several whey proteins have important economic relevance. For its valorization, inexpensive ligands and integrated chromatography methods need to be developed for specific and low-cost protein purification. Here, we describe a novel affinity process with the dye Yellow HE-4R immobilized on Sepharose for bovine lactoferrin purification. This approach based on a low-cost ligand showed an efficient performance for the recovery and purification of bovine lactoferrin directly from whey, with a yield of 71% and a purification factor of 61.

  12. Efficient fabrication of high-capacity immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media: The role of the dextran-grafting process and its manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Jingfei; Huang, Yongdong; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Rongyue; Zhu, Kai; Suo, Jia; Su, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhigang; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-03-01

    Novel high-capacity Ni(2+) immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media were prepared through the dextran-grafting process. Dextran was grafted to an allyl-activated agarose-based matrix followed by functionalization for the immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media. With elaborate regulation of the allylation degree, dextran was completely or partly grafted to agarose microspheres, namely, completely dextran-grafted agarose microspheres and partly dextran-grafted ones, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscope results demonstrated that a good adjustment of dextran-grafting degree was achieved, and dextran was distributed uniformly in whole completely dextran-grafted microspheres, while just distributed around the outside of the partly dextran-grafted ones. Flow hydrodynamic properties were improved greatly after the dextran-grafting process, and the flow velocity increased by about 30% compared with that of a commercial chromatographic medium (Ni Sepharose FF). A significant improvement of protein binding performance was also achieved by the dextran-grafting process, and partly dextran-grafted Ni(2+) chelating medium had a maximum binding capacity for His-tagged lactate dehydrogenase about 2.5 times higher than that of Ni Sepharose FF. The results indicated that this novel chromatographic medium is promising for applications in high-efficiency and large-scale protein purification.

  13. Comparison of gas chromatographic hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevado, J J Berzas; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Krupp, E M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Fariñas, N Rodríguez; Moreno, M Jiménez; Wallace, D; Ropero, M J Patiño

    2011-07-15

    In this study, we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of three hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis in different sample matrices using gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) and pyrolysis atomic fluorescence (GC-pyro-AFS) detection. Aqueous ethylation with NaBEt(4) was required in all cases. All systems were validated with respect to precision, with repeatability and reproducibility <5% RSD, confirmed by the Snedecor F-test. All methods proved to be robust according to a Plackett-Burnham design for 7 factors and 15 experiments, and calculations were carried out using the procedures described by Youden and Steiner. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (DORM-2 and DOLT-3) were analyzed after closed-vessel microwave extraction with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). No statistically significant differences were found to the certified values (p=0.05). The suitability for water samples analysis with different organic matter and chloride contents was evaluated by recovery experiments in synthetic spiked waters. Absolute detection and quantification limits were in the range of 2-6 pg for GC-pyro-AFS, 1-4 pg for GC-MS, with 0.05-0.21 pg for GC-ICP-MS showing the best limits of detection for the three systems employed. However, all systems are sufficiently sensitive for mercury speciation in environmental samples, with GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS offering isotope analysis capabilities for the use of species-specific isotope dilution analysis, and GC-pyro-AFS being the most cost effective alternative.

  14. Systematic toxicological analysis of drugs and poisons in biosamples by hyphenated chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A

    1999-10-15

    The introduction of hyphenated chromatographic-spectroscopic techniques represented a substantial step-forward for Systematic Toxicological Analysis (STA), increasing the amount and quality of information obtainable from the analysis of a biological sample, and enhancing the possibilities of identifying unknown drugs and poisons. STA methods based either on GC-MS or on HPLC-UV published in the last decade are reviewed in this paper. The different analytical phases, i.e. sample preparation (pretreatment, extraction, derivatisation), chromatographic separation and detection/identification are examined in detail in order to emphasise the complementarity of the two approaches. In addition, the first STA method based on HPLC-MS is illustrated and some applications of TLC-UV to drug screening are also described. Finally, an overview of semi- and fully-automated STA methods is given.

  15. New approaches to the kinetic study of alcoholic fermentation by chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Lainioti, Georgia Ch; Karaiskakis, George

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of the fermentation process has gained increasing interest, not only in the scientific community, but in the industrial world as well. Information concerning the improvement of batch fermentation performance may potentially be valuable for the designing of scale-up processes. Intensive studies have been conducted with the use of various chromatographic techniques, such as conventional gas chromatography, reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC), high-performance liquid chromatography, field-flow fractionation and others. In the present study, specific focus is placed on the employment of RFGC, a method that can successfully be applied for the determination of physicochemical quantities, such as reaction rate constants and activation energies, at each phase of the alcoholic fermentation. In contrast to conventional chromatographic techniques, RFGC can lead to substantial information referring to the evaluation of fermentation kinetics at any time of the process. Moreover, gravitational field-flow fractionation, a sub-technique of field-flow fractionation, presents the ability to monitor the proliferation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells through their elution profiles that can be related to the different cell growth stages. The combination of the two techniques can provide important information for kinetic study and the distinction of the growth phases of yeast cell proliferation during alcoholic fermentations conducted under different environmental conditions.

  16. On-line coupling of supercritical fluid extraction and chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Camargo, Andrea Del Pilar; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses recent advances and applications of on-line supercritical fluid extraction coupled to liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and supercritical fluid chromatographic techniques. Supercritical fluids, due to their exceptional physical properties, provide unique opportunities not only during the extraction step but also in the separation process. Although supercritical fluid extraction is especially suitable for recovery of non-polar organic compounds, this technique can also be successfully applied to the extraction of polar analytes by the aid of modifiers. Supercritical fluid extraction process can be performed following "off-line" or "on-line" approaches and their main features are contrasted herein. Besides, the parameters affecting the supercritical fluid extraction process are explained and a "decision tree" is for the first time presented in this review work as a guide tool for method development. The general principles (instrumental and methodological) of the different on-line couplings of supercritical fluid extraction with chromatographic techniques are described. Advantages and shortcomings of supercritical fluid extraction as hyphenated technique are discussed. Besides, an update of the most recent applications (from 2005 up to now) of the mentioned couplings is also presented in this review.

  17. Novel affinity chromatographic system for the single-step purification of glycosaminoglycans from complex systems using volatile buffers.

    PubMed

    Hodson, B A; Pepper, D S; Dawes, J

    1991-04-19

    A new system for the isolation and purification of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and related molecules from complex systems such as plasma is described. Affinity chromatography which exploits the very high affinity between the polymeric base Polybrene and sulphated polysaccharides was used. A novel volatile buffer system composed of ammonium formate and formic acid, which allows the complete recovery of samples, was developed, and elution conditions were optimised for the separation and purification of GAGs of different charge densities. Using this system the losses associated with dialysis and desalting, frequently necessary preliminaries to further analysis, are avoided.

  18. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques in studies on oxidative stress in autism.

    PubMed

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Jóźwik-Pruska, Jagoda

    2016-04-15

    Healthy body is characterized by the presence of a dynamic and balanced equilibrium between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant capacity. In oxidative stress this balance is switched to reactions of oxidation leading to increased production of ROS, exceeding the capacity of physiological antioxidant systems. Oxidative stress is known to be linked to many disturbances, disorders and diseases. One of these is the autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder manifested by abnormalities in social communication and interaction, as well as by occurrence of repetitive, restricted patterns of behavior or activities. It is believed that adequate knowledge about the oxidative stress biomarkers and the possibility of their reliable measuring could be useful in broadening knowledge on various diseases including ASD. A high number of compounds have been proposed as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Some of these are connected with the severity of ASD. The present review gives a summary of the chromatographic techniques used for the determination of biomarkers for oxidative stress in autism, and of other compounds important in this context. The first part of the review focuses on the correlation between oxidative stress and autism. The second part describes applications of chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods to the analysis of different metabolites connected with oxidative stress in biological fluids of autistic children. Advantages as well as disadvantages of the application of these methods for the analysis of different types of oxidative stress biomarkers are discussed.

  19. Chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques used in the analysis of triazole antifungal agents-a review.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, R J; Krzek, J; Talik, P

    2010-09-15

    Systematic review of literature coupled with integrative research of published data for triazole antifungal agents was done. The investigated literature covered chromatographic and electrophoretic methods developed in the last 10 years (2000-2009). The aim of this review was to compare different methodologies, assess preferences in the selection of analytical methods and to find still existing analytical problems. Last decade is characterized by dynamic development of instrumental methods, that results in advance and diversity of applied analytical procedures. The main focus was given to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the technique of choice in the analysis of most of pharmaceuticals. The review includes literature on 8 triazole antifungal drugs: fluconazole, itraconazole and terconazole from the first generation and posaconazole, voriconazole, ravuconazole, isavuconazole and albaconazole classified in second generation. Investigations of pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples were considered.

  20. Affinity chromatography on immobilized "biomimetic" ligands. Synthesis, immobilization and chromatographic assessment of an immunoglobulin G-binding ligand.

    PubMed

    Teng, S F; Sproule, K; Husain, A; Lowe, C R

    2000-03-31

    A synthetic bifunctional ligand (22/8) comprising a triazine scaffold substituted with 3-aminophenol (22) and 4-amino-1-naphthol (8) has been designed, synthesised, characterised and immobilized on agarose beads to create a robust, highly selective affinity adsorbent for human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Scatchard analysis of the binding isotherm for IgG on immobilized 22/8 (90 micromol 22/8/g moist weight gel) indicated an affinity constant (Ka) of 1.4 x 10(5) M(-1) and a theoretical maximum capacity of 151.9 mg IgG/g moist weight gel. The adsorbent shows similar selectivity to immobilized protein A and binds IgG from a number of species. An apparent capacity of 51.9 mg human IgG/g moist weight gel was observed under the experimental conditions selected for adsorption. Human IgG was eluted with glycine-HCl buffer with a recovery of 67-69% and a purity of 97.3-99.2%, depending on the pH value of the buffer used for elution. Preparative chromatography of IgG from human plasma showed that under the specified conditions, 94.4% of plasma IgG was adsorbed and 60% subsequently eluted with a purity of 92.5%. The immobilized ligand was able to withstand incubation in 1 M NaOH for 7 days without loss of binding capacity for IgG.

  1. Pharmacognostic Screening of Piper trichostachyon Fruits and its Comparative Analysis with Piper nigrum Using Chromatographic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R.; Ankad, Gireesh M.; Hegde, Harsha V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Piper trichostachyon is a wild, endemic Piper species from Western Ghats of India. The folklore healers of Belagavi region use this plant, similar to Piper nigrum. Aims: The present study investigates the comparison between P. nigrum and P. trichostachyon using pharmacognostic parameters. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic evaluation was carried out in terms of morphological, microscopic characters, and phytochemical analysis using standard methods. Comparative physicochemical analysis between P. trichostachyon and P. nigrum was also carried out through estimation of micro-macro nutrients, high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) investigation and using piperine as a marker compound for reversed phase-ultra flow liquid chromatographic (RP-UFLC) technique. Results: P. trichostachyon grows in the forests, and the fruits are morphologically similar to P. nigrum fruits, so the name in Kannada “Kaadu Kalu menasu” (wild/forest black pepper). The microscopy revealed the presence of stone cells, starch grains, oil cells and globules, beaker cells, and yellowish brown pigment layer, parenchymatous cells. The presence of alkaloids, oil, and tannins were observed in P. trichostachyon fruits. The HPTLC studies visibly indicated differences among two species with 12 peaks and varied banding pattern. RP-UFLC results showed less amount of piperine in P. trichostachyon (0.05 ± 0.002 mg/g) than in P. nigrum (16.14 ± 0.807 mg/g). Conclusion: The study reports on pharmacognostic parameters of P. trichostachyon for the 1st time and will be useful for the identification and authentication. The comparative HPTLC and RP-UFLC studies resolve the differentiation impasse among two species. However, further biological efficacy studies are required to establish its use in traditional medicine. SUMMARY Piper trichostachyon grows in the forests, and the fruits are morphologically similar to Piper nigrum fruitsThe microscopy of P. trichostachyon revealed the

  2. A novel strategy for quantitative analysis of the formulated complex system using chromatographic fingerprints combined with some chemometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xuan; Yan, Jun; Li, Yan-Chun; Kong, Bo; Lu, Hong-Bing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a novel strategy based on chromatographic fingerprints and some chemometric techniques is proposed for quantitative analysis of the formulated complex system. Here, the formulated complex system means a formulated type of complicated analytical system containing more than one kind of raw material under some concentration composition according to a certain formula. The strategy is elaborated by an example of quantitative determination of mixtures consist of three essential oils. Three key steps of the strategy are as follows: (1) remove baselines of the chromatograms; (2) align retention time; (3) conduct quantitative analysis using multivariate regression with entire chromatographic profiles. Through the determination of concentration compositions of nine mixtures arranged by uniform design, the feasibility of the proposed strategy is validated and the factors that influence the quantitative result are also discussed. This strategy is proved to be viable and the validation indicates that quantitative result obtained using this strategy mainly depends on the efficiency of the alignment method as well as chromatographic peak shape of the chromatograms. Previously, chromatographic fingerprints were only used for identification and/or recognition of some products. This work demonstrates that with the assistance of some effective chemometric techniques, chromatographic fingerprints are also potential and promising in solving quantitative problems of complex analytical systems.

  3. Ionic liquids in chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques: toward additional improvements in the separation of natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Carmen S. R.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Silvestre, Armando J. D.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, in recent years, ionic liquids (ILs) have been largely investigated in the field of analytical chemistry. Particularly during the last sixteen years, they have been successfully applied in the chromatographic and electrophoretic analysis of value-added compounds extracted from biomass. Considering the growing interest in the use of ILs in this field, this critical review provides a comprehensive overview on the improvements achieved using ILs as constituents of mobile or stationary phases in analytical techniques, namely in capillary electrophoresis and its different modes, in high performance liquid chromatography, and in gas chromatography, for the separation and analysis of natural compounds. The impact of the IL chemical structure and the influence of secondary parameters, such as the IL concentration, temperature, pH, voltage and analysis time (when applied), are also critically addressed regarding the achieved separation improvements. Major conclusions on the role of ILs in the separation mechanisms and the performance of these techniques in terms of efficiency, resolution and selectivity are provided. Based on a critical analysis of all published results, some target-oriented ILs are suggested. Finally, current drawbacks and future challenges in the field are highlighted. In particular, the design and use of more benign and effective ILs as well as the development of integrated (and thus more sustainable) extraction–separation processes using IL aqueous solutions are suggested within a green chemistry perspective. PMID:27667965

  4. Ionic liquids in chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques: toward additional improvements in the separation of natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Soares, Belinda; Passos, Helena; Freire, Carmen S R; Coutinho, João A P; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Mara G

    2016-09-07

    Due to their unique properties, in recent years, ionic liquids (ILs) have been largely investigated in the field of analytical chemistry. Particularly during the last sixteen years, they have been successfully applied in the chromatographic and electrophoretic analysis of value-added compounds extracted from biomass. Considering the growing interest in the use of ILs in this field, this critical review provides a comprehensive overview on the improvements achieved using ILs as constituents of mobile or stationary phases in analytical techniques, namely in capillary electrophoresis and its different modes, in high performance liquid chromatography, and in gas chromatography, for the separation and analysis of natural compounds. The impact of the IL chemical structure and the influence of secondary parameters, such as the IL concentration, temperature, pH, voltage and analysis time (when applied), are also critically addressed regarding the achieved separation improvements. Major conclusions on the role of ILs in the separation mechanisms and the performance of these techniques in terms of efficiency, resolution and selectivity are provided. Based on a critical analysis of all published results, some target-oriented ILs are suggested. Finally, current drawbacks and future challenges in the field are highlighted. In particular, the design and use of more benign and effective ILs as well as the development of integrated (and thus more sustainable) extraction-separation processes using IL aqueous solutions are suggested within a green chemistry perspective.

  5. Chromatographic techniques coupled with mass spectrometry for the determination of organic acids in the study of autism.

    PubMed

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Zurawicz, Ewa; Jóźwik, Jagoda

    2014-08-01

    Chromatographic methods find application in the diagnostics and prognosis of diseases. They are used in finding new biomarkers, which may result in early medical intervention. Early diagnosis and intervention are especially important in the case of diseases of unknown etiology. One of these is autism. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction and communication and a pattern of repetitive or stereotyped behavior. Organic acids are intermediate metabolites of all major groups of organic cellular components and can play a role in the pathogenesis of autism. This review presents information about abnormal levels of some organic acids observed in the urine of children with autism and determination of acids with the use of chromatographic techniques. 342 literature sources on frequency (2005-2012) of the use of chromatographic methods in the determination of organic compounds in various body fluids were searched.

  6. Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bazzali, Ophélie; Thai, Tran Huy; Hoi, Tran Minh; Khang, Nguyen Sinh; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange; Tomi, Félix

    2016-06-27

    In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, (13)C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%), 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-one (17.2%), γ-eudesmol (5.1%), nootkatone (4.7%), valencene (3.5%) and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-11-one (2.6%). The structure of two new compounds-10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran-has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%), phyllocladene (37.8%) or by pimara-6(14)-15-diene (19.4%).

  7. Coupling spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for evaluation of the depositional history of hydrocarbons in a subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Doumer, Marta E; Gallice, Wellington C; Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Cabral, Ana Caroline; Cardoso, Fernanda D; Dolci, Natiely N; Camargo, Luana M; Ferreira, Paulo A L; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-10-01

    Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques can be used together to evaluate hydrocarbon inputs to coastal environments such as the Paranaguá estuarine system (PES), located in the SW Atlantic, Brazil. Historical inputs of aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using two sediment cores from the PES. The AHs were related to the presence of biogenic organic matter and degraded oil residues. The PAHs were associated with mixed sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations were related to oil spills, while relatively low levels could be attributed to the decrease in oil usage during the global oil crisis. The results of electron paramagnetic resonance were in agreement with the absolute AHs and PAHs concentrations measured by chromatographic techniques, while near-infrared spectroscopy results were consistent with unresolved complex mixture (UCM)/total n-alkanes ratios. These findings suggest that the use of a combination of techniques can increase the accuracy of assessment of contamination in sediments.

  8. Purification of pre-miR-29 by a new O-phospho-l-tyrosine affinity chromatographic strategy optimized using design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Adriana; Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Sousa, Ângela; Sousa, Fani

    2014-05-23

    MicroRNAs are the most studied small non-coding RNA molecules that are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of target genes. Their role in Alzheimer's disease is being studied and explored in order to develop a new therapeutic strategy based on specific gene silencing. This disease is characterized by protein deposits, mainly deposits of extracellular Aβ plaques, produced upon endoproteolytic cleavage of APP by ß-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Recent studies have shown that particularly miR-29 cluster can be involved in the decrease of Aβ plaques production, by acting on BACE1 expression silencing. In order to use this microRNA as potential therapeutic it is essential to guarantee its purity, stability and integrity. Hence, the main purpose of this study was the development of a new affinity chromatographic strategy by using an O-phospho-l-tyrosine matrix and applying Box-Behnken design (BBD) to obtain pre-miR-29 with high purity degree and yield, envisioning its application in gene therapy. Thus, after process optimization the best results were achieved with a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient in 10mM Tris buffer, pH 8 (1.6M (NH4)2SO4, 1.11M (NH4)2SO4 and 0M (NH4)2SO4), at 16°C. These experimental conditions allowed the recovery of pre-miR-29 with 52% of purity and 71% of recovery yield. The O-phospho-l-tyrosine matrix was initially chosen to mimic the natural interactions that occur inside the cell, and in fact it was proved a satisfactory selectivity for pre-miR-29. Also the innovative application of BBD for this strategy was efficient (R(2)=0.98 for % relative recovery and R(2)=0.93 for % relative purity) and essential to achieve best purification results in short time, saving lab resources.

  9. A review of chromatographic characterization techniques for biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    This review surveys chromatographic technology that has been applied to the characterization of biodiesel and its blends. Typically, biodiesel consists of fatty acid methyl esters produced by transesterification of plant or animal derived triacylglycerols. Primary attention is given to the determination of trace impurities in biodiesel, such as methanol, glycerol, mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, and sterol glucosides. The determination of the fatty acid methyl esters, trace impurities in biodiesel, and the determination of the biodiesel content of commercial blends of biodiesel in conventional diesel are also addressed.

  10. Object matching using a locally affine invariant and linear programming techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongsheng; Huang, Xiaolei; He, Lei

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new matching method based on a novel locally affine-invariant geometric constraint and linear programming techniques. To model and solve the matching problem in a linear programming formulation, all geometric constraints should be able to be exactly or approximately reformulated into a linear form. This is a major difficulty for this kind of matching algorithm. We propose a novel locally affine-invariant constraint which can be exactly linearized and requires a lot fewer auxiliary variables than other linear programming-based methods do. The key idea behind it is that each point in the template point set can be exactly represented by an affine combination of its neighboring points, whose weights can be solved easily by least squares. Errors of reconstructing each matched point using such weights are used to penalize the disagreement of geometric relationships between the template points and the matched points. The resulting overall objective function can be solved efficiently by linear programming techniques. Our experimental results on both rigid and nonrigid object matching show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Intact protein separation by chromatographic and/or electrophoretic techniques for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-12-09

    Mass spectrometry used in combination with a wide variety of separation methods is the principal methodology for proteomics. In bottom-up approach, proteins are cleaved with a specific proteolytic enzyme, followed by peptide separation and MS identification. In top-down approach intact proteins are introduced into the mass spectrometer. The ions generated by electrospray ionization are then subjected to gas-phase separation, fragmentation, fragment separation, and automated interpretation of mass spectrometric and chromatographic data yielding both the molecular weight of the intact protein and the protein fragmentation pattern. This approach requires high accuracy mass measurement analysers capable of separating the multi-charged isotopic cluster of proteins, such as hybrid ion trap-Fourier transform instruments (LTQ-FTICR, LTQ-Orbitrap). Front-end separation technologies tailored for proteins are of primary importance to implement top-down proteomics. This review intends to provide the state of art of protein chromatographic and electrophoretic separation methods suitable for MS coupling, and to illustrate both monodimensional and multidimensional approaches used for LC-MS top-down proteomics. In addition, some recent progresses in protein chromatography that may provide an alternative to those currently employed are also discussed.

  12. Microextraction techniques for the non-chromatographic speciation of ultratraces of elements in waters: some significant cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Vicente-Martinez, Yesica; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel; Martínez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    The speciation of very low concentrations of some elements in waters is of interest due to the different behaviour and toxicity the species can have. This task can be carried out by using liquid chromatographic techniques (LC) for separation together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. However, this combination is not easily available in all laboratories mainly due to the relative high cost of acquisition and maintenance of the ICP-MS spectrometer, and so other alternatives are of practical interest. Present knowledge of microextraction techniques involving minimal (or none) amounts of organic solvents allows, in some cases, speciation to be carried out without the need of such an expensive instrument, and even avoiding the use of a chromatographic stage. The selectivity of the separation (fractionation or speciation) can be achieved by modifying the experimental conditions used for microextraction, and a sensitive final measurement be obtained by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In this way, since an ETAAS instrument is common (and sometimes underused) in all laboratories, the speciation procedures are made available to most laboratories worldwide. The high preconcentration factor achieved by means of the microextraction stage together with the high sensitivity inherent in ETAAS measurements result in extremely sensitive methods that permit the speciation at ultratrace levels. The advantages of this methodology are presented by discussing speciation of chromium and arsenic as representative examples.

  13. Selective surface modification technique for improvement of chromatographic separation selectivity for sugar derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Ken; Yoshizako, Kimihiro; Kubo, Takuya; Ikegami, Tohru; Tanaka, Nobuo; Haginaka, Jun

    2002-01-01

    Highly cross-linked macroporous polymers were prepared utilizing ethylene dimethacrylate as a cross-linking agent, in the presence or absence of methyl-alpha-D-glucoside as a kind of template molecule with methacrylic acid as a functional monomer. After the preparation of the polymers, we applied a high temperature to the cross-linked polymers to study the changes of adsorption properties of the polymers for sugar derivatives including the template molecule utilized. Interestingly, the heat treatment up to 250 degrees C afforded improvement of relative adsorption affinity for several sugar derivatives including the template molecule, while heat treatment up to 150 degrees C did not afford those improvements. The detailed studies including polymers prepared using acrylic acid as a functional monomer instead of methacrylic acid prove that temperatures higher than the Tg temperature of the polymer derived from a functional monomer such as methacrylic acid and higher than the melting point (mp) of the sugar template are necessary to afford the observed improvement of relative affinity based on the surface modification effects through the heat treatment to cross-linked polymers.

  14. Brain penetration of colistin in mice assessed by a novel high-performance liquid chromatographic technique.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2009-10-01

    A sensitive and reliable liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of colistin concentrations in mouse brain homogenate. With a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran-water (50:25:25 [vol/vol]) at a flow rate of 1 ml/min, a linear correlation between peak area and colistin concentration was observed over the concentration range of 93.8 to 3,000 ng/g in brain tissue (R2 > 0.994). Intra- and interday coefficients of variation were 5.1 to 8.3% and 5.8 to 8.5%, respectively, and the recovery ranged from 85% to 94%. This assay was then utilized to determine the amount of colistin that permeated the blood-brain barrier over a 2-h period following bolus intravenous administration of colistin sulfate to mice. After a single dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight to mice, brain homogenate concentrations of colistin were very low, relative to plasma colistin concentrations, suggesting that colistin permeability across the healthy blood-brain barrier is negligible during this experimental period.

  15. Identification of piecewise affine systems based on fuzzy PCA-guided robust clustering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmirza, Esmaeel; Nazarahari, Milad; Mousavi, Alireza

    2016-12-01

    Hybrid systems are a class of dynamical systems whose behaviors are based on the interaction between discrete and continuous dynamical behaviors. Since a general method for the analysis of hybrid systems is not available, some researchers have focused on specific types of hybrid systems. Piecewise affine (PWA) systems are one of the subsets of hybrid systems. The identification of PWA systems includes the estimation of the parameters of affine subsystems and the coefficients of the hyperplanes defining the partition of the state-input domain. In this paper, we have proposed a PWA identification approach based on a modified clustering technique. By using a fuzzy PCA-guided robust k-means clustering algorithm along with neighborhood outlier detection, the two main drawbacks of the well-known clustering algorithms, i.e., the poor initialization and the presence of outliers, are eliminated. Furthermore, this modified clustering technique enables us to determine the number of subsystems without any prior knowledge about system. In addition, applying the structure of the state-input domain, that is, considering the time sequence of input-output pairs, provides a more efficient clustering algorithm, which is the other novelty of this work. Finally, the proposed algorithm has been evaluated by parameter identification of an IGV servo actuator. Simulation together with experiment analysis has proved the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Effect of new training technique on affinity of cynomolgus monkeys for animal care personnel.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Ai; Tachibana, Yuki; Takaura, Kaoru; Ochi, Takehiro; Koyama, Hironari

    2015-01-01

    To confirm our hypothesis that the sex and age of cynomolgus monkeys influences the effect of training, we employed a new training technique designed to increase the animal's affinity for animal care personnel. During 151 days of training, monkeys aged 2 to 10 years accepted each 3 raisins/3 times/day, and communicated with animal care personnel (5 times/day). Behavior was scored using integers between -1 and 5. Before training, 35 of the 61 monkeys refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (Score -1, 0 and 1). After training, 28 of these 35 monkeys (80%) accepted raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (>Score 2). The mean score of monkeys increased from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 4.3 ± 0.2. The minimum training period required for monkeys to reach Score 2 was longer for females than for males. After 151 days, 6 of the 31 females and 1 of the 30 males still refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel. Beneficial effects of training were obtained in both young and adult monkeys. These results indicate that our new training technique markedly improves the affinity of monkeys for animal care personnel, and that these effects tend to vary by sex but not age. In addition, abnormal behavior and symptoms of monkeys were improved by this training.

  17. Solid phase micro extraction - A new technique coupled with gas chromatograph for chloroethene analysis from aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.; Sewell, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    Once the chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene) contamination occurs in the subsurface environment, they tend to retain and form a Pollution plum in the aquifer because of their recalcitrance to aerobic oxidation. Currently, the most promising bioremediation method for chlorinated compounds is through anaerobic reductive biotransformation, in which each chlorine is replaced by a hydrogen. To study the biodegradation process, it is essential to monitor tetrachloroethene and its degradation daughter products frequently. An analytical method has been modified for chloroethene analysis by gas chromatography. Solid Phase Micro Extraction technique has been used to extract aqueous sample onto a fiber and then to desorb the sample directly into a gas chromatograph injection port. The total run time is less than 17 minutes.

  18. Ambient Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Content as Determined by Gas Chromatographic Techniques from Rural Tidewater Virginia in Late Spring 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E.; Davis, R.; Maroulis, P.; Bandy, A. R.; Denyszyn, R.; Kindle, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to ascertain the naturally generated hydrocarbon contribution to the air quality of the Hampton Roads region of Tidewater Virginia, a series of 27 air samples was obtained in two rural locations during late spring of 1974. These samples were analyzed for their hydrocarbon content (carbon number range C5 to C10) using gas chromatographic techniques. The thirty different hydrocarbon species were identified and monitored in the experiment. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates an average concentration of 397 parts per billion by weight (carbon) for the total non-methane hydrocarbon loading for C5 to C10 during the experiment. This value exceeds the National Primary Air Quality Standards as set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  19. Determination of formate in natural waters by a coupled enzymatic/high-performance liquid chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, D.J.; Vaughan, G.M.; Mopper, K.

    1988-09-01

    An enzymatic method was developed to quantify formic acid in natural water samples at submicromolar concentrations. The method is based on the oxidation of formate by formate dehydrogenase with corresponding reduction of ..beta..-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (..beta..-NAD/sup +/) to reduced ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ (..beta..-NADH); ..beta..-NADH is quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. An important feature of this method is that the enzymatic reaction occurs directly in aqueous media, even sea water, and does not require sample pretreatment other than sample filtration. The reaction proceeds at room temperature at a slightly alkaline pH (7.5 - 8.5) and is specific for formate with a detection limit of 0.5 ..mu..M (S/N = 4) for a 200-..mu..L injection. The precision of the method was 4.6% relative standard deviation (n = 6) for a 0.6 ..mu..M standard addition of formate to Sargasso sea water. Average recoveries of 2 ..mu..M additions of formate to sea water, pore water, or rain were 103, 103, and 87%, respectively. Intercalibration with a Dionex ion chromatographic system showed an excellent agreement of 98%. Concentrations of formate present in natural samples ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sea water, 0.4 to 10.0 ..mu..M for Miami rain, and 0.9 to 8.4 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sediment pore water.

  20. The extraction and chromatographic determination of the essentials oils from Ocimum basilicum L. by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredana Soran, Maria; Codruta Cobzac, Simona; Varodi, Codruta; Lung, Ildiko; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile

    2009-08-01

    Three different techniques (maceration, sonication and extraction in microwave field) were used for extraction of essential oils from Ocimum basilicum L. The extracts were analyzed by TLC/HPTLC technique and the fingerprint informations were obtained. The GC-FID was used to characterized the extraction efficiency and for identify the terpenic bioactive compounds. The most efficient extraction technique was maceration followed by microwave and ultrasound. The best extraction solvent system was ethyl ether + ethanol (1:1, v/v). The main compounds identified in Ocimum basilicum L. extracts were: α and β-pinene (mixture), limonene, citronellol, and geraniol.

  1. Current Developments in Analyzing Food Volatiles by Multidimensional Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Schmarr, Hans-Georg; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Bicchi, Carlo

    2017-02-02

    This paper presents current developments and future perspectives on the spread of advanced analytical tasks in the field of food volatile analysis. The topics outlined comprise (a) recent advances on miniaturized sampling techniques; (b) the potential and challenges of multidimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection for volatile identification and quantitation in samples with complex matrices;

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of effect of spacer arm and support matrix of synthetic affinity chromatographic materials for the purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zamolo, Laura; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo; Galarza, Benedict; Sadler, Chris; Williams, Sharon; Hofer, Stefan; Horak, Jeannie; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-07-29

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of each material component-the support, the spacer, and the surface chemistry-on the overall material performance of an affinity type purification media for the capture of immunoglobulin G (IgG). Material properties were investigated in terms of an experimental evaluation using affinity chromatography as well as computer modeling. The biomimetic triazine-based A2P affinity ligand was chosen as a fixed point, while spacer and support were varied. The investigated spacers were 1-2-diaminoethane (2LP), 1,3-propanedithiol (SS3), 3,6-dioxo-1,8-octanedithiol (DES), and a 1,4-substituted [1,2,3]-triazole spacer (TRZ). The support media considered were the agarose (AG) resins, PuraBead, the polyvinylether, Fractoprep, the polymethacrylate, Fractogel, and the porous silica, Fractosil. All materials were tested with pure IgG standard solution, with a mock feed solution as well as real cell culture supernatant. The interaction between IgG and A2P linked through the investigated spacers to AG was studied using molecular dynamics. The effect of a modification of the support chemical structure or of the protein-ligand binding site on the material performances was studied through target oriented simulations. Dynamic binding experiments (DBC) revealed that the performances of materials containing 2LP spacers were significantly decreased in the presence of Pluronic F68. The simulations indicated that this is probably determined by the establishment of intermolecular interactions between the 2LP charged amino group and the ether oxygen of Pluronic F68. The spacer giving the highest IgG dynamic binding capacity when Pluronic F68 was present in the feed was TRZ. The simulations showed that, among the investigated spacers, TRZ is the only one that prevents the adsorption of A2P on the support surface, thus suggesting that the mobility and lack of interaction of the ligand with the support is an important property for an affinity

  3. Development of a simple technique for the coating of monolithic silica with pristine boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs): HPLC chromatographic applications.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Yves Claude; André, Claire

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel and very simple homogeneous coating of a monolithic silica HPLC support using pristine boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) was d0.escribed. The chromatographic support was coated with BNNTs in a non covalent way to preserve the nanotube structure. A solution of BNNTs dispersed in dimethylacetamide (DMAc) was pumped through the column at a flow-rate of 0.3mL/min for 24h at room temperature. Strong interaction between amino groups and the BNNT surfaces induces the adsorption of the BNNTs on the silica, while the stable solvation in DMAc hampers further adsorption of the tubes. The excellent stability of the non covalent BNNT-coating on the monolithic silica in view of application for HPLC was also demonstrated. It was shown that this novel stationary phase was efficient for the HPLC isocratic or gradient mode separation of molecules of different structure such as phenol derivatives, alkylbenzene or doping agents (steroids). As well, this simple technique of BNNT immobilization offers new perspectives for the BNNT-coating on the surfaces of a wide range of solid substrates.

  4. Chromatographic Fingerprint Analysis of Marrubiin in Marrubium vulgare L. via HPTLC Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Keyvan; Hamedeyazdan, Sanaz; Torbati, Mohammadali; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study we aimed to quantify marrubiin, as the major active compound, in the aerial parts of Marrubium vulgare from Iran using a HPTLC-densitometry technique. Methods: Quantitative determination of marrubiin in M. vulgare methanol extract was performed by HPTLC analysis via a fully automated TLC scanner. Later on, the in vitro antioxidant activity of the M. vulgare methanol extract was determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. Furthermore, total phenolics and flavonoids contents of the methanol extract were quantified, spectrophotometrically. Results: The amount of marrubiin was calculated as 156 mg/g of M. vulgare extract. The antioxidant assay revealed a strong radical scavenging activity for the M. vulgare methanol extract with RC50 value of 8.24μg/mL. Total phenolics and flavonoids contents for M. vulgare were determined as 60.4 mg gallic acid equivalent and 12.05 mg quercetin equivalent per each gram of the extract, correspondingly. Conclusion: The presented fingerprint of marrubiin in M. vulgare extract developed by HPTLC densitometry afforded a detailed chemical profile, which might be useful in the identification as well as quality evaluation of herbal medications based on M. vulgare. Besides, the considerable antioxidant activity of M. vulgare was associated with the presence of marrubiin along with phenolics and flavonoids exerting a synergistic effect. PMID:27123428

  5. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-02

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided.

  6. CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES IN PHARMACEUTICAL ANALYSIS IN POIAND: HISTORY AND THE PRESENCE ON THE BASIS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED IN SELECTED POLISH PHARMACEUTICAL JOURNALS IN XX CENTURY.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Maciej; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, chromatographic techniques and techniques related to them have stimulated the development of new procedures in the field of pharmaceutical analysis. The newly developed methods, characterized by improved metrological parameters, allow for more accurate testing of, among others, the composition of raw materials, intermediates and final products. The chromatographic techniques also enable studies on waste generated in research laboratories and factories producing pharmaceuticals and parapharmaceuticals. Based on the review of reports published in Polish pharmaceutical journals, we assessed the impact of chromatographic techniques on the development of pharmaceutical analysis. The first chromatographic technique used in pharmaceutical analysis was a so-called capillary analysis. It was applied in the 1930s to control the identity of pharmaceutical formulations. In the 1940s and 1950s, the chromatographic techniques were mostly a subject of review publications, while their use in experimental work was rare. Paper chromatography and thin layer chromatography were introduced in the 1960s and 1970s, respectively. These new analytical tools have contributed to the intensive development of research in the field of phytochemistry and the analysis of herbal medicines. The development of colunm chromatography-based techniques, i.e., gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography took place in the end of 20th century. Both aforementioned techniques were widely applied in pharmaceutical analysis, for example, to assess the stability of drugs, test for impurities and degradation products as well as in pharmacokinetics studies. The first decade of 21" century was the time of new detection methods in gas and liquid chromatography. The information sources used to write this article were Polish pharmaceutical journals, both professional and scientific, originating from the interwar and post-war period, i.e., "Kronika Farmaceutyczna", "Farmacja Wsp

  7. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  8. A new on-line, in-tube pre-column derivatization technique for high performance liquid chromatographic determination of azithromycin in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Gholamreza; Mohammadi, Bahareh

    2006-01-18

    Pre-column derivatization methods for high performance liquid chromatographic assay of specific pharmaceutical agents using 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl) have received special attention because highly fluorescent and stable adducts are provided by these methods. However, unlike the post-column on-line techniques, long derivatization time is needed and the reaction cannot be well controlled. A new, sensitive and fast pre-column on-line derivatization technique coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography using FMOC-Cl as labeling agent is described and validated for determination of azithromycin in human serum. After extraction of the drug from serum, the residue was reconstituted in mixture of acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (3:1, v/v; pH 8.5) and directly injected onto the chromatographic system. Continuous on-line derivatization and analysis of the compounds were successfully performed using in-tube elution of FMOC-Cl. The total time needed for derivatization and chromatographic analysis of the drug was 13 min. The assay was reliable and reproducible, with limit of quantification of 10 ng/ml. The described technique may offer significant advantages over existing off-line derivatization methods using FMOC-Cl.

  9. Fast and accurate registration techniques for affine and nonrigid alignment of MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Xiu; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Registration of magnetic resonance brain images is a geometric operation that determines point-wise correspondences between two brains. It remains a difficult task due to the highly convoluted structure of the brain. This paper presents novel methods, Brain Image Registration Tools (BIRT), that can rapidly and accurately register brain images by utilizing the brain structure information estimated from image derivatives. Source and target image spaces are related by affine transformation and non-rigid deformation. The deformation field is modeled by a set of Wendland's radial basis functions hierarchically deployed near the salient brain structures. In general, nonlinear optimization is heavily engaged in the parameter estimation for affine/non-rigid transformation and good initial estimates are thus essential to registration performance. In this work, the affine registration is initialized by a rigid transformation, which can robustly estimate the orientation and position differences of brain images. The parameters of the affine/non-rigid transformation are then hierarchically estimated in a coarse-to-fine manner by maximizing an image similarity measure, the correlation ratio, between the involved images. T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images were utilized for performance evaluation. Our experimental results using four 3-D image sets demonstrated that BIRT can efficiently align images with high accuracy compared to several other algorithms, and thus is adequate to the applications which apply registration process intensively. Moreover, a voxel-based morphometric study quantitatively indicated that accurate registration can improve both the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical inference results.

  10. Ambient formaldehyde measurements made at a remote marine boundary layer site during the NAMBLEX campaign - a comparison of data from chromatographic and modified Hantzsch techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, T. J.; Al-Haider, S.; Seakins, P. W.; Sommariva, R.; Stanton, J. C.; Mills, G.; Penkett, S. A.

    2006-07-01

    Ambient formaldehyde concentrations are reported from the North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (NAMBLEX) campaign at Mace Head on the west coast of Eire during August 2002. The results from two techniques, using direct determination via gas chromatography and the Hantzsch technique, show similar trends but a significant off set in concentrations. For westerly air flows characteristic of the marine boundary layer, formaldehyde concentrations from the gas chromatographic and Hantzsch technique ranged from 0.78-1.15 ppb and 0.13-0.43 ppb, respectively. Possible reasons for the discrepancy have been investigated and are discussed, however, no satisfactory explanation has yet been found. In a subsequent laboratory intercomparison the two techniques were in good agreement. The observed concentrations have been compared with previous formaldehyde measurements in the North Atlantic marine boundary layer and with other measurements from the NAMBLEX campaign. The measurements from the Hantzsch technique and the GC results lie at the lower and upper ends respectively of previous measurements. In contrast to some previous measurements, both techniques show distinct diurnal profiles with day maxima and with an amplitude of approximately 0.15 ppb. Strong correlations were observed with ethanal concentrations measured during NAMBLEX and the ratio of ethanal to formaldehyde determined by the gas chromatographic technique is in good agreement with previous measurements. Some simple box modelling has been undertaken to investigate possible sources of formaldehyde. Such models are not able to predict absolute formaldehyde concentrations as they do not include transport processes, but the results show that oxygenated VOCs such as ethanal and methanol are very significant sources of formaldehyde in the air masses reaching Mace Head.

  11. Ambient formaldehyde measurements made at a remote marine boundary layer site during the NAMBLEX campaign a comparison of data from chromatographic and modified Hantzsch techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, T. J.; Al-Haider, S.; Seakins, P. W.; Sommariva, R.; Stanton, J. C.; Mills, G.; Penkett, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Ambient formaldehyde concentrations are reported from the North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (NAMBLEX) campaign at Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland during August 2002. The results from two techniques, using direct determination via gas chromatography and the Hantzsch technique, show similar trends but a significant off set in concentrations. For westerly air flows characteristic of the marine boundary layer, formaldehyde concentrations from the gas chromatographic and Hantzsch technique ranged from 0.78-1.15 ppb and 0.13-0.43 ppb, respectively. Possible reasons for the discrepancy have been investigated and are discussed, however, no satisfactory explanation has yet been found. In a subsequent intercomparison the two techniques were in good agreement. The observed concentrations have been compared with previous formaldehyde measurements in the North Atlantic marine boundary layer and with other measurements from the NAMBLEX campaign. The measurements from the Hantzsch technique and the GC results lie at the lower and upper ends respectively of previous measurements. In contrast to some previous measurements, both techniques show distinct diurnal profiles with day maxima and with an amplitude of approximately 0.15 ppb. Strong correlations were observed with ethanal concentrations measured during NAMBLEX and the ratio of ethanal to formaldehyde determined by the gas chromatographic technique is in good agreement with previous measurements. Some simple box modelling has been undertaken to investigate possible sources of formaldehyde. Such models are not able to predict absolute formaldehyde concentrations as they do not include transport processes, but the results show that oxygenated VOCs such as ethanal and methanol are very significant sources of formaldehyde in the air masses reaching Mace Head.

  12. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  13. Secondary metabolites isolation in natural products chemistry: comparison of two semipreparative chromatographic techniques (high pressure liquid chromatography and high performance thin-layer chromatography).

    PubMed

    Do, Thi Kieu Tiên; Hadji-Minaglou, Francis; Antoniotti, Sylvain; Fernandez, Xavier

    2014-01-17

    Chemical investigations on secondary metabolites in natural products chemistry require efficient isolation techniques for characterization purpose as well as for the evaluation of their biological properties. In the case of phytochemical studies, the performance of the techniques is critical (resolution and yield) since the products generally present a narrow range of polarity and physicochemical properties. Several techniques are currently available, but HPLC (preparative and semipreparative) is the most widely used. To compare the performance of semipreparative HPLC and HPTLC for the isolation of secondary metabolites in different types of extracts, we have chosen carvone from spearmint essential oil (Mentha spicata L.), resveratrol from Fallopia multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson, and rosmarinic acid from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts. The comparison was based on the chromatographic separation, the purity and quantity of isolated compounds, the solvent consumption, the duration and the cost of the isolation operations. The results showed that semipreparative HPTLC can in some case offer some advantages over conventional semipreparative HPLC.

  14. Column performance study of different variants of liquid chromatographic technique: an application on pharmaceutical ternary mixtures containing tetryzoline.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Lotfy, Hayam M; Saleh, Sarah S

    2015-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and rapid resolution liquid chromatographic (RRLC) methods have been developed and validated for the separation and quantitation of both or either of two ternary mixtures present in ophthalmic solutions. The first mixture contains chloramphenicol, dexamethasone sodium phosphate and tetryzoline HCl (TZH); while the second one contains ofloxacin, prednisolone acetate and TZH. Both preparations contain benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The columns used were a HPLC column (C18 5 µm particle size), a RRLC column (C18 2.6 µm particle size) and a UPLC column (C18 1.7 µm particle size). A comparative study was conducted to illustrate the effect of the change in column particle size and dimensions on the other chromatographic conditions, backpressure and the separation of both ternary mixtures. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, repeatability, interday precision and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits. The RRLC column provided shorter run time and better resolution than HPLC, while the UPLC column gave the shortest run time for all columns. The RRLC column resulted in minimum backpressure, so it could be used with any HPLC instrument, which makes the method more practical and economic. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with official ones where no significant difference was observed.

  15. Biomagnetic separation of Salmonella Typhimurium with high affine and specific ligand peptides isolated by phage display technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingroewer, Juliane; Bley, Thomas; Bergemann, Christian; Boschke, Elke

    2007-04-01

    Analyses of food-borne pathogens are of great importance in order to minimize the health risk for customers. Thus, very sensitive and rapid detection methods are required. Current conventional culture techniques are very time consuming. Modern immunoassays and biochemical analysis also require pre-enrichment steps resulting in a turnaround time of at least 24 h. Biomagnetic separation (BMS) is a promising more rapid method. In this study we describe the isolation of high affine and specific peptides from a phage-peptide library, which combined with BMS allows the detection of Salmonella spp. with a similar sensitivity as that of immunomagnetic separation using antibodies.

  16. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L.; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J.; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique. PMID:26287192

  17. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-08-13

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique.

  18. Enantioseparation of nuarimol by affinity electrokinetic chromatography-partial filling technique using human serum albumin as chiral selector.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Maria Amparo; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa M; Sagrado, Salvador; Medina-Hernández, Maria J

    2008-10-01

    The present paper deals with the enantiomeric separation of nuarimol enantiomers by affinity EKC-partial filling technique using HSA as chiral selector. Firstly, a study of nuarimol interactions with HSA by CE-frontal analysis was performed. The binding parameters obtained for the first site of interaction were n(1) = 0.84; K(1) = 9.7 +/- 0.3x10(3 )M(-1) and the protein binding percentage of nuarimol at physiological concentration of HSA was 75.2 +/- 0.2%. Due to the moderate affinity of nuarimol towards HSA the possibility of using this protein as chiral selector for the separation of nuarimol using the partial filling technique was evaluated. A multivariate optimization approach of the most critical experimental variables in enantioresolution, running pH, HSA concentration and plug length was carried out. Separation of nuarimol enantiomers was obtained under the following selected conditions: electrophoretic buffer composed of 50 mM Tris at pH 7.3; 160 muM HSA solution applied at 50 mbar for 156 s as chiral selector; nuarimol solutions in the range of 2-8x10(-4) M injected hydrodynamically at 30 mbar for 2 s and the electrophoretic runs performed at 30 degrees C applying 15 kV voltage. Resolution, accuracy, reproducibility speed and cost of the proposed method make it suitable for quality control of the enantiomeric composition of nuarimol in formulations and for further toxicological studies. The results showed a different affinity between nuarimol enantiomers towards HSA.

  19. Potential of human serum albumin as chiral selector of basic drugs in affinity electrokinetic chromatography-partial filling technique.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Maria A; Villanueva-Camañas, R M; Sagrado, Salvador; Medina-Hernández, Maria J

    2006-11-01

    The enantiomeric resolution of compounds using HSA by means of affinity EKC (AEKC)-partial filling technique is the result of a delicate balance between different experimental variables such as protein concentration, running pH (background electrophoretic buffer (BGE), protein, and compound solutions), and plug length. In this paper, the possibility of using HSA as chiral selector for enantioseparation of 28 basic drugs using this methodology is studied. The effect of the physicochemical parameters, the structural properties of compounds, and compound-HSA protein binding percentages over their chiral resolution with HSA is outlined. Based on the results obtained, a decision tree is proposed for the "a priori" prediction of the capability of HSA for enantioseparation of basic drugs in AEKC. The results obtained indicated that enantioresolution of basic compounds with HSA depends on the hydrophobicity, polarity, and molar volume of compounds.

  20. A technique for rapid source apportionment applied to ambient organic aerosol measurements from a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaping; Williams, Brent J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-11-01

    We present a rapid method for apportioning the sources of atmospheric organic aerosol composition measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. Here, we specifically apply this new analysis method to data acquired on a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) system. Gas chromatograms are divided by retention time into evenly spaced bins, within which the mass spectra are summed. A previous chromatogram binning method was introduced for the purpose of chromatogram structure deconvolution (e.g., major compound classes) (Zhang et al., 2014). Here we extend the method development for the specific purpose of determining aerosol samples' sources. Chromatogram bins are arranged into an input data matrix for positive matrix factorization (PMF), where the sample number is the row dimension and the mass-spectra-resolved eluting time intervals (bins) are the column dimension. Then two-dimensional PMF can effectively do three-dimensional factorization on the three-dimensional TAG mass spectra data. The retention time shift of the chromatogram is corrected by applying the median values of the different peaks' shifts. Bin width affects chemical resolution but does not affect PMF retrieval of the sources' time variations for low-factor solutions. A bin width smaller than the maximum retention shift among all samples requires retention time shift correction. A six-factor PMF comparison among aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), TAG binning, and conventional TAG compound integration methods shows that the TAG binning method performs similarly to the integration method. However, the new binning method incorporates the entirety of the data set and requires significantly less pre-processing of the data than conventional single compound identification and integration. In addition, while a fraction of the most oxygenated aerosol does not elute through an underivatized TAG analysis, the TAG binning method does have the ability to achieve molecular level resolution on

  1. Development of an ELP-Z based mAb affinity precipitation process using scaled-down filtration techniques.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Rahul D; Bhut, Bharat V; Jin, Mi; Li, Zhengjian; Chen, Wilfred; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-12-20

    In this work, a proof of concept elastin-like polypeptide-Z domain fusion (ELP-Z) based monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity precipitation process is developed using scaled-down filtration techniques. Tangential flow filtration (TFF) is examined for the recovery of ELP-Z-mAb precipitates formed during the mAb binding step and the ELP-Z precipitates formed during the mAb elution step. TFF results in complete precipitate recovery during both stages of the process and high host cell protein and DNA impurity clearance after diafiltration. Total recycle TFF experiments are then employed to determine permeate flux as a function of the precipitate concentration for both stages of the process. While the ELP-Z-mAb precipitate recovery step resulted in high permeate flux (550-600L/m(2)/h/bar), the ELP-Z precipitates are shown to severely foul the TFF membrane, causing rapid flux decay. Confocal microscopy of the ELP-Z-mAb and ELP-Z precipitates suggests significant differences in the morphology and the kinetics of formation of these precipitates, which is likely responsible for their different behavior during TFF. Finally, an alternative normal flow filtration strategy is developed for the ELP-Z precipitate recovery step during mAb elution, using a combination of 5μm and a 0.45/0.2μm filters. Using this approach, the ELP-Z precipitates are separated from the final mAb elution pool at high volumetric throughputs and high ELP-Z recovery (96%) is obtained after resolubilization from the filter. This study demonstrates that the ELP-Z affinity precipitation process can be readily scaled up using conventional membrane processing.

  2. Multivariate optimization approach for chiral resolution of drugs using human serum albumin in affinity electrokinetic chromatography-partial filling technique.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gomez, Maria A; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa M; Sagrado, Salvador; Medina-Hernández, Maria J

    2005-11-01

    The enantiomeric resolution of chiral compounds using HSA by means of affinity EKC (AEKC)-partial filling technique is the result of a delicate balance between different experimental variables such as protein concentration, running pH (background electrophoretic buffer, protein and compound solutions) and protein solution plug length. In this paper multivariate optimization approaches for chiral separation of four basic drugs (alprenolol, oxprenolol, promethazine and propranolol) using HSA as chiral selector in AEKC-partial filling technique are studied. The experimental conditions to achieve maximum resolution are optimized using the Box-Behnken experimental design. Partial least squares and pareto charts are used to analyse the main effects on the resolution. The experimental resolutions observed for all compounds studied in optimum conditions agree with the estimated values based on response surface models. The results obtained show that the range of experimental conditions that provided enantioresolution narrows as hydrophobicity of analytes decreases. This fact can be explained by assuming that hydrophobicity controls the interaction of basic compounds with HSA.

  3. Drug Monitoring Techniques for the Biological Chemistry Laboratory: Determination of Drug Concentrations by Chromatographic and Immunochemical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkill, Jeffrey A.

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a series of experiments that integrate analytical techniques in order that students are able to compare, based on their laboratory results, the relative reliabilities of the most common therapeutic drug monitoring methods. Discusses materials, procedures, and results of three experiments on the determination of drug concentration by…

  4. Multidimensional chromatographic techniques for hydrophilic copolymers II. Analysis of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl acetate) graft copolymers.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Daniela; Rittig, Frank; Lange, Ronald F M; Pasch, Harald

    2006-10-13

    A large variety of hydrophilic copolymers is applied in different fields of chemical industry including bio, pharma and pharmaceutical applications. For example, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl alcohol) graft copolymers that are used as tablet coatings are responsible for the controlled release of the active compounds. These copolymers are produced by grafting of vinyl acetate onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) and subsequent hydrolysis of the poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl acetate) graft copolymers. The poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl acetate) copolymers are distributed with regard to molar mass and chemical composition. In addition, they frequently contain the homopolymers polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl acetate. The comprehensive analysis of such complex systems requires hyphenated analytical techniques, including two-dimensional liquid chromatography and combined LC and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The development and application of these techniques are discussed in the present paper.

  5. On-line preferential solvation studies of polymers by coupled chromatographic-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic flow-cell technique.

    PubMed

    Malanin, M; Eichhorn, K-J; Lederer, A; Treppe, P; Adam, G; Fischer, D; Voigt, D

    2009-12-18

    Qualitative and quantitative comparison between liquid chromatography (LC) and LC coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (LC-FTIR) to evaluate preferential solvation phenomenon of polymers in a mixed solvent has been performed. These studies show that LC-FTIR technique leads to detailed structural information without the requirement for determination of additional parameters for quantitative analysis except calibration. Appropriate experimental conditions for preferential solvation study have been established by variation of polymer concentration, molar mass and eluent content.

  6. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides.

  7. Chemical and morphological changes in hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose and investigated by chromatographic, spectroscopic and adsorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Diakité, Mamadou; Paul, Andrea; Jäger, Christian; Pielert, Judith; Mumme, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) can be used for converting the biomass into a carbon-rich material, whose application as a fuel requires higher heating value, whereas soil amendment needs stable carbon. This work was focused on the characterization of hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose. The chars were investigated using elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Severity in temperature between 230 and 270°C with reaction times between 2 and 10 h only affect the carbon content moderately. The results show that aromatization of HTC chars correlates well with temperature, which was further supported by the increase of organic radicals with decreasing g values at higher temperatures. Based on these results, the energetic use of chars favors mild HTC (T<230°C and t≤6 h), while the soil amendement favors serve conditions (T≥230°C, and t>6 h).

  8. On-line sample cleanup and enrichment chromatographic technique for the determination of ambroxol in human serum.

    PubMed

    Emara, Samy; Kamal, Maha; Abdel Kawi, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    A sensitive and efficient on-line clean up and pre-concentration method has been developed using column-switching technique and protein-coated µ-Bondapak CN silica pre-column for quantification of ambroxol (AM) in human serum. The method is performed by direct injection of serum sample onto a protein-coated µ-Bondapak CN silica pre-column, where AM is pre-concentrated and retained, while proteins and very polar constituents are washed to waste using a phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4). The retained analyte on the pre-column is directed onto a C(18) analytical column for separation, with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol and distilled deionized water (containing 1% triethylamine adjusted to pH 3.5 with ortho-phosphoric acid) in the ratio of 50:50 (v/v). Detection is performed at 254 nm. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 12-120 ng/mL (r(2) = 0.9995). The recovery, selectivity, linearity, precision, and accuracy of the method are convenient for pharmacokinetic studies or routine assays.

  9. Study of the Behaviors of Gunshot Residues from Spent Cartridges by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-07-01

    Gunshot residues, produced after shooting activity, have acquired their importance in analysis due to the notoriety of firearms-related crimes. In this study, solid-phase microextraction was performed to extract the headspace composition of spent cartridges using 85-μm polyacrylate fiber at 66°C for 21 min. Organic compounds, that is, naphthalene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, and dibutyl phthalate were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. Evaluation of chromatograms for diphenylamine, dibutyl phthalate, and naphthalene indicates the period after a gunshot was discharged, whether it was 1 days, 2-4 days, <5 days, 10 days, 20 days, or more than 30 days ago. This study revealed the potential effects of environmental factors such as occasional wind blow and direct sunlight on the estimation of time after spent cartridges were discharged. In conclusion, we proposed reliable alternative in analyzing the headspace composition of spent cartridges in a simulated crime scene.

  10. A quantitative method to identify microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a 3'UTR RNA affinity technique.

    PubMed

    Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2013-12-01

    The identification of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that target a given messenger RNA (mRNA) is essential for studies in gene regulation, but the available bioinformatic software programs are often unreliable. We have developed a unique experimental miRNA affinity assay whereby a 3'UTR RNA is end-labeled with biotin, immobilized, and then used as a bait sequence for affinity pull-down of miRNAs. After washes and release, cloning and sequencing identify the miRNAs. Binding affinity is quantitated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), comparing released and original input concentrations. As an initial demonstration, the TCF8/ZEB1 mRNA affinity pull-down yielded miR-200 family member miRs in the majority of clones, and binding affinity was approximately 100%; virtually all copies of miR-200c bound the immobilized mRNA transcript. For validation in cells, miR-200c strongly inhibited expression of a TCF8 luciferase reporter, native TCF8 mRNA, and protein levels, which contrasted with other recovered miRNAs with lower binding affinities. For Smad4 mRNA, miR-150 (and others) displayed a binding affinity of 39% (or less) yet did not inhibit a Smad4 reporter, native Smad4 mRNA, or protein levels. These results were not predicted by available software. This work demonstrates this miRNA binding affinity assay to be a novel yet facile experimental means of identification of miRNAs targeting a given mRNA.

  11. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  12. Trans fat labeling and levels in U.S. foods: assessment of gas chromatographic and infrared spectroscopic techniques for regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Mossoba, Magdi M; Moss, Julie; Kramer, John K G

    2009-01-01

    Trans fatty acids are found in a variety of foods like dairy and meat products, but the major dietary sources are products that contain commercially hydrogenated fats. There has been a renewed need for accurate analytical methods for the quantitation of total trans fat since mandatory requirements to declare the amount of trans fat present in food products and dietary supplements were issued in many countries. Official capillary GC and IR methodologies are the two most common validated methods used to identify and quantify trans fatty acids for regulatory compliance. The present article provides a comprehensive discussion of the GC and IR techniques, including the latest attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FTIR methodology called the negative second derivative ATR-FTIR procedure, which is currently being validated in an international collaborative study. The identification and quantitation of trans fatty acid isomers by GC is reviewed and an alternative GC method is proposed using two temperature programs and combining their results; this proposed method deals more effectively with the resolution of large numbers of geometric and positional monoene, diene, and triene fatty acid isomers present in ruminant fats. In addition, the different methylation procedures that affect quantitative conversion to fatty acid methyl esters are reviewed. There is also a lack of commercial chromatographic standards for many trans fatty acid isomers. This review points to potential sources of interferences in the FTIR determination that may lead to inaccurate results, particularly at low trans levels. The presence of high levels of saturated fats may lead to interferences in the FTIR spectra observed for trans triacylglycerols (TAGs). TAGs require no derivatization, but have to be melted prior to IR measurement. While GC is currently the method of choice, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a viable, rapid alternative, and a complementary method to GC for a more rapid determination of total trans

  13. Determination of the analytical performance of a headspace capillary gas chromatographic technique and karl Fischer coulometric titration by system calibration using oil samples containing known amounts of moisture.

    PubMed

    Jalbert, J; Gilbert, R; Tétreault, P

    1999-08-01

    Over the past few years, concerns have been raised in the literature about the accuracy of the Karl Fischer (KF) method for assessing moisture in transformer mineral oils. To better understand this issue, the performance of a static headspace capillary gas chromatographic (HS-CGC) technique was compared to that of KF coulometric titration by analyzing moisture in samples containing known amounts of water and various samples obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Two modes of adding samples into the KF vessel were used:  direct injection and indirect injection via an azeotropic distillation of the moisture with toluene. Under the conditions used for direct injection, the oil matrix was totally dissolved in the anolyte, which allowed the moisture to be titrated in a single-phase solution rather than in a suspension. The results have shown that when HS-CGC and combined azeotropic distillation/KF titration are calibrated with moisture-in-oil standards, a linear relation is observed over 0-60 ppm H(2)O with a correlation coefficient better than 0.9994 (95% confidence), with the regression line crossing through zero. A similar relation can also be observed when calibration is achieved by direct KF addition of standards prepared with octanol-1, but in this case an intercept of 4-5 ppm is noted. The amount of moisture determined by curve interpolation in NIST reference materials by the three calibrated systems ranges from 13.0 to 14.8 ppm for RM 8506 and 42.5 to 46.4 ppm for RM 8507, and in any case, the results were as high as those reported in the literature with volumetric KF titration. However, titration of various dehydrated oil and solvent samples showed that direct KF titration is affected by a small bias when samples contain very little moisture. The source of error after correction for the large sample volume used for the determination (8 mL) is about 6 ppm for Voltesso naphthenic oil and 4 ppm for toluene, revealing a matrix

  14. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  15. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  16. Identification of humic-like substances (HULIS) in oxygenated organic aerosols using NMR and AMS factor analyses and liquid chromatographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Sandrini, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Schlag, P.; Piazzalunga, A.; Tagliavini, E.; Henzing, J. S.; Decesari, S.

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric organic aerosol composition is characterized by a great diversity of functional groups and chemical species, challenging simple classification schemes. Traditional offline chemical methods identify chemical classes based on the retention behaviour on chromatographic columns and absorbing beds. Such an approach led to the isolation of complex mixtures of compounds such as the humic-like substances (HULIS). More recently, online aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) was employed to identify chemical classes by extracting fragmentation patterns from experimental data series using statistical methods (factor analysis), providing simplified schemes for the classification of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOAs) on the basis of the distribution of oxygen-containing functionalities. The analysis of numerous AMS data sets suggested the occurrence of very oxidized OOAs which were postulated to correspond to HULIS. However, only a few efforts were made to test the correspondence of the AMS classes of OOAs with the traditional classifications from the offline methods. In this paper, we consider a case study representative of polluted continental regional background environments. We examine the AMS factors for OOAs identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and compare them to chemical classes of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) analysed offline on a set of filters collected in parallel. WSOC fractionation was performed by means of factor analysis applied to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic data, and by applying an ion-exchange chromatographic method for direct quantification of HULIS. Results show that the very oxidized low-volatility OOAs from AMS correlate with the NMR factor showing HULIS features and also with true "chromatographic" HULIS. On the other hand, UV/VIS-absorbing polyacids (or HULIS {sensu stricto}) isolated on ion-exchange beds were only a fraction of the AMS and NMR organic carbon fractions showing functional groups

  17. Identification of humic-like substances (HULIS) in oxygenated organic aerosols using NMR and AMS factor analyses and liquid chromatographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Sandrini, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Schlag, P.; Piazzalunga, A.; Tagliavini, E.; Henzing, J. S.; Decesari, S.

    2013-06-01

    The atmospheric organic aerosol composition is characterized by a great diversity of functional groups and chemical species challenging simple classification schemes. Traditional off-line chemical methods identified chemical classes based on the retention behavior on chromatographic columns and absorbing beds. Such approach led to the isolation of complex mixtures of compounds such as the humic-like substances (HULIS). More recently, on-line aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) was employed to identify chemical classes by extracting fragmentation patterns from experimental data series using statistical methods (factor analysis), providing simplified schemes for oxygenated organic aerosols (OOAs) classification on the basis of the distribution of oxygen-containing functionalities. The analysis of numerous AMS datasets suggested the occurrence of very oxidized OOAs which were postulated to correspond to the HULIS. However, only a few efforts were made to test the correspondence of the AMS classes of OOAs with the traditional classification from the off-line methods. In this paper, we consider a case study representative for polluted continental regional background environments. We examine the AMS factors for OOAs identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and compare to chemical classes of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) analysed off-line on a set of filters collected in parallel. WSOC fractionation was performed by means of factor analysis applied to H-NMR spectroscopic data, and by applying an ion-exchange chromatographic method for direct quantification of HULIS. Results show that the very oxidized low-volatility OOAs from AMS correlate with the NMR factor showing HULIS features and also with true "chromatographic" HULIS. On the other hand, UV/VIS-absorbing polyacids (or HULIS sensu stricto) isolated on ion-exchange beds were only a fraction of the AMS and NMR organic carbon fractions showing functional groups attributable to highly substituted carboxylic

  18. High-pressure/high-temperature gas-solubility study in hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems using static and chromatographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    The design and discovery of sources for alternative energy such as coal liquefaction has become of major importance over the past two decades. One of the major problems in such design in the lack of available data, particularly, for gas solubility in polycyclic aromatics at high temperature and pressure. Static and gas-liquid partition chromatographic methods were used for the study of hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems. The static data for these two binaries were taken along 398.2, 423.2, 448.2, and 473.2 K isotherms up to 25.23 MPa. Gas-liquid partition chromatography was used to study the infinite dilution behavior of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the hydrogen-phenanthrene system as well as hydrogen, ethane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the methane-phenanthrene binary. The principle objective was to examine the role of the elution gas. Temperatures were along the same isotherms as the static data and up to 20.77 MPa. With the exception of carbon dioxide, Henry's constants were calculated for all systems. Expressions for the heat of solution as a function of pressure were derived for both binary and chromatographic data. Estimates of delta H/sub i/sup sol/ at high pressure were presented.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of polyamines in milk as their 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl derivatives using a column-switching technique.

    PubMed

    Bellagamba, F; Moretti, V M; Mentasti, T; Albertini, A; Luzzana, U; Valfrè, F

    1997-12-12

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of polyamines in milk is milk is described. Polyamines were extracted in perchloric acid and derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl). The excess of reagent was reacted with aspartic acid before the analysis on a column-switching system. Linearity of derivatization was calculated for each amine and the coefficient of regression ranged from 0.994 to 0.999. Chromatographic separation of FMOC-polyamines was achieved with a gradient elution programme of water-acetonitrile. The correlation coefficients of the standard curves in the concentration range from 0.5 to 5 nmol ml-1 were higher than 0.991. The repeatability of the method, expressed as R.S.D. for each polyamines ranged from 3.0 to 8.6%. The percent mean recoveries at 1 nmol ml-1 spiking level were 49 +/- 3, 58 +/- 5, 61 +/- 5 and 48 +/- 4 for putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine and spermine, respectively. The limit of detection, calculated on the basis of three times signal-to-noise ratio, was 50 pmol ml-1 for each polyamine.

  20. Chromatography on DEAE ion-exchange and Protein G affinity columns in tandem for the separation and purification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Qi, Y; Yan, Z; Huang, J

    2001-10-30

    A high-performance liquid-chromatographic method based on coupled DEAE anion-exchange and Protein G affinity columns has been developed for the simultaneous separation and purification of immunoglobulin G and albumin from mouse serum. The diluted mouse serum was injected directly into this system, and the proteins were eluted separately from the DEAE and Protein G columns, coupled in series, by the column-switching technique. The advantages of this method are that IgG and albumin can be separated and purified simultaneously, the expensive affinity column is protected from contamination by the impurities in the mouse serum, and it is fast, selective, robust, and reproducible.

  1. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  2. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  3. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  4. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  5. Development and validation of packed column supercritical fluid chromatographic technique for quantification of chlorzoxazone, paracetamol and aceclofenac in their individual and combined dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Desai, P P; Patel, N R; Sherikar, O D; Mehta, P J

    2012-10-01

    A reproducible, rapid and sensitive method has been developed for the assay of chlorzoxazone (CHL), paracetamol (PCM) and aceclofenac (ACE) in their combined solid dosage forms using packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The analytes were resolved by elution with supercritical carbon dioxide doped with 15% v/v methanol as the modifier on an ACE 5 Phenyl column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm). The detection was carried out at 215 nm using a UV-Visible detector. The densities and polarities of the mobile phase were optimized from the effects of pressure, temperature and modifier concentration on chromatographic parameters like retention time, retention factor, resolution, asymmetry and theoretical plates. Modifier concentration proved to be the most effective means for changing both retention and selectivity. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The developed SFC method was compared with a reported high-performance liquid chromatography method for the estimation of CHL, PCM and ACE using Student t-test. With respect to the speed and use of organic solvents, SFC was found to be superior and eco-friendly. The developed SFC method was successfully used for the assay of different marketed formulations containing CHL, PCM and ACE individually and in combination.

  6. Analysis of Reaction between α-Lipoic Acid and 2-Chloro-1-methylquinolinium Tetrafluoroborate Used as a Precolumn Derivatization Technique in Chromatographic Determination of α-Lipoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Magdalena; Odachowska, Angelika; Turkowicz, Monika; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The present study offers results of analysis concerning the course of reaction between reduced α-lipoic acid (LA) and 2-chloro-1-methylquinolinium tetrafluoroborate (CMQT). In water environments, the reaction between CMQT and hydrophilic thiols proceeds very rapidly and the resultant products are stable. For the described analysis, optimum reaction conditions, such as concentration of the reducing agent, environment pH, and concentration of the reagent were carefully selected. The spectrophotometric assay was carried out measuring absorbance at λ = 348 nm (i.e., the spectral band of the obtained reaction product). Furthermore, the calibration curve of lipoic acid was registered. It was concluded that the Lambert-Beer law was observed within the range 1-10 μmol L(-1). Later, the reaction between LA and CMQT was used as precolumn derivatization in a chromatographic determination of the lipoic acid in the range 2.5-50 μmol L(-1). Practical applicability of the designed methods was evaluated by determining lipoic acid in Revitanerv pharmaceutical preparation which contains 300 mg LA in a single capsule. The error of the determination did not exceed 0.5% in relation to the declared value.

  7. Analysis of Reaction between α-Lipoic Acid and 2-Chloro-1-methylquinolinium Tetrafluoroborate Used as a Precolumn Derivatization Technique in Chromatographic Determination of α-Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Godlewska, Magdalena; Odachowska, Angelika; Turkowicz, Monika; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The present study offers results of analysis concerning the course of reaction between reduced α-lipoic acid (LA) and 2-chloro-1-methylquinolinium tetrafluoroborate (CMQT). In water environments, the reaction between CMQT and hydrophilic thiols proceeds very rapidly and the resultant products are stable. For the described analysis, optimum reaction conditions, such as concentration of the reducing agent, environment pH, and concentration of the reagent were carefully selected. The spectrophotometric assay was carried out measuring absorbance at λ = 348 nm (i.e., the spectral band of the obtained reaction product). Furthermore, the calibration curve of lipoic acid was registered. It was concluded that the Lambert-Beer law was observed within the range 1–10 μmol L−1. Later, the reaction between LA and CMQT was used as precolumn derivatization in a chromatographic determination of the lipoic acid in the range 2.5–50 μmol L−1. Practical applicability of the designed methods was evaluated by determining lipoic acid in Revitanerv pharmaceutical preparation which contains 300 mg LA in a single capsule. The error of the determination did not exceed 0.5% in relation to the declared value. PMID:26504616

  8. Chromatographic methods in the study of autism.

    PubMed

    Żurawicz, Ewa; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Rynkowski, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    Research into biomarkers of autism is a new means of medical intervention in this disease. Chromatographic techniques, especially coupled with mass spectrometry, are widely used in determination of biomarkers and assessment of effectiveness of autism therapy owing to their sensitivity and selectivity. Among the chromatographic techniques gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, especially high-performance liquid chromatography, have found application in clinical trials. The high-performance liquid chromatography technique allows an analysis of liquid samples with a wide range of molecules, small and large, providing an opportunity to perform advanced assays within a short time frame. Gas chromatography with the appropriate preparation of samples (gaseous and liquid) and a selection of analysis conditions enables the separation of thermally stable, volatile and non-volatile organic substances in short runtimes. The chromatographic techniques that are currently used in metabolic studies in autism are designed to identify abnormalities in three areas: the metabolism of neurotransmitters, nutritional and metabolic status and manifestations of oxidative stress. This review presents a necessary theoretical introduction and examples of applications of chromatographic studies of disorder markers in autism.

  9. [Progresses in screening active compounds from herbal medicine by affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying-shu; Tong, Shan-shan; Xu, Xi-ming; Yu, Jiang-nan

    2015-03-01

    Affinity chromatography is a chromatographic method for separating molecules using the binding characteristics of the stationary phase with potential drug molecules. This method can be performed as a high throughput screening method and a chromatographic separation method to screen a variety of active drugs. This paper summarizes the history of affinity chromatography, screening technology of affinity chromatography, and application of affinity chromatography in screening bio-active compounds in herbal medicines, and then discusses its application prospects, in order to broaden applications of the affinity chromatography in drug screening.

  10. Tetanus toxoid purification: chromatographic procedures as an alternative to ammonium-sulphate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Stojićević, Ivana; Dimitrijević, Ljiljana; Dovezenski, Nebojša; Živković, Irena; Petrušić, Vladimir; Marinković, Emilija; Inić-Kanada, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Marijana

    2011-08-01

    Given an existing demand to establish a process of tetanus vaccine production in a way that allows its complete validation and standardization, this paper focuses on tetanus toxoid purification step. More precisely, we were looking at a possibility to replace the widely used ammonium-sulphate precipitation by a chromatographic method. Based on the tetanus toxin's biochemical characteristics, we have decided to examine the possibility of tetanus toxoid purification by hydrophobic chromatography, and by chromatographic techniques based on interaction with immobilized metal ions, i.e. chelating chromatography and immobilized metal affinity chromatography. We used samples obtained from differently fragmented crude tetanus toxins by formaldehyde treatment (assigned as TTd-A and TTd-B) as starting material for tetanus toxoid purification. Obtained results imply that purification of tetanus toxoid by hydrophobic chromatography represents a good alternative to ammonium-sulphate precipitation. Tetanus toxoid preparations obtained by hydrophobic chromatography were similar to those obtained by ammonium-sulphate precipitation in respect to yield, purity and immunogenicity. In addition, their immunogenicity was similar to standard tetanus toxoid preparation (NIBSC, Potters Bar, UK). Furthermore, the characteristics of crude tetanus toxin preparations had the lowest impact on the final purification product when hydrophobic chromatography was the applied method of tetanus toxoid purification. On the other hand, purifications of tetanus toxoid by chelating chromatography or immobilized metal affinity chromatography generally resulted in a very low yield due to not satisfactory tetanus toxoid binding to the column, and immunogenicity of the obtained tetanus toxoid-containing preparations was poor.

  11. Chromatographic Degradation of Phloridzin

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Maria J.

    1966-01-01

    Phloridzin, the main phenolic glucoside in apple leaves, has been found to undergo transformation during chromatography. When chromatographed repeatedly in ammoniacal solvents, at least 2 new derivatives appeared. One of these was identified as phloretic acid. When bioassayed in the presence of indole-3-acetic acid this substance behaved as though it promoted the destruction of the auxin. Comparative bioassay with naphthaleneacetic acid suggested that phloretic acid acts on indoleacetic acid destruction via stimulation of indoleacetic acid oxidase. However, at low concentration and in presence of a small amount of phloridzin it also showed a synergistic effect with indoleacetic acid. A substance with the same characteristics was obtained directly from apple leaves, which are known to contain phloridzin when the extracts were chromatographed only once in the same (alkaline) solvent. While not completely confirmed, this suggests that phloretic acid is normally present in apple leaves, where it may affect growth there by promoting indoleacetic acid oxidation. Images PMID:16656273

  12. Gas chromatograph injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Henderson, M. E.; Donaldson, R. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An injection system for a gas chromatograph is described which uses a small injector chamber (available in various configurations). The sample is placed in the chamber while the chamber is not under pressure and is not heated, and there is no chance of leakage caused by either pressure or heat. It is injected into the apparatus by changing the position of a valve and heating the chamber, and is volatilized and swept by a carrier gas into the analysis apparatus.

  13. Fractionation of the genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein in the native form by chromatography on an immobilized copper(II) affinity adsorbent. Heterogeneity of the separate variants by isoelectrofocusing and by concanavalin A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hervé, F; Gomas, E; Duché, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-05-19

    Fractionation of the three main genetic variants (F1, S and A) of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), in their native (sialylated) form, by chromatography on immobilized copper(II) affinity adsorbent was investigated. This chromatographic method had been previously developed to fractionate the desialylated protein variants. For that purpose, the three main AAG phenotypes samples (F1S/A, F1/A and S/A), which had been previously isolated from individual human plasma samples, and an AAG sample from commercial source (a mixture of the phenotypes) were used in the native form. Affinity chromatography of these different samples on an iminodiacetate Sepharose-copper(II) gel at pH 7 resolved two protein peaks, irrespective of the origin of the native AAG sample used. The unbound peak 1 was found to consist of the F1, the S or both variants, depending on the phenotype of the AAG sample used in the chromatography. The bound peak 2 was found to consist of the A variant in a pure form. The fractionation results obtained with native AAG were found to be the same as those originally yielded by the desialylated protein. However, comparison of the interactions of native and desialylated AAG with immobilized copper(II) ions, using an affinity chromatographic method and a non-chromatographic equilibrium binding technique, respectively, showed that desialylation increased the non-specific interactions of the protein with immobilized copper(II) ions. The AAG variants were not fractionated when affinity chromatography was performed using immobilized zinc, nickel or cobalt(II) ions, instead of copper. After purification of each variant in the sialylated form (F1, S and A), their respective heterogeneity was studied by analytical isoelectrofocusing with carrier ampholytes in the pH range 2.5-4.5. In addition, the lectin-binding behaviour of the separate sialylated AAG variants was investigated by affinity chromatography on immobilized concanavalin A.

  14. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles Obtained by Four Different Techniques from Salvia rosifolia Sm. and Evaluation for Biological Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Salvia rosifolia Sm. (Lamiaceae), endemic to Turkey, were obtained by four different isolation techniques and then analyzed by gas chromatography (GC/FID) and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. Also in scope of the present work, the...

  15. A quantitative method to identify microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a 3′UTR RNA affinity technique

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that target a given messenger RNA (mRNA) is essential for studies in gene regulation, but the available bioinformatic software programs are often unreliable. We have developed a unique experimental miRNA affinity assay whereby a 3′UTR RNA is end-labeled with biotin, immobilized, and then used as a bait sequence for affinity pull-down of miRNAs. After washes and release, cloning and sequencing identify the miRNAs. Binding affinity is quantitated by quantitatvie polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), comparing released and original input concentrations. As an initial demonstration, the TCF8/ZEB1 mRNA affinity pull-down yielded miR-200 family member miRs in the majority of clones, and binding affinity was approximately 100%; virtually all copies of miR-200c bound the immobilized mRNA transcript. For validation in cells, miR-200c strongly inhibited expression of a TCF8 luciferase reporter, native TCF8 mRNA, and protein levels, which contrasted with other recovered miRNAs with lower binding affinities. For Smad4 mRNA, miR-150 (and others) displayed a binding affinity of 39% (or less) yet did not inhibit a Smad4 reporter, native Smad4 mRNA, or protein levels. These results were not predicted by available software. This work demonstrates this miRNA binding affinity assay to be a novel yet facile experimental means of identification of miRNAs targeting a given mRNA. PMID:23938772

  16. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatiles obtained by four different techniques from Salvia rosifolia Sm., and evaluation for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Ozek, Gulmira; Demirci, Fatih; Ozek, Temel; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Khan, Shabana I; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Duran, Ahmet; Hamzaoglu, Ergin

    2010-01-29

    Four different isolation techniques, conventional hydrodistillation (HD), microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MWHD), microdistillation (MD) and micro-steam distillation-solid-phase microextraction (MSD-SPME), have been used to analyze the volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Salvia rosifolia Sm. by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. HD and MWHD techniques produced quantitatively (yield, 0.39% and 0.40%) and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar essential oils. alpha-Pinene (15.7-34.8%), 1,8-cineole (16.6-25.1%), beta-pinene (6.7-13.5%), beta-caryophyllene (1.4-5.0%) and caryophyllene oxide (1.4-4.4%) were identified as major constituents of this Turkish endemic species. Besides, the hydrodistilled oil of S. rosifolia was evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The hydrodistilled oil of S. rosifolia showed antibacterial activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with a MIC value of 125microg/mL. Other human pathogenic microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans) were also inhibited within a moderate range (MIC=125-1000microg/mL). Antifungal activity of the oil was also observed against the strawberry anthracnose-causing fungal plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae and C. gloeosporioides. No cytotoxicity was observed for S. rosifolia oil up to 25mg/mL against malignant melanoma, epidermal, ductal and ovary carcinoma.

  17. Simple protein precipitation extraction technique followed by validated chromatographic method for linezolid analysis in real human plasma samples to study its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Samah A; Eissa, Maya S; Ahmed, Hytham M

    2017-02-01

    Fast and sensitive HPLC method was developed, optimized and validated for quantification of linezolid (LNZ) in human plasma using guaifenesin as an internal standard (IS). Analyte and IS were extracted from plasma by simple protein precipitation extraction technique using methanol as the precipitating solvent. The pretreated samples were injected in a mobile phase formed of acetonitrile:water:methanol (20:70:10v/v/v) in an isocratic mode at a flow rate of 1.5mL/min with UV detection at 251nm. Separation was done using Aglient ODS C18. The method showed linearity in the range of 0.75-50μg/mL with correlation coefficients equals to 0.9991. Precision and accuracy were in conformity with the criteria normally accepted in bio-analytical method validation. The RSDs for intra- and inter-day assays were <3.56 and 4.63%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day accuracies were 94.67-98.28% and 91.25-96.18%, respectively. The mean absolute recoveries ranged from 92.56±1.78 to 95.24±2.84. According to stability results, LNZ was stable in human plasma during the storage and analysis. LNZ a pharmacokinetic behavior was studied by applying the proposed analytical method.

  18. Determination of triazine herbicides: development of an electroanalytical method utilizing a solid amalgam electrode that minimizes toxic waste residues, and a comparative study between voltammetric and chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Djenaine; de Toledo, Renata A; Galli, Andressa; Salazar-Banda, Giancarlo R; Silva, Maria R C; Garbellini, Gustavo S; Mazo, Luiz H; Avaca, Luis A; Machado, Sergio A S

    2007-03-01

    The use of a copper solid amalgam electrode (CuSAE) for the analytical determination of triazine herbicides (atrazine and ametryne) instead of the conventional hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is reported. The results obtained using electroanalytical methods utilizing each of these electrodes were also compared with those provided by the HPLC technique. The results indicated that the CuSAE electrode can be used to detect the herbicides studied, since the detection limits reached using the electrode (3.06 microg L-1 and 3.78 microg L-1 for atrazine and ametryne, respectively) are lower than the maximum values permitted by CONAMA (Brazilian National Council for the Environment) for wastewaters (50 microg L-1) and by the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency of the United States) in natural water samples (10.00 microg L-1). An electroanalytical methodology employing CuSAE and square wave voltammetry (SWV) was successfully applied to the determination of atrazine and ametryne in natural water samples, yielding good recoveries (70.30%-79.40%). This indicates that the CuSAE provides a convenient substitute for the HMDE, particularly since the CuSAE minimizes the toxic waste residues produced by the use of mercury in HDME-based analyses.

  19. New designer drug alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (PVP): studies on its metabolism and toxicological detection in rat urine using gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Christoph; Peters, Frank T; Haas, Claudia; Meyer, Markus R; Fritschi, Giselher; Maurer, Hans H

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the metabolites of the new designer drug alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (PVP) in rat urine using GC/MS techniques. Eleven metabolites of PVP could be identified suggesting the following metabolic steps: hydroxylation of the side chain followed by dehydrogenation to the corresponding ketone; hydroxylation of the 2''-position of the pyrrolidine ring followed by dehydrogenation to the corresponding lactam or followed by ring opening to the respective aliphatic aldehyde and further oxidation to the respective carboxylic acid; degradation of the pyrrolidine ring to the corresponding primary amine; and hydroxylation of the phenyl ring, most probably in the 4'-position. The authors' screening procedure for pyrrolidinophenones allowed the detection of PVP metabolites after application of a dose corresponding to a presumed user's dose. In addition, the involvement of nine different human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes in the side chain hydroxylation of PVP was investigated and CYP 2B6, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were found to catalyze this reaction.

  20. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  1. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  2. Development of High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    Oxidized Oils and Fats by Gra- dient Elution Liquid Chromatography." J. of Chromatogr., 83, 1973, pp. 461-469. Baczuk. R. J.. Landram, G. K. , Dubois...Pressure Liquid Chromatographie Separation of Phenethy1 amines of Forensic Interest," ,/. Chrom. Sen.. 11(1), 1973. pp. 7-9. Cassidy. R. M

  3. Investigation of substituent effect of 1-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-piperidinyl phenylacetamides on CCR5 binding affinity using QSAR and virtual screening techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afantitis, Antreas; Melagraki, Georgia; Sarimveis, Haralambos; Koutentis, Panayiotis A.; Markopoulos, John; Igglessi-Markopoulou, Olga

    2006-02-01

    A linear quantitative-structure activity relationship model is developed in this work using Multiple Linear Regression Analysis as applied to a series of 51 1-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-piperidinyl phenylacetamides derivatives with CCR5 binding affinity. For the selection of the best variables the Elimination Selection-Stepwise Regression Method (ES-SWR) is utilized. The predictive ability of the model is evaluated against a set of 13 compounds. Based on the produced QSAR model and an analysis on the domain of its applicability, the effects of various structural modifications on biological activity are investigated. The study leads to a number of guanidine derivatives with significantly improved predicted activities.

  4. Insulin and epidermal growth factor-urogastrone: Affinity crosslinking to specific binding sites in rat liver membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hock, R. A.; Hollenberg, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    Both insulin and human epidermal growth factor-urogastrone (EGF/URO) can be covalently linked to specific rat liver membrane binding sites by glutaraldehyde coupling followed by sodium borohydride reduction to yield affinity-labeled membrane constituents sufficiently stable for solubilization and further analysis by various techniques. Solubilization of membranes covalently labeled with 125I-labeled insulin yields a component with chromatographic properties identical to those of a soluble insulin receptor characterized in previous studies. A second soluble insulin-binding component that is not revealed by the affinity-labeling method and that has not yet been reported can also be detected. Membranes similarly labeled with 125I-labeled EGF/URO yield one major and two minor ligand-specific soluble (Triton X-100) affinity-labeled components, as detected by chromatography on Sepharose 6B. Further analysis of the EGF/URO-labeled components by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose, by disc gel electrophoresis, and by enzymatic digestion suggests that the major specific binding component for EGF/URO in liver membranes is a glycoprotein subunit of approximately 100,000 daltons that possesses a 20,000-dalton portion inaccessible to proteolytic cleavage when the subunit is anchored in the membrane. The affinity labeling approach described should prove of use for the study of other polypeptide receptors that, like the EGF/URO receptor, lose their ligand recognition property subsequent to membrane solubilization. PMID:205865

  5. Analytical method for the identification and assay of 12 phthalates in cosmetic products: application of the ISO 12787 international standard "Cosmetics-Analytical methods-Validation criteria for analytical results using chromatographic techniques".

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Pascal; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Bousquet, Claudine; Quoirez, Audrey; Civade, Corinne; Bonnet, Pierre-Antoine

    2012-08-31

    Esters of phthalic acid, more commonly named phthalates, may be present in cosmetic products as ingredients or contaminants. Their presence as contaminant can be due to the manufacturing process, to raw materials used or to the migration of phthalates from packaging when plastic (polyvinyl chloride--PVC) is used. 8 phthalates (DBP, DEHP, BBP, DMEP, DnPP, DiPP, DPP, and DiBP), classified H360 or H361, are forbidden in cosmetics according to the European regulation on cosmetics 1223/2009. A GC/MS method was developed for the assay of 12 phthalates in cosmetics, including the 8 phthalates regulated. Analyses are carried out on a GC/MS system with electron impact ionization mode (EI). The separation of phthalates is obtained on a cross-linked 5%-phenyl/95%-dimethylpolysiloxane capillary column 30 m × 0.25 mm (i.d.) × 0.25 mm film thickness using a temperature gradient. Phthalate quantification is performed by external calibration using an internal standard. Validation elements obtained on standard solutions, highlight a satisfactory system conformity (resolution>1.5), a common quantification limit at 0.25 ng injected, an acceptable linearity between 0.5 μg mL⁻¹ and 5.0 μg mL⁻¹ as well as a precision and an accuracy in agreement with in-house specifications. Cosmetic samples ready for analytical injection are analyzed after a dilution in ethanol whereas more complex cosmetic matrices, like milks and creams, are assayed after a liquid/liquid extraction using ter-butyl methyl ether (TBME). Depending on the type of cosmetics analyzed, the common limits of quantification for the 12 phthalates were set at 0.5 or 2.5 μg g⁻¹. All samples were assayed using the analytical approach described in the ISO 12787 international standard "Cosmetics-Analytical methods-Validation criteria for analytical results using chromatographic techniques". This analytical protocol is particularly adapted when it is not possible to make reconstituted sample matrices.

  6. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  7. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  8. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  9. Deconvolution of gas chromatographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S.; Rayborn, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of deconvolution methods on gas chromatographic data to obtain an accurate determination of the relative amounts of each material present by mathematically separating the merged peaks is discussed. Data were obtained on a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. Chromatograms of five xylenes with differing degrees of separation were generated by varying the column temperature at selected rates. The merged peaks were then successfully separated by deconvolution. The concept of function continuation in the frequency domain was introduced in striving to reach the theoretical limit of accuracy, but proved to be only partially successful.

  10. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; Hargrove, Paul; Roman, Eric

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core maps and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.

  11. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    DOE PAGES

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; ...

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core mapsmore » and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.« less

  12. Calcium-modulated conformational affinity chromatography. Application to the purification of calmodulin and S100 proteins.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Neufeld, T; Star-Weinstock, M; Litvak, M; Solomon, B

    1992-04-24

    The purification of proteins by affinity chromatography is based on their highly specific interaction with an immobilized ligand followed by elution under conditions where their affinity towards the ligand is markedly reduced. Thus, a high-degree purification by a single chromatographic step is achieved. However, when several proteins in the crude mixture share affinity to a common immobilized ligand, they may not be resolved by affinity chromatography and subsequent "real" chromatographic purification steps may be required. It is shown that by using properly selected gradient elution conditions, the affinities of the various proteins towards the immobilized ligand may be gradually modulated and their separation may be achieved. This is exemplified by the isolation and separation of a group of Ca(2+)-activated proteins, Calmodulin, S100a and S100b, from bovine brain extract, using a melittin-Eupergit C affinity column which is developed with Ca(2+)-chelator gradients. As expected, separation of the three proteins into individual peaks, eluted in order of increasing affinity to the matrix, was obtained. Sigmoid selectivity curves calculated from the elution volumes under different elution conditions for each of the proteins were obtained, illustrating the chromatographic behaviour of the gradient affinity separation system.

  13. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination.

  14. Mathematical functions for the representation of chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, V B; Bombi, G G

    2001-10-05

    About ninety empirical functions for the representation of chromatographic peaks have been collected and tabulated. The table, based on almost 200 references, reports for every function: (1) the most used name; (2) the most convenient equation, with the existence intervals for the adjustable parameters and for the independent variable; (3) the applications; (4) the mathematical properties, in relation to the possible applications. The list includes also equations originally proposed to represent peaks obtained in other analytical techniques (e.g. in spectroscopy), which in many instances have proved useful in representing chromatographic peaks as well; the built-in functions employed in some commercial peak-fitting software packages were included, too. Some of the most important chromatographic functions, i.e. the Exponentially Modified Gaussian, the Poisson, the Log-normal, the Edgeworth/Cramér series and the Gram/Charlier series, have been reviewed and commented in more detail.

  15. Ask the experts: chromatographic baselines.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; James, Christopher A; Scott, Rebecca; Woolf, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Bioanalysis invited a selection of leading researchers to express their views on chromatographic baseline assignment in the bioanalytical laboratory. The topics discussed include the challenges presented with ensuring automated baseline assignment is correct, when reintegration is necessary, regulation and consistency in terminology. Their enlightening responses provide a valuable insight into developing an industry consensus towards reintegration. An accompanying commentary article in this issue, authored by Howard Hill and colleagues (Huntingdon Life Sciences), provides background to this much debated topic.

  16. The Cutting Edge of Affinity Electrophoresis Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is an important technique that is widely used to separate and analyze biomolecules in the fields of biology and medicine. Both quantitative and qualitative information can be gained through affinity electrophoresis. Affinity electrophoresis can be applied through a variety of strategies, such as mobility shift electrophoresis, charge shift electrophoresis or capillary affinity electrophoresis. These strategies are based on changes in the electrophoretic patterns of biological macromolecules that result from interactions or complex-formation processes that induce changes in the size or total charge of the molecules. Nucleic acid fragments can be characterized through their affinity to other molecules, for example transcriptional factor proteins. Hydrophobic membrane proteins can be identified by means of a shift in the mobility induced by a charged detergent. The various strategies have also been used in the estimation of association/disassociation constants. Some of these strategies have similarities to affinity chromatography, in that they use a probe or ligand immobilized on a supported matrix for electrophoresis. Such methods have recently contributed to profiling of major posttranslational modifications of proteins, such as glycosylation or phosphorylation. Here, we describe advances in analytical techniques involving affinity electrophoresis that have appeared during the last five years. PMID:28248262

  17. Decision-support software for the industrial-scale chromatographic purification of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chhatre, Sunil; Thillaivinayagalingam, Pranavan; Francis, Richard; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J; Newcombe, Anthony R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2007-01-01

    The high therapeutic and financial value offered by polyclonal antibodies and their fragments has prompted extensive commercialization for the treatment of a wide range of acute clinical indications. Large-scale manufacture typically includes antibody-specific chromatography steps that employ custom-made affinity matrices to separate product-specific IgG from the remainder of the contaminating antibody repertoire. The high cost of such matrices necessitates efficient process design in order to maximize their economic potential. Techniques that identify the most suitable operating conditions for achieving desired levels of manufacturing performance are therefore of significant utility. This paper describes the development of a computer model that incorporates the effects of capacity changes over consecutive chromatographic operational cycles in order to identify combinations of protein load and loading flowrate that satisfy preset constraints of product yield and throughput. The method is illustrated by application to the manufacture of DigiFab, an FDA-approved polyclonal antibody fragment purified from ovine serum, which is used to treat digoxin toxicity (Protherics U.K. Limited). The model was populated with data obtained from scale-down experimental studies of the commercial-scale affinity purification step, which correlated measured changes in matrix capacity with the total protein load and number of resin re-uses. To enable a tradeoff between yield and throughput, output values were integrated together into a single metric by multi-attribute decision-making techniques to identify the most suitable flowrate and feed concentration required for achieving target levels of DigiFab yield and throughput. Results indicated that reducing the flowrate by 70% (from the current level) and using a protein load at the midpoint of the range currently employed at production scale (approximately 200-500 g/L) would provide the most satisfactory tradeoff between yield and

  18. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  19. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  20. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  1. Affinity capillary electrophoresis coupling with partial filling technique and field-amplified sample injection for enantioseparation and determination of DL-tetrahydropalmatine.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongzhi; Yu, Lishuang; Xu, Xueqin; Zheng, Chunsong; Lin, Wei; Liu, Xianxiang; Chen, Guonan

    2010-06-01

    A novel, simple and sensitive method for the enantioseparation and determination of DL-tetrahydropalmatine (DL-THP) was developed using ACE in combination with partial filling technique and field-amplified sample injection. A chiral selector, i.e. BSA, was used for the enantioseparation of DL-THP in ACE. Effects of BSA concentration, pH and separation voltage on the effectiveness of the enantiomer separation were evaluated. In an optimal condition, D- and L-THP were completely enantio-separated in less than 9 min by partially filling an electrophoretic capillary with 50 micromol/L BSA (50 mbar, 100 s) and carrying out an electrophoresis with 20 mmol/L phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 15 kV. The sensitivity was further improved by making use of field-amplified sample injection to lower the LOD (defined as S/N=3) down to 6 ng/mL. Real samples were also tested and promising results for the determination of DL-THP enantiomers were obtained.

  2. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  4. Extension of the selection of protein chromatography and the rate model to affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, G; Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2010-01-01

    The rational selection of optimal protein purification sequences, as well as mathematical models that simulate and allow optimization of chromatographic protein purification processes have been developed for purification procedures such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. This paper investigates the extension of such analysis to affinity chromatography both in the selection of chromatographic processes and in the use of the rate model for mathematical modelling and simulation. Two affinity systems were used: Blue Sepharose and Protein A. The extension of the theory developed previously for ion-exchange and HIC chromatography to affinity separations is analyzed in this paper. For the selection of operations two algorithms are used. In the first, the value of η, which corresponds to the efficiency (resolution) of the actual chromatography and, Σ, which determines the amount of a particular contaminant eliminated after each separation step, which determines the purity, have to be determined. It was found that the value of both these parameters is not generic for affinity separations but will depend on the type of affinity system used and will have to be determined on a case by case basis. With Blue Sepharose a salt gradient was used and with Protein A, a pH gradient. Parameters were determined with individual proteins and simulations of the protein mixtures were done. This approach allows investigation of chromatographic protein purification in a holistic manner that includes ion-exchange, HIC, gel filtration and affinity separations for the first time.

  5. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Castro, Nathan J; Condon, Brian; Costable, Carmen; Goheen, Steven C

    2012-05-01

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatographic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressings is adsorption and accumulation of proteins like albumin at the solid-liquid interface of the biological fluid and wound dressing fiber. To better understand the effect of fiber charge and molecular modifications in cellulose-containing fibers on the binding of serum albumin as observed in protease sequestrant dressings, albumin binding to modified cotton fibers was compared with traditional and chromatographic isotherms. Modified cotton including carboxymethylated, citrate-crosslinked, dialdehyde and phosphorylated cotton, which sequester elastase and collagenase, were compared for their albumin binding isotherms. Albumin isotherms on citrate-cellulose, cross-linked cotton demonstrated a two-fold increased binding affinity over untreated cotton. A comparison of albumin binding between traditional, solution isotherms and chromatographic isotherms on modified cellulose yielded similar equilibrium constants. Application of the binding affinity of albumin obtained in the in vitro protein isotherm to the in vivo wound dressing uptake of the protein is discussed. The chromatographic approach to assessment of albumin isotherms on modified cellulose offers a more rapid approach to evaluating protein binding on modified cellulose over traditional solution approaches.

  6. Affinity-based screening of combinatorial libraries using automated, serial-column chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.M.; Williams, K.P.; McGuinness, B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors have developed an automated serial chromatographic technique for screening a library of compounds based upon their relative affinity for a target molecule. A {open_quotes}target{close_quotes} column containing the immobilized target molecule is set in tandem with a reversed-phase column. A combinatorial peptide library is injected onto the target column. The target-bound peptides are eluted from the first column and transferred automatically to the reversed-phase column. The target-specific peptide peaks from the reversed-phase column are identified and sequenced. Using a monoclonal antibody (3E-7) against {beta}-endorphin as a target, we selected a single peptide with sequence YGGFL from approximately 5800 peptides present in a combinatorial library. We demonstrated the applicability of the technology towards selection of peptides with predetermined affinity for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). We expect that this technology will have broad applications for high throughput screening of chemical libraries or natural product extracts. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Multidimensional High-Resolution Gas Chromatographic Investigations of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Various Turbine Engine Fuel Precursors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy . 15. B. Welton, Column Switching and Backflush Techniques with Open Tubular and...Packed Columns in Gas Chromatography, Paper presented at 1978 Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy . 16. R. Miller... Applied Spectroscopy . 33. J. F. Pankow and L. M. Isabelle, Interface of the Direct Coupling of a Second Gas Chromatograph to a Gas Chromatograph/ Mass

  8. Chromatographic and computational assessment of lipophilicity using sum of ranking differences and generalized pair-correlation.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Héberger, Károly

    2015-02-06

    Lipophilicity (logP) represents one of the most studied and most frequently used fundamental physicochemical properties. At present there are several possibilities for its quantitative expression and many of them stems from chromatographic experiments. Numerous attempts have been made to compare different computational methods, chromatographic methods vs. computational approaches, as well as chromatographic methods and direct shake-flask procedure without definite results or these findings are not accepted generally. In the present work numerous chromatographically derived lipophilicity measures in combination with diverse computational methods were ranked and clustered using the novel variable discrimination and ranking approaches based on the sum of ranking differences and the generalized pair correlation method. Available literature logP data measured on HILIC, and classical reversed-phase combining different classes of compounds have been compared with most frequently used multivariate data analysis techniques (principal component and hierarchical cluster analysis) as well as with the conclusions in the original sources. Chromatographic lipophilicity measures obtained under typical reversed-phase conditions outperform the majority of computationally estimated logPs. Oppositely, in the case of HILIC none of the many proposed chromatographic indices overcomes any of the computationally assessed logPs. Only two of them (logkmin and kmin) may be selected as recommended chromatographic lipophilicity measures. Both ranking approaches, sum of ranking differences and generalized pair correlation method, although based on different backgrounds, provides highly similar variable ordering and grouping leading to the same conclusions.

  9. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  10. Chromatographic resolution of altered forms of protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashendel, C.L.; Minor, P.L.; Baudoin, P.A.; Carlos, M.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid chromatographic resolution of protein kinase C (PKC) in extracts of rat brain on DEAE-cellulose yielded two major peaks of activity. These fractions bound phorbol esters with identical affinity and specificity and had similar ratios of PKC to phorbol ester-binding activities. Chicken egg yolk antibodies raised to PKC in the first fraction reacted with 74 to 76 kilodalton peptides in the second fraction. Chromatography of each fraction on hydroxylapatite yielded similar distributions of three PKC isozymes. Rechromatography of the DEAE-cellulose fractions on DEAE-cellulose confirmed that these forms of PKC were not rapidly interconvertible. Results of experiments in which extracts or fractions were incubated with MgATP and phosphatase inhibitors were consistent with elution of dephospho-PKC in the first fraction while the second fraction contained phospho-PKC. If confirmed, this suggests that a substantial fraction of PKC in rat and mouse tissues exists in the phosphorylated form.

  11. Validation and pharmacokinetic application of a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique for determining the concentrations of amodiaquine and its metabolite in plasma of patients treated with oral fixed-dose amodiaquine-artesunate combination in areas of malaria endemicity.

    PubMed

    Adedeji, Olumuyiwa N; Bolaji, Oluseye O; Falade, Catherine O; Osonuga, Odusoga A; Ademowo, Olusegun G

    2015-09-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) have been adopted by most African countries, including Nigeria, as first-line treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Fixed-dose combinations of these ACTs, amodiaquine-artesunate (FDC AQAS) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL), were introduced in Nigeria to improve compliance and achieve positive outcomes of malaria treatment. In order to achieve clinical success with AQAS, we developed and validated a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection for determination of amodiaquine (AQ) and desethylamodiaquine (DAQ) in plasma using liquid-liquid extraction of the drugs with diethyl ether following protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was achieved using an Agilent Zorbax C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of distilled water-methanol (80:20 [vol/vol]) with 2% (vol/vol) triethylamine, pH 2.2, at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. Calibration curves in spiked plasma were linear from 100 to 1,000 ng/ml (r > 0.99) for both AQ and DAQ. The limit of detection was 1 ng (sample size, 20 μl). The intra- and interday coefficients of variation at 150, 300, and 900 ng/ml ranged from 1.3 to 4.8%, and the biases were between 6.4 and 9.5%. The mean extraction recoveries of AQ and DAQ were 80.0% and 68.9%, respectively. The results for the pharmacokinetic parameters of DAQ following oral administration of FDC AQAS (612/200 mg) for 3 days in female and male patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria showed that the maximum plasma concentrations (C max) (740 ± 197 versus 767 ± 185 ng/ml), areas under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) (185,080 ± 20,813 versus 184,940 ± 16,370 h · ng/ml), and elimination half-life values (T 1/2) (212 ± 1.14 versus 214 ± 0.84 h) were similar (P > 0.05).

  12. Validation and Pharmacokinetic Application of a High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Technique for Determining the Concentrations of Amodiaquine and Its Metabolite in Plasma of Patients Treated with Oral Fixed-Dose Amodiaquine-Artesunate Combination in Areas of Malaria Endemicity

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, Olumuyiwa N.; Bolaji, Oluseye O.; Falade, Catherine O.; Osonuga, Odusoga A.

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) have been adopted by most African countries, including Nigeria, as first-line treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Fixed-dose combinations of these ACTs, amodiaquine-artesunate (FDC AQAS) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL), were introduced in Nigeria to improve compliance and achieve positive outcomes of malaria treatment. In order to achieve clinical success with AQAS, we developed and validated a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection for determination of amodiaquine (AQ) and desethylamodiaquine (DAQ) in plasma using liquid-liquid extraction of the drugs with diethyl ether following protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was achieved using an Agilent Zorbax C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of distilled water-methanol (80:20 [vol/vol]) with 2% (vol/vol) triethylamine, pH 2.2, at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. Calibration curves in spiked plasma were linear from 100 to 1,000 ng/ml (r > 0.99) for both AQ and DAQ. The limit of detection was 1 ng (sample size, 20 μl). The intra- and interday coefficients of variation at 150, 300, and 900 ng/ml ranged from 1.3 to 4.8%, and the biases were between 6.4 and 9.5%. The mean extraction recoveries of AQ and DAQ were 80.0% and 68.9%, respectively. The results for the pharmacokinetic parameters of DAQ following oral administration of FDC AQAS (612/200 mg) for 3 days in female and male patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria showed that the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) (740 ± 197 versus 767 ± 185 ng/ml), areas under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) (185,080 ± 20,813 versus 184,940 ± 16,370 h · ng/ml), and elimination half-life values (T1/2) (212 ± 1.14 versus 214 ± 0.84 h) were similar (P > 0.05). PMID:25896711

  13. Improving the binding capacities of protein A chromatographic materials by means of ligand polymerization.

    PubMed

    Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-06-20

    Protein A chromatography is one of the most important techniques used in the purification of monoclonal antibodies. Due to the low dynamic binding capacity of protein A chromatographic materials compared to other stationary phases, protein A chromatography is often discussed to be the bottleneck among current purification processes. Several approaches were tested within this study in order to maximize IgG binding capacities of current acrylamido-based based resins. Genetic engineering techniques were used in order to polymerize one of the IgG binding domains (B-domain) of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) to achieve ligands with an increased length. The solution-binding ratio and the total size of ligand-antibody complexes were used to characterize the interaction potential of novel ligands, revealing a relatively linear dependency between the number of binding domains upon the amount of bound antibody molecules. This relationship was also valid up to a ligand which was comprised of 8 B-domains after attaching them onto acrylamido-based based stationary phases using epoxy coupling techniques. Equilibrium binding capacities of more than 80mghIgGmL(-1) were achieved using the B8 ligand. Furthermore, static binding capacities, especially for smaller ligands comprised of fewer B-domains, were improved up to 87mghIgGmL(-1) using site-specific coupling chemistry, which is an improvement of more than 20% compared to commercially available materials. In order to evaluate pore exclusion effects due to the use of prolonged affinity ligands, prepared materials were characterized regarding their effective intraparticle porosity and breakthrough capacity.

  14. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, Thomas G.; Ives, Jeffrey T.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means.

  15. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, T.G.; Ives, J.T.

    1993-12-28

    A method and apparatus are presented for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means. 16 figures.

  16. Preliminary numerical analysis of improved gas chromatograph model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for the gas chromatograph was developed which incorporates the heretofore neglected transport mechanisms of intraparticle diffusion and rates of adsorption. Because a closed-form analytical solution to the model does not appear realizable, techniques for the numerical solution of the model equations are being investigated. Criteria were developed for using a finite terminal boundary condition in place of an infinite boundary condition used in analytical solution techniques. The class of weighted residual methods known as orthogonal collocation is presently being investigated and appears promising.

  17. Composite affinity sorbents and their cleaning in place.

    PubMed

    Girot, P; Moroux, Y; Duteil, X P; Nguyen, C; Boschetti, E

    1990-06-27

    Making large-scale affinity sorbents that are reusable under acceptable hygienic conditions implies specific treatments for cleaning in place with known aqueous solutions of chemical agents. However, common agents such as sodium hydroxide are frequently considered too drastic for the stability of macromolecular biologically active immobilized ligands. According to a large series of trials, it was found that only a mixture of sodium hydroxide and ethanol was actually effective in sterilizing a sorbent in a single step. When hydroxide or an ethanol-acetic acid mixture were used alone, they were not totally efficient in the inactivation of sporulated Bacillus subtilis. Conversely, they were efficient when used sequentially. All these solutions were able to remove pyrogens from chromatographic sorbents. As the sterilizing solutions contained a certain amount of ethanol, the most suitable chromatographic affinity sorbents had to be based on an incompressible matrix. When washing an affinity silica sorbent that had proteins as ligands with solutions such as sodium hydroxide, ethanol-acetic acid or ethanol-sodium hydroxide, it was found that certain sorbents were able to tolerate the treatments without a noticeable decrease in their biochemical activity.

  18. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  19. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva, M S; Graça, V C; Reis, L V; Santos, P F; Almeida, P; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2013-12-01

    The most selective purification method for proteins and other biomolecules is affinity chromatography. This method is based on the unique biological-based specificity of the biomolecule-ligand interaction and commonly uses biological ligands. However, these ligands may present some drawbacks, mainly because of their cost and lability. Dye-affinity chromatography overcomes the limitations of biological ligands and is widely used owing to the low cost of synthetic dyes and to their resistance to biological and chemical degradation. In this work, immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dyes are used in order to exploit affinity interactions with standard proteins such as lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin. These studies evaluate the affinity interactions occurring between the immobilized ligand and the different proteins, as a reflection of the sum of several molecular interactions, namely ionic, hydrophobic and van der Waals, spread throughout the structure, in a defined spatial manner. The results show the possibility of using an aminosquarylium cyanine dye bearing a N-hexyl pendant chain, with a ligand density of 1.8 × 10(-2) mmol of dye/g of chromatographic support, to isolate lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin from a mixture. The application of a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient resulted in the recovery of lysozyme in the flowthrough. On the other hand, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin were retained, involving different interactions with the ligand. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential applicability of ligands such as aminosquarylium cyanine dyes for the separation and purification of proteins by affinity chromatography.

  20. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Enrivonmentally Significant Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Walter E.; Beu, Steve

    1982-01-01

    A chromatographic procedure for analyzing organophosphorus pesticides (such as PCB's, nitrosamines, and phthalate esters) in orange juice is described, including a summary of the method, instrumentation, methodology, results/discussion, and calculations. (JN)

  1. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  2. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  3. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Nanofluidic Size-Exclusion Chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Svehla, Danielle; Grunthaner, Frank; Feldman, Jason; Shakkottai, P.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a nanofluidic size-exclusion chromatograph (SEC), which would be a compact, robust, lightweight instrument for separating molecules of interest according to their sizes and measuring their relative abundances in small samples. About as large as a deck of playing cards, the nanofluidic SEC would serve, in effect, as a laboratory on a chip that would perform the functions of a much larger, conventional, bench-top SEC and ancillary equipment, while consuming much less power and much smaller quantities of reagent and sample materials. Its compactness and low power demand would render it attractive for field applications in which, typically, it would be used to identify and quantitate a broad range of polar and nonpolar organic compounds in soil, ice, and water samples. Size-exclusion chromatography is a special case of high-performance liquid chromatography. In a conventional SEC, a sample plug is driven by pressure along a column packed with silica or polymer beads that contain uniform nanopores. The interstices between, and the pores in, the beads collectively constitute a size-exclusion network. Molecules follow different paths through the size-exclusion network, such that characteristic elution times can be related to sizes of molecules: basically, smaller molecules reach the downstream end of the column after the larger ones do because the smaller ones enter minor pores and stay there for a while, whereas the larger ones do not enter the pores. The volume accessible to molecules gradually diminishes as their size increases. All molecules bigger than a pore size elute together. For most substances, the elution times and sizes of molecules can be correlated directly with molecular weights. Hence, by measuring the flux of molecules arriving at the downstream end as a function of time, one can obtain a liquid mass spectrum for the molecules present in a sample over a broad range of molecular weights.

  5. The Experimental Values of Atomic Electron Affinities: Their Selection and Periodic Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, E. C. M.; Wentworth, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes new experimental techniques, such as dye-laser photodetachment studies, which have recently provided accurate values for the electron affinity of numerous elements. Provides a periodic chart with available electron affinity data. (MLH)

  6. Bioskin as an affinity matrix for the separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vicente, C; Sebastián, B; Fontaniella, B; Márquez, A; Xavier Filho, L; Legaz, M E

    2001-05-11

    Bioskin is a natural product produced by a mixed culture of Acetobacter xylinum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pombe cultured on media containing sucrose. It is of fibrillar nature able to retain some proteins, such as cytochrome c, by adsorption, and mainly composed of glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This makes it possible that, at an adequate pH value, proteins charged as polyanionic molecules, such as catalase, can be retained by ionic adsorption using the positively charged amino groups of the matrix. In addition, bioskin can also be used as an affinity matrix to retain glycoproteins able to perform specific affinity reactions with the amino sugars of the matrix, such as invertase, fetuin or ovalbumin. Its possible use as a chromatographic support is discussed.

  7. Gas chromatographic analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Laurens, J B; de Coning, J P; Swinley, J M

    2001-03-09

    Highly reactive fluorinated gaseous matrices require special equipment and techniques for the gas chromatographic analysis of trace impurities in these gases. The impurities that were analysed at the low-microg/l levels included oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen. This paper describes the use of a system utilising backflush column switching to protect the columns and detectors in the analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride. Two separate channels were used for the analysis of H2, O2, N2, CO, CO2 and SF6 impurities with pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection.

  8. Comparison among three anion exchange chromatographic supports to capture erythropoietin from cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lourdes; Stewart, Diobel; Zumalacárregui, Lourdes; Amaro, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Affinity and ion exchange conventional chromatography have been used to capture erythropoietin (EPO) from mammalian cell culture supernatant. Currently, chromatographic adsorbent perfusion is available, however a limited number of applications have been found in the literature. In this work, three anion exchange chromatographic supports (gel, membrane and monolithic) were evaluated in the capture step of the recombinant erythropoietin purification process. The influences of load and flow rate on each support performance were analyzed. Also the purity of the EPO molecules was determined. A productivity analysis, as a decision tool for larger scale implementation, was done. As a conclusion, the evaluated supports are technically suitable to capture EPO with adequate recovery and good purity. However, the monolithic column admits high operating velocity, showing the highest adsorption capacity and productivity.

  9. Chromatographic separation of germanium and arsenic for the production of high purity (77)As.

    PubMed

    Gott, Matthew D; DeGraffenreid, Anthony J; Feng, Yutian; Phipps, Michael D; Wycoff, Donald E; Embree, Mary F; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2016-04-08

    A simple column chromatographic method was developed to isolate (77)As (94±6% (EtOH/HCl); 74±11 (MeOH)) from germanium for potential use in radioimmunotherapy. The separation of arsenic from germanium was based on their relative affinities for different chromatographic materials in aqueous and organic environments. Using an organic or mixed mobile phase, germanium was selectively retained on a silica gel column as germanate, while arsenic was eluted from the column as arsenate. Subsequently, enriched (76)Ge (98±2) was recovered for reuse by elution with aqueous solution (neutral to basic). Greater than 98% radiolabeling yield of a (77)As-trithiol was observed from methanol separated [(77)As]arsenate [17].

  10. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  11. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  12. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  13. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  14. Chromatographic Separation of Glucose and Fructose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsevich, Yu E.; Larionov, Oleg G.; Stal'naya, I. D.; Nakhapetyan, L. A.; Pronin, A. Ya

    1987-03-01

    The structures, mutarotation, and the physicochemical properties of glucose and fructose as well as methods for their separation are examined. Their chromatographic separation on cation exchangers in the calcium-form is discussed in detail. A theory of the formation of complexes of carbohydrates with metal cations is described and the mechanism of the separation of glucose and fructose on cation exchangers in the calcium-form is discussed in detail. Factors influencing the chromatographic separation of glucose and fructose on sulphonic acid cation-exchange resins are also considered. The bibliography includes 138 references.

  15. Chiral separation of new sulfonamide derivatives and evaluation of their enantioselective affinity for human carbonic anhydrase II by microscale thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Foulon, Catherine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Schifano, Nadège; Six, Perrine; Devassine, Stéphanie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Goossens, Laurence; Danel, Cécile; Goossens, Jean-François

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a method combining chiral separation and biophysical techniques to evaluate the enantioselective affinity of original sulfonamide derivatives towards their therapeutic target, the human carbonic anhydrase II (hACII). The first step consisted in the preparation of the enantiomers by chromatographic separation. The performances of HPLC and Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (SFC) were studied at the analytical scale by optimization of various experimental conditions using adsorbed polysaccharide chiral stationary phases (amylose AD-H and cellulose OD-H). Since SFC allowed obtaining higher enantioresolutions per time unit, it was selected for the semi-preparative scale and successfully used to isolate each enantiomer with a satisfactory enantiomeric purity (>98%). Secondly, microscale thermophoresis (MST) method and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) used as reference method were developed to measure potential enantioselective affinities of these enantiomers towards the hACII. The optimizations of both methods were performed using a reference compound, i.e. acetazolamide, which affinity for hCAII has previously been demonstrated. For all compounds, KD values obtained using MST and SPR were in good agreement, leading to similar affinity scales despite both approaches totally differ (labeling for MST versus immobilization of the protein for SPR). The equilibrium dissociation constants of our original compounds for the hCAII were in the range 100-1000nM and an enantioselectivity was observed using the MST and SPR methods for the diarylpyrazole 2. Finally, by comparing the MST and SPR techniques, MST appears especially adapted for further screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives due to the lower time required to estimate a binding constant while consuming as little hCAII as SPR.

  16. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay.

    PubMed

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this end, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to 1,000 domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from human papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human 'PDZome'. We obtained sharply sequence-dependent binding profiles that quantitatively describe the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes.

  17. Evaluation of selectivity in homologous multimodal chromatographic systems using in silico designed antibody fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Woo, James; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-12-24

    This study describes the in silico design, surface property analyses, production and chromatographic evaluations of a diverse set of antibody Fab fragment variants. Based on previous findings, we hypothesized that the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) constitute important binding sites for multimodal chromatographic ligands. Given that antibodies are highly diversified molecules and in particular the CDRs, we set out to examine the generality of this result. For this purpose, four different Fab fragments with different CDRs and/or framework regions of the variable domains were identified and related variants were designed in silico. The four Fab variant libraries were subsequently generated by site-directed mutagenesis and produced by recombinant expression and affinity purification to enable examination of their chromatographic retention behavior. The effects of geometric re-arrangement of the functional moieties on the multimodal resin ligands were also investigated with respect to Fab variant retention profiles by comparing two commercially available multimodal cation-exchange ligands, Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime, and two novel multimodal ligand prototypes. Interestingly, the chromatographic data demonstrated distinct selectivity trends between the four Fab variant libraries. For three of the Fab libraries, the CDR regions appeared as major binding sites for all multimodal ligands. In contrast, the fourth Fab library displayed a distinctly different chromatographic behavior, where Nuvia cPrime and related multimodal ligand prototypes provided markedly improved selectivity over Capto MMC. Clearly, the results illustrate that the discriminating power of multimodal ligands differs between different Fab fragments. The results are promising indications that multimodal chromatography using the appropriate multimodal ligands can be employed in downstream bioprocessing for challenging selective separation of product related variants.

  18. Affinity chromatography of porcine pepsin A using quinolin-8-ol as ligand.

    PubMed

    Novotná, Lenka; Hrubý, Martin; Benes, Milan J; Kucerová, Zdenka

    2005-08-19

    Stationary phase containing quinolin-8-ol immobilized on macroporous methacrylate support for the affinity chromatography of porcine pepsin A is described. Optimized chromatographic conditions for separation of porcine pepsin A on this stationary phase were found investigating the influence of pH, concentration, ionic strength and chemical composition of the used mobile phases. The stationary phase shows a good reproducibility of chromatographic analyses (relative standard deviation, +/-2%), a high recovery (ca. 93%) and a satisfactory capacity (13 mg pepsin A/1 mL stationary phase) for porcine pepsin A. The obtained findings confirm the applicability of affinity chromatography on the stationary phase with immobilized quinolin-8-ol to the isolation and determination of porcine pepsin A.

  19. An affinity matrix for the purification of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Thomassin, H; Jacobson, M K; Guay, J; Verreault, A; Aboul-ela, N; Menard, L; Poirier, G G

    1990-01-01

    The preparation of quantities of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sufficient for detailed structural and enzymatic characterizations has been difficult due to the very low tissue content of the enzyme and its lability in late stages of purification. To date, the only purification of this enzyme to apparent homogeneity has involved a procedure requiring 6 column chromatographic steps. Described here is the preparation of an affinity matrix which consists of ADP-ribose polymers bound to dihydroxyboronyl sepharose. An application is described for the purification of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase from calf thymus in which a single rapid affinity step was used to replace 3 column chromatographic steps yielding enzyme of greater than 90% purity with a 3 fold increase in yield. This matrix should also prove useful for other studies of ADP-ribose polymer metabolism and related clinical conditions. Images PMID:2395636

  20. Thin-Layer Chromatographic Separation of Phenols: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Mark J.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and equipment needed are provided for an experiment in which a series of readily available, inexpensive, and relatively nontoxic phenols are separated using thin-layer chromatographic techniques. The experiment permits a discussion of how relative Rf values may be rationalized by considering a molecule's…

  1. Numerical Simulation of an Optical Chromatographic Separator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-02

    its close relative, Bacillus thuringiensis ," Anal. Chem. 78, 3221-3225 (2006). 10. S. J. Hart, A. Terray, K. L. Kuhn, J. Arnold, and T. A. Leski...Terray, T. A. Leski, J. Arnold, and R. Stroud, "Discovery of a significant optical chromatographic difference between spores of Bacillus anthracis and

  2. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  4. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; dle Castillo, L.; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This poster describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through a microcolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristics elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight.

  5. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  6. A Small-Scale Low-Cost Gas Chromatograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gros, Natasa; Vrtacnik, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    The design and application of a small-scale portable gas chromatograph for learning of the basic concepts of chromatography is described. The apparatus consists of two basic separable units, which includes a chromatographic unit and an electronic unit.

  7. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1997-07-29

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  8. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  9. Quantitative high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of acrolein in plasma after derivatization with Luminarin 3.

    PubMed

    Paci, A; Rieutord, A; Guillaume, D; Traoré, F; Ropenga, J; Husson, H P; Brion, F

    2000-03-10

    A rapid, sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the quantification of acrolein (1), one of the toxic metabolites of oxazaphosphorine alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide) was developed. Condensation of acrolein with Luminarin 3 afforded a fluorescent derivative that could be specifically detected and quantified. Chromatographic conditions involved a C18 RP column Uptisphere and a gradient elution system to optimize resolution and time analysis. The method showed high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 100 pmol/ml and a limit of quantification of 300 pmol/ml. This technique is particularly suitable for pharmacokinetic studies on plasma of oxazaphosphorine-receiving patients.

  10. Tadpole toxicity prediction using chromatographic systems.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pumarega, Alejandro; Amézqueta, Susana; Fuguet, Elisabet; Rosés, Martí

    2015-10-30

    Toxicity has been emulated in tadpole species through chromatographic systems. The parameter studied to evaluate the non-specific toxicity of a compound is the narcosis concentration (Cnar), which is defined as the concentration needed for the immobilization of the organism. Because experimental investigation with animals is lengthy, costly, technically difficult, and ethically questionable, there is a great interest in developing surrogate physicochemical systems able to emulate biological systems to obtain the same information in a faster, more economic, and easier manner. In order to see which chromatographic systems would be able to emulate tadpole narcosis, both, tadpole narcosis data and data in several chromatographic and electrophoretic systems, were fitted to a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model. Thus, by comparison of the models it was possible to see which of the chromatographic systems were more similar to the biological one. The physicochemical systems that best emulate tadpole narcosis were an HPLC system based on an immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) column, and two micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) systems based on sodium taurocholate (STC) and a mixture of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Brij 35 as surfactants. A system based on a RP18 HPLC column also was selected for comparison because it is a common column in most analytical laboratories. To establish the models, a set of compounds with known Cnar values were analyzed in the chromatographic, and electrophoretic selected systems and, then, the retention factor (k) was correlated to the concentration of narcosis. Statistics showed that the system based on STC micelles was the best to emulate toxicity in tadpoles. The robustness and predictive ability of the developed models were validated.

  11. Extraction, chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods for lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sumitra; Nie, Ben; Arnold, Robert D; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-05-01

    Lipids make up a diverse subset of biomolecules that are responsible for mediating a variety of structural and functional properties as well as modulating cellular functions such as trafficking, regulation of membrane proteins and subcellular compartmentalization. In particular, phospholipids are the main constituents of biological membranes and play major roles in cellular processes like transmembrane signaling and structural dynamics. The chemical and structural variety of lipids makes analysis using a single experimental approach quite challenging. Research in the field relies on the use of multiple techniques to detect and quantify components of cellular lipidomes as well as determine structural features and cellular organization. Understanding these features can allow researchers to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms by which lipid-lipid and/or lipid-protein interactions take place within the conditions of study. Herein, we provide an overview of essential methods for the examination of lipids, including extraction methods, chromatographic techniques and approaches for mass spectrometric analysis.

  12. [Thin-layer chromatographic demonstration of the herbicide zenkor].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Ts; Sergeeva, D; Grigorova, D

    1976-01-01

    Established were the thin-layer chromatography conditions for the demonstration of the herbicide Zenkor as a pure substance and a preparation. Comparative experiments were carried out applying Thomson and Stanley's thin-layer chromatography conditions and the authors' personal ones. Most adequate proved to be the following conditions: sorbent-Kieselgel 60F 254 (Merck); solvent -- chloroform: 1,4-dioxan (9:1); developer -- ultraviolet light (authors' technique). Essential with this method is the preliminary (prior to apply the pure substances on the thin-layer chromatographic plaque) moving of the plaque in the indicated mobile phase (authors' technique). Under these thin-layer chromatography conditions work is made feasible and the method is fast and simple, achieving high sensitivity -- 0.5 mug Zenkor.

  13. [A peak recognition algorithm designed for chromatographic peaks of transformer oil].

    PubMed

    Ou, Linjun; Cao, Jian

    2014-09-01

    In the field of the chromatographic peak identification of the transformer oil, the traditional first-order derivative requires slope threshold to achieve peak identification. In terms of its shortcomings of low automation and easy distortion, the first-order derivative method was improved by applying the moving average iterative method and the normalized analysis techniques to identify the peaks. Accurate identification of the chromatographic peaks was realized through using multiple iterations of the moving average of signal curves and square wave curves to determine the optimal value of the normalized peak identification parameters, combined with the absolute peak retention times and peak window. The experimental results show that this algorithm can accurately identify the peaks and is not sensitive to the noise, the chromatographic peak width or the peak shape changes. It has strong adaptability to meet the on-site requirements of online monitoring devices of dissolved gases in transformer oil.

  14. Chromatographic immunoassays: strategies and recent developments in the analysis of drugs and biological agents

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryan; Rodriguez, Elliott; Suresh, Doddavenkatanna; Hage, David S

    2015-01-01

    A chromatographic immunoassay is a technique in which an antibody or antibody-related agent is used as part of a chromatographic system for the isolation or measurement of a specific target. Various binding agents, detection methods, supports and assay formats have been developed for this group of methods, and applications have been reported that range from drugs, hormones and herbicides to peptides, proteins and bacteria. This review discusses the general principles and applications of chromatographic immunoassays, with an emphasis being given to methods and formats that have been developed for the analysis of drugs and biological agents. The relative advantages or limitations of each format are discussed. Recent developments and research in this field, as well as possible future directions, are also considered. PMID:26571109

  15. Micro and nanotechnologies for the development of an integrated chromatographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casals, O.; Romano-Rodríguez, A.; Illa, X.; Zamani, C.; Vilà, A.; Morante, J. R.; Gràcia, I.; Ivanov, P.; Sabaté, N.; Fonseca, L.; Santander, J.; Figueras, E.; Cané, C.

    2007-05-01

    The development of an integrated gas chromatographic system using micro and nanotechnologies is presented in this paper. For this purpose, the different components of the chromatographic system, namely the preconcentrator, the chromatographic column and the gas sensors are being investigated and developed, and the actual state of this investigation is presented. The proposed target application comes from the agrofood industry, in particular the determination of the fish freshness. The structure of the preconcentrator has been fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The same fabrication technique has been employed for the patterning of the silicon microcolumns, which have been sealed with Pyrex glass. Inlet and outlets have been connected and initial experiments of functionalization have been performed. Gas sensors have been obtained by microdeposition of doped WO 3 or SnO II nanomaterials on microhotplates and their responses to the gases of interest have been measured, proving that the target gas concentrations can be detected.

  16. PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: RECENT TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe A.; Bi, Cong; Li, Rong; Matsuda, Ryan; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Vargas, John; Zheng, Xiwei

    2012-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a separation technique that has become increasingly important in work with biological samples and pharmaceutical agents. This method is based on the use of a biologically-related agent as a stationary phase to selectively retain analytes or to study biological interactions. This review discusses the basic principles behind affinity chromatography and examines recent developments that have occurred in the use of this method for biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis. Techniques based on traditional affinity supports are discussed, but an emphasis is placed on methods in which affinity columns are used as part of HPLC systems or in combination with other analytical methods. General formats for affinity chromatography that are considered include step elution schemes, weak affinity chromatography, affinity extraction and affinity depletion. Specific separation techniques that are examined include lectin affinity chromatography, boronate affinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography, and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Approaches for the study of biological interactions by affinity chromatography are also presented, such as the measurement of equilibrium constants, rate constants, or competition and displacement effects. In addition, related developments in the use of immobilized enzyme reactors, molecularly imprinted polymers, dye ligands and aptamers are briefly considered. PMID:22305083

  17. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  18. Optimal Affine-Invariant Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mauro S.; Haralick, Robert M.; Phillips, Tsaiyun I.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    1989-03-01

    The affine-transformation matching scheme proposed by Hummel and Wolfson (1988) is very efficient in a model-based matching system, not only in terms of the computational complexity involved, but also in terms of the simplicity of the method. This paper addresses the implementation of the affine-invariant point matching, applied to the problem of recognizing and determining the pose of sheet metal parts. It points out errors that can occur with this method due to quantization, stability, symmetry, and noise problems. By beginning with an explicit noise model which the Hummel and Wolfson technique lacks, we can derive an optimal approach which overcomes these problems. We show that results obtained with the new algorithm are clearly better than the results from the original method.

  19. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  20. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of Pycnogenol dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Song, Fenhong; Lin, Long-Ze

    2009-01-01

    The bark of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) has been widely used as a remedy for various degenerative diseases. A standard high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure for Pycnogenol analysis is a method specified in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph, which requires measurement of peak areas and identification of four components of the extract: caffeic acid, catechin, ferulic acid, and taxifolin. In this study, a fingerprint analysis using an HPLC method based on the USP monograph has been developed to provide additional qualitative information for the analysis of Pycnogenol-containing dietary supplements (PDS). Twelve commercially available PDS samples were purchased and analyzed along with a standard Pycnogenol extract. Their chromatographic fingerprints were analyzed using principal component analysis. The results showed that two of the samples were not consistent with the standard reference Pycnogenol extract. One contained other active ingredients in addition to Pycnogenol, and the other may have resulted from a quality control issue in manufacturing.

  1. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  2. Chromatographic purification of highly active yeast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-10-24

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  3. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; Castillo, L. del; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through amicrocolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristic elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight. Compared to conventional size exclusion chromatography, the nSEC offers greater control over the size exclusion process; mass fabrication; integration of the separation column with associated valves, pumps, and detectors; and dramatic reductions in instrument mass and power requirements.

  4. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  5. Host cell protein impurities in chromatographic polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicholas E; Valente, Kristin N; Lee, Kelvin H; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-06-01

    Downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is normally performed using a platform process that is empirically tuned to optimize impurity removal for each new product. A more fundamental understanding of impurities and the product itself would provide insights into the rational design of efficient downstream processes. This work examines the chromatographic properties of Chinese hamster ovary host cell protein (HCP) impurities in non-affinity chromatographic resins commonly used in polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification: ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and multimodal. Using proteomic analysis, the specific HCP impurities that elute close to mAb products are identified for these resins at typical downstream processing conditions. Additionally, the interactions of HCP impurities with mAb products are profiled to determine the total extent of product association and the specific HCP species that form associative complexes under conditions encountered in polishing columns. Product association and co-elution were both identified as viable mechanisms of HCP retention for the non-affinity resins tested here. A relatively large sub-population of HCP impurities was found to co-elute or associate with mAbs in each polishing column, but only a small population of HCPs-including lipoprotein lipase, chrondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, nidogen-1, and SPARC-were identified as difficult to remove across an entire downstream mAb process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1260-1272. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Enrichment of adenosine using thermally responsive chromatographic materials under friendly pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanli; Geng, Fangfang; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin

    2015-12-01

    A thermally responsive boronate affinity chromatographic material, which showed thermal sensitivity, had been successfully applied for the enrichment and separation of cis-diol-containing compounds, and the capture and release process could be facilitated by adjusting the temperature. However, in this system, the pH of the mobile phase must be higher than 9.8, and alkaline media can lead to the degradation of labile compounds; the use of silica beads also limits its use. In this study, thermally responsive boronate affinity chromatographic material, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloyl-3-aminophenylboronic acid) grafted silica, was successfully prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization. Its structure was confirmed by IR spectroscopy and the graft ratio was 20.8%, determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, the capture/release of adenosine, a cis-diol, was performed from pH 5.0-9.0 and 10-50°C. The elution of adenosine was remarkably retarded at decreased temperatures and adenosine could be captured completely at 10°C at pH values of 5.0-9.0. The enrichment of adenosine could be achieved by simply changing the temperature from 10 to 50°C. Therefore, this material not only improved the stability of the silica, but was also suitable for the capture of oxidation-sensitive biological analytes. Moreover, it could be used for the enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds in LC with MS.

  7. Membrane chromatographic immunoassay method for rapid quantitative analysis of specific serum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raja

    2006-02-05

    This paper discusses a membrane chromatographic immunoassay method for rapid detection and quantitative analysis of specific serum antibodies. A type of polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane was used in the method for its ability to reversibly and specifically bind IgG antibodies from antiserum samples by hydrophobic interaction. Using this form of selective antibody binding and enrichment an affinity membrane with antigen binding ability was obtained in-situ. This was done by passing a pulse of diluted antiserum sample through a stack of microporous PVDF membranes. The affinity membrane thus formed was challenged with a pulse of antigen solution and the amount of antigen bound was accurately determined using chromatographic methods. The antigen binding correlated well with the antibody loading on the membrane. This method is direct, rapid and accurate, does not involve any chemical reaction, and uses very few reagents. Moreover, the same membrane could be repeatedly used for sequential immunoassays on account of the reversible nature of the antibody binding. Proof of concept of this method is provided using human hemoglobin as model antigen and rabbit antiserum against human hemoglobin as the antibody source.

  8. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Prateek A; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-06-15

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp cDNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)), CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) and CMAC(Sf9(BCRP)) columns and a control column produced using membrane fragments from non-transfected Sf9 cells, CMAC(Sf9), were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography using [(3)H]-etoposide as the marker ligand and etoposide, benzbromarone and MK571 as the displacers on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)) column, etoposide and furosemide on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) column and etoposide and fumitremorgin C on the CMAC(Sf9(BCPR)) column. The binding affinities (K(i) values) obtained from the chromatographic studies were consistent with the data obtained using non-chromatographic techniques and the results indicate that the immobilized MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters retained their ability to selectively bind known ligands. (S)-verapamil displaced [(3)H]-etoposide on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)) column to a greater extent than (R)-verapamil and the relative IC(50) values of the enantiomers were calculated using the changes in the retention times of the marker. The observed enantioselectivity and calculated IC(50) values were consistent with previously reported data. The results indicated that the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)), CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) and CMAC(Sf9(BCRP)) columns can be used for the study of binding to the MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters and that membranes from the Sf9 cell line can be used to prepare CMAC columns. This is the first example of the use of membranes from a non-mammalian cell line in an affinity chromatographic system.

  9. Gas chromatographic determination of oxalic acid in foods.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, H

    1985-01-01

    A new quantitative gas chromatographic (GC) method has been developed for the determination of oxalic acid in foods. Solid sample is extracted with water (soluble oxalic acid) or 2N hydrochloric acid (total oxalic acid) at room temperature. An aliquot of sample extract is evaporated to dryness, and the oxalic acid in the residue is methylated with 7% hydrochloric acid-methanol. The reaction mixture is extracted with chloroform, and dimethyl oxalate is quantitated by GC. Recovery of oxalic acid added to liquid samples averaged 100.6%; recoveries from extracts of solid samples were 96.2-99.5 and 97.2-100.1% for water and hydrochloric acid extractions, respectively. Results are shown for determination of oxalic acid in spinach and beverages. The technique is simple, rapid, and accurate, and small samples may be used. The limit of determination is 20 micrograms.

  10. Solubilities in supercritical fluids: the application of chromatographic measurement methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Wright, B.W.; Yonker, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    New methods are described for the measurement of the solubilities of solids in supercritical fluids. These methods utilize instrumentation developed for capillary supercritical fluid chromatography consisting of deactivated, small diameter, fused silica tubing, coupled with detection methods based upon on flame ionization and mass spectrometric detectors. The methods involve (a) direct solubility determination where the fused silica capillary is used as an equilibrium cell, and (b) a pressure of threshold solubility technique which resembles chromatography and uses a programmed pressure increase and sensitive detection to determine the onset of solute migration. Results are also presented which suggest that solubilities can be determined, within certain limitations, from actual chromatographic experiments. The methods are illustrated using aromatic hydrocarbons and complex mycotoxins of the trichothecene group.

  11. A novel strategy for the purification of a recombinant protein using ceramic fluorapatite-binding peptides as affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tuhidul; Aguilar-Yañez, José Manuel; Simental-Martínez, Jesús; Ortiz-Alcaraz, Cesar Ivan; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-04-25

    In recent years, affinity fusion-tag systems have become a popular technique for the purification of recombinant proteins from crude extracts. However, several drawbacks including the high expense and low stability of ligands, their leakage during operation, and difficulties in immobilization, make it important to further develop the method. The present work is concerned with the utilization of a ceramic fluorapatite (CFT)-based chromatographic matrix to overcome these drawbacks. A heptapeptide library exhibiting a range of properties have been synthesized and subjected to ceramic fluorapatite (CFT) chromatography to characterize their retention behavior as a function of pH and composition of the binding buffer. The specific binding and elution behavior demonstrates the possible application of CFT-binding peptides as tags for enhancing the selective recovery of proteins by CFT chromatography. To materialize this strategy, a phage-derived CFT-specific sequence KPRSVSG (Tag1) with/without a consecutive hexalysine sequence, KKKKKKKPRSVSG (Tag2), were fused at the C-terminus of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The resulting gene constructs H-eGFP, H-eGFP-Tag1 and H-eGFP-Tag2 were expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL-21, and the clarified cell lysate was applied to the CFT column equilibrated with binding buffer (20-50mM sodium phosphate, pH 6-8.4). Sodium phosphate (500mM) or 1M NaCl in the respective binding buffer was used to elute the fused proteins, and the chromatographic fractions were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Both the yield and purity were over 90%, demonstrating the potential application of the present strategy.

  12. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  13. A thermodynamic approach to the affinity optimization of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ernesto

    2009-11-01

    High throughput screening and other techniques commonly used to identify lead candidates for drug development usually yield compounds with binding affinities to their intended targets in the mid-micromolar range. The affinity of these molecules needs to be improved by several orders of magnitude before they become viable drug candidates. Traditionally, this task has been accomplished by establishing structure activity relationships to guide chemical modifications and improve the binding affinity of the compounds. As the binding affinity is a function of two quantities, the binding enthalpy and the binding entropy, it is evident that a more efficient optimization would be accomplished if both quantities were considered and improved simultaneously. Here, an optimization algorithm based upon enthalpic and entropic information generated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry is presented.

  14. Prefractionation techniques in proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Castagna, Annalisa; Herbert, Ben; Reymond, Frederic; Rossier, Joël S

    2003-08-01

    The present review deals with a number of prefractionation protocols in preparation for two-dimensional map analysis, both in the fields of chromatography and in the field of electrophoresis. In the first case, Fountoulaki's groups has reported just about any chromatographic procedure useful as a prefractionation step, including affinity, ion-exchange, and reversed-phase resins. As a result of the various enrichment steps, several hundred new species, previously undetected in unfractionated samples, could be revealed for the first time. Electrophoretic prefractionation protocols include all those electrokinetic methodologies which are performed in free solution, essentially all relying on isoelectric focusing steps. The devices here reviewed include multichamber apparatus, such as the multicompartment electrolyzer with Immobiline membranes, Off-Gel electrophoresis in a multicup device and the Rotofor, an instrument also based on a multichamber system but exploiting the conventional technique of carrier-ampholyte-focusing. Other instruments of interest are the Octopus, a continuous-flow device for isoelectric focusing in a upward flowing liquid curtain, and the Gradiflow, where different pI cuts are obtained by a multistep passage through two compartments buffered at different pH values. It is felt that this panoply of methods could offer a strong step forward in "mining below the tip of the iceberg" for detecting the "unseen proteome".

  15. Reversible cyclic peptide libraries for the discovery of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Ward, Kevin Lawrence; Naik, Amith Dattatray; Kish, William Stanley; Blackburn, Robert Kevin; Carbonell, Ruben Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    A novel strategy is presented for the identification of cyclic peptide ligands from combinatorial libraries of reversible cyclic depsipeptides. A method for the solid-phase synthesis of individual cyclic depsipeptides and combinatorial libraries of these compounds is proposed, which employs lactic acid (Lact) and the dipeptide ester (Nα-Ac)-Ser(Ala)- as linkers for dilactonization. Upon alkaline treatment of the beads selected by screening a model library, the cyclic depsipeptides are linearized and released from the solid support to the liquid phase, to be sequenced via single-step tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The protocol presented for library synthesis provides for wide structural diversity. Two model sequences, VVWVVK and AAWAAR, were chosen to present different structural examples for depsipeptide libraries and demonstrate the process of sequence determination by mass spectrometry. Further, a case study using the IgG binding cyclic depsipeptide cyclo[(Nα-Ac)-S(A)-RWHYFK-Lact-E] is presented to demonstrate the process of library screening and sequence determination on the selected beads. Finally, a method is shown for synthesis of the irreversible cyclic peptide corresponding to the proposed depsipeptide structure, to make the ligand stable to the aqueous acid and alkaline conditions encountered in affinity chromatographic applications. The cyclic peptide ligand was synthesized on a poly(methacrylate) resin and used for chromatographic binding of the target IgG.

  16. Adsorption saturation and chromatographic distortion effects on passive headspace sampling with activated charcoal in fire debris analysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mary R; Fernandes, Denise; Bridge, Candice; Dorrien, Derek; Elliott, Stefanie; Sigman, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Distortion of the chromatographic profile obtained for hydrocarbons that have been sampled by adsorption onto activated charcoal is a well-known phenomenon. The work reported here helps to better define the causes of chromatographic profile distortion and offers a potential method to avoid chromatographic distortion in some cases through a subsampling technique. The recovery of hydrocarbons from an equimolar mixture was investigated to determine the influence of hydrocarbon concentration on the molar ratios of recovered components. In a one-quart container, hydrocarbon volumes as small as 24 microL (liquid) were sufficient to saturate the surface area available for adsorption on a 99.0 mm2 square of activated charcoal, resulting in significant distortions in the molar ratio and the chromatographic profile of the recovered hydrocarbons. Passive headspace sampling of a similarly small volume of unweathered gasoline spiked onto carpet padding resulted in a significant distortion of the chromatographic profile. The chromatographic profile of the recovered hydrocarbons closely resembled 75% weathered gasoline. Heating the container spiked with unweathered gasoline to evenly distribute the components and then removing a subsample of the carpet padding to a second container for passive headspace analysis greatly reduced the amount of distortion in the resulting chromatogram.

  17. The synthesis and characterization of a nuclear membrane affinity chromatography column for the study of human breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) using nuclear membranes obtained from the LN-229 cells.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Frazier, C; Singh, N; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2013-01-01

    BCRP expression has been reported in glioblastoma cell lines and clinical specimens and has been shown to be expressed both in purified nuclei and in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. To date, the nuclear BCRP has not been characterized. Our laboratory has previously developed an online chromatographic approach for the study of binding interactions between ligands and protein, cellular membrane affinity chromatography. To this end, we have immobilized the nuclear membrane fragments onto an immobilized artificial membrane stationary phase (IAM), resulting in the nuclear membrane affinity chromatography (NMAC) column. Initial characterization was carried out on the radio flow detector, as well as the LC-MSD, using frontal displacement chromatography techniques. Etoposide, a substrate for BCRP, was initially tested, to determine the functional immobilization of BCRP. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of etoposide were run and the binding affinity was determined to be 4.54 μM, which is in close agreement with literature. The BCRP was fully characterized on the NMAC column and this demonstrates that for the first time the nuclear membranes have been successfully immobilized.

  18. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  19. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  20. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  1. Packed multi-channels for parallel chromatographic separations in microchips.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea; Gaspar, Attila

    2013-08-23

    Here we report on a simple method to fabricate microfluidic chip incorporating multi-channel systems packed by conventional chromatographic particles without the use of frits. The retaining effectivities of different bottlenecks created in the channels were studied. For the parallel multi-channel chromatographic separations several channel patterns were designed. The obtained multipackings were applied for parallel separations of dyes. The implementation of several chromatographic separation units in microscopic size makes possible faster and high throughput separations.

  2. High-performance liquid-chromatographic separation of subcomponents of antimycin-A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Using a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique, a mixture of antimycins A was separated into eight hitherto unreported subcomponents, Ala, Alb, A2a, A2b, A3a, A3b, A4a, and A4b. Although a base-line resolution of the known four major antimycins Al, A2, A3, and A4 was readily achieved with mobile phases containing acetate buffers, the separation of the new antibiotic subcomponents was highly sensitive to variation in mobile phase conditions. The type and composition of organic modifiers, the nature of buffer salts, and the concentration of added electrolytes had profound effects on capacity factors, separation factors, and peak resolution values. Of the numerous chromatographic systems examined, a mobile phase consisting of methanol-water (70:30) and 0.005 M tetrabutylammonium phosphate at pH 3.0 yielded the most satisfactory results for the separation of the subcomponents. Reversed-phase gradient HPLC separation of the dansylated or methylated antibiotic compounds produced superior chromatographic characteristics and the presence of added electrolytes was not a critical factor for achieving separation. Differences in the chromatographic outcome between homologous and structural isomers were interpretated based on a differential solvophobic interaction rationale. Preparative reversed-phase HPLC under optimal conditions enabled isolation of pure samples of the methylated antimycin subcomponents for use in structural studies.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of subcomponents of antimycin A.

    PubMed

    Abidi, S L

    1988-08-05

    Using a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique, a mixture of antimycins A was separated into eight hitherto unreported subcomponents, A1a, A1b, A2a, A2b, A3a, A3b, A4a, and A4b. Although a base-line resolution of the known four major antimycins A1, A2, A3, and A4 was readily achieved with mobile phases containing acetate buffers, the separation of the new antibiotic subcomponents was highly sensitive to variation in mobile phase conditions. The type and composition of organic modifers, the nature of buffer salts, and the concentration of added electrolytes had profound effects on capacity factors, separation factors, and peak resolution values. Of the numerous chromatographic systems examined, a mobile phase consisting of methanol-water (70:30) and 0.005 M tetrabutylammonium phosphate at pH 3.0 yielded the most satisfactory results for the separation of the subcomponents. Reversed-phase gradient HPLC separation of the dansylated or methylated antibiotic compounds produced superior chromatographic characteristics and the presence of added electrolytes was not a critical factor for achieving separation. Differences in the chromatographic outcome between homologous and structural isomers were interpreted based on a differential solvophobic interaction rationale. Preparative reversed-phase HPLC under optimal conditions enabled isolation of pure samples of the methylated antimycin subcomponents for use in structural studies.

  4. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  5. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv.

  6. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  7. Regulation of protein binding toward a ligand on chromatographic matrixes by masking and forced-releasing effects using thermoresponsive polymer.

    PubMed

    Yoshizako, Kimihiro; Akiyama, Yoshikatsu; Yamanaka, Hidenori; Shinohara, Yasuro; Hasegawa, Yukio; Carredano, Enrique; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Okano, Teruo

    2002-08-15

    A novel concept of affinity regulation based on masking and forced-releasing effects using a thermoresponsive polymer was elucidated. Affinity chromatographic matrixes were prepared using either poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) or poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) beads immobilized with ligand molecule, Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB), together with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm), a polymer with a cloud point of 32 degrees C. Two different lengths of spacer molecules were used for the immobilization of CB while maintaining the PIPAAm size constant. Chromatographic analyses using bovine serum albumin as a model protein showed a clear correlation between spacer length and binding capacity at temperatures lower than the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PIPAAm. The binding capacity under the LCST was significantly reduced only when the calculated spacer length was shorter than the mean size of the extended PIPAAm. Furthermore, the adsorbed protein could be desorbed (released) from the matrix surface by lowering the temperature to below the LCST while maintaining other factors such as pH and ion strength. Selective recovery of human albumin from human sera was demonstrated using this newly developed thermoresponsive affinity column.

  8. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-03-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers.

  9. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods

    PubMed Central

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  10. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  11. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF INORGANIC RADICALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    energy in the latter compound is 110 kcals/mole, distinctly higher than in ammonia. Cyanogen (CN)2 and hydrocyanic acid (HCN) yield values for the...ions very readily, and the electron affinity is 49 kcals/mole. A comparison with the results from thiocyanic acid (HNCS) indicates that the H-N bond

  12. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  13. A recombinant envelope protein from Dengue virus purified by IMAC is bioequivalent with its immune-affinity chromatography purified counterpart.

    PubMed

    Hermida, L; Rodríguez, R; Lazo, L; López, C; Márquez, G; Páez, R; Suárez, C; Espinosa, R; García, J; Guzmán, G; Guillén, G

    2002-03-28

    Semi-purified DEN-4 envelope protein, obtained in Pichia pastoris, was capable of generating neutralising and protecting antibodies after immunisation in mice. Here we compared two purification processes of this recombinant protein using two chromatographic steps: immune-affinity chromatography and immobilised metal ion adsorption chromatography (IMAC). The protein purified by both methods produced functional antibodies reflected by titres of haemagglutination inhibition and neutralisation. IMAC could be used as an alternative for high scale purification.

  14. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P

    2016-12-09

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets.

  15. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets. PMID:28060343

  16. Chromatographic Separation and NMR An Integrated Approach in Pharmaceutical Development.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Nina C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, major improvements in the performance of LC-NMR have been realized. The addition of postcolumn SPE, advances in probe technology including cryogenic probes and microcoil probes, improved solvent suppression pulse sequences, and shielded magnets with better homogeneity have all contributed to rapid advancements in this technology. Application of LC-NMR to problems in pharmaceutical development has had a major impact on structure elucidation studies. LC-NMR has been successfully applied to determine the structures of degradation products, impurities, mixtures of compounds, and metabolites. Use of stop flow techniques with LC-NMR experiments has been a critical means of identifying unstable compounds and studying conformational kinetics. The integration of SPE as an intermediate step between the LC unit and the NMR spectrometer has vastly improved the power of the hyphenated technique in trace analysis applications. Online postcolumn enrichment of chromatographic peaks by SPE dramatically reduces the NMR acquisition times by allowing repeated injections to be trapped onto the same cartridge or different cartridges. Because protonated solvents can be easily removed with a drying procedure, solvents and buffers may be freely chosen for maximizing chromatographic separation without compromising NMR spectral quality. The compound of interest may then be eluted from an SPE cartridge using deuterated organic solvent, which helps to reduce dynamic range issues. When combined with cryogenically cooled microcapillary probes, the sensitivity of the NMR signal increases about 10-fold over conventional room temperature probes, enabling full structure characterization at the microgram level. Heteronuclear experiments with concentrations previously only possible in a limited number of cases have now become standard experiments. The availability of HSQC and HMBC experiments and microcoil/cryogenic technology opens the possibility of using LC-(SPE) NMR for the

  17. High-productivity membrane adsorbers: Polymer surface-modification studies for ion-exchange and affinity bioseparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenette, Heather C. S.

    This dissertation centers on the surface-modification of macroporous membranes to make them selective adsorbers for different proteins, and the analysis of the performance of these membranes relative to existing technology. The common approach used in these studies, which is using membrane technology for chromatographic applications and using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) as a surface modification technique, will be introduced and supported by a brief review in Chapter 1. The specific approaches to address the unique challenges and motivations of each study system are given in the introduction sections of the respective dissertation chapters. Chapter 2 describes my work to develop cation-exchange membranes. I discuss the polymer growth kinetics and characterization of the membrane surface. I also present an analysis of productivity, which measures the mass of protein that can bind to the stationary phase per volume of stationary phase adsorbing material per time. Surprisingly and despite its importance, this performance measure was not described in previous literature. Because of the significantly shorter residence time necessary for binding to occur, the productivity of these cation-exchange membrane adsorbers (300 mg/mL/min) is nearly two orders of magnitude higher than the productivity of a commercial resin product (4 mg/mL/min). My work studying membrane adsorbers for affinity separations was built on the productivity potential of this approach, as articulated in the conclusion of Chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on the chemical formulation work to incorporate glycoligands into the backbone of polymer tentacles grown from the surface of the same membrane stationary phase. Emphasis is given to characterizing and testing the working formulation for ligand incorporation, and details about how I arrived at this formulation are given in Appendix B. The plant protein, or lectin, Concanavalin A (conA) was used as the target protein. The carbohydrate affinity

  18. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  19. Detection system for a gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John M.; Small, Gerald J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

  20. Liquid chromatographic determination of melamine in beverages.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, H; Inoue, T; Yamazaki, T; Yoshihira, K

    1987-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of melamine in beverages. Melamine is separated by column chromatography using cation and anion exchange resin and determined by ion-pair liquid chromatography using an ODS column and a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.05M phosphate buffer (pH 3.0) containing 0.005M sodium 1-laurylsulfate (1 + 4, v/v) as mobile phase. Recoveries of melamine ranged between 90.3 +/- 7.8 and 102.1 +/- 5.6% at levels of 0.6 to 2.4 ppm in 4 kinds of beverages. The quantitation limit was 2.5 micrograms melamine in 50 mL beverage. The method was applied to the migration test of melamine from melamine-formaldehyde resin products to the beverages.

  1. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  2. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  3. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  4. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everwhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separation components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m0-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory.

  5. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 17 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  6. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 9 figures, 1 table.

  7. [High performance liquid chromatography of peptide bioregulators, their fragments and derivatives. IV. Chromatographic behavior and purification of oxytocin].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, V D; Shatts, V D

    1989-09-01

    Chromatographic behaviour of oxytocin has been studied. A simple and convenient technique has been developed for preparative purification of oxytocin using silica and ethanol. The product obtained contains not more than 3% impurities and has activity about 450 IU/mg.

  8. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this aim, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to a thousand domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. Extracts of overexpressed domains are incubated with peptide-coated resins and subjected to filtration. Binding affinities are deduced from microfluidic capillary electrophoresis of flow-throughs. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from Human Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human PDZome. We obtained exquisite sequence-dependent binding profiles, describing quantitatively the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has a wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes. PMID:26053890

  9. Gas-chromatographic measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in blood from mothers and newborns.

    PubMed

    Fogh-Andersen, N; Eriksen, P S; Grinsted, J; Siggaard-Andersen, O

    1988-01-01

    HbCO in blood sampled from 20 mothers and newborns immediately after birth was measured with a new, simple gas-chromatographic method for CO. The mean ratio of HbCO to total hemoglobin for 13 non-smoking mothers did not differ significantly from that for their infants (mean 0.38%, SD 0.26% vs 0.38%, SD 0.13%), but the HbCO ratio varied more in the mothers than in the infants (P less than 0.05). The infants of seven cigarette-smoking mothers, tobacco-abstinent for 7 h during labor, had higher HbCO ratios than their mothers (mean 1.88% vs 1.28%, P less than 0.05). The results are in harmony with the concept of equal affinities of fetal and adult hemoglobin for CO and a long time for passage of CO across the placenta.

  10. [Prospects of application of the chitin-binding domains to isolation and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography: a review].

    PubMed

    Kurek, D V; Lopatin, S A; Varlamov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Properties of substrate-binding domains, some parameters of affinity sorbents, and a number of other special features that were necessary to take into account during creation of chromatographic system for isolation and purification of proteins with incorporated chitin-binding domain were discussed in this review. This method was shown to be successfully used along with metal-chelate affinity chromatography. The metal-chelate affinity chromatography with the use of polyhistidine peptides as affinity labels is successfully applied to isolation, purification, and investigation of recombinant proteins. However, this system had some disadvantages. At present, scientists attracted more and more attention to substrate-binding domains, including those chitin-binding, because they had a number of advantages being used as affinity label.

  11. The local electron affinity for non-minimal basis sets.

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    A technique known as intensity filtering is introduced to select valence-like virtual orbitals for calculating the local electron affinity, EA(L). Intensity filtering allows EA(L) to be calculated using semiempirical molecular orbital techniques that include polarisation functions. Without intensity filtering, such techniques yield spurious EA(L) values that are dominated by the polarisation functions. As intensity filtering should also be applicable for ab initio or density functional theory calculations with large basis sets, it also makes EA(L) available for these techniques.

  12. Rapid and Complete Purification of Acetylcholinesterases of Electric Eel and Erythrocyte by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jonathan Dembitz; Young, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has been used to purify acetylcholinesterase both from the electric tissue of Electrophorus electricus and from bovine erythrocyte membranes. For this purpose, several specific enzymic inhibitors of each protein were synthesized and joined covalently to an insoluble support resin. AchE is selectively retained by such inhibitor-resins when highly impure solutions are chromatographed upon them. After removal from the resin, both enzymes are electrophoretically homogeneous and they may be recovered in yields of 75% or more. Images PMID:5277092

  13. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatile amines produced by several strains of Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pons, J L; Rimbault, A; Darbord, J C; Leluan, G

    1985-02-08

    A gas chromatographic--mass spectrometric technique is proposed for the analysis of volatile amines which were isolated from Clostridium cultures by vacuum distillation and concentrated as hydrochloride salts. Headspace sampling after alkalinization of the salts under vacuum was the most suitable for subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. With ammonia-loaded helium as carrier gas, methylamines were separated on 4.8% PEG 2OM + 0.3% potassium hydroxide on Carbopack B, and other volatile amines on 28% Pennwalt 223 + 4% potassium hydroxide on Gas-Chrom R. Bacterial volatile amines (dimethylamine, trimethylamine, isobutylamine, 3-methylbutylamine, etc.) were detected with a flame-ionization detector and identified by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry in electron-impact and chemical ionization modes.

  14. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  15. Chromatographic Separations of Enantiomers and Underivatized Oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying

    2004-01-01

    My graduate research has focused on separation science and bioanalytical analysis, which emphasized in method development. It includes three major areas: enantiomeric separations using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Super/subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE); drug-protein binding behavior studies using CE; and carbohydrate analysis using liquid chromatograph-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Enantiomeric separations continue to be extremely important in the pharmaceutical industry. An in-depth evaluation of the enantiomeric separation capabilities of macrocyclic glycopeptides CSPs with SFC mobile phases was investigated using a set of over 100 chiral compounds. It was found that the macrocyclic based CSPs were able to separate enantiomers of various compounds with different polarities and functionalities. Seventy percent of all separations were achieved in less than 4 min due to the high flow rate (4.0 ml/min) that can be used in SFC. Drug-protein binding is an important process in determining the activity and fate of a drug once it enters the body. Two drug/protein systems have been studied using frontal analysis CE method. More sensitive fluorescence detection was introduced in this assay, which overcame the problem of low sensitivity that is common when using UV detection for drug-protein studies. In addition, the first usage of an argon ion laser with 257 nm beam coupled with CCD camera as a frontal analysis detection method enabled the simultaneous observation of drug fluorescence as well as the protein fluorescence. LC-ESI-MS was used for the separation and characterization of underivatized oligosaccharide mixtures. With the limits of detection as low as 50 picograms, all individual components of oligosaccharide mixtures (up to 11 glucose-units long) were baseline resolved on a Cyclobond I 2000 column and detected using ESI-MS. This system is characterized by high chromatographic

  16. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  17. High-performance reversed-phase ion-pair chromatographic study of myo-inositol phosphates. Separation of myo-inositol phosphates, some common nucleotides and sugar phosphates.

    PubMed

    Patthy, M; Balla, T; Arányi, P

    1990-12-07

    A detailed study of all the major chromatographic variables affecting the retention behaviour and separation of myo-inositol phosphates in reversed-phase ion-pair chromatographic systems was carried out. The parameters studied included the eluent concentration of the pairing ion, the eluent concentration of the organic modifier and the buffer salt, the pH of the eluent, the minimum column plate count necessary for the separation of the inositol trisphosphate isomers and isocratic and gradient modes of separation. The retention behaviour of some common nucleotides and sugar phosphates was also investigated as these phosphates present chromatographic interference problems in biochemical studies based on the cellular incorporation of [32P]Pi. The separation methods developed appear to be superior to established anion-exchange separation techniques in terms of separation speed and "mildness" of the chromatographic conditions.

  18. Chromatographic Separation of Vitamin E Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ju-Yen; Htar, Thet-Thet; De Silva, Leanne; Tan, Doryn Meam-Yee; Chuah, Lay-Hong

    2017-02-04

    Vitamin E is recognized as an essential vitamin since its discovery in 1922. Most vegetable oils contain a mixture of tocopherols and tocotrienols in the vitamin E composition. Structurally, tocopherols and tocotrienols share a similar chromanol ring and a side chain at the C-2 position. Owing to the three chiral centers in tocopherols, they can appear as eight different stereoisomers. Plant sources of tocopherol are naturally occurring in the form of RRR while synthetic tocopherols are usually in the form of all-racemic mixture. Similarly, with only one chiral center, natural tocotrienols occur as the R-isoform. In this review, we aim to discuss a few chromatographic methods that had been used to separate the stereoisomers of tocopherols and tocotrienols. These methods include high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and combination of both. The review will focus on method development including selection of chiral columns, detection method and choice of elution solvent in the context of separation efficiency, resolution and chiral purity. The applications for separation of enantiomers in vitamin E will also be discussed especially in terms of the distinctive biological potency among the stereoisoforms.

  19. [Combination similarity algorithm on chromatographic fingerprints].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xueyan; Shi, Xinyuan; Duan, Tianxuan; Li, Lei; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2010-11-01

    The similarity of chromatographic fingerprints is one of the effective approaches evaluating the quality stability of Chinese medicine, and the cosine of angle plays an important role in the application of similarity. However, the cosine approach is insensitive to the data difference when the distribution range of the data sets is wide. When the data proportion of the reference sample and the test sample is greatly different, it confirms that the sensitivity of the cosine to the differences of the peaks owned by both the reference sample and the test sample differs from the peaks owned only by the reference sample or the test sample in this study. The method considers the peaks owned by one sample in addition to peaks owned by both samples, and determines their own appropriate weigh targeting for the maximal homostasis value of proportion among the peaks of all of Smilax glabra Roxb. samples. The method based on sample data could reflect the difference in the chemical composition area ratio between the reference sample and test samples sensitively, and measures the similarity among the nine Smilax glabra Roxb. samples, which is a new similarity algorithm for evaluating the quality stability of herbal medicines.

  20. Protein selectivity with immobilized metal ion-tacn sorbents: chromatographic studies with human serum proteins and several other globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Graham, B; Spiccia, L; Hearn, M T

    1998-01-01

    The chromatographic selectivity of the immobilized chelate system, 1,4,7-triazocyclononane (tacn), complexed with the borderline metal ions Cu2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ has been investigated with hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart cytochrome c, and horse skeletal muscle myoglobin, as well as proteins present in partially fractionated preparations of human plasma. The effects of ionic strength and pH of the loading and elution buffers on protein selectivities of these new immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic (IMAC) systems have been examined. The results confirm that immobilized Mn;pl-tacn sorbents exhibit a novel type of IMAC behavior with proteins. In particular, the chromatographic properties of these immobilized M(n+)-tacn ligand systems were significantly different compared to the IMAC behavior observed with other types of immobilized tri- and tetradentate chelating ligands, such as iminodiacetic acid, O-phosphoserine, or nitrilotriacetic acid, when complexed with borderline metal ions. The experimental results have consequently been evaluated in terms of the additional contributions to the interactive processes mediated by effects other than solely the conventional lone pair Lewis soft acid-Lewis soft base coordination interactions, typically found for the IMAC of proteins with borderline and soft metal ions, such as Cu2+ or Ni2+.

  1. Advanced hyphenated chromatographic-mass spectrometry in mycotoxin determination: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Zhaowei; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques are essential for advanced research in food safety and environmental monitoring. These fields are important for securing the health of humans and animals, and for ensuring environmental security. Mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi, are major contaminants of agricultural products, food and feed, biological samples, and the environment as a whole. Mycotoxins can cause cancers, nephritic and hepatic diseases, various hemorrhagic syndromes, and immune and neurological disorders. Mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed can provoke trade conflicts, resulting in massive economic losses. Risk assessment of mycotoxin contamination for humans and animals generally depends on clear identification and reliable quantitation in diversified matrices. Pioneering work on mycotoxin quantitation using mass spectrometry (MS) was performed in the early 1970s. Now, unambiguous confirmation and quantitation of mycotoxins can be readily achieved with a variety hyphenated techniques that combine chromatographic separation with MS, including liquid chromatography (LC) or gas chromatography (GC). With the advent of atmospheric pressure ionization, LC-MS has become a routine technique. Recently, the co-occurrence of multiple mycotoxins in the same sample has drawn an increasing amount of attention. Thus, modern analyses must be able to detect and quantitate multiple mycotoxins in a single run. Improvements in tandem MS techniques have been made to achieve this purpose. This review describes the advanced research that has been done regarding mycotoxin determination using hyphenated chromatographic-MS techniques, but is not a full-circle survey of all the literature published on this topic. The present work provides an overview of the various hyphenated chromatographic-MS-based strategies that have been applied to mycotoxin analysis, with a focus on recent developments. The use of chromatographic-MS to measure levels of mycotoxins, including

  2. High-Throughput Melanin-Binding Affinity and In Silico Methods to Aid in the Prediction of Drug Exposure in Ocular Tissue.

    PubMed

    Reilly, John; Williams, Sarah L; Forster, Cornelia J; Kansara, Viral; End, Peter; Serrano-Wu, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Drugs possessing the ability to bind to melanin-rich tissue, such as the eye, are linked with higher ocular exposure, and therefore have the potential to affect the efficacy and safety profiles of therapeutics. A high-throughput melanin chromatographic affinity assay has been developed and validated, which has allowed the rapid melanin affinity assessment for a large number of compounds. Melanin affinity of compounds can be quickly assigned as low, medium, or high melanin binders. A high-throughput chromatographic method has been developed and fully validated to assess melanin affinity of pharmaceuticals and has been useful in predicting ocular tissue distribution in vivo studies. The high-throughput experimental approach has also allowed for a specific training set of 263 molecules for a quantitative structure-affinity relationships (QSAR) method to be developed, which has also been shown to be a predictor of ocular tissue exposure. Previous studies have reported the development of in silico QSAR models based on training sets of relatively small and mostly similar compounds; this model covers a broader range of melanin-binding affinities than what has been previously published and identified several physiochemical descriptors to be considered in the design of compounds where melanin-binding modulation is desired.

  3. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  4. Affinity Chromatography of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alexander J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a laboratory technique of enzyme purification by affinity chromatography as part of an undergraduate biochemical methodology course. Provides preparation details of the rat muscle homogenate and reagents. Proposes column requirements and assaying information. (MVL)

  5. CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND MASS SPECTRAL STUDIES OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE AND THREE PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONAMIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chromatographic and mass spectral characteristics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and three nitrogen-substituted perfluorooctanesulfonamides have been obtained. A methyl/phenol mixed phase fused silica capillary column was used for GC analysis, while a C18 reversed phase ...

  6. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  8. Preparation and evaluation of a phenylboronate affinity monolith for selective capture of glycoproteins by capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zi An; Pang, Ji Lei; Lin, Yao; Huang, Hui; Cai, Zong Wei; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Guo Nan

    2011-08-21

    A phenylboronate affinity monolith was prepared and applied to the selective capture of glycoproteins from unfractionated protein mixtures. The monolith was synthesized in a 100 μm i.d capillary by an in situ polymerization procedure using a pre-polymerization mixture consisting of 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as functional monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as crosslinker, diethylene glycol and ethylene glycol as binary porogenic solvents, and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The prepared monolith was characterized in terms of the morphology, pore property, and recognition property. The selectivity and dynamic binding capacity were evaluated by using standard glycoproteins and nonglycoproteins as model proteins. The chromatographic results demonstrated that the phenylboronate affinity monolith had higher selectivity and binding capacity for glycoprotein than nonglycoprotein. The resulting phenylboronate affinity monolith was used as the sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME), and the extraction performance of the monolith was assessed by capture of ovalbumin from egg white sample.

  9. Quantifying process tradeoffs in the operation of chromatographic sequences.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Sheau-Huey; Bracewell, Daniel G; Zhou, Yuhong; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    A method for the rapid representation of key process tradeoffs that need to be made during the analysis of chromatographic sequences has been proposed. It involves the construction of fractionation and maximum purification factor versus yield diagrams, which can be completed easily on the basis of chromatographic data. The output of the framework developed reflects the degree of tradeoff between levels of yield and purity and provides a fast and precise prediction of the sample fraction collection strategy needed to meet a desired process specification. The usefulness of this approach for the purposes of product purification and contaminant removal in a single chromatographic step has been successfully demonstrated in an earlier paper and it is now extended by application to a chromatographic sequence: the separation of a hypothetical three-component protein system by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The HIC operation has a strong impact upon the subsequent SEC step. The studies show how the analysis of performance in such a chromatographic sequence can be carried out easily and in a straightforward fashion using the fractionation diagram approach. The methodology proposed serves as a useful tool for identifying the process tradeoffs that must be made during operation of a sequence of chromatographic steps and indicates the impact on further processing of the cut-point decisions that are made.

  10. Chromatographic fingerprinting: An innovative approach for food 'identitation' and food authentication - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis; Ruiz-Samblás, Cristina; Valverde-Som, Lucia; Pérez-Castaño, Estefanía; González-Casado, Antonio

    2016-02-25

    Fingerprinting methods describe a variety of analytical methods that provide analytical signals related to the composition of foodstuffs in a non-selective way such as by collecting a spectrum or a chromatogram. Mathematical processing of the information in such fingerprints may allow the characterisation and/or authentication of foodstuffs. In this context, the particular meaning of 'fingerprinting', in conjunction with 'profiling', is different from the original meanings used in metabolomics. This fact has produced some confusion with the use of these terms in analytical papers. Researchers coming from the metabolomic field could use 'profiling' or 'fingerprinting' on a different way to researchers who are devoted to food science. The arrival of an eclectic discipline, named 'foodomics' has not been enough to allay this terminological problem, since the authors keep on using the terms with both meanings. Thus, a first goal of this tutorial is to clarify the difference between both terms. In addition, the chemical approaches for food authentication, i.e., chemical markers, component profiling and instrumental fingerprinting, have been described. A new term, designated as 'food identitation', has been introduced in order to complete the life cycle of the chemical-based food authentication process. Chromatographic fingerprinting has been explained in detail and some strategies which could be applied has been clarified and discussed. Particularly, the strategies for chromatographic signals acquisition and chromatographic data handling are unified in a single framework. Finally, an overview about the applications of chromatographic (GC and LC) fingerprints in food authentication using different chemometric techniques has been included.

  11. Qualitative evaluation of chromatographic data from quality control schemes using a support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Ventura, M; Sanchez-Niubo, A; Ruiz, F; Agell, N; Ventura, R; Angulo, C; Domingo-Salvany, A; Segura, J; Torre, R de la

    2008-01-01

    The qualitative evaluation of chromatographic data in the framework of external quality assurance schemes is considered in this paper. The homogeneity in the evaluation of chromatographic data among human experts in samples with analytes close to the limit of detection of analytical methods was examined and also a Support Vector Machine (SVM) was developed as an alternative to experts for a more homogeneous and automatic evaluation. A set of 105 ion chromatograms obtained by anti-doping control laboratories was used in this study. The quality of the ion chromatograms was evaluated qualitatively by nine independent experts (associating a score from 0 to 4) and also more objectively taking into account chromatographic parameters (peak width, asymmetry, resolution and S/N ratio). Results obtained showed a high degree of variability among experts when judging ion chromatograms. Experts applying extremely outlying evaluation criteria were identified and excluded from the data used to develop the SVM. This machine was built providing the system with qualitative information (scores assigned by experts) and with objective data (parameters) of the ion chromatograms. A seven-fold cross-validation approach was used to train and to evaluate the predictive ability of the machine. According to the results obtained, the SVM developed was found to be close to the reasoning process followed by the homogeneous human expert group. This machine also could provide a scoring system to sort laboratories according to the quality of their results. The qualitative evaluation of analytical records using a scoring system allowed the identification of the main factors affecting the quality of chromatographic analytical data, such as the specific analytical technique applied and the adherence to guidelines for reporting positive results.

  12. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank-p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n-dimensions is bounded by (n + 1)!/p!(n − p)!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes. PMID:26858463

  13. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, Kenneth Sherman

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  14. Development and evaluation of a gas chromatographic method for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Brooks, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-residue method is described for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples. The technique uses solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection employing nitrogen-selective devices. Seven compounds can be determined simultaneously at a nominal detection limit of 0.1 ??g/L in a 1-litre sample. Three different natural water samples were used for error analysis via evaluation of recovery efficiencies and estimation of overall method precision. As an alternative to liquid-liquid partition (solvent extraction) for removal of compounds of interest from water, solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques employing chromatographic grade silicas with chemically modified surfaces have been examined. SPE is found to provide rapid and efficient concentration with quantitative recovery of some triazine herbicides from natural water samples. Concentration factors of 500 to 1000 times are obtained readily by the SPE technique.A multi-residue method is described for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples. The technique uses solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection employing nitrogen-selective devices. Seven compounds can be determined simultaneously at a nominal detection limit of 0. 1 mu g/L in a 1-litre sample. As an alternative to liquid-liquid partition (solvent extraction) for removal of compounds of interest from water, solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques employing chromatographic grade silicas with chemically modified surfaces have been examined. SPE is found to provide rapid and efficient concentration with quantitative recovery of some triazine herbicides from natural water samples. Concentration factors of 500 to 1000 times are obtained readily by the SPE technique.

  15. Targeting Synaptic Pathology with a Novel Affinity Mass Spectrometry Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmalm, Ann; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Honer, William G.; Moreno, Julie A.; Jakobsson, Joel; Mallucci, Giovanna R.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Öhrfelt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel strategy for studying synaptic pathology by concurrently measuring levels of four SNARE complex proteins from individual brain tissue samples. This method combines affinity purification and mass spectrometry and can be applied directly for studies of SNARE complex proteins in multiple species or modified to target other key elements in neuronal function. We use the technique to demonstrate altered levels of presynaptic proteins in Alzheimer disease patients and prion-infected mice. PMID:24973420

  16. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  17. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  18. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  19. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  20. Development of thermo-responsive hydrogels with immobilized metal affinity groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young-Seo

    A Hydrogel is defined as a polymeric material which possesses the ability to swell in water and retain a significant fraction of water within its structure, but which will not dissolve in water. Hydrogels have been studied by many researchers because they have many useful applications in bio related fields such as drug delivery, bioseparation, and etc. In this thesis, a new hydrogel system that possesses the characteristics of thermo-responsive swelling property and immobilized metal affinity was developed. This affinity material consists of a hydrogel with stimuli responsive swelling characteristics to provide modulated diffusivity and size selectivity. Covalently bound ligands within hydrogels provide highly selective and tunable affinity-based separation. Swelling and affinity properties can be independently controlled by regulating the temperature or pH of the solution to provide a sequential separations scheme. The developed affinity hydrogels incorporate multiple modes of separations or recovery and concentrate specific solutes in chromatographic systems. Thermal sensitive affinity hydrogels were synthesized from a N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer, a crosslinker (1,4-bismethylene acrylamide) and a ligand attachable co-monomer acrylamide (AAm), using free radical chemistry. The ligand of choice is the metal affinity iminodiacetic acid (IDA) which is bound to hydrogel backbone via a spacer arm. The challenge lay in incorporating affinity ligands without affecting the temperature induced swelling of the hydrogel. Thus, PNIPAAm-Am hydrogels are functionalized with a spacer arm (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether), the chelating ligand IDA and a divalent metal ion (Cu2+). This ligand binds histidine groups at high pH and releases them upon protonation of histidine at low pH. This can be used to separate proteins based on the occurrence of surface histidine residues in them. The resulting affinity hydrogel was shown to adsorb the protein chicken egg white

  1. A novel gigaporous GSH affinity medium for high-speed affinity chromatography of GST-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Juan; Li, Qiang; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-03-01

    Novel GSH-AP (phenoxyl agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene, Agap-co-PSt) microspheres were successfully prepared by introducing GSH ligand into hydrophilic AP microspheres pre-activated with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of GSH-AP medium were evaluated and compared with commercial GSH Sepharose FF (GSH-FF) medium. The macropores (100-500nm) of gigaporous PSt microspheres were well maintained after coating with agarose and functionalized with GSH ligand. Hydrodynamic experiments showed that GSH-AP column had less backpressure and plate height than those of GSH-FF column at high flow velocity, which was beneficial for its use in high-speed chromatography. The presence of flow-through pores in GSH-AP microspheres also accelerated the mass transfer rate of biomolecules induced by convective flow, leading to high protein resolution and high dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of glutathione S-transferase (GST) at high flow velocity. High purity of GST and GST-tagged recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) were obtained from crude extract with an acceptable recovery yield within 1.5min at a velocity up to 1400cm/h. GSH-AP medium is promising for high-speed affinity chromatography for the purification of GST and GST-tagged proteins.

  2. Authentication of geographical origin of palm oil by chromatographic fingerprinting of triacylglycerols and partial least square-discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Samblás, Cristina; Arrebola-Pascual, Cristina; Tres, Alba; van Ruth, Saskia; Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis

    2013-11-15

    Main goals of the present work were to develop authentication models based on liquid and gas chromatographic fingerprinting of triacylglycerols (TAGs) from palm oil of different geographical origins in order to compare them. For this purpose, a set of palm oil samples were collected from different continents: South eastern Asia, Africa and South America. For the analysis of the information in these fingerprint profiles, a pattern recognition technique such as partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to discriminate the geographical origin of these oils, at continent level. The liquid chromatography, coupled to a charged aerosol detector, (HPLC-CAD) TAGs separation was optimized in terms of mobile phase composition and by means of a solid silica core column. The gas chromatographic method with a mass spectrometer was applied under high temperature (HTGC-MS) in order to analyze the intact TAGs. Satisfactory chromatographic resolution within a short total analysis time was achieved with both chromatographic approaches and without any prior sample treatment. The rates of successful in prediction of the geographical origin of the 85 samples varied between 70% and 100%.

  3. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  4. Macroporous chitin affinity membranes for lysozyme separation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, E; Zeng, X

    1997-12-20

    Macroporous chitin membranes with high, controlled porosity and good mechanical properties have been prepared using a technique developed in this laboratory based on silica particles as porogen. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme. Chitin membranes (1 mm thickness) can be operated at high fluxes (>/=1.1 mL/min/cm(2)) corresponding to pressure drops >/=2 psi. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme ( approximately 50 mg/mL membrane) is by an order of magnitude higher than that of the chitin beads employed in column separation. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the membranes showed very high selectivity towards lysozyme. The effect of some important operation parameters, such as the flow rates during loading and elution were investigated. Lysozyme of very high purity (>98%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and from egg white. The results indicate that the macroporous chitin membranes can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme at large scale. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 610-617, 1997.

  5. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  6. Probabilistic classification method on multi wavelength chromatographic data for photosynthetic pigments identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Setiawan, Y.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2014-02-01

    Environmental and health problem caused by artificial colorant encourages the increasing usage of natural colorant nowadays. Natural colorant refers to the colorant that is derivate from living organism or minerals. Extensive research topic has been done to exploit these colorant, but recent data shows that only 0.5% of the wide range of plant pigments in the earth has been exhaustively used. Hence development of the pigment characterization technique is an important consideration. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a widely used technique to separate pigments in a mixture and identify it. In former HPLC fingerprinting, pigment characterization was based on a single chromatogram from a fixed wavelength (one dimensional) and discard the information contained at other wavelength. Therefore, two dimensional fingerprints have been proposed to use more chromatographic information. Unfortunately this method leads to the data processing problem due to the size of its data matrix. The other common problem in the chromatogram analysis is the subjectivity of the researcher in recognizing the chromatogram pattern. In this research an automated analysis method of the multi wavelength chromatographic data was proposed. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compress the data matrix and Maximum Likelihood (ML) classification was applied to identify the chromatogram pattern of the existing pigments in a mixture. Three photosynthetic pigments were selected to show the proposed method. Those pigments are β-carotene, fucoxanthin and zeaxanthin. The result suggests that the method could well inform the existence of the pigments in a particular mixture. A simple computer application was also developed to facilitate real time analysis. Input of the application is multi wavelength chromatographic data matrix and the output is information about the existence of the three pigments.

  7. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  8. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  9. Semiempirical Theories of the Affinities of Negative Atomic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, John W.

    1961-01-01

    The determination of the electron affinities of negative atomic ions by means of direct experimental investigation is limited. To supplement the meager experimental results, several semiempirical theories have been advanced. One commonly used technique involves extrapolating the electron affinities along the isoelectronic sequences, The most recent of these extrapolations Is studied by extending the method to Include one more member of the isoelectronic sequence, When the results show that this extension does not increase the accuracy of the calculations, several possible explanations for this situation are explored. A different approach to the problem is suggested by the regularities appearing in the electron affinities. Noting that the regular linear pattern that exists for the ionization potentials of the p electrons as a function of Z, repeats itself for different degrees of ionization q, the slopes and intercepts of these curves are extrapolated to the case of the negative Ion. The method is placed on a theoretical basis by calculating the Slater parameters as functions of q and n, the number of equivalent p-electrons. These functions are no more than quadratic in q and n. The electron affinities are calculated by extending the linear relations that exist for the neutral atoms and positive ions to the negative ions. The extrapolated. slopes are apparently correct, but the intercepts must be slightly altered to agree with experiment. For this purpose one or two experimental affinities (depending on the extrapolation method) are used in each of the two short periods. The two extrapolation methods used are: (A) an isoelectronic sequence extrapolation of the linear pattern as such; (B) the same extrapolation of a linearization of this pattern (configuration centers) combined with an extrapolation of the other terms of the ground configurations. The latter method Is preferable, since it requires only experimental point for each period. The results agree within

  10. [Derivative gas chromatographic analysis of fructooligosaccharide in fermented sucrose].

    PubMed

    Cai, W M; Liu, H; Sun, X J

    2000-01-01

    As a new sweetener, fructooligosaccharide is paid more and more attention for its health improvement property. It includes trisaccharide, tetrasaccharide and pentasaccharide, and can be produced from sucrose by the fermentation of microorganism. In order to analyze the content of fructooligosaccharide in fermented sugar by gas chromatography, fructooligosaccharide was transformed into trimethylsilyl derivatives. Based on the modified gas chromatograph SP2308, and under the chosen chromatographic conditions with 0.53 mm capillary column of OV-101, the contents of fructose, glucose, sucrose and fructooligosaccharide were determined by programmed temperature chromatography. The recovery of fructooligosaccharide was satisfactory.

  11. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne V [Berkeley, CA; Goldstein, Allen H [Orinda, CA

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  12. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO.

  13. Evaluation of practical chromatographic procedures for identification of clinical isolates of mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Luquin, M; Ausina, V; López Calahorra, F; Belda, F; García Barceló, M; Celma, C; Prats, G

    1991-01-01

    After experimental conditions were established, 366 strains of mycobacteria belonging to 23 different species were studied for fatty acids, secondary alcohols, and mycolic acid cleavage products by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Additionally, the mycolic acid pattern was studied by thin-layer chromatography. Capillary gas-liquid chromatography allowed direct identification of the following Mycobacterium spp.: M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. szulgai, M. xenopi, M. malmoense, and M. gordonae. The patterns of mycolic acid methyl esters recorded for the test strains of M. chelonae and M. agri may be of value in the identification of these species. Moreover, the combined use of the two chromatographic techniques provided precise identification of the M. tuberculosis complex, M. simiae, M. fallax, M. triviale, and M. chelonae-like organisms. A minimal set of biochemical tests is usually required to obtain identification to the species level when chromatographic procedures alone are not sufficient. Under the reported experimental conditions, thin-layer chromatography and capillary gas-liquid chromatography are rapid and very useful techniques for the identification of mycobacteria. Images PMID:1993746

  14. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-07-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with (3H)folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin.

  15. Electrochemical Affinity Biosensors Based on Disposable Screen-Printed Electrodes for Detection of Food Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Vasilescu, Alina; Nunes, Gilvanda; Hayat, Akhtar; Latif, Usman; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Food allergens are proteins from nuts and tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy, eggs or milk which trigger severe adverse reactions in the human body, involving IgE-type antibodies. Sensitive detection of allergens in a large variety of food matrices has become increasingly important considering the emergence of functional foods and new food manufacturing technologies. For example, proteins such as casein from milk or lysozyme and ovalbumin from eggs are sometimes used as fining agents in the wine industry. Nonetheless, allergen detection in processed foods is a challenging endeavor, as allergen proteins are degraded during food processing steps involving heating or fermentation. Detection of food allergens was primarily achieved via Enzyme-Linked Immuno Assay (ELISA) or by chromatographic methods. With the advent of biosensors, electrochemical affinity-based biosensors such as those incorporating antibodies and aptamers as biorecognition elements were also reported in the literature. In this review paper, we highlight the success achieved in the design of electrochemical affinity biosensors based on disposable screen-printed electrodes towards detection of protein allergens. We will discuss the analytical figures of merit for various disposable screen-printed affinity sensors in relation to methodologies employed for immobilization of bioreceptors on transducer surface. PMID:27827963

  16. Isolation and characterisation of putative adhesins from Helicobacter pylori with affinity for heparan sulphate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Ochoa, J L; Wadström, T; Ascencio, F

    2001-03-01

    A pool of heparan sulphate-binding proteins (HSBPs) from Helicobacter pylori culture supernates was obtained by sequential ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. The chromatographic procedure yielded one major fraction that contained proteins with heparan sulphate affinity as revealed by inhibition studies of heparan sulphate binding to H. pylori cells. Preparative iso-electric focusing, SDS-PAGE and blotting experiments, with peroxidase(POD)-labelled heparan sulphate as a probe, indicated the presence of two major extracellular proteins with POD-heparan sulphate affinity. One protein had a molecular mass of 66.2 kDa and a pI of 5.4, whilst the second protein had a molecular mass of 71.5 kDa and a pI of 5.0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 71.5-kDa HSBP did not show homology to any other heparin-binding protein, nor to known proteins of H. pylori, whereas the 66.2-kDa HSBP showed a high homology to an Escherichia coli chaperon protein and equine haemoglobin. A third HSBP was isolated from an outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction of H. pylori cells with a molecular mass of 47.2 kDa. The amino acid sequence of an internal peptide of the OMP-HSBP did not show homology to the extracellular HSBP of H. pylori, or to another microbial HSBP.

  17. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  18. Affinity-based precipitation via a bivalent peptidic hapten for the purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Michael W; Stefanick, Jared F; Deak, Peter E; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-09-07

    In a previous study, we demonstrated a non-chromatographic affinity-based precipitation method, using trivalent haptens, for the purification of mAbs. In this study, we significantly improved this process by using a simplified bivalent peptidic hapten (BPH) design, which enables facile and rapid purification of mAbs while overcoming the limitations of the previous trivalent design. The improved affinity-based precipitation method (ABP(BPH)) combines the simplicity of salt-induced precipitation with the selectivity of affinity chromatography for the purification of mAbs. The ABP(BPH) method involves 3 steps: (i) precipitation and separation of protein contaminants larger than immunoglobulins with ammonium sulfate; (ii) selective precipitation of the target-antibody via BPH by inducing antibody-complex formation; (iii) solubilization of the antibody pellet and removal of BPH with membrane filtration resulting in the pure antibody. The ABP(BPH) method was evaluated by purifying the pharmaceutical antibody trastuzumab from common contaminants including CHO cell conditioned media, DNA, ascites fluid, other antibodies, and denatured antibody with >85% yield and >97% purity. Importantly, the purified antibody demonstrated native binding activity to cell lines expressing the target protein, HER2. Combined, the ABP(BPH) method is a rapid and scalable process for the purification of antibodies with the potential to improve product quality while decreasing purification costs.

  19. Chromatographic fingerprints analysis for evaluation of Ginkgo Biloba products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leaf extract of Ginkgo biloba has purported value for improving mental capacities in Alzheimer’s patients. The flavonoids and the terpene lactones are considered to be the two main active components that influence human health. This paper compared an LC/UV chromatographic fingerprint method wi...

  20. On the ion chromatographic determination of S(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    Ion Chromatographie determination of S(IV) is described with special reference to the determination of SO 2(g) and/or aerosol S(IV) along with chloride, nitrate and sulfate in particulate matter. A method is presented for the baseline separation of the above species. The Chromatographic behavior of hydroxymethanesulfonate under various eluent conditions is discussed.

  1. [The gas chromatographic detection of acetylene in cadaveric material].

    PubMed

    Iablochkin, V D

    1999-01-01

    Acetylene traces were detected by gas chromatography in the cadaveric right crural muscle of a 30-year-old man dead from an explosion of an acetylene reservoir at a plant. Acetylene was identified using the absolute calibration method on 3 standard gas chromatographic columns, reaction gas chromatography, and acetylene "deduction" by silver sulfate on silicagel.

  2. Chromatographic profiles of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An LC-DAD-ESI/MS method was developed to obtain chromatographic profiles for the flavonoids and terpene lactones of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected G. biloba products. The method was used to identify 46 glycosylated flavonols and flavones, 3 free flavonol aglycones, catechin, 10 biflavones, a dihy...

  3. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Performance of chromatographic systems to model soil-water sorption.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Marta; Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí

    2012-08-24

    A systematic approach for evaluating the goodness of chromatographic systems to model the sorption of neutral organic compounds by soil from water is presented in this work. It is based on the examination of the three sources of error that determine the overall variance obtained when soil-water partition coefficients are correlated against chromatographic retention factors: the variance of the soil-water sorption data, the variance of the chromatographic data, and the variance attributed to the dissimilarity between the two systems. These contributions of variance are easily predicted through the characterization of the systems by the solvation parameter model. According to this method, several chromatographic systems besides the reference octanol-water partition system have been selected to test their performance in the emulation of soil-water sorption. The results from the experimental correlations agree with the predicted variances. The high-performance liquid chromatography system based on an immobilized artificial membrane and the micellar electrokinetic chromatography systems of sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium taurocholate provide the most precise correlation models. They have shown to predict well soil-water sorption coefficients of several tested herbicides. Octanol-water partitions and high-performance liquid chromatography measurements using C18 columns are less suited for the estimation of soil-water partition coefficients.

  5. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  6. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  7. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  8. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  9. Advances in high-throughput and high-efficiency chiral liquid chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshan C; Wahab, M Farooq; Armstrong, Daniel W; Breitbach, Zachary S

    2016-10-07

    The need for improved liquid chromatographic chiral separations has led to the advancement of chiral screening techniques as well as the development of new, high efficiency chiral separation methods and stationary phases. This review covers these advancements, which primarily occurred over the last 15 years. High throughput techniques include multi-column screening units, multiple injection sequences, and fast gradient SFC screening. New separation methods and column technologies that aim at high efficiency chiral separations include the use of achiral UHPLC (i.e. sub-2μm) columns for separating derivatized chiral analytes or using chiral additives in the run buffer, UHPLC chiral stationary phases, and superficially porous particle based chiral stationary phases. Finally, the enhancement of chiral separations through these new technologies requires that certain instrumental considerations be made. Future directions in continuing to improve chiral separations are also discussed.

  10. Thermal Modulation Methods To Improve the Efficiency of a Gas Chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.; Dimandja, J. D.; Do, M. T.; Kaljurand, M.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Thermal modulation techniques can be used to improve capacity, resolution, and time of analysis of a gas chromatograph. Two of-the techniques developed in our laboratories include using a GC column to store a sample (sample storage system) and applying temperature programming directly onto the wall of a capillary column. The storage system developed allowed the continuous collection of a sample profile for about 3 hours and storing it for as long as 20 hours. Thereafter, the samples were eluted maintaining the individual characteristics of the components present in it. Moreover, temperature programming was done directly on a capillary column improving the time of analysis and resolution of a mixture containing light hydrocarbons.

  11. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromatographic separation material for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2230 Chromatographic separation material for clinical use. (a) Identification. A chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents,...

  12. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromatographic separation material for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2230 Chromatographic separation material for clinical use. (a) Identification. A chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents,...

  13. Measurement of the Electron Affinities of Indium and Thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J. S.; Carpenter, D. L.; Covington, A. M.; Williams, W. W.; Kvale, T. J.; Seely, D. G.

    1999-03-20

    The electron affinities of indium and thallium were measured in separate experiments using the laser-photodetachment electron spectroscopy technique. The measurements were performed at the University of Nevada, Reno. Negative ion beams of both indium and thallium were extracted from a cesium-sputter negative ion source, and mass analyzed using a 90{sup o} bending magnet. The negative ion beam of interest was then crossed at 90{sup o} with a photon beam from a cw 25-Watt Ar{sup +} laser. The resulting photoelectrons were energy analyzed with a 160{sup o} spherical-sector spectrometer. The electron affinity of In({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) was determined to be 0.404 {+-} 0.009 eV and the electron affinity of thallium was determined to be 0.377 {+-} 0.013 eV. The fine-structure splittings in the ground states of the negative ions were also determined. The experimental measurements will be compared to several recent theoretical predictions.

  14. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in <4 h (corresponding to >3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  15. Using precipitation by polyamines as an alternative to chromatographic separation in antibody purification processes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junfen; Hoang, Hai; Myint, Thomas; Peram, Thanmaya; Fahrner, Robert; Chou, Judy H

    2010-03-15

    Polyamine precipitation conditions for removing host cell protein impurities from the cell culture fluid containing monoclonal antibody were studied. We examined the impact of polyamine concentration, size, structure, cell culture fluid pH and ionic strength. A 96-well microtiter plate based high throughput screening method was developed and used for evaluating different polyamines. Polyallylamine, polyvinylamine, branched polyethyleneimine and poly(dimethylamine-co-epichlorohydrin-ethylenediamine) were identified as efficient precipitants in removing host cell protein impurities. Leveraging from the screening results, we incorporated a polyamine precipitation step into a monoclonal antibody purification process to replace the Protein A chromatography step. The optimization of the overall purification process was performed by taking the mechanisms of both precipitation and chromatographic separation into account. The precipitation-containing process removed a similar amount of process-related impurities, including host cell proteins, DNA, insulin and gentamicin and maintained similar product quality in respect of size and charge variants to chromatography based purification. Overall recovery yield was comparable to the typical Protein A affinity chromatography based antibody purification process.

  16. Protein separation using affinity-based reversed micelles

    PubMed

    Sun; Gu; Tong; Bai; Ichikawa; Furusaki

    1999-05-01

    Reversed micellar two-phase extraction is a developing technique for protein separation. Introduction of an affinity ligand is considered to be an effective approach to increase the selectivity and capacity of reversed micelles. In this article, Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB) as an affinity ligand was immobilized to reversed micelles composed of soybean lecithin by a two-phase reaction. The affinity partitioning of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the CB-lecithin micelles was studied. Formation of mixed micelles by additionally introducing a nonionic surfactant, Tween 85, to the CB-lecithin micelles was effective to increase the solubilization of lysozyme due to the increase of W0 (water/surfactant molar ratio)/micellar size. The partitioning isotherms of lysozyme to the CB-lecithin micelles with and without Tween 85 were expressed by the Langmuir equation. The dissociation constants in the Langmuir equation decreased on addition of Tween 85, indicating the increase of the effectiveness of lysozyme binding to the immobilized CB. On addition of 20 g/L Tween 85 to 50 g/L lecithin/hexane micellar phase containing 0.1 mmol/L CB, the extraction capacity for lysozyme could be increased by 42%. Moreover, the CB-lecithin micelles with or without Tween 85 showed significant size exclusion for BSA due to its high molecular weight. Thus, lysozyme and BSA were separated from artificial solutions containing the two proteins. In addition, the affinity-based reversed micellar phase containing Tween 85 was recycled three times for lysozyme purification from crude egg-white solutions. Lysozyme purity increased by 16-18-fold, reaching 60-70% in the recycled use.

  17. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  18. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples.

  19. De Novo Identification and Biophysical Characterization of Transcription Factor Binding Sites with Microfluidic Affinity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, Polly M.; Gerber, Doron; Tran, Danh; Zheng, Jiashun; Li, Hao; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated in part by protein transcription factors (TFs) that bind target regulatory DNA sequences. Predicting DNA binding sites and affinities from transcription factor sequence or structure is difficult; therefore, experimental data are required to link TFs to target sequences. We present a microfluidics-based approach for de novo discovery and quantitative biophysical characterization of DNA target sequences. We validated our technique by measuring sequence preferences for 28 S. cerevisiae TFs with a variety of DNA binding domains, including several that have proven difficult to study via other techniques. For each TF, we measured relative binding affinities to oligonucleotides covering all possible 8-bp DNA sequences to create a comprehensive map of sequence preferences; for 4 TFs, we also determined absolute affinities. We anticipate that these data and future use of this technique will provide information essential for understanding TF specificity, improving identification of regulatory sites, and reconstructing regulatory interactions. PMID:20802496

  20. Fingerprinting of morphine using chromatographic purity profiling and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Acevska, Jelena; Stefkov, Gjoshe; Cvetkovikj, Ivana; Petkovska, Rumenka; Kulevanova, Svetlana; Cho, JungHwan; Dimitrovska, Aneta

    2015-05-10

    Chromatographic purity profiling (CPP) is the common name of a group of analytical and chemometric applications for detection, identification and quantitative determination of related substances and other impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished dosage forms (FDFs). CPP is used for fingerprinting and discriminating between samples, thus representing a core activity in modern drug analysis. The worldwide demand for morphine and its congeners is tremendous and depends entirely on the supply of natural opiates. The aim of this research was to develop a methodology that enables identification of a source of morphine, thus revealing falsification of the substance. The characteristic and reproducible features of impurity profiles for 28 samples of morphine (6 morphine sulfate, 9 morphine hydrochloride and 13 morphine base) were captured by a new LC/MS method for impurity profiling of morphine. The impurity profile encompasses the related substances specified in relevant Ph.Eur. monographs, as well as the other morphinane like impurities, including the naturally occurring co-extracted alkaloids. Different pattern recognition techniques (unsupervised and supervised) were used to reveal the differentiation features of the morphine fingerprints for classification and authentication purposes. The results described in this research open the possibility of using the chromatographic purity profile combined with multivariate data analysis for fingerprinting of morphine samples.

  1. Liquid chromatographic method for the determination of uridine in human serum.

    PubMed

    Zilly, M; Langmann, P; Winzer, R; Benesic, A; Schirmer, D; Walker, U A; Klinker, H

    2004-04-25

    To evaluate uridine levels in humans we developed a very sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of uridine in serum. We use techniques which are available in a standard analytical laboratory. Chromatographic analysis was carried out on a Phenomenex Aqua C18 5 micro 125A column protected by a guard cartridge system. Potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer-acetonitrile was used as an eluent and oxypurinol as the internal standard. All sample preparation steps were done at 4 degrees C and the autosampler was cooled down to 4 degrees C. The calibration curve was linear throughout the calibration range from 0.25 to 100 micromol/l. This method was primarily established to evaluate uridine serum levels in patients with HIV infection since patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) might develop metabolic disturbances that could lead to severe and fatal lactic acidosis due to mitochondrial toxicity. It is suggested that a limited or inadequate uridine supply is at least in part responsible for the onset of such deterioration.

  2. Recent developments in the chromatographic bioanalysis of approved kinase inhibitor drugs in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rood, Johannes J M; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Sparidans, Rolf W

    2016-10-25

    In recent years (2010-present) there has been an increase in the number of publications reporting the development, validation and use of bioanalytical methods in the rapidly expanding drug class of small molecule protein kinase inhibitors. Most reports describe the technological set-up of the methods that have allowed for drug concentration measurements from various sample types. This includes plasma, dried blood-spot, and tissue-analysis. Also method development, exploration of various techniques, as well as measurement and identification of metabolites were addressed. For the bioanalysis, a variety of sample-pretreatment methods like protein-precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction, and solid-phase extraction have been employed, all varying in complexity, cleanliness and time-consumption. Chromatographic separation, nowadays, is more focused on separating components from ion-suppressive effects, since for MS/MS detection, various components do not have to be baseline separated. For detection multiple types of detectors were used, ranging from state-of-the-art high resolution, and tandem mass spectrometry with low picogram per milliliter detection limits to the classical UV-detector with several nanograms per milliliter limits. As new bioanalytical methods have arisen that do rely on chromatographic separation, for example for high-throughput analysis, these are addressed in this review as well.

  3. Artificial neural network model for photosynthetic pigments identification using multi wavelength chromatographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Hariyanto, S.; Natali, F. D. D.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2016-04-01

    The development of rapid and automatic pigment characterization method become an important issue due to the fact that there are only less than 1% of plant pigments in the earth have been explored. In this research, a mathematical model based on artificial intelligence approach was developed to simplify and accelerate pigment characterization process from HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) procedure. HPLC is a widely used technique to separate and identify pigments in a mixture. Input of the model is chromatographic data from HPLC device and output of the model is a list of pigments which is the spectrum pattern is discovered in it. This model provides two dimensional (retention time and wavelength) fingerprints for pigment characterization which is proven to be more accurate than one dimensional fingerprint (fixed wavelength). Moreover, by mimicking interconnection of the neuron in the nervous systems of the human brain, the model have learning ability that could be replacing expert judgement on evaluating spectrum pattern. In the preprocessing step, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the huge dimension of the chromatographic data. The aim of this step is to simplify the model and accelerate the identification process. Six photosynthetic pigments i.e. zeaxantin, pheophytin a, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene and lutein could be well identified by the model with accuracy up to 85.33% and processing time less than 1 second.

  4. Purification of Capping Protein Using the Capping Protein Binding Site of CARMIL as an Affinity Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Capping Protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function and regulation. PMID:19427903

  5. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  6. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  7. Stability of flavin semiquinones in the gas phase: the electron affinity, proton affinity, and hydrogen atom affinity of lumiflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlan; Papson, Kaitlin; Ochran, Richard; Ridge, Douglas P

    2013-11-07

    Examination of electron transfer and proton transfer reactions of lumiflavin and proton transfer reactions of the lumiflavin radical anion by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. From the equilibrium constant determined for electron transfer between 1,4-naphthoquinone and lumiflavin the electron affinity of lumiflavin is deduced to be 1.86 ± 0.1 eV. Measurements of the rate constants and efficiencies for proton transfer reactions indicate that the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion is between that of difluoroacetate (331.0 kcal/mol) and p-formyl-phenoxide (333.0 kcal/mol). Combining the electron affinity of lumiflavin with the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion gives a lumiflavin hydrogen atom affinity of 59.7 ± 2.2 kcal/mol. The ΔG298 deduced from these results for adding an H atom to gas phase lumiflavin, 52.1 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with ΔG298 for adding an H atom to aqueous lumiflavin from electrochemical measurements in the literature, 51.0 kcal/mol, and that from M06-L density functional calculations in the literature, 51.2 kcal/mol, suggesting little, if any, solvent effect on the H atom addition. The proton affinity of lumiflavin deduced from the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction between lumiflavin and 2-picoline is 227.3 ± 2.0 kcal mol(-1). Density functional theory calculations on isomers of protonated lumiflavin provide a basis for assigning the most probable site of protonation as position 1 on the isoalloxazine ring and for estimating the ionization potentials of lumiflavin neutral radicals.

  8. Affinity chromatography approaches to overcome the challenges of purifying plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fani; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Queiroz, João A

    2008-09-01

    The diversity of biomolecules present in plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing extracts and the structural and chemical similarities between pDNA and impurities are some of the main challenges of improving or establishing novel purification procedures. In view of the unequalled specificity of affinity purification, this technique has recently begun to be applied in downstream processing of plasmids. This paper discusses the progress and importance of affinity chromatography (AC) for the purification of pDNA-based therapeutic products. Several affinity approaches have already been successfully developed for a variety of applications, and we will focus here on highlighting their possible contributions to the pDNA purification challenge. Diverse affinity applications and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as the most significant results and improvements in the challenging task of purifying plasmids.

  9. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  10. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  12. Delimiting affinity zones as a basis for air pollution mapping in Europe.

    PubMed

    Vienneau, Danielle; Briggs, David J

    2013-01-01

    Affinity zones are defined as areas within which air quality displays consistent behaviour over space and time. Constructed using multivariate statistical techniques and physiographic and landscape variables reflecting underlying sources and spatial patterns of air pollution, affinity zones provide a spatial structure suited to exploring the representativity of monitoring networks and as a basis for air pollution mapping and exposure assessment. The affinity zone method is demonstrated using European air pollution monitoring sites, and environmental data compiled within a 1 km GIS. Organised into three main stages, this method involves: (i) indicator selection, using principal components analysis, (ii) zonation by cluster analysis to classify areas into distinct types, and (iii) site allocation, to confirm similarity within affinity zones in terms of monitored air pollution concentrations. Ten interpretable and coherent air pollution affinity zones were constructed for Europe, including two rural zones and eight related to different types of densely populated and built up environments. Concentrations between affinity zones differed significantly for NO(2) background and traffic sites and for PM(10) traffic sites only. Not all zones, however, were found to be sufficiently represented by monitoring sites, illustrating the importance of affinity zones in identifying deficiencies in monitoring networks. Spatial modelling within affinity zones is also demonstrated, showing that simple kriging of background NO(2) concentrations within zones (compared to kriging ignoring zones) produced a ca. 22% reduction in errors and increased R(2) by 0.25 at reserved validation monitoring sites. The affinity zone method developed here is a robust, statistical approach that can be used for evaluating the representativity of routine monitoring networks often used in continental level environmental and health risk assessments.

  13. Accuracy of peak deconvolution algorithms within chromatographic integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Papas, A.N. ); Tougas, T.P. )

    1990-02-01

    The soundness of present-day algorithms to deconvolve overlapping skewed peaks was investigated. From simulated studies based on the exponentially modified Gaussian model (EMG), chromatographic peak area inaccuracies for unresolved peaks are presented for the two deconvolution methods, the tangent skim and the perpendicular drop method. These inherent inaccuracies, in many cases exceeding 50%, are much greater than those calculated from ideal Gaussian profiles. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to build models that predict the relative error for either peak deconvolution method. MLR also provided a means for determining influential independent variables, defining the required chromatographic relationships needed for prediction. Once forecasted errors for both methods are calculated, selection of either peak deconvolution method can be made by minimum errors. These selection boundaries are contrasted to method selection criteria of present data systems algorithms.

  14. Catalytically-Promoted Analyte Derivatization Inside a Gas Chromatographic Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, William K.; Gamble, Kelly J.; Wright, Amber R.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of catalyzing on-line derivatization reactions inside the inlet (i.e., the injection port) of a gas chromatograph (GC) with solid heterogeneous catalysts. The experiments described here entail the installation of candidate catalysts inside the GC inlet liner and the subsequent injection of analyte/reagent mixtures onto the catalyst beds. Two catalysts are identified, each of which clearly catalyzes one of the chosen model derivatization reactions in the inlet of a GC. This result supports our hypothesis that on-line derivatizations can, in principle, be reproducibly catalyzed inside the GC inlet by solid heterogeneous catalysts and that the presence of such catalysts in the inlet do not necessarily cause a serious loss of instrument performance or chromatographic efficiency. PMID:20822662

  15. Intercalibration of chromatographic methods for auxino phytodrugs in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, M C; Marengo, E; Gianotti, V; Angioi, S; Copeta, G

    2003-04-18

    Three chromatographic methods are considered for the determination in Solanaceae of auxino-similar phytodrugs, so called because their structure resembles an auxine plant hormone. The phytodrugs studied were: 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxypropionic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, naphthylacetic acid and 2-naphthyloxyacetic acid. Three chromatographic methods, respectively based on ion-interaction HPLC, GC-MS with intra-injector derivatisation and CC-MS with pre-injection derivatisation, were developed, optimised and validated. A comparative discussion of the advantages/disadvantages of the methods suggests a strategy for their preferential use, that is essentially a function of the matrix complexity.

  16. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    1982-08-12

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a microcolumn liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit is claimed. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  17. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same…

  18. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  19. Bioengineering of bacteria to assemble custom-made polyester affinity resins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Iain D; Du, Jinping; Burr, Natalie; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2015-01-01

    Proof of concept for the in vivo bacterial production of a polyester resin displaying various customizable affinity protein binding domains is provided. This was achieved by engineering various protein binding domains into a bacterial polyester-synthesizing enzyme. Affinity binding domains based on various structural folds and derived from molecular libraries were used to demonstrate the potential of this technique. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), engineered OB-fold domains (OBodies), and VHH domains from camelid antibodies (nanobodies) were employed. The respective resins were produced in a single bacterial fermentation step, and a simple purification protocol was developed. Purified resins were suitable for most lab-scale affinity chromatography purposes. All of the affinity domains tested produced polyester beads with specific affinity for the target protein. The binding capacity of these affinity resins ranged from 90 to 600 nmol of protein per wet gram of polyester affinity resin, enabling purification of a recombinant protein target from a complex bacterial cell lysate up to a purity level of 96% in one step. The polyester resin was efficiently produced by conventional lab-scale shake flask fermentation, resulting in bacteria accumulating up to 55% of their cellular dry weight as polyester. A further proof of concept demonstrating the practicality of this technique was obtained through the intracellular coproduction of a specific affinity resin and its target. This enables in vivo binding and purification of the coproduced "target protein." Overall, this study provides evidence for the use of molecular engineering of polyester synthases toward the microbial production of specific bioseparation resins implementing previously selected binding domains.

  20. Bioengineering of Bacteria To Assemble Custom-Made Polyester Affinity Resins

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Iain D.; Du, Jinping; Burr, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Proof of concept for the in vivo bacterial production of a polyester resin displaying various customizable affinity protein binding domains is provided. This was achieved by engineering various protein binding domains into a bacterial polyester-synthesizing enzyme. Affinity binding domains based on various structural folds and derived from molecular libraries were used to demonstrate the potential of this technique. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), engineered OB-fold domains (OBodies), and VHH domains from camelid antibodies (nanobodies) were employed. The respective resins were produced in a single bacterial fermentation step, and a simple purification protocol was developed. Purified resins were suitable for most lab-scale affinity chromatography purposes. All of the affinity domains tested produced polyester beads with specific affinity for the target protein. The binding capacity of these affinity resins ranged from 90 to 600 nmol of protein per wet gram of polyester affinity resin, enabling purification of a recombinant protein target from a complex bacterial cell lysate up to a purity level of 96% in one step. The polyester resin was efficiently produced by conventional lab-scale shake flask fermentation, resulting in bacteria accumulating up to 55% of their cellular dry weight as polyester. A further proof of concept demonstrating the practicality of this technique was obtained through the intracellular coproduction of a specific affinity resin and its target. This enables in vivo binding and purification of the coproduced “target protein.” Overall, this study provides evidence for the use of molecular engineering of polyester synthases toward the microbial production of specific bioseparation resins implementing previously selected binding domains. PMID:25344238

  1. The chromatographic behaviour of wasp venom kinin, kallidin and bradykinin.

    PubMed

    MATHIAS, A P; SCHACHTER, M

    1958-09-01

    Wasp venom kinin which has hitherto appeared to be homogeneous can be resolved by ionexchange chromatography into a single major and two minor components. These are indistinguishable by their action on smooth muscle and by their rapid inactivation by chymotrypsin. All three components of wasp kinin are chromatographically different from kallidin or bradykinin. The close similarity of the latter compounds is confirmed by their identical behaviour on an ion-exchange resin.

  2. Can enantiomers be separated in achiral chromatographic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davankov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Consideration of chromatography of a nonracemic mixture on an achiral sorbent from a stereochemical point of view allows the claim that partial separation of the excess enantiomer zone from the racemate zone is possible only with analytes capable of self-associating under the conditions of the chromatographic column. It is from these positions that features of this process can be explained and conditions for its maximal proceeding formulated.

  3. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Thin-Layer Chromatographic Applications.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Claudia; Kutzscher, Christel; Drache, Franziska; Helten, Stella; Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan

    2017-01-25

    Preparation of thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) plates based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as porous stationary phases is described. DUT-67 (DUT = Dresden University of Technology), a zirconium based MOF, was used in combination with a fluorescent indicator as stationary phase for analyzing a small selection of a wide spectrum of relevant analytes. The successful separation of benzaldehyde from trans-cinnamaldehyde and 4-aminophenol from 2-aminotoluene is reported as a model system using optimized eluent mixtures containing acetic acid.

  4. Affine coherent states and Toeplitz operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutníková, Mária; Hutník, Ondrej

    2012-06-01

    We study a parameterized family of Toeplitz operators in the context of affine coherent states based on the Calderón reproducing formula (= resolution of unity on L_2( {R})) and the specific admissible wavelets (= affine coherent states in L_2( {R})) related to Laguerre functions. Symbols of such Calderón-Toeplitz operators as individual coordinates of the affine group (= upper half-plane with the hyperbolic geometry) are considered. In this case, a certain class of pseudo-differential operators, their properties and their operator algebras are investigated. As a result of this study, the Fredholm symbol algebras of the Calderón-Toeplitz operator algebras for these particular cases of symbols are described. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  5. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  6. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  7. Prediction of pesticides chromatographic lipophilicity from the computational molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Casoni, Dorina; Petre, Jana; David, Victor; Sârbu, Costel

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship models were developed for the prediction of pesticides and some PAH compounds lipophilicity based on a wide set of computational molecular descriptors and a set of experimental chromatographic data. The chromatographic lipophilicity of pesticides has been evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using different chemically bonded (C18, C8, CN and Phenyl HPLC columns) stationary phases and two different organic modifiers (methanol and acetonitrile, respectively) in the mobile phase composition. Through a systematic study, by using the classic multivariate analysis, several quantitative structure-property/lipophilicity multi-dimensional models were established. Multiple linear regression and genetic algorithm for the variable subset selection were used. The internal and external statistical evaluation procedures revealed some appropriate models for the chromatographic lipophilicity prediction of pesticides. Moreover, the statistical parameters of regression and those obtained by applying t-test for the intercept (a(0)) and for the slope (a(1)) in order to evaluate relationship between experimental and predicted octanol-water partition coefficients in case of the test set compounds, revealed two statistically valid models that can be successfully used in lipophilicity prediction of pesticides.

  8. Use of Affinity Diagrams as Instructional Tools in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselden, Polly G.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how the affinity diagram, a tool for gathering information and organizing it into natural groupings, can be used in inclusive classrooms. It discusses how students can be taught to use an affinity diagram, how affinity diagrams can be used to reflect many voices, and how affinity diagrams can be used to plan class projects.…

  9. The affinity of magnetic microspheres for Schistosoma eggs.

    PubMed

    Candido, Renata R F; Favero, Vivian; Duke, Mary; Karl, Stephan; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Woodward, Robert C; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Jones, Malcolm K; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease of humans, with two species primarily causing the intestinal infection: Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Traditionally, diagnosis of schistosomiasis is achieved through direct visualisation of eggs in faeces using techniques that lack the sensitivity required to detect all infections, especially in areas of low endemicity. A recently developed method termed Helmintex™ is a very sensitive technique for detection of Schistosoma eggs and exhibits 100% sensitivity at 1.3 eggs per gram of faeces, enough to detect even low-level infections. The Helminthex™ method is based on the interaction of magnetic microspheres and schistosome eggs. Further understanding the underlying egg-microsphere interactions would enable a targeted optimisation of egg-particle binding and may thus enable a significant improvement of the Helmintex™ method and diagnostic sensitivity in areas with low infection rates. We investigated the magnetic properties of S. mansoni and S. japonicum eggs and their interactions with microspheres with different magnetic properties and surface functionalization. Eggs of both species exhibited higher binding affinity to the magnetic microspheres than the non-magnetic microspheres. Binding efficiency was further enhanced if the particles were coated with streptavidin. Schistosoma japonicum eggs bound more microspheres compared with S. mansoni. However, distinct differences within eggs of each species were also observed when the distribution of the number of microspheres bound per egg was modelled with double Poisson distributions. Using this approach, both S. japonicum and S. mansoni eggs fell into two groups, one having greater affinity for magnetic microspheres than the other, indicating that not all eggs of a species exhibit the same binding affinity. Our observations suggest that interaction between the microspheres and eggs is more likely to be related to surface charge-based electrostatic

  10. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  11. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  12. On the electron affinity of B2

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vanda A.; Taylor, Peter

    2009-02-02

    We present the results of high-level ab initio calculations on the electron affinity of B2. Our new best estimate of 1.93±0.03 eV is in agreement with previous calculations as well as the sole existing experimental estimate of 1.8 eV, as derived from quantities with an uncertainty of 0.4 eV. The electron affinity of atomic boron, which is much smaller, is also calculated for comparison, and again found to be in good agreement with experiment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  14. Evidence of multi-affinity in the Japanese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    Fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (Tokyo Stock Price Index: TOPIX) are analyzed using a multi-affine analysis method. In the research to date, only some simulated self-affine models have shown multi-affinity. In most experiments using observations of self-affine fractal profiles, multi-affinity has not been found. However, we find evidence of multi-affinity in fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (TOPIX). The qth-order Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. This multi-affinity indicates that there are plural mechanisms that affect the same time scale as stock market price fluctuation dynamics.

  15. A review on creatinine measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr; Ganbari, Ahmad

    2012-08-15

    This paper reviews the entire recent global tendency for creatinine measurement. Creatinine biosensors involve complex relationships between biology and micro-mechatronics to which the blood is subjected. Comparison between new and old methods shows that new techniques (e.g. Molecular Imprinted Polymers based algorithms) are better than old methods (e.g. Elisa) in terms of stability and linear range. All methods and their details for serum, plasma, urine and blood samples are surveyed. They are categorized into five main algorithms: optical, electrochemical, impedometrical, Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistor (ISFET) based technique and chromatography. Response time, detection limit, linear range and selectivity of reported sensors are discussed. Potentiometric measurement technique has the lowest response time of 4-10 s and the lowest detection limit of 0.28 nmol L(-1) belongs to chromatographic technique. Comparison between various techniques of measurements indicates that the best selectivity belongs to MIP based and chromatographic techniques.

  16. Gas chromatographic investigation of volatile nitrogen containing bases of Antarctic krill Euphausia superba Dana.

    PubMed

    Svetlova, N I; Golovnya, R V; Zhuravleva, I L; Grigorieva, D N; Samusenko, A L

    1985-01-01

    The composition of the volatile nitrogen-containing bases of fresh-caught Antarctic krill E. superba has been investigated by gas chromatography. The analysis was carried out on three packed columns with Apiezon L, Triton X-305, PEG-1000 and one glass capillary column with Triton X-305. The components were identified by standardless gas chromatographic method with a special computer program. No less than 63 compounds have been found and 54 compounds have been identified, among these primary, secondary and tertiary aliphatic amines as well as heterocyclic bases. The presence of 5 compounds has been confirmed by GC/MS technique. Analysis with the help of a specific flame-photometric detector has shown the presence of 9 bi-functional nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  17. Evaluation of the separation performance of polyvinylpyrrolidone as a virtual stationary phase for chromatographic NMR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaohua; Wu, Rui; Bai, Zhengwu; Yang, Ying; Li, Suying; Dou, Xiaowei

    2014-09-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used as a virtual stationary phase to separate p-xylene, benzyl alcohol, and p-methylphenol by the chromatographic NMR technique. The effects of concentration and weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of PVP, solvent viscosity, solvent polarity, and sample temperature on the resolution of these components were investigated. It was found that both higher PVP concentration and higher PVP Mw caused the increase of diffusion resolution for the three components. Moreover, the diffusion resolution did not change at viscosity-higher solvents. Moreover, the three components showed different resolution at different solvents. As temperature increased, the diffusion resolution between p-xylene and benzyl alcohol gradually increased, and the one between p-xylene and p-methylphenol slightly increased from 278 to 298 K and then decreased above 298 K. It was also found that the polarity of the analytes played an important role for the separation by affecting the diffusion coefficient.

  18. Correlation of the "EMIT" antiepileptic drug assay with a gas liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M; Raisys, V A

    1976-02-01

    Many methodologies have been developed for determining anticonvulsant drug levels in human serum. Unfortunately, most procedures are either time consuming or subject to a variety of interferring substances. The "Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique" (EMIT) system has been evaluated for its speed, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. When compared with a gas-liquid chromatographic procedure, the EMIT assay appeared to yield results which were statistically comparable for the drugs diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbital, and primidone. The EMIT assay also demonstrated no significant interference when challenged with extraordinarily high levels of potentially cross reacting drugs. Results obtained with the EMIT assay correlated well with GLC data and rank it as an attractive alternative to many of the existing procedures now being used.

  19. Current Applications of Chromatographic Methods in the Study of Human Body Fluids for Diagnosing Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jóźwik, Jagoda; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, analysis of various human body fluids is one of the most essential and promising approaches to enable the discovery of biomarkers or pathophysiological mechanisms for disorders and diseases. Analysis of these fluids is challenging due to their complex composition and unique characteristics. Development of new analytical methods in this field has made it possible to analyze body fluids with higher selectivity, sensitivity, and precision. The composition and concentration of analytes in body fluids are most often determined by chromatography-based techniques. There is no doubt that proper use of knowledge that comes from a better understanding of the role of body fluids requires the cooperation of scientists of diverse specializations, including analytical chemists, biologists, and physicians. This article summarizes current knowledge about the application of different chromatographic methods in analyses of a wide range of compounds in human body fluids in order to diagnose certain diseases and disorders.

  20. Chromatographic separation of vanadium, tungsten and molybdenum with a liquid anion-exchanger.

    PubMed

    Fritz, J S; Topping, J J

    1971-09-01

    In acidic solution only molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), vanadium(V), niobium(V) and tantalum(V) form stable, anionic complexes with dilute hydrogen peroxide. This fact has been used in developing an analytical method of separating molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI) and vanadium(V) from other metal ions and from each other. Preliminary investigations using reversed-phase paper chromatography and solvent extraction led to a reversed-phase column Chromatographic separation technique. These metal-peroxy anions are retained by a column containing a liquid anion-exchanger (General Mills Aliquat 336) in a solid support. Then molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI) and vanadium(V) are selectively eluted with aqueous solutions containing dilute hydrogen peroxide and varying concentrations of sulphuric acid.

  1. The current practice in the application of chemometrics for correlation of sensory and gas chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Vene, Kristel; Koppel, Kadri

    2016-11-01

    A lot of research has been conducted in correlating the sensory properties of food with different analytical measurements in recent years. Various statistical methods have been used in order to get the most reliable results and to create prediction models with high statistical performance. The current review summarises the latest practices in the field of correlating attributes from sensory analysis with volatile data obtained by gas chromatographic analysis. The review includes the origin of the data, different pre-processing and variable selection methods and finally statistical methods of analysis and validation. Partial least squares regression analysis appears as the most commonly used statistical method in the area. The main shortcomings were identified in the steps of pre-processing, variable selection and also validation of models that have not gained enough attention. As the association between volatiles and sensory perception is often nonlinear, future studies should test the application of different nonlinear techniques.

  2. Gas chromatographic method for measuring nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacetyl nitrate in air without compressed gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Maniga, N.I.; Stedman, D.H.; Paur, R.J.

    1988-04-15

    A gas chromatographic technique that measures atmospheric concentrations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO/sub 2/ has been developed that uses luminol-based chemiluminescence for detection. The carrier gas is air that has been scrubbed by passing it over FeSO/sub 4/, which eliminates the need for any compressed gas cylinders. A novel gas sampling system and time enable variable sample volumes of contaminated air to be injected. Ambient PAN and NO/sub 2/ measurements can be made every 40 s with detection limits of 0.12 ppb for PAN and 0.2 ppb for NO/sub 2/. Seven other atmospheric species, including ozone, gave no interference. Linear response was observed for NO/sub 2/ from 0.2 to 170 ppb and for PAN from 1 to 70 ppb.

  3. Bio-sample preparation and gas chromatographic determination of benzodiazepines--a review.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Samanidou, Victoria F; Papadoyannis, Ioannis N

    2013-08-01

    Benzodiazepines have become commonly prescribed medicines worldwide in the therapy of anxiety, sleep disorders and convulsive attacks because they are relatively safe, with mild side effects. The availability of rapid, sensitive and selective analytical methods is essential for the determination of these drugs in clinical and forensic cases. Benzodiazepines are usually present at trace levels (μg/mL or ng/mL) in a complex biological matrix, and the potentially interfering compounds need to be removed before analysis. Therefore, a sample preparation technique is often mandatory, both to extract the drugs of interest from the matrices and to increase their concentration. An extended and comprehensive review is presented herein, focusing on bio-sample preparation (pretreatment, extraction and derivatization) and gas chromatographic methods applied for the quantification of 1,4-benzodiazepines.

  4. Polydimethylsiloxane: a general matrix for high-performance chromatographic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaohua; Gao, Jun; Wu, Rui; Li, Shengying; Bai, Zhengwu

    2014-10-20

    The detection and structural characterization of the components of a mixture is a challenging task. Therefore, the development of a facile and general method that enables both the separation and the structural characterization of the components is desired. Diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY) with the aid of a matrix is a promising tool for this purpose. However, because the currently existing matrices only separate limited components, the application of the DOSY technique is restricted. Herein we introduce a new versatile matrix, poly(dimethylsiloxane), which can fully separate many mixtures of different structural types by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. With poly(dimethylsiloxane), liquid-state chromatographic NMR spectroscopy could become a general approach for the structural elucidation of mixtures of compounds.

  5. On modality and complexity of affine embeddings

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    2001-08-31

    Let G be a reductive algebraic group and let H be a reductive subgroup of G. The modality of a G-variety X is the largest number of the parameters in a continuous family of G-orbits in X. A precise formula for the maximum value of the modality over all affine embeddings of the homogeneous space G/H is obtained.

  6. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  7. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  8. Stabilization of the Motion of Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, E. A.; Martynyuk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient conditions for the stability of a nonlinear affine system subject to interval initial conditions are established. These conditions are based on new estimates of the norms of the solutions of the systems of perturbed equations of motion. This stabilization method is used to analyze an electromechanical system with permanent magnet

  9. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  10. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  11. Design and Performance of a Gas Chromatograph for Automatic Monitoring of Pollutants in Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalobos, R.; Stevens, D.; LeBlanc, R.; Braun, L.

    1971-01-01

    In recent years, interest in air pollution constituents has focused on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as prime components of polluted air. Instrumental methods have been developed, and commercial instruments for continuous monitoring of these components have been available for a number of years. For the measurement of carbon monoxide, non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy has been the accepted tool, in spite of its marginal sensitivity at low parts-per-million levels. For continuously monitoring total hydrocarbons, the hydrogen flame ionization analyzer has been widely accepted as the preferred method. The inadequacy of this latter method became evident when it was concluded that methane is non-reactive and cannot be considered a contaminant even though present at over 1 ppm in the earth's atmosphere. Hence, the need for measuring methane separately became apparent as a means of measuring the reactive and potentially harmful non-methane hydrocarbons fraction. A gas chromatographic method for the measurement of methane and total hydrocarbons which met these requirements has been developed. In this technique, methane was separated on conventional gas chromatographic columns and detected by a hydrogen flame ionization detector (FID) while the total hydrocarbons were obtained by introducing a second sample directly into the FID without separating the various components. The reactive, or non-methane hydrocarbons, were determined by difference. Carbon monoxide was also measured after converting to methane over a heated catalyst to render it detectable by the FID. The development of this method made it possible to perform these measurements with a sensitivity of as much as 1 ppm full scale and a minimum detectability of 20 ppb. Incorporating this technique, criteria were developed by APCO for a second generation continuous automatic instrument for atmospheric monitoring stations.

  12. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-08

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals.

  13. Integrating computational methods and experimental data for understanding the recognition mechanism and binding affinity of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Yugandhar, K

    2017-01-07

    Protein-protein interactions perform several functions inside the cell. Understanding the recognition mechanism and binding affinity of protein-protein complexes is a challenging problem in experimental and computational biology. In this review, we focus on two aspects (i) understanding the recognition mechanism and (ii) predicting the binding affinity. The first part deals with computational techniques for identifying the binding site residues and the contribution of important interactions for understanding the recognition mechanism of protein-protein complexes in comparison with experimental observations. The second part is devoted to the methods developed for discriminating high and low affinity complexes, and predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes using three-dimensional structural information and just from the amino acid sequence. The overall view enhances our understanding of the integration of experimental data and computational methods, recognition mechanism of protein-protein complexes and the binding affinity.

  14. Purification and affinity labeling of dihydropyridine receptor from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanngiesser, U.; Nalik, P.; Pongs, O.

    1988-05-01

    Undegraded dihydropyridine (DHP)-receptor (putatively a voltage-gated Ca/sup 2 +/ channel) has been purified as a 340-kDa protein complex to approx.80% homogeneity (2.4 nmol of DHP-receptor per mg of protein) from rabbit skeletal muscle by a rapid purification protocol. Transverse-tubule membranes were prepared in high yield by Ribi-press treatment. The DHP-receptor complex was solubilized in 1% digitonin followed by a two step-chromatographic purification procedure. The equilibrium dissociation constant of (/sup 3/H) (+) -PN200-110 binding (K/sub d/; 0.9 nM) was not significantly changed by solubilization or purification. The purified DHP-receptor is composed of two subunits with apparent molecular masses of 148 kDa and 195 kDa migrating in polyacrylamide gels under nonreducing conditions as a single moiety of approx.300 kDa. The 195-kDa subunit was affinity-labeled with (/sup 3/H)azidopine in both transverse-tubule membranes and purified DHP-receptor preparations. The subunit can be degraded by high-energy irradiation to a 26-kDa peptide and by proteolysis to a 32-kDa peptide. Thus, it is probably due to proteolytic cleavage and/or photolysis that neither purification nor affinity-labeling studies have previously identified a DHP-receptor subunit of comparable molecular mass (195 kDa).

  15. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography in open-loop simulated moving bed technology: purification of a heat stable histidine tagged beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Deepti; Andersson, Jonatan; Mattiasson, Bo

    2009-06-01

    Open-loop simulated moving bed (SMB) has been used for immobilized metal affinity chromatographic (IMAC) purification of his-tagged beta-glucosidase expressed in E. coli. A simplified approach based on an optimized single column protocol is used to design the open-loop SMB. A set of columns in the SMB represent one step in the chromatographic cycle i.e. there will be one set each of columns for load, wash, elution etc within the SMB. Only the wash and elution are operated with columns in sequence. The beta-glucosidase was purified to almost single band purity with a purification factor of 15 and a recovery of 91%. SMB-performance showed reduced buffer consumption, higher purification fold, a better yield and higher productivity.

  16. Surface affinity role in graphoepitaxy of lamellar block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claveau, Guillaume; Quemere, Patrick; Argoud, Maxime; Hazart, Jerome; Barros, Patricia Pimenta; Sarrazin, Aurelien; Posseme, Nicolas; Tiron, Raluca; Chevalier, Xavier; Nicolet, Celia; Navarro, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Overcoming the optical limitations of 193-nm immersion lithography can be achieved using directed self-assembly (DSA) of block-copolymers (BCPs) as a low-cost and versatile complementary technique. The goal of this paper is to investigate the potential of DSA to address line and space (L/S) high-resolution patterning by performing the density multiplication of lines with the graphoepitaxy approach. As surface affinity is a key parameter in self-assembly, three variations, or "flavors," of DSA template affinity are investigated regarding several success criteria such as morphology control or defectivity. More precisely, both the methodology to register DSA defects and the impact of process parameters on defectivity are detailed. Using the 300-mm pilot line available in LETI and Arkema's advanced materials, we investigate process optimization of DSA line/space patterning of a 38-nm period lamellar PS-b-PMMA BCP (L38). Our integration scheme is based on BCP self-assembly inside organic hard mask guiding patterns obtained using 193i-nm lithography. Defect analysis coupled with the fine tuning of process parameters (annealing, brush material) provided the optimum conditions for the L38 self-assembly. Using such conditions, DSA using the three affinity flavors is investigated by means of SEM top-view and cross-section review. Lithographic performances of one selected flavor are then evaluated with the comparison of process windows function of either commensurability, morphology, or roughness. This work is meant as a guideline for the graphoepitaxy optimization of materials and process parameters on a 300-mm platform.

  17. Rotating annular chromatograph for continuous metal separations and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. By continuously introducing the feed material to be separated at a stationary point at the top of the bed and eluent everywhere else around the annulus, elution chromatography occurs. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence, the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effect of annulus width and diameter has recently been studied using the same device with a 50.8-mm-wide annulus and another 0.6-m-long chromatograph with an 89-mm diameter and annulus widths of 6.4, 12.7, and 22.2 mm. These columns have been constructed of Plexiglas and typically operate at a gauge pressure of 175 kPa. To further study the effect of size and pressure, a new 445-mm-diam by 1-m-long column with a 31.8-mm-wide annulus has been fabricated. Its metal construction allows preparative-scale operation with a wide variety of liquids at pressures to 1.3 MPa. Three metal recovery systems have been explored: (1) separation of iron and aluminum in ammonium sulfate-sulfuric acid solutions; (2) separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions; and (3) the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt in ammonium carbonate solutions. This last system simulates the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. It has been studied, using similar conditions, on each of the chromatographs, and the results demonstrate the effect of column dimensions on the quality and quantity of the separation. 8 figures, 1 table.

  18. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  19. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of benzalkonium and naphazoline or tetrahydrozoline in nasal and ophthalmic solutions.

    PubMed

    Santoni, G; Medica, A; Gratteri, P; Furlanetto, S; Pinzauti, S

    1994-11-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of benzalkonium chloride homologues and naphazoline nitrate or tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride in ophthalmic and nasal solutions. The technique involves a one-step dilution (1:5) for sample preparation and direct injection onto a 5 mm RP C-8 column. The mobile phase is acetonitrile-diluted acetic acid (80:20, v/v) with 6 mM tetramethylammonium bromide. Detection is carried out at 260 nm with a diode array. The method is rapid, specific, reproducible and is especially useful for quality control procedures.

  1. Liquid chromatographic determination of pyrantel tartrate in medicated formulations.

    PubMed

    Konrardy, Joyce A; Burner, Mary A; Garner, Tommy W; Litchman, Mark A; Webster, Gregory K

    2003-01-01

    The validation of a novel liquid chromatographic (LC) method for the determination of pyrantel tartrate in feed is presented. The method provides a significant improvement over the efficiency and precision of AOAC Official Method 978.30. The method was shown to be accurate, precise, linear, and robust for medicated articles. Unlike the official method, the LC method was shown to be a superior stability-indicating method. After the method was validated by using laboratory blends, the effectiveness of the method was demonstrated with marketed product as well.

  2. Cation exchange chromatographic elution and separation of rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, V.P.; Khopkar, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The systematic cation exchange chromatographic separation of rubidium on Dowex 50W-X8 was carried out with mineral acids and their salts as eluants.A selectivity scale for various eluants in terms of the elution constant was devised. Rubidium was separated from a large number of elements in binary mixtures by the process of gradient or selective elutions or selective sorption. The noteworthy feature of the method is the sequential separation of rubidium from alkali as well as alkaline earth elements.

  3. Evaluation of Gas Chromatographic Methods for Analysis of Gasoline/Oxygenate Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    determination of various oxygenated compounds in gasoline by gas chromotography have been developed.(3-6) These include gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the...ID-Ai33 0i6 EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS i/t OF GASOLINE/OXYGEN.. (U) SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST SAN ANTONIO TX ARMY FUELS...0 EVALUATION OF GAS -CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE/OXYGENATE BLENDS INTERIM REPORT

  4. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  5. Validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of ketorolac tromethamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Belal, T S; El-Kafrawy, D S; Mahrous, M S; Abdel-Khalek, M M; Abo-Gharam, A H

    2016-07-01

    This work describes five simple and reliable spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for analysis of the binary mixture of ketorolac tromethamine (KTR) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). Method I is based on the use of conventional Amax and derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where KTR was determined using its Amax and (1)D amplitudes at 323 and 341nm respectively, while PHE was determined by measuring the (1)D amplitudes at 248.5nm. Method II involves the application of the ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry. For KTR, 12μg/mL PHE was used as a divisor and the (1)DD amplitudes at 265nm were plotted against KTR concentrations; while - by using 4μg/mL KTR as divisor - the (1)DD amplitudes at 243.5nm were found proportional to PHE concentrations. Method III depends on ratio-difference measurement where the peak to trough amplitudes between 260 and 284nm were measured and correlated to KTR concentration. Similarly, the peak to trough amplitudes between 235 and 260nm in the PHE ratio spectra were recorded. For method IV, the two compounds were separated using Merck HPTLC sheets of silica gel 60 F254 and a mobile phase composed of chloroform/methanol/ammonia (70:30:2, by volume) followed by densitometric measurement of KTR and PHE spots at 320 and 278nm respectively. Method V depends on HPLC-DAD. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using Zorbax eclipse plus C8 column (4.6×250mm, 5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05M o-phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (50:50, by volume) at a flow rate 1mL/min and detection at 313 and 274nm for KTR and PHE respectively. Analytical performance of the developed methods was statistically validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, detection and quantification limits. The validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of KTR and PHE in synthetic mixtures

  6. Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Kumar, Ashok; Sundström, Heléne; Ledung, Erika; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-03-23

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices.

  7. [Preparation and evaluation of pepsin affinity organic polymer capillary monolithic column].

    PubMed

    Chi, Cuijie; Wang, Wei; Ji, Yibing

    2014-08-01

    The protein modified monolithic column in affinity capillary electrochromatography (CEC) has attracted considerable attention over the past decades because of its great enantioseparation ability. A porous polymethacrylate ester-based capillary monolithic column poly (glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) (poly (GMA-co-EDMA)) was prepared by in situ co-polymerization. The process was initiated thermally by azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN). The polymerization mixture contained GMA as the function monomer and EDMA as the crosslinking agent with 1,4-butanediol and 1-propanol as the binary porogen solvent. Under the optimized reaction conditions, including the proportion of monomer and porogens, reaction temperature etc, the column exhibited a uniform structure, sufficient permeability and excel- lent pressure resistance. The separation of alkyl benzenes on the column was mainly based on typical reversed-phase chromatographic retention mechanism. The reproducibility and stability were good with RSDs less than 9. 0%. A pepsin functionalized organic polymer monolith was prepared by covalently bonded pepsin to poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monolith with glutaraldehyde as a spacer based on the activity of epoxide group. The enantioseparation performance of the pepsin affinity monolith for basic enantiomers has been investigated by CEC. Nefopam, amlodipine, citalopram and chlorpheniramine were resolved, and baseline separations of nefopam, amlodipine, citalopram were achieved. The influences of pH, operating voltage, temperature and sample quantity used on the chiral separation were studied. The chiral recognition mechanism of enantiomers on the monolithic column in CEC is discussed. This work developed a new method for the prepataion and application of protein affinity monolith in CEC.

  8. Negative affinity X-ray photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Duckett, S.

    1974-01-01

    A new X-ray image intensifier is described. The device should eventually have a quantum efficiency which is an order of magnitude greater than that of presently available high spatial resolution X-ray detectors, such as microchannel plates. The new intesifier is based upon a GaAs crystal photocathode which is activated to achieve negative electron affinity. Details concerning the detector concept are discussed together with the theoretical relations involved, X-ray data, and optical data.

  9. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  10. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  11. Iminobiotin affinity columns and their application to retrieval of streptavidin.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, K; Wood, S W; Brinton, C C; Montibeller, J A; Finn, F M

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for the retrieval of streptavidin from the culture broth of Streptomyces avidinii. The key step in this procedure is the adsorption of streptavidin from culture concentrates to an affinity column in which iminobiotin is attached to AH-Sepharose 4B. This column binds streptavbidin at pH 11 and releases the protein at pH 4. The recovery of streptavidin is practically quantitative. The pH dependence of the iminobiotin-avidin affinity, discovered by Green [Green, N. M. (1966) Biochem. J. 101, 774-779], has thus found practical application. The streptavidin bound 4.07 +/- 0.02 mol of [14C]biotin per mol and was essentially homogeneous as judged by disc and slab gel electrophoresis. Streptavidin was extensively succinoylated without loss of biotin-binding capacity. The observations that 125I-labeled streptavidin and 125I-labeled succinoylstreptavidin are retained by iminobiotin-AH-Sepharose 4B columns at pH 7.5 and are eluted at pH 4.0 provides a convenient purification method for these iodinated proteins. The technique employed for the retrieval of streptavidin is generally applicable to the isolation of iminobiotinylated molecules. PMID:6933515

  12. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  13. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  14. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture.

  15. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  16. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium.

  17. Gas chromatographic retention characteristics of phenols with Superox-20M

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.M.; Li, N.C.

    1982-08-01

    The gas chromatographic retention characteristics of a variety of underivatized phenols have been studied by using Superox-20M coated on fused silica. The relative retention times of thes compounds were measured at 160, 150, and 140/sup 0/C in order to determine the effect of operating temperature on relative retention. This information is used to predict relative retention times of phenols for which we had no standards. The linear temperature-programmed retention indexes of the solutes were measured. The retention of phenols on this phase is a function of the compounds vapor pressure, its ability to hydrogen bond with the stationary phase, and the strengths of those hydrogen bonds. These properties are in turn governed by steric, inductive, and resonance effects of the substituents. Linear free-energy relations between the logarithm of the ratio of the activity coefficients of phenol to substituted phenol (calculated from relative retention data) and the chromatographic substituent constant, sigma/sub c/, have been determined for some phenols on Superox-20M. Lastly, it was shown by nuclear magnetic resonance experiments that Superox-20M is apparently a poly(ethylene glycol) (also called a polyoxiran or poly(ethylene oxide)). 5 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Thin layer chromatographic determination of deoxynivalenol in processed grain products.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, M W; Flood, M T; Page, S W

    1986-01-01

    The thin layer chromatographic (TLC) method of Trucksess et al. (J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem. (1984) 67, 40-43) was modified for the determination of deoxynivalenol (DON) in high-sugar breakfast cereals, corn syrup, and beer. Celite was added to the substrate before extraction with acetonitrile-water (84 + 16). After filtration through an alumina-charcoal-Celite (0.5 + 0.7 + 0.3) column, the filtrate was evaporated to dryness and redissolved in water, which was passed through an octylsilyl reverse phase column. DON was eluted with anhydrous ethyl ether. The residue remaining after the eluate was evaporated to dryness was dissolved in CHCl3-acetonitrile (4 + 1) and chromatographed on AlCl3-impregnated silica gel TLC plates. The blue fluorescent DON spot was quantitated fluorodensitometrically after the TLC plate was heated at 120 degrees C for 7 min. Recoveries of DON added to breakfast cereals at 100, 200, and 400 ng/g levels and to syrup and beer at 50, 100, and 200 ng/g levels averaged 86%. The limit of determination in these products was about 50 ng/g.

  19. A discontinuous Galerkin method to solve chromatographic models.

    PubMed

    Javeed, Shumaila; Qamar, Shamsul; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Warnecke, Gerald

    2011-10-07

    This article proposes a discontinuous Galerkin method for solving model equations describing isothermal non-reactive and reactive chromatography. The models contain a system of convection-diffusion-reaction partial differential equations with dominated convective terms. The suggested method has capability to capture sharp discontinuities and narrow peaks of the elution profiles. The accuracy of the method can be improved by introducing additional nodes in the same solution element and, hence, avoids the expansion of mesh stencils normally encountered in the high order finite volume schemes. Thus, the method can be uniformly applied up to boundary cells without loosing accuracy. The method is robust and well suited for large-scale time-dependent simulations of chromatographic processes where accuracy is highly demanding. Several test problems of isothermal non-reactive and reactive chromatographic processes are presented. The results of the current method are validated against flux-limiting finite volume schemes. The numerical results verify the efficiency and accuracy of the investigated method. The proposed scheme gives more resolved solutions than the high resolution finite volume schemes.

  20. Development and validation of a high performance chromatographic method for determining sumatriptan in niosomes.

    PubMed

    Cózar-Bernal, M J; Rabasco, A M; González-Rodríguez, M L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel, precise, specific, accurate and rapid reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed, optimized and validated for determining sumatriptan succinate in niosomes with the best chromatographic peak resolution, reduced run time and low cost of analysis. The formulation has been previously optimized in terms of composition and preparation technique to obtain a high drug encapsulation efficiency and adequate vesicle size distribution. This method showed the best resolution by using Spherisorb OSD2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) using phosphate buffer (0.05 M):acetonitrile (80:20, v/v; pH adjusted to 6.0) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and wavelength of 214 nm. The main objective of this research was to demonstrate the robustness of the reversed-phase HPLC method development by applying the Taguchi robust methodology. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) was employed as a quality measurement. This tool permits to establish the influence of some selected factors (acetonitrile:phosphate ratio, pH buffer, oven temperature and flow rate) on two responses (peak areas and retention time). On the basis of the results obtained, we can conclude that this analytical method was robust for all the factors studies, as exception of the flow rate, where the higher quality was obtained for the fewer values (0.8 mL/min). Therefore, this parameter must be carefully controlled when this method was employed, to avoid any modification in the peak areas overall.

  1. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  2. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J R

    1989-03-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  3. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  4. Genetic affinities of Ukrainians from the maternal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnov, Andrey; Balanovsky, Oleg; Utevska, Olga; Metspalu, Ene; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Agdzhoyan, Anastasia; Churnosov, Mikhail; Atramentova, Lyubov; Balanovska, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The area of what is now the Ukraine has been the arena of large-scale demographic processes that may have left their traces in the contemporary gene pool of Ukrainians. In this study, we present new mitochondrial DNA data for 607 Ukrainians (hypervariable segment I sequences and coding region polymorphisms). To study the maternal affinities of Ukrainians at the level of separate mitochondrial haplotypes, we apply an original technique, the haplotype co-occurrence analysis. About 20% of the Ukrainian maternal gene pool is represented by lineages highly specific to Ukrainians, but is scarcely found in other populations. About 9% of Ukrainian mtDNA lineages are typical for peoples of the Volga region. We also identified minor gene pool strata (1.6-3.3%), each of which is common in Lithuanians, Estonians, Saami, Nenets, Cornish, and the populations of the North Caucasus.

  5. DNA aptamer affinity ligands for highly selective purification of human plasma-related proteins from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    Forier, Cynthia; Boschetti, Egisto; Ouhammouch, Mohamed; Cibiel, Agnès; Ducongé, Frédéric; Nogré, Michel; Tellier, Michel; Bataille, Damien; Bihoreau, Nicolas; Santambien, Patrick; Chtourou, Sami; Perret, Gérald

    2017-03-17

    Nucleic acid aptamers are promising ligands for analytical and preparative-scale affinity chromatography applications. However, a full industrial exploitation requires that aptamer-grafted chromatography media provide a number of high technical standards that remained largely untested. Ideally, they should exhibit relatively high binding capacity associated to a very high degree of specificity. In addition, they must be highly resistant to harsh cleaning/sanitization conditions, as well as to prolonged and repeated exposure to biological environment. Here, we present practical examples of aptamer affinity chromatography for the purification of three human therapeutic proteins from various sources: Factor VII, Factor H and Factor IX. In a single chromatographic step, three DNA aptamer ligands enabled the efficient purification of their target protein, with an unprecedented degree of selectivity (from 0.5% to 98% of purity in one step). Furthermore, these aptamers demonstrated a high stability under harsh sanitization conditions (100h soaking in 1M NaOH). These results pave the way toward a wider adoption of aptamer-based affinity ligands in the industrial-scale purification of not only plasma-derived proteins but also of any other protein in general.

  6. Integrin avidity regulation: are changes in affinity and conformation underemphasized?

    PubMed

    Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-10-01

    Integrins play critical roles in development, wound healing, immunity and cancer. Central to their function is their unique ability to modulate dynamically their adhesiveness through both affinity- and valency-based mechanisms. Recent advances have shed light on the structural basis for affinity regulation and on the signaling mechanisms responsible for both affinity and valency modes of regulation.

  7. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  8. Cross-linked leucaena seed gum matrix: an affinity chromatography tool for galactose-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Seshagirirao, Kottapalli; Leelavathi, Chaganti; Sasidhar, Vemula

    2005-05-31

    A cross-linked leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala) seed gum (CLLSG) matrix was prepared for the isolation of galactose-specific lectins by affinity chromatography. The matrix was evaluated for affinity with a known galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of snake gourd (Trichosanthes anguina). The matrix preparation was simple and inexpensive when compared to commercial galactose-specific matrices (i.e. about 1.5 US dollars/100 ml of matrix). The current method is also useful for the demonstration of the affinity chromatography technique in laboratories. Since leucaena seeds are abundant and inexpensive, and the matrix preparation is easy, CLLSG appears to be a promising tool for the separation of galactose-specific lectins.

  9. Assessment of speciation techniques including the application of photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, J.; Gehmecker, H.; Edelstein, N.

    1985-08-01

    This document describes laboratory experiments that compare chromatographic and spectroscopic methods for rapidly characterizing ionic species in detail. These techniques were tested on various radioactive ion systems to develop a rapid, accurate approach to site characterization for use with Remedial Action Programs. Promising techniques were evaluated. 9 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Review of UV spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrophoretic methods for the cholinesterase reactivating antidote pralidoxime (2-PAM).

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pralidoxime (2-PAM) belongs to the class of monopyridinium oximes with reactivating potency on cholinesterases inhibited by phosphylating organophosphorus compounds (OPC), for example, pesticides and nerve agents. 2-PAM represents an established antidote for the therapy of anticholinesterase poisoning since the late 1950s. Quite high therapeutic concentrations in human plasma (about 13 µg/ml) lead to concentrations in urine being about 100 times higher allowing the use of less sensitive analytical techniques that were used especially in the early years after 2-PAM was introduced. In this time (mid-1950s until the end of the 1970s) 2-PAM was most often analyzed by either paper chromatography or simple UV spectroscopic techniques omitting any sample separation step. These methods were displaced completely after the establishment of column liquid chromatography in the early 1980s. Since then, diverse techniques including cation exchange, size-exclusion, reversed-phase, and ligand-exchange chromatography have been introduced. Today, the most popular method for 2-PAM quantification is ion pair chromatography often combined with UV detection representing more than 50% of all column chromatographic procedures published. Furthermore, electrophoretic approaches by paper and capillary zone electrophoresis have been successfully used but are seldom applied. This review provides a commentary and exhaustive summary of analytical techniques applied to detect 2-PAM in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples to characterize stability and pharmacokinetics as well as decomposition and biotransformation products. Separation techniques as well as diverse detectors are discussed in appropriate detail allowing comparison of individual preferences and limitations. In addition, novel data on mass spectrometric fragmentation of 2-PAM are provided.

  11. Scope of partial least-squares regression applied to the enantiomeric composition determination of ketoprofen from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Padró, Juan M; Osorio-Grisales, Jaiver; Arancibia, Juan A; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Castells, Cecilia B

    2015-07-01

    Valuable quantitative information could be obtained from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles of two enantiomers by using proper chemometric methods. Complete separation profiles where the peaks are fully resolved are difficult to achieve in chiral separation methods, and this becomes a particularly severe problem in case that the analyst needs to measure the chiral purity, i.e., when one of the enantiomers is present in the sample in very low concentrations. In this report, we explore the scope of a multivariate chemometric technique based on unfolded partial least-squares regression, as a mathematical tool to solve this quite frequent difficulty. This technique was applied to obtain quantitative results from partially overlapped chromatographic profiles of R- and S-ketoprofen, with different values of enantioresolution factors (from 0.81 down to less than 0.2 resolution units), and also at several different S:R enantiomeric ratios. Enantiomeric purity below 1% was determined with excellent precision even from almost completely overlapped signals. All these assays were tested on the most demanding condition, i.e., when the minor peak elutes immediately after the main peak. The results were validated using univariate calibration of completely resolved profiles and the method applied to the determination of enantiomeric purity of commercial pharmaceuticals.

  12. A review of chromatographic methods for the determination of water- and fat-soluble vitamins in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Karaźniewicz-Łada, Marta; Główka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vitamins are an essential element of nutrition and thus contribute to human health. Vitamins catalyze many biochemical reactions and their lack or excess can cause health problems. Therefore, monitoring vitamin concentrations in plasma or other biological fluids may be useful in the diagnosis of various disorders as well as in the treatment process. Several chromatographic methods have been developed for the determination of these compounds in biological samples, including high-performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection. Recently, high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods have been widely used for the determination of vitamins in complex matrices because of their high sensitivity and selectivity. This method requires preconditioning of samples for analysis, including protein precipitation and/or various extraction techniques. The choice of method may depend on the desired cost, convenience, turnaround time, specificity, and accuracy of the information to be obtained. This article reviews the recently reported chromatographic methods used for determination of vitamins in biological fluids. Relevant papers published mostly during the last 5 years were identified by an extensive PubMed search using appropriate keywords. Particular attention was given to the preparation steps and extraction techniques. This report may be helpful in the selection of procedures that are appropriate for certain types of biological materials and analytes.

  13. Doxylamine: a cause for false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Schaldenbrand, J D; McClatchey, K D; Patel, J A; Muilenberg, M J

    1981-01-01

    A 25-year-old white woman ingested an unknown quantity of doxylamine succinate and flurazepam. Urine immunoassay screen (EMIT-dau) was positive for benzodiazopine and negative for phencyclidine. Subsequent gas chromatographic assay of the urine revealed a markedly positive assay for phencyclidine. Doxylamine was ultimately found to be the cause for the false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

  14. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  15. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  16. On the electron affinity of Be2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the electron affinity (EA) of Be2 using a large Slater-type orbital basis set and extensive correlation based upon a CASSCF reference are reported. The adiabatic EAs are estimated to be 0.44 eV for the 2Sigma sub g(+) state and 0.56 eV for the 2Pi sub u state. The extra electron attaches into an empty bonding orbital, causing a shortening of the bond length and an increase in omega(e). The D(e) of the 2Pi sub u state of Be2 is six times as large as the D(e) of Be2.

  17. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  18. Characterization of Atypical Off-Flavor Compounds in Natural Cork Stoppers by Multidimensional Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Slabizki, Petra; Fischer, Claus; Legrum, Charlotte; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2015-09-09

    Natural cork stoppers with sensory deviations other than the typical cork taint were subgrouped according to their sensory descriptions and compared with unaffected control cork stoppers. The assessment of purge and trap extracts obtained from corresponding cork soaks was performed by heart-cut multidimensional gas chromatography-olfactometry (MDGC-O). The identification of compounds responsible for atypical cork taint detected in MDGC-O was further supported with additional multidimensional GC analysis in combination with mass spectrometric detection. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol were mainly found in cork stoppers described as moldy and cellarlike; 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine were found in cork stoppers described with green attributes. Across all cork subgroups, the impact compound for typical cork taint, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), was present and is therefore a good marker for cork taint in general. Another potent aroma compound, 3,5-dimethyl-2-methoxypyrazine (MDMP), was also detected in each subgroup, obviously playing an important role with regard to the atypical cork taint. Sensory deviations possibly affecting the wine could be generated by MDMP and its presence should thus be monitored in routine quality control.

  19. Differentiation of degrees of ripeness of Catuai and Tipica green coffee by chromatographical and statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smrke, Samo; Kroslakova, Ivana; Gloess, Alexia N; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2015-05-01

    The quality of green coffee is influenced by the degree of ripeness of the fruit at harvest. The aim of this study was to identify chemical markers differentiating between degrees of ripeness. Two coffee varieties, Catuai and Tipica, from the same farm were analysed using the following parameters and methods: caffeine and chlorogenic acid content using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), sucrose content using hydrophilic interaction chromatography, high-molecular weight fraction (HMW) using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and volatile compounds using headspace solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The best method for differentiating between degrees of ripeness was found to be principal component analysis (PCA) based on HPLC data. HPSEC showed differences in the HMW fraction for different degrees of ripeness and both coffee varieties. Volatile profiles allowed separation of both varieties; yet, except for ripe Catuai, no separation was achieved for the degree of ripeness.

  20. Combined analysis of the root bark oil of Cleistopholis glauca by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ouattar, Zana A; Boti, Jean Brice; Ahibo, Coffy Antoine; Tomi, Félix; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2013-12-01

    The composition of root bark oil from Cleistopholis glauca Pierre ex Engler & Diels growing wild in Ivory Coast was investigated by GC (in combination with retention indices) and "3C NMR spectroscopy after partition o f hydrocarbons a nd oxygenated compounds on silica g el. Thirty-one compounds havebeen identified. C. glauca produces a sesquiterpene-rich oil, patchoulenone (33.5%), cyperene (9.5%) and germacrene D (6.6%) being the main components. Special attention was paid to the identification and quantification ofgermacrene C (a heat-sensitive compound) and &-elemene, which were achieved by a combination of GC(FID) and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The composition of C. glauca root bark and leaf oils differed drastically.

  1. ANALYSIS OF DISSOLVED METHANE, ETHANE, AND ETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER BY A STANDARD GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of dissolved gases such as methane, ethane, and ethylene in ground water is important in determining whether intrinsic bioremediation is occurring in a fuel- or solvent-contaminated aquifer. A simple procedure is described for the collection and subsequent analys...

  2. Different Stability-Indicating Chromatographic Techniques for the Determination of Netobimin

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Nesrin K.; Mohamed, Afaf O.; Shawky, Sara E.; Salem, Maissa Y.

    2012-01-01

    Two simple, accurate, and sensitive methods were developed for the determination of netobimin in the presence of its degradation product. Method (A) was an HPLC method, performed on C18 column using acetonitrile/methanol/0.01 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate (56 : 14 : 30 by volume) as a mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed at 254 nm. Method (B) was a TLC method, using silica gel 60 F254 plates; the optimized mobile phase was toluene/methanol/chloroform/ammonium hydroxide (5 : 4 : 6 : 0.1 by volume). The spots were scanned densitometrically at 346 nm. Linearity ranges were 1–10 μg/mL for method (A) and 0.5–5 μg/band for method (B), and the mean percentage recoveries were 99.3 ± 0.7% and 99.7 ± 0.7% for methods (A) and (B), respectively. The proposed methods were found to be specific for netobimin in the presence of up to 90% of its degradation product. Statistical comparison between the results obtained by these methods and the manufacturer method was done, and no significance difference was obtained. PMID:22567566

  3. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  4. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Model-based design of peptide chromatographic purification processes.

    PubMed

    Gétaz, David; Stroehlein, Guido; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-04-05

    In this work we present a general procedure for the model-based optimization of a polypeptide crude mixture purification process through its application to a case of industrial relevance. This is done to show how much modeling can be beneficial to optimize complex chromatographic processes in the industrial environment. The target peptide elution profile was modeled with a two sites adsorption equilibrium isotherm exhibiting two inflection points. The variation of the isotherm parameters with the modifier concentration was accounted for. The adsorption isotherm parameters of the target peptide were obtained by the inverse method. The elution of the impurities was approximated by lumping them into pseudo-impurities and by regressing their adsorption isotherm parameters directly as a function of the corresponding parameters of the target peptide. After model calibration and validation by comparison with suitable experimental data, Pareto optimizations of the process were carried out so as to select the optimal batch process.

  6. Chromatographic hydrophobicity index: pH profile for polyprotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-11-06

    The Chromatographic Hydrophobicity Index (CHI) has been measured for several diprotic compounds. In order to model the variation of CHI with pH, a general equation for polyprotic compounds which allows the calculation of CHI for each one of the species has been proposed. Different types of diprotic solutes have been selected: neutral acids, neutral bases, and amphiprotic compounds (non-zwitterionic and zwitterionic). The applicability of the model to these complex polyprotic compounds, its advantages and limitations, as well as the information provided by the fits is discussed. In general, the model fits the experimental behaviour of all kind of solutes very well, obtaining the higher hydrophobicity values for the neutral form of the compounds, except for the zwitterionic phenylalanine. The equation and parameters obtained allow an easy calculation of CHI of the compound at any pH value.

  7. Chromatographic evaluation of the toxicity in fish of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Saldaña, José María; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Medina-Hernández, María José; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa María; Sagrado, Salvador

    2005-01-05

    Ecotoxicity assessment is essential before placing new chemical substances on the market. An investigation of the use of the chromatographic retention (log k) in biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) as an in vitro approach to evaluate the toxicity in fish of pesticides (acute toxicity levels as pLC(50)) is proposed. A heterogeneous data set of 85 pesticides from six chemical families with available experimental fish toxicity data (ECOTOX database from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)) was used. For pesticides exhibiting non-polar narcosis mechanism in fish (non-specific toxicity), more reliable models and precise pLC(50) estimations are obtained from log k (quantitative retention-activity relationships, QRAR) than from log P (quantitative structure-activity relationships, QSAR) or ECOSAR (ECOSAR program from U.S. EPA).

  8. Chromatographic separation of neodymium isotopes by using chemical exchange process.

    PubMed

    Ismail, I M; Ibrahim, M; Aly, H F; Nomura, M; Fujii, Y

    2011-05-20

    The neodymium isotope effects were investigated in Nd-malate ligand exchange system using the highly porous cation exchange resin SQS-6. The temperature of the chromatographic columns was kept constant at 50°C by temperature controlled water passed through the columns jackets. The separation coefficient of neodymium isotopes, ɛ's, was calculated from the isotopic ratios precisely measured by means of an ICP mass spectrometer equipped with nine collectors as ion detectors. The separation coefficient, ɛ×10(5), were calculated and found to be 1.4, 4.8, 5.4, 10.6, 16.8 and 20.2 for (143)Nd, (144)Nd, (145)Nd, (146)Nd, (148)Nd and (150)Nd, respectively.

  9. Mathematical model for multicomponent separations on the continuous annular chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Bratzler, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    A model for multicomponent separations on ion exchange columns has been adapted for use in studying the performance of the continuous annular chromatograph. The model accurately predicts solute peak positions in the column effluent and qualitatively predicts trends in solute effluent resolution as a function of increasing bandwidth of the solute feed pulse. The major virtues of the model are its simplicity in terms of the calculations involved and the fact that it incorporates the nonlinear solute-resin binding isotherms common in many ion exchange separations. Because dispersion effects are not accounted for in the model, discrepancies exist between the shapes of the effluent peaks predicted by the model and those determined experimentally.

  10. The gas chromatographic resolution of DL-isovaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Van Dort, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Isovaline is of cosmological interest because it is one of the 12 non-protein amino acids which have been isolated from the Murchison meteorite, and unlike the other chiral amino acids in this meteorite, it has no alpha-hydrogen at its asymmetric center and hence cannot racemize by the customary alpha-hydrogen-dependent mechanisms which engender racemization in ordinary amino acids. Experiments were conducted in which a .01 M solution of N-TFA-DL-isovalyl-L-leucine isopropyl ester in nitromethane was injected into the capillary column of a gas chromatograph coupled to a digital electronic integrator-recorder. Efflux times and integrated peak area percents are shown next to each diastereometer peak.

  11. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

    2009-03-24

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

  12. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Amnesic Shellfish Poison in Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2000-10-01

    A simple, rapid, high-performance liquid chromatographic experiment suitable for undergraduate students is described for determining amnesic shellfish poison in mussels. The poison itself is an unusual naturally occurring amino acid, domoic acid, that has been found in seafood, particularly shellfish, worldwide. The symptoms of poisoning include amnesia (memory loss), loss of balance, mental confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and in extreme cases death. The domoic acid is extracted from homogenized mussel tissue by boiling in water for 5 minutes. The homogenate is cooled and centrifuged, and an aliquot of the supernatant is diluted and analyzed by isocratic HPLC using a C18 column and an acetonitrile-water mobile phase at pH 2.5 with UV detection at 242 nm.

  13. Allyl-silica Hybrid Monoliths For Chromatographic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjuan

    Column technology continues to be the most investigated topics in the separation world, since the column is the place where the chromatographic separation happens, making it the heart of the separation system. Allyl-silica hybrid monolithic material has been exploited as support material and potential stationary phases for liquid chromatography; the stationary phase anchored to the silica surface by Si-C bond, which is more pH stable than traditional stationary phase. First, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the sol in the synthesis of allyl-silica hybrid monoliths. Allyl-trimethoxysilane (allyl-TrMOS), dimethyldimethoxysilane (DMDMOS) and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) have been served as co-precursors in the sol-gel synthesis of organo-silica hybrid monolithic columns for liquid chromatography (LC). 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were employed to monitor reaction profiles for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and initial condensation reactions of the individual precursor and the hybrid system. 29Si-NMR has also been used to identify different silane species formed during the reactions. The overall hydrolysis rate has been found to follow the trend DMDMOS > allyl-TrMOS > TMOS, if each precursor is reacted individually (homo-polymerization). Precursors show different hydrolysis rate when reacted together in the hybrid system than they are reacted individually. Cross-condensation products of TMOS and DMDMOS (QD) arise about 10 minutes of initiation of the reaction. The allyl-silica monolithic columns for capillary liquid chromatography can only be prepared in capillaries with 50 im internal diameter with acceptable performance. One of the most prominent problems related to the synthesis of silica monolithic structures is the volume shrinkage. The synthesis of allylfunctionalized silica hybrid monolithic structures has been studied in an attempt to reduce the volume shrinkage during aging, drying and heat treatment

  14. Gas chromatographic determination of sulphur compounds in town gas.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Y; Iida, Y

    1977-04-11

    The gas chromatographic (GC) determination of the sulphur compounds in town gas (in the Nagoya area) was studied by using a flame-photometric detector (FPD) and the cold-trap method with liquid oxygen. The column packings used were 25% TCEP on Shimalite (AW, DMCS), 25% TCP on Shimalite (AW, DMCS), 10% PPE on Shimalite TPA, Porapak Q and silica gel. The major components identified were carbonyl sulphide, hydrogen sulphide, carbon disulphide, thiophene and tetrahydrothiophene (THT). The identities of thiophene and THT were also confirmed by GC combined with the use of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The average concentrations and standard deviations of thiophene and THT were 8.8 +/- 1.8and 124 +/- 35 ng per 0.051, respectively. The latter value corresponds to 0.7 ppm, which is relatively high for the concentration of an odorant.

  15. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios.

  16. Soil chromatographic movement of technetium-99 through selected Minnesota soils

    SciTech Connect

    Balogh, J.C.; Grigal, D.F.

    1980-11-01

    We monitored the movement of technetium-99 through 41 samples of Minnesota soils, using soil column layer chromatography (CLC), a modification of soil thin layer chromatography. Under the aerobic conditions of soil CLC, /sup 99/Tc occurs as the pertechnetate anion. Pertechnetate movement in the soils was characterized by the traditional R/sub f/ chromatographic parameter. Reduced R/sub f/ values were statistically related to elevated levels of soil organic matter. Complexation of /sup 99/Tc, related to soil organic matter, was weak. Elution patterns of /sup 99/Tc in the soil CLC columns were asymmetric, with pertechnetate retardation associated with both hydrodynamic dispersion and weak retention. Pertechnetate was less mobile than was Cl/sup -/ in selected soils by soil CLC.

  17. Improved Chromatographic Separation of Sitagliptin Phosphate and Metformin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Moataz S.

    2015-01-01

    New UPLC method was developed for determination of sitagliptin and metformin using Symmetry C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) and isocratic elution (methanol 20%), pH (3.5) as a mobile phase. The ultraviolet detector was operated at 220 nm and the column temperature was 50°C. Linearity parameters were acceptable over the concentration ranges of 2-12 μgml-1 and 5-35 μgml-1 for sitagliptin and metformin, respectively. The variables were premeditated to adjust the chromatographic conditions using design of experiment. The proposed method was proved to be accurate for the quality control of the mentioned drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:26759536

  18. Understanding and design of existing and future chromatographic support formats.

    PubMed

    Billen, J; Desmet, G

    2007-10-19

    The present contribution reviews the use of alternative support formats as a means to surpass the chromatographic performance of the packed bed of spheres. First, a number of idealized structures are considered to obtain a general insight in how the performance of a chromatographic support depends on its shape and size, using the isocratic peak-capacity generation speed as the main performance indicator. Using this criterion, it is found that the packing density or, equivalently, the external porosity, is the most important of all geometrical shape factors. Depending on whether the sample consists of weakly or strongly retained components, the optimal external porosity can be expected to vary between 60% and a value near 100%. The optimal exploitation of a high external porosity, however, also requires overall shrinkage of the domain size, towards and into the sub-micron range. With the current fabrication technologies, this requirement seems difficult to achieve. In the presence of a lower limit on the characteristic support size, each range of desired plate numbers or peak capacities has its own optimal external porosity, ranging from a very low value (high packing density) for high speed, small peak capacity applications, to very high external porosities (low packing density) for applications requiring a very large peak capacity. Subsequently, the obtained theoretical insights are used to review and discuss the past and current research on alternative support formats. Finally, a number of emerging micro- and nano-fabrication technologies are introduced and their potential for the future production of supports with improved shape and homogeneity is discussed.

  19. Liquid chromatographic method for determining the concentration of bisazir in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholefield, Ronald J.; Slaght, Karen S.; Allen, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Barrier dams, traps, and lampricides are the techniques currently used by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission to control sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes. To augment these control techniques, a sterile-male-release research program was initiated at the Lake Huron Biological Station. Male sea lampreys were sterilized by intraperitoneal injection of the chemical sterilant P,P-bis(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic amide (bisazir). An analytical method was needed to quantitate the concentration of bisazir in water and to routinely verify that bisazir (>25 μg/L) does not persist in the treated effluent discharged from the sterilization facility to Lake Huron. A rapid, accurate, and sensitive liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for determining bisazir in water. Bisazir was dissolved in Lake Huron water; extracted and concentrated on a C18 solid-phase extraction column; eluted with methanol; and quantitated by reversed-phase LC using a C18 column, a mobile phase of 70% water and 30% methanol (v/v), and UV detection (205 nm). Bisazir retention time was 7-8 min; total run time was about 20 min. Method detection limit for bisazir dissolved in Lake Huron water was about 15 μg/L. Recovery from Lake Huron water fortified with bisazir at 100 μg/L was 94% (95% confidence interval, 90.2-98.2%).

  20. Extraction of haemoglobin from human blood by affinity precipitation using a haptoglobin-based stimuli-responsive affinity macroligand.

    PubMed

    Stocker-Majd, Gisela; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-06-13

    Affinity precipitation was compared to affinity chromatography and batch adsorption as the final purification step in a protocol for the isolation of haemoglobin from human blood. Haptoglobin was the affinity ligand. The first steps on the process were realized by traditional methods (lyses of red blood cells followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation). For affinity chromatography (and batch adsorption) the ligand was linked to Sepharose, for affinity precipitation to a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Five haptoglobin-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bioconjugates (affinity macroligands) were constructed with different polymer: haptoglobin-coupling ratios. Conjugation of haptoglobin to the soluble poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) apparently does not change the interaction thermodynamics with haemoglobin, as the haemoglobin binding constants calculated by a Scatchard analysis for the affinity macroligand were of the same order of magnitude as those described in the literature for the haemoglobin-haptoglobin complex in solution. Two elution protocols were used for haemoglobin release from the various affinity materials, one at pH 2, the other with 5 M urea at pH 11. Both affinity chromatography and affinity precipitation yielded a pure haemoglobin of high quality. Compared to the affinity chromatography, affinity precipitation showed a significantly higher ligand efficiency (ratio of the experimental capacity to the theoretical one). The method thus makes better use of the expensive affinity ligands. As affinity precipitation only requires small temperature changes to bring about precipitation/redissolution of the affinity complexes and a centrifugation step for recovery of the precipitate, the method in addition has advantages in term of scalability and simplicity.

  1. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  2. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  3. Affinity-based target deconvolution of safranal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Affinity-based target deconvolution is an emerging method for the identification of interactions between drugs/drug candidates and cellular proteins, and helps to predict potential activities and side effects of a given compound. In the present study, we hypothesized that a part of safranal pharmacological effects, one of the major constituent of Crocus sativus L., relies on its physical interaction with target proteins. Methods Affinity chromatography solid support was prepared by covalent attachment of safranal to agarose beads. After passing tissue lysate through the column, safranal-bound proteins were isolated and separated on SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot software. Results and major conclusion Data showed that safranal physically binds to beta actin, cytochrome b-c1 complex sub-unit 1, trifunctional enzyme sub-unit beta and ATP synthase sub-unit alpha and beta. These interactions may explain part of safranal’s pharmacological effects. However, phenotypic and/or biological relevance of these interactions remains to be elucidated by future pharmacological studies. PMID:23514587

  4. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  5. An automated multidimensional preparative gas chromatographic system for isolation and enrichment of trace amounts of xenon from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Larson, Tuula; Östman, Conny; Colmsjö, Anders

    2011-04-01

    The monitoring of radioactive xenon isotopes is one of the principal methods for the detection of nuclear explosions in order to identify clandestine nuclear testing. In this work, a miniaturized, multiple-oven, six-column, preparative gas chromatograph was constructed in order to isolate trace quantities of radioactive xenon isotopes from ambient air, utilizing nitrogen as the carrier gas. The multidimensional chromatograph comprised preparative stainless steel columns packed with molecular sieves, activated carbon, and synthetic carbon adsorbents (e.g., Anasorb®-747 and Carbosphere®). A combination of purification techniques--ambient adsorption, thermal desorption, back-flushing, thermal focusing, and heart cutting--was selectively optimized to produce a well-defined xenon peak that facilitated reproducible heart cutting and accurate quantification. The chromatographic purification of a sample requires approximately 4 h and provides complete separation of xenon from potentially interfering components (such as water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, and radon) with recovery and accuracy close to 100%. The preparative enrichment process isolates and concentrates a highly purified xenon gas fraction that is suitable for subsequent ultra-low-level γ-, ß/γ-spectroscopic or high-resolution mass spectrometric measurement (e.g., to monitor the gaseous fission products of nuclear explosions at remote locations). The Xenon Processing Unit is a free-standing, relatively lightweight, and transportable system that can be interfaced to a variety of sampling and detection systems. It has a relatively inexpensive, rugged, and compact modular (19-inch rack) design that provides easy access to all parts for maintenance and has a low power requirement.

  6. Multiplexed Affinity-Based Separation of Proteins and Cells Using Inertial Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aniruddh; Hou, Han Wei; Mahan, Alison. E.; Han, Jongyoon; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of low abundance proteins or rare cells from complex mixtures, such as blood, is required for many diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications. Current affinity-based protein or cell separation methods use binary ‘bind-elute’ separations and are inefficient when applied to the isolation of multiple low-abundance proteins or cell types. We present a method for rapid and multiplexed, yet inexpensive, affinity-based isolation of both proteins and cells, using a size-coded mixture of multiple affinity-capture microbeads and an inertial microfluidic particle sorter device. In a single binding step, different targets–cells or proteins–bind to beads of different sizes, which are then sorted by flowing them through a spiral microfluidic channel. This technique performs continuous-flow, high throughput affinity-separation of milligram-scale protein samples or millions of cells in minutes after binding. We demonstrate the simultaneous isolation of multiple antibodies from serum and multiple cell types from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or whole blood. We use the technique to isolate low abundance antibodies specific to different HIV antigens and rare HIV-specific cells from blood obtained from HIV+ patients. PMID:27026280

  7. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  8. Determination of Sinomenine in Cubosome Nanoparticles by HPLC Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanfang; Guo, Chunlian; Chen, Hongying; Zhang, Yudai; Peng, Xinsheng; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We applied HPLC technique to quantitatively analyze sinomenine in cubosome nanoparticles. The chromatographic method was performed by using an isocratic system. The mobile phase was composed of methanol-PBS(pH6.8)-triethylamine (50 : 50 : 0.1%) with a flow rate of 1 mL/min; the detection wavelength was at 265 nm. Sinomenine can be successfully separated with good linearity (the regression equation is A = 10835C + 1058; R2 = 1.0) and perfect recovery (102.2%). The chromatograph technique was proper for quality control of sinomenine in cubosome nanoparticles. PMID:25734024

  9. Improving the productivity of a multidimensional chromatographic preparative system by collecting pure chemicals after each of three chromatographic dimensions.

    PubMed

    Sciarrone, Danilo; Pantò, Sebastiano; Donato, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-12-02

    The enhanced sample collection capability of a heart-cutting three-dimensional GC-prep system is reported. In its original configuration, a highly pure component can be usually collected after the last (3D) column outlet by means of a dedicated preparative station. The latter is located after the last chromatographic column, and this poses the requirement for multiple heart cuts even for those components showing satisfactory degree of purity after the first (or second) separation dimension. The feasibility to collect pure components after each chromatographic dimension is here described, employing a three-dimension MDGC system equipped with high-temperature valves, located inside the first and second GC ovens, with the aim to improve the productivity of the collection procedure. In addition to a commercial preparative collector located at the 3D outlet, two laboratory-made collection systems were applied in the first and second dimension, reached by the effluent to be collected trough a high-temperature valve switching the heart-cut fraction between either the detector (FID), or the collector. Highly pure sesquiterpene components were collected, namely: patchouli alcohol after the first column [poly(5% diphenyl/95% dimethylsiloxane)], α-bulnesene after a second column coated with high molecular weight polyethylene glycol, and α-guaiene after an ionic-liquid based column (SLB-IL60), used as the third dimension. Purity levels ranging from 85 to 95% were achieved with an average collection recovery of 90% (n=5). The following average amounts were collected per run: 160μg for α-guaiene, 295μg for α-bulnesene, and 496μg for patchouli alcohol.

  10. Liquid chromatographic determination of benzocaine and N-acetylbenzocaine in the edible fillet tissue from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Stehly, G.R.; Hubert, T.D.; Bernardy, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A method was developed for determining benzocaine and N-acetylbenzocaine concentrations in fillet tissue of rainbow trout. The method involves extracting the analytes with acetonitrile, removing lipids or hydrophobic compounds from the extract with hexane, and providing additional clean-up with solid-phase extraction techniques. Analyte concentrations are determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic techniques with an isocratic mobile phase and UV detection. The accuracy (range, 92 to 121%), precision (R.S.D., <14%), and sensitivity (method quantitation limit, <24 ng/g) for each analyte indicate the usefulness of this method for studies characterizing the depletion of benzocaine residues from fish exposed to benzocaine. Copyright (C) 1999.

  11. Multivariate curve resolution of incomplete fused multiset data from chromatographic and spectrophotometric analyses for drug photostability studies.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Michele; Ragno, Gaetano; Ioele, Giuseppina; Tauler, Romà

    2014-07-21

    An advanced and powerful chemometric approach is proposed for the analysis of incomplete multiset data obtained by fusion of hyphenated liquid chromatographic DAD/MS data with UV spectrophotometric data from acid-base titration and kinetic degradation experiments. Column- and row-wise augmented data blocks were combined and simultaneously processed by means of a new version of the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, including the simultaneous analysis of incomplete multiset data from different instrumental techniques. The proposed procedure was applied to the detailed study of the kinetic photodegradation process of the amiloride (AML) drug. All chemical species involved in the degradation and equilibrium reactions were resolved and the pH dependent kinetic pathway described.

  12. Parallel development of chromatographic and mass-spectrometric methods for quantitative analysis of glycation on an IgG1 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Viski, Kornél; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Lenkey, Krisztián; Baranyáné Ganzler, Katalin

    2016-10-01

    Monitoring post-translational modifications (PTMs) in biotherapeutics is of paramount importance. In pharmaceutical industry, chromatography with optical detection is the standard choice of quantitation of product related impurities; and mass spectrometry is used only for characterization. Parallel development of a boronate affinity chromatographic (BAC) and a mass spectrometric methods for quantitative measurement of glycation on a monoclonal antibody (mAb) shed light on the importance of certain characteristics of the individual methods. Non-specific interactions in BAC has to be suppressed with the so-called shielding reagent. We have found that excessive amount of shielding reagents in the chromatographic solvents may cause significant underestimation of glycation. Although contamination of the retained peak with the non-glycated isoforms in BAC is unavoidable, our work shows that it can be characterized and quantitated by mass spectrometry. It has been demonstrated that glycation can be measured by mass spectrometry at the intact protein level with an LOQ value of 3.0% and error bar of ±0.5%. The BAC and MS methods have been found to provide equivalent results. These methods have not been compared from these points of view before.

  13. Development of Chromatographic Fingerprints of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali) Roots Using Online Solid Phase Extraction-Liquid Chromatography (SPE-LC).

    PubMed

    Zaini, Nor Nasriah; Osman, Rozita; Juahir, Hafizan; Saim, Norashikin

    2016-04-30

    E. longifolia is attracting interest due to its pharmacological properties and pro-vitality effects. In this study, an online SPE-LC approach using polystyrene divinyl benzene (PSDVB) and C18 columns was developed in obtaining chromatographic fingerprints of E. longifolia. E. longifolia root samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) technique prior to online SPE-LC. The effects of mobile phase compositions and column switching time on the chromatographic fingerprint were optimized. Validation of the developed method was studied based on eurycomanone. Linearity was in the range of 5 to 50 µg∙mL(-1) (r² = 0.997) with 3.2% relative standard deviation of peak area. The developed method was used to analyze 14 E. longifolia root samples and 10 products (capsules). Selected chemometric techniques: cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the fingerprint datasets of 37 selected peaks to evaluate the ability of the chromatographic fingerprint in classifying quality of E. longifolia. Three groups were obtained using CA. DA yielded 100% correlation coefficient with 19 discriminant compounds. Using PCA, E. longifolia root samples were clearly discriminated from the products. This study showed that the developed online SPE-LC method was able to provide comprehensive evaluation of E. longifolia samples for quality control purposes.

  14. Multivariate curve resolution based chromatographic peak alignment combined with parallel factor analysis to exploit second-order advantage in complex chromatographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Akvan, Nadia

    2014-03-13

    In the present contribution, a new combination of multivariate curve resolution-correlation optimized warping (MCR-COW) with trilinear parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) is developed to exploit second-order advantage in complex chromatographic measurements. In MCR-COW, the complexity of the chromatographic data is reduced by arranging the data in a column-wise augmented matrix, analyzing using MCR bilinear model and aligning the resolved elution profiles using COW in a component-wise manner. The aligned chromatographic data is then decomposed using trilinear model of PARAFAC in order to exploit pure chromatographic and spectroscopic information. The performance of this strategy is evaluated using simulated and real high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) datasets. The obtained results showed that the MCR-COW can efficiently correct elution time shifts of target compounds that are completely overlapped by coeluted interferences in complex chromatographic data. In addition, the PARAFAC analysis of aligned chromatographic data has the advantage of unique decomposition of overlapped chromatographic peaks to identify and quantify the target compounds in the presence of interferences. Finally, to confirm the reliability of the proposed strategy, the performance of the MCR-COW-PARAFAC is compared with the frequently used methods of PARAFAC, COW-PARAFAC, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), and MCR-COW-MCR. In general, in most of the cases the MCR-COW-PARAFAC showed an improvement in terms of lack of fit (LOF), relative error (RE) and spectral correlation coefficients in comparison to the PARAFAC, COW-PARAFAC, MCR-ALS and MCR-COW-MCR results.

  15. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  16. Predicting Adsorption Affinities of Small Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Chen, Ran; Poblete, Horacio; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-12-22

    Computational techniques have the potential to accelerate the design and optimization of nanomaterials for applications such as drug delivery and contaminant removal; however, the success of such techniques requires reliable models of nanomaterial surfaces as well as accurate descriptions of their interactions with relevant solutes. In the present work, we evaluate the ability of selected models of naked and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes to predict adsorption equilibrium constants for about 30 small aromatic compounds with a variety of functional groups. The equilibrium constants determined using molecular dynamics coupled with free-energy calculation techniques are directly compared to those derived from experimental measurements. The calculations are highly predictive of the relative adsorption affinities of the compounds, with excellent correlation (r ≥ 0.9) between calculated and measured values of the logarithm of the adsorption equilibrium constant. Moreover, the agreement in absolute terms is also reasonable, with average errors of less than one decade. We also explore possible effects of surface loading, although we demonstrate that they are negligible for the experimental conditions considered. Given the degree of reliability demonstrated, we move on to employing the in silico techniques in the design of nanomaterials, using the optimization of adsorption affinity for the herbacide atrazine as an example. Our simulations suggest that, compared to other modifications of graphenic carbon, polyvinylpyrrolidone conjugation gives the highest affinity for atrazine-substantially greater than that of graphenic carbon alone-and may be useful as a nanomaterial for delivery or sequestration of atrazine.

  17. [Investigation of a gas chromatographic column system for the on-line analysis of gaseous components in de-propane tower of pyrolysis equipment].

    PubMed

    Cai, H; Liu, L J; Yan, J; Lu, X; Ye, F; Xu, G W

    2000-03-01

    Multi-dimensional gas chromatograph has become an important process analyzer due to the advantages of high resolution and fast speed. According to the production requirement, a gas chromatographic column switching system has been investigated for the on-line analysis of gaseous components from high-pressure and lower-pressure de-propane towers of pyrolysis equipment. By using two different injection times on three injectors, and fore-flush and back-flush techniques, C2-hydrocarbons, propane, propene, methylacetylene, propadiene and C4-hydrocarbons can be separated on 7 columns in 7 minutes. The practical application showed the developed column system is suitable for the on-line monitoring of the production process.

  18. Inverse gas chromatographic method for measurement of interactions between soy protein isolate and selected flavor compounds under controlled relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiaoxuan; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2004-10-06

    An inverse gas chromatographic (IGC) method was developed to study the binding interactions between selected volatile flavor compounds and soy protein isolate (SPI) under controlled relative humidity (RH). Three volatile probes (hexane, 1-hexanol, and hexanal) at very low levels were used to evaluate and validate system performance. On the basis of the thermodynamic data and the isotherms measured at 0% RH, 1-hexanol and hexanal had higher binding affinities than hexane, which could be attributed to hydrogen-bonding interactions with SPI. At 30% RH, 1-hexanol and hexanal were retained less than at 0% RH, indicating possible competition for binding sites on the SPI surface between water and volatile probe molecules. Results showed that the thermodynamic data determined were comparable to the available literature values. Use of IGC allowed for the rapid and precise generation of sorption isotherms. Repeatability between replicate injections and reproducibility across columns were very good. IGC is a potentially high-throughput method for the sensitive, precise, and accurate measurement of flavor-ingredient interactions in low-moisture food systems.

  19. The affine cohomology spaces and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraj, Nizar Ben; Laraiedh, Ismail

    2016-12-01

    We compute the nth cohomology space of the affine Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) on the (1,1)-dimensional real superspace with coefficient in a large class of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-modules M. We apply our results to the module of weight densities and the module of linear differential operators acting on a superspace of weighted densities. This work is the generalization of a result by Basdouri et al. [The linear 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-invariant differential operators on weighted densities on the superspace ℝ1|n and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-relative cohomology, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 10 (2013), Article ID: 1320004, 9 pp.

  20. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  1. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  2. Affinity-based methods in drug-target discovery.

    PubMed

    Rylova, Gabriela; Ozdian, Tomas; Varanasi, Lakshman; Soural, Miroslav; Hlavac, Jan; Holub, Dusan; Dzubak, Petr; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Target discovery using the molecular approach, as opposed to the more traditional systems approach requires the study of the cellular or biological process underlying a condition or disease. The approaches that are employed by the "bench" scientist may be genetic, genomic or proteomic and each has its rightful place in the drug-target discovery process. Affinity-based proteomic techniques currently used in drug-discovery draw upon several disciplines, synthetic chemistry, cell-biology, biochemistry and mass spectrometry. An important component of such techniques is the probe that is specifically designed to pick out a protein or set of proteins from amongst the varied thousands in a cell lysate. A second component, that is just as important, is liquid-chromatography tandem massspectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS and the supporting theoretical framework has come of age and is the tool of choice for protein identification and quantification. These proteomic tools are critical to maintaining the drug-candidate supply, in the larger context of drug discovery.

  3. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  4. A Robust and Fully-Automated Chromatographic Method for the Quantitative Purification of Ca and Sr for Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. B.; Kim, H.; Romaniello, S. J.; Field, P.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    High throughput methods for sample purification are required to effectively exploit new opportunities in the study of non-traditional stable isotopes. Many geochemical isotopic studies would benefit from larger data sets, but these are often impractical with manual drip chromatography techniques, which can be time-consuming and demand the attention of skilled laboratory staff. Here we present a new, fully-automated single-column method suitable for the purification of both Ca and Sr for stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis. The method can accommodate a wide variety of sample types, including carbonates, bones, and teeth; silicate rocks and sediments; fresh and marine waters; and biological samples such as blood and urine. Protocols for these isotopic analyses are being developed for use on the new prepFAST-MCTM system from Elemental Scientific (ESI). The system is highly adaptable and processes up to 24-60 samples per day by reusing a single chromatographic column. Efficient column cleaning between samples and an all Teflon flow path ensures that sample carryover is maintained at the level of background laboratory blanks typical for manual drip chromatography. This method is part of a family of new fully-automated chromatographic methods being developed to address many different isotopic systems including B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb, and U. These methods are designed to be rugged and transferrable, and to allow the preparation of large, diverse sample sets via a highly repeatable process with minimal effort.

  5. Chromatographic separation and concentration of quercetin and (+)-catechin using mesoporous composites based on MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S. I.; Belanova, N. A.; Korabel'nikova, E. O.; Nedosekina, I. V.; Roessner, F.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Data on chromatographic separation of quercetin and (+)-catechin-flavonoids with similar physicochemical (including sorption) properties—are presented. The highest efficiency of chromatographic process at high sorption capacity of the material with respect to quercetin and slightly lower capacity for (+)-catechin were observed when silylated composites of ordered MCM-41 type materials were used. The application of acetonitrile as a solvent increased the sorption capacity of the material and can be recommended for separation of related polyphenol substances and their determination using ordered MCM-41 modified with trimethylchlorosilane as a stationary phase in a chromatographic column.

  6. Considerations on the temperature dependence of the gas-liquid chromatographic retention.

    PubMed

    González, Francisco Rex

    2002-01-04

    A discussion on the temperature dependence of the partition coefficient K is developed. This discussion embraces topics such as the limitations of conventional thermodynamic approaches followed in the chromatographic literature, qualitative theoretical notions arising from molecular thermodynamics and the experimental information that is accessible through modern capillary gas chromatography. It is shown that the heat capacity difference of solute transfer for flexible molecules has at least one maximum in the chromatographic range of temperature. As a consequence, a great amount of experimental data is required for a correct thermodynamic interpretation of the chromatographic retention.

  7. Gas purge microsyringe extraction for quantitative direct gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatile and semivolatile chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Piao, Xiangfan; Qiu, Jinxue; Wang, Xiaoping; Ren, Chunyan; Li, Donghao

    2011-03-25

    Sample pretreatment before chromatographic analysis is the most time consuming and error prone part of analytical procedures, yet it is a key factor in the final success of the analysis. A quantitative and fast liquid phase microextraction technique termed as gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE) has been developed for simultaneous direct gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of volatile and semivolatile chemicals without cleanup process. Use of a gas flowing system, temperature control and a conventional microsyringe greatly increased the surface area of the liquid phase micro solvent, and led to quantitative recoveries of both volatile and semivolatile chemicals within short extraction time of only 2 min. Recoveries of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and alkylphenols (APs) determined were 85-107%, and reproducibility was between 2.8% and 8.5%. In particular, the technique shows high sensitivity for semivolatile chemicals which is difficult to achieve in other sample pretreatment techniques such as headspace-liquid phase microextraction. The variables affecting extraction efficiency such as gas flow rate, extraction time, extracting solvent type, temperature of sample and extracting solvent were investigated. Finally, the technique was evaluated to determine PAHs, APs and OCPs from plant and soil samples. The experimental results demonstrated that the technique is economic, sensitive to both volatile and semivolatile chemicals, is fast, simple to operate, and allows quantitative extraction. On-site monitoring of volatile and semivolatile chemicals is now possible using this technique due to the simplification and speed of sample treatment.

  8. UPLC: a preeminent technique in pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Saini, Gautam; Nair, Anroop; Sharma, Rishbha

    2012-01-01

    The pharmaceutical companies today are driven to create novel and more efficient tools to discover, develop, deliver and monitor the drugs. In this contest the development of rapid chromatographic method is crucial for the analytical laboratories. In precedent decade, substantial technological advances have been done in enhancing particle chemistry performance, improving detector design and in optimizing the system, data processors and various controls of chromatographic techniques. When all was blended together, it resulted in the outstanding performance via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), which holds back the principle of HPLC technique. UPLC shows a dramatic enhancement in speed, resolution as well as the sensitivity of analysis by using particle size less than 2 pm and the system is operational at higher pressure, while the mobile phase could be able to run at greater linear velocities as compared to HPLC. This technique is considered as a new focal point in field of liquid chromatographic studies. This review focuses on the basic principle, instrumentation of UPLC and its advantages over HPLC, furthermore, this article emphasizes various pharmaceutical applications of this technique.

  9. A simple, high-resolution method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Fink, B E; Brunette, S R; Tse, W C; Hedrick, M P

    2001-06-27

    Full details of the development of a simple, nondestructive, and high-throughput method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are described. The method is based on the loss of fluorescence derived from the displacement of ethidium bromide or thiazole orange from the DNA of interest or, in selected instances, the change in intrinsic fluorescence of a DNA binding agent itself and is applicable for assessing relative or absolute DNA binding affinities. Enlisting a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all five base pair (512 hairpins) or four base pair (136 hairpins) sequences displayed in a 96-well format, a compound's rank order binding to all possible sequences is generated, resulting in a high-resolution definition of its sequence selectivity using this fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay. As such, the technique complements the use of footprinting or affinity cleavage for the establishment of DNA binding selectivity and provides the information at a higher resolution. The merged bar graphs generated by this rank order binding provide a qualitative way to compare, or profile, DNA binding affinity and selectivity. The 96-well format assay (512 hairpins) can be conducted at a minimal cost (presently ca. $100 for hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides/assay with ethiduim bromide or less with thiazole orange), with a rapid readout using a fluorescent plate reader (15 min), and is adaptable to automation (Tecan Genesis Workstation 100 robotic system). Its use in generating a profile of DNA binding selectivity for several agents including distamycin A, netropsin, DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and berenil is described. Techniques for establishing binding constants from quantitative titrations are compared, and recommendations are made for use of a Scatchard or curve fitting analysis of the titration binding curves as a reliable means to quantitate the binding affinity.

  10. Engineered protein A ligands, derived from a histidine-scanning library, facilitate the affinity purification of IgG under mild acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In antibody purification processes, the acidic buffer commonly used to elute the bound antibodies during conventional affinity chromatograph, can damage the antibody. Herein we describe the development of several types of affinity ligands which enable the purification of antibodies under much milder conditions. Results Staphylococcal protein A variants were engineered by using both structure-based design and combinatorial screening methods. The frequency of amino acid residue substitutions was statistically analyzed using the sequences isolated from a histidine-scanning library screening. The positions where the frequency of occurrence of a histidine residue was more than 70% were thought to be effective histidine-mutation sites. Consequently, we identified PAB variants with a D36H mutation whose binding of IgG was highly sensitive to pH change. Conclusion The affinity column elution chromatograms demonstrated that antibodies could be eluted at a higher pH (∆pH**≧2.0) than ever reported (∆pH = 1.4) when the Staphylococcal protein A variants developed in this study were used as affinity ligands. The interactions between Staphylococcal protein A and IgG-Fab were shown to be important for the behavior of IgG bound on a SpA affinity column, and alterations in the affinity of the ligands for IgG-Fab clearly affected the conditions for eluting the bound IgG. Thus, a histidine-scanning library combined with a structure-based design was shown to be effective in engineering novel pH-sensitive proteins. PMID:25057290

  11. Purification and Characterization of Bovine Serum Albumin Using Chromatographic Method

    PubMed Central

    Balkani, Sanaz; Shamekhi, Sara; Raoufinia, Ramin; Parvan, Reza; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Albumin is an abundant protein of blood and has many biopharmaceutical applications. The aim of this study was to purify bovine serum albumin (BSA) using produced rabbit anti-BSA antibody. Methods: The polyclonal antibody was produced against the BSA in rabbits. Then, the pure BSA was injected to three white New Zealand rabbits. ELISA test was done to evaluate antibody production. After antibody purification,the purified antibody was attached to CNBr-activated sepharose and finally it was used for purification of albumin from bovine serum. Western blotting analysis was used for functional assessment of immunoaffinity purified BSA. Results: The titer of anti-bovine albumin determined by ELISA was obtained 1: 256000. The SDS-PAGE showed up to 98% purity of isolated BSA and western blotting confirmed the BSA functionality. Purified bovine serum albumin by affinity chromatography showed a single band with molecular weight of 66 KDa. Conclusion: Affinity chromatography using produced rabbit anti-BSA antibody would be an economical and safe method for purification of BSA. PMID:28101473

  12. Smooth affine shear tight frames: digitization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly discuss one of the recent developed directional multiscale representation systems: smooth affine shear tight frames. A directional wavelet tight frame is generated by isotropic dilations and translations of directional wavelet generators, while an affine shear tight frame is generated by anisotropic dilations, shears, and translations of shearlet generators. These two tight frames are actually connected in the sense that the affine shear tight frame can be obtained from a directional wavelet tight frame through subsampling. Consequently, an affine shear tight frame indeed has an underlying filter bank from the MRA structure of its associated directional wavelet tight frame. We call such filter banks affine shear filter banks, which can be designed completely in the frequency domain. We discuss the digitization of affine shear filter banks and their implementations: the forward and backward digital affine shear transforms. Redundancy rate and computational complexity of digital affine shear transforms are also investigated in this paper. Numerical experiments and comparisons in image/video processing show the advantages of digital affine shear transforms over many other state-of-art directional multiscale representation systems.

  13. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  14. Quantitative analysis and chromatographic fingerprinting for the quality evaluation of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke; Gong, Yifei; Lin, Zhongying; Cheng, Yiyu

    2007-01-17

    Quantitative analysis and chromatographic fingerprinting for the quality evaluation of a Chinese herb Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi using capillary electrophoresis (CE) technique was developed. The separation was performed with a 50.0cm (42.0cm to the detector window)x75mum i.d. fused-silica capillary, and the CE fingerprint condition was optimized using the combination of central composite design and multivariate analysis. The optimized buffer system containing 15mM borate, 40mM phosphate, 15mM SDS, 15% (v/v) acetonitrile and 7.5% (v/v) 2-propanol was employed for the method development, and the baseline separation was achieved within 15min. The determination of the major active components (Baicalin, Baicalein and Wogonin) was carried out using the optimized CE condition. Good linear relationships were provided over the investigated concentration ranges (the values of R(2): 0.9997 for Baicalin, 0.9992 for Baicalein, and 0.9983 for Wogonin, respectively). The average recoveries of these target components ranged between 96.1-105.6%, 98.6-105.2%, and 96.3-105.0%, respectively. CE fingerprints combined with the quantitative analysis can be used for the quality evaluation of S. baicalensis.

  15. Liquid chromatographic determination of quinolones in water and human urine samples after microextraction by packed sorbent.

    PubMed

    Rani, Susheela; Kumar, Ashwini; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Baldev

    2012-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of quinolones in water and urine samples by microextraction in a sorbent-packed syringe (MEPS) with LC is described. MEPS is a new miniaturized SPE technique that can be used with chromatographic instruments without any modifications. In MEPS, approximately 1 mg of the solid packing material is inserted into a syringe (100-250 microL) as a plug. Sample preparation takes place on the packed bed. The new method is promising, easy to use, economical, and rapid. The determination of quinolones in groundwater and urine was performed using MEPS as a sample preparation method with LC-UV determination. Four quinolone antibiotics--enrofloxacin, enoxacin, danofloxacin, and nalidixic acid--in groundwater and urine samples were used as analytes. The extraction recovery was found to be between 64.9 and 98.9%. The results showed high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.992) for all of the analytes within the calibration range. The LOQ was between 0.091 and 0.315 ng/mL.

  16. Gas chromatographic quantitative analysis of methanol in wine: operative conditions, optimization and calibration model choice.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosario; Gambino, Grazia Laura; Scordino, Monica; Sabatino, Leonardo; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2011-12-01

    The influence of the wine distillation process on methanol content has been determined by quantitative analysis using gas chromatographic flame ionization (GC-FID) detection. A comparative study between direct injection of diluted wine and injection of distilled wine was performed. The distillation process does not affect methanol quantification in wines in proportions higher than 10%. While quantification performed on distilled samples gives more reliable results, a screening method for wine injection after a 1:5 water dilution could be employed. The proposed technique was found to be a compromise between the time consuming distillation process and direct wine injection. In the studied calibration range, the stability of the volatile compounds in the reference solution is concentration-dependent. The stability is higher in the less concentrated reference solution. To shorten the operation time, a stronger temperature ramp and carrier flow rate was employed. With these conditions, helium consumption and column thermal stress were increased. However, detection limits, calibration limits, and analytical method performances are not affected substantially by changing from normal to forced GC conditions. Statistical data evaluation were made using both ordinary (OLS) and bivariate least squares (BLS) calibration models. Further confirmation was obtained that limit of detection (LOD) values, calculated according to the 3sigma approach, are lower than the respective Hubaux-Vos (H-V) calculation method. H-V LOD depends upon background noise, calibration parameters and the number of reference standard solutions employed in producing the calibration curve. These remarks are confirmed by both calibration models used.

  17. A high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of major phenolic compounds in tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, C.H.; Cash, S.L. )

    1990-05-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is developed that simultaneously quantifies the dihydroxy compounds hydroquinone, resorcinol, and catechol and the monohydroxy compounds phenol, m + p-cresol and o-cresol in cigarette smoke. Particulate matter samples collected on Cambridge pads and in impingers by conventional trapping techniques are simply (no derivatization required) subjected to reversed-phase gradient liquid chromatography. Samples of both mainstream and sidestream smoke can be analyzed. Selective fluorescence detection is used to monitor the mobile phase effluent, by which these phenolic compounds are detected in the nanogram range. The detector response is linear, overall precision is good, and recoveries are greater than 95 percent. The total run time, excluding extraction, is one hour. The procedure has been applied to tobacco products whose smoke contains varying amounts of these phenols. Kentucky Reference Cigarette 1R4F was found to contain substantially more of these compounds than a new cigarette that heats but does not burn tobacco (New Cigarette). The method is compared with other procedures used to determine phenolics in cigarette smoke.

  18. Multivariate Chemometrics with Regression and Classification Analyses in Heroin Profiling Based on the Chromatographic Data.

    PubMed

    B Gadžurić, Slobodan; O Podunavac Kuzmanović, Sanja; B Vraneš, Milan; Petrin, Marija; Bugarski, Tatjana; Kovačević, Strahinja Z

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to promote and facilitate forensic profiling and chemical analysis of illicit drug samples in order to determine their origin, methods of production and transfer through the country. The article is based on the gas chromatography analysis of heroin samples seized from three different locations in Serbia. Chemometric approach with appropriate statistical tools (multiple-linear regression (MLR), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Wald-Wolfowitz run (WWR) test) were applied on chromatographic data of heroin samples in order to correlate and examine the geographic origin of seized heroin samples. The best MLR models were further validated by leave-one-out technique as well as by the calculation of basic statistical parameters for the established models. To confirm the predictive power of the models, external set of heroin samples was used. High agreement between experimental and predicted values of acetyl thebaol and diacetyl morphine peak ratio, obtained in the validation procedure, indicated the good quality of derived MLR models. WWR test showed which examined heroin samples come from the same population, and HCA was applied in order to overview the similarities among the studied heroine samples.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of cotinine in urine in isocratic mode.

    PubMed

    Ceppa, F; El Jahiri, Y; Mayaudon, H; Dupuy, O; Burnat, P

    2000-09-15

    A simple procedure for the determination of cotinine, major metabolite of nicotine in urine, is described. The assay involved a liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane in alkaline environment. The extract was dried at ambient temperature under a gentle stream of nitrogen. The residue was dissolved in 300 microl of mobile phase and 30 microl aliquot was injected via an automatic sampler into the liquid chromatograph and eluted with the mobile phase (10-9%, v/v methanol and acetonitrile, respectively in potassium dihydrogenphosphate buffer adjusted to pH 3.4) at a flow rate of 1 ml/min on a C8 Symmetry cartridge column (5 microm, 150 mm x 3.9 mm, Waters) at 25 degrees C. The eluate was detected at 260 nm. Internal standard was 2-phenylimidazole. Sensitive and specific, this technique was performed to test urine of diabetic patients (smokers and non-smokers) admitted in an endocrinology service. Urinary cotinine seems to be a better marker of smoking status than thiocyanates.

  20. Enantioseparation of cetirizine by chromatographic methods and discrimination by 1H-NMR.

    PubMed

    Taha, Elham A; Salama, Nahla N; Wang, Shudong

    2009-03-01

    Cetirizine is an antihistaminic drug used to prevent and treat allergic conditions. It is currently marketed as a racemate. The H1-antagonist activity of cetirizine is primarily due to (R)-levocetirizine. This has led to the introduction of (R)-levocetirizine into clinical practice, and the chiral switching is expected to be more selective and safer. The present work represents three methods for the analysis and chiral discrimination of cetirizine. The first method was based on the enantioseparation of cetirizine on silica gel TLC plates using different chiral selectors as mobile phase additives. The mobile phase enabling successful resolution was acetonitrile-water 17: 3, (v/v) containing 1 mM of chiral selector, namely hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, chondroitin sulphate or vancomycin hydrochloride. The second method was a validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), based on stereoselective separation of cetirizine and quantitative determination of its eutomer (R)-levocetirizine on a monolithic C18 column using hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin as a chiral mobile phase additive. The resolved peaks of (R)-levocetirizine and (S)-dextrocetirizine were confirmed by further mass spectrometry. The third method used a (1)H-NMR technique to characterize cetirizine and (R)-levocetirizine. These methods are selective and accurate, and can be easily applied for chiral discrimination and determination of cetirizine in drug substance and drug product in quality control laboratory. Moreover, chiral purity testing of (R)-levocetirizine can also be monitored by the chromatographic methods.

  1. Multivariate Chemometrics with Regression and Classification Analyses in Heroin Profiling Based on the Chromatographic Data

    PubMed Central

    B. Gadžurić, Slobodan; O. Podunavac Kuzmanović, Sanja; B. Vraneš, Milan; Petrin, Marija; Bugarski, Tatjana; Kovačević, Strahinja Z.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to promote and facilitate forensic profiling and chemical analysis of illicit drug samples in order to determine their origin, methods of production and transfer through the country. The article is based on the gas chromatography analysis of heroin samples seized from three different locations in Serbia. Chemometric approach with appropriate statistical tools (multiple-linear regression (MLR), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Wald-Wolfowitz run (WWR) test) were applied on chromatographic data of heroin samples in order to correlate and examine the geographic origin of seized heroin samples. The best MLR models were further validated by leave-one-out technique as well as by the calculation of basic statistical parameters for the established models. To confirm the predictive power of the models, external set of heroin samples was used. High agreement between experimental and predicted values of acetyl thebaol and diacetyl morphine peak ratio, obtained in the validation procedure, indicated the good quality of derived MLR models. WWR test showed which examined heroin samples come from the same population, and HCA was applied in order to overview the similarities among the studied heroine samples. PMID:28243268

  2. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  3. Authenticity analysis of pear juice employing chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Low, Nicholas H

    2014-12-03

    Pear juice is predominately composed of carbohydrates/polyols (>95% of the total soluble solids), making it susceptible to adulteration by the addition of less expensive commercial sweeteners. In this research, the major carbohydrate and polyol (fructose, glucose, sucrose, and sorbitol) content of 32 pure pear juices representing five world producing regions and three years of production was determined. Additionally, methods employing oligosaccharide profiling to detect the debasing of these samples with four commercial sweeteners (HFCS 55 and 90, TIS, and HIS) were developed using capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (CGC-FID) and high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). Detection limits for the four commercial sweeteners ranged from 0.5 to 5.0% (v/v). In addition, the developed CGC-FID method could be used to (a) detect the addition of pear to apple juice via arbutin detection and (b) determine if a pear juice was produced using enzymatic liquefaction via the presence of O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranose (cellobiose), all within a single chromatographic analysis.

  4. Liquid chromatographic determination of progestogens in animal fat.

    PubMed

    Andresen, M T; Fesser, A C

    1996-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method was developed for determination of 3 progestogens-melengestrol acetate, megestrol acetate, and chlormadinone acetate-found in edible tissue at concentrations between 10 and 1000 ppb. These progestogens are commonly used as feed additives to control herd estrus and to improve feed efficiency. Rendered fat was extracted with acetonitrile, washed with hexane, and dried. The remaining lipids were saponified with sodium hydroxide and precipitated with magnesium chloride. The progestogens were extracted from the basic solution with hexane, dried, and cleaned up on a cyanopropyl solid-phase extraction column in the normal-phase mode. The eluate was dried and reconstituted with acetonitrile-water (7 + 3, v/v). Chromatography was performed on a 5 microns high-carbon load C18 column with acetonitrile-water (7 + 3, v/v) at 1 mL/min and UV detection at 291 nm. Recoveries from fortified samples ranged from 84 to 116%. The limit of quantitation was 10 ppb for both beef and pork. The detection limit was 3 ppb.

  5. Liquid chromatographic analysis of oxytocin and its related substances.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, Dunge; Van Hemelrijck, Elise; Chopra, Shruti; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2010-01-05

    A selective gradient liquid chromatographic (LC) method for the determination of oxytocin (OT) and its related substances in bulk drugs has been developed. The method uses a reversed-phase C18 column (25 cm x 4.0 mm i.d.), 5 microm kept at 40 degrees C. The mobile phases consist of acetonitrile, dihydrogen phosphate solution pH 4.4 and water. The flow rate is 1.0 ml/min. UV detection is performed at 220 nm. A system suitability test (SST) was developed to govern the quality of the separation. The separation towards OT components was investigated on different C18 columns. The developed method was further validated with respect to robustness, precision, sensitivity and linearity. A central composite design was applied to examine the robustness of the method. The method shows good precision, sensitivity, linearity and robustness. Two commercial OT samples were examined using this method. Furthermore, the method proved to be successful when applied to analyze a marketed OT formulation for injection.

  6. Chromatographic Studies of Protein-Based Chiral Separations.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Zheng, Xiwei; Azaria, Shiden; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Hage, David S

    2016-09-01

    The development of separation methods for the analysis and resolution of chiral drugs and solutes has been an area of ongoing interest in pharmaceutical research. The use of proteins as chiral binding agents in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been an approach that has received particular attention in such work. This report provides an overview of proteins that have been used as binding agents to create chiral stationary phases (CSPs) and in the use of chromatographic methods to study these materials and protein-based chiral separations. The supports and methods that have been employed to prepare protein-based CSPs will also be discussed and compared. Specific types of CSPs that are considered include those that employ serum transport proteins (e.g., human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein), enzymes (e.g., penicillin G acylase, cellobiohydrolases, and α-chymotrypsin) or other types of proteins (e.g., ovomucoid, antibodies, and avidin or streptavidin). The properties and applications for each type of protein and CSP will also be discussed in terms of their use in chromatography and chiral separations.

  7. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  8. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of pans with luminol chemilumnescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.; Bornick, R.; Chen, Yu-Harn; Marley, N.

    1996-12-31

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) are important air pollutants in tropospheric chemistry. PANs are known to be potent phytotoxins at low ppb concentrations and are lachrymators. They can also transport the more reactive nitrogen dioxide long distances, because they are in equilibrium with that NO{sub x} species. Since PANs are trapped peroxyradicals, they are a direct measure of the peroxyradical levels and the of {open_quotes}photochemical age{close_quotes} of an air parcel. The PANs are typically measured in the atmosphere by using electron capture detection methods. These methods suffer from large background signals and detector responses to oxygen and water vapor. This paper describes the combination of a capillary gas chromatographic column with a modified luminol chemiluminescent nitrogen dioxide detector (Scintrex, Luminox) for rapid and sensitive detection of nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxypropionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyryl nitrate. Detection limits for this approach in the low tens of parts per trillion have been observed with total analysis times of less than three minutes. We will discuss the potential application of this method to other compounds, particularly, organonitrates, in a pyrolysis system and/or with ozone addition to the sampling streams.

  9. Novel reduced pressure-balance syringe for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Windom, Bret C; Bruno, Thomas J

    2010-11-19

    When withdrawing a fluid sample (for additional chromatographic analyses) from an apparatus operated at a reduced pressure, a typical syringe proves to be ineffective (even if it is equipped with a gas tight plunger). It simply does not create enough pressure differential to remove a fluid sample from a reduced pressure environment. We encountered such a situation as part of efforts to extend the operation of the advanced distillation curve protocol to reduced pressures. The problem was solved by the development of a pressure balance syringe that allows reliable and precise sampling from an apparatus operating at sub-ambient pressures. This new device uses an external vacuum source to evacuate a syringe barrel, allowing a user to withdraw fluid samples from environments with pressures as low as 0.5kPa. To demonstrate the operation of the newly developed device, distillate analyses were performed on two fluids at low pressure: a predefined validation mixture, and a commercial soy based biodiesel fuel. The pressure balance syringe was used successfully for sampling in both cases. The use of the pressure balance syringe is not limited to reduced pressure distillations; indeed it can be used for a variety of applications in which chemical/compositional analyses are desired on a fluid contained in a reduced pressure environment.

  10. Liquid chromatographic determination of beta-naphthoxyacetic acid in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Gökmen, V; Acar, J

    1998-03-06

    An alternative high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of beta-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) in tomatoes is described. BNOA was extracted from tomatoes with acetone-dichloromethane (2:1). The extract was cleaned up by Bio-Beads S-X3 gel-permeation chromatography and by partitioning. A reversed-phase C18 column was used for HPLC analysis. The mobile phase was acetonitrile-2% acetic acid in water (50:50, v/v) pumped at a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min. Retention time of BNOA was ca. 7 min with a percentage coefficient of variation of 0.71. Resolution of BNOA was good on the column. Percentage recoveries of BNOA were 79.5 +/- 6.82, 94.8 +/- 2.70 and 86.4 +/- 16.43 for the corresponding spiking levels of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 micrograms per g tomato, respectively. Analysis of 10 greenhouse tomato samples from local markets in Ankara showed no BNOA residue.

  11. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  12. Chromatographic Studies of Protein-Based Chiral Separations

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Cong; Zheng, Xiwei; Azaria, Shiden; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Hage, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of separation methods for the analysis and resolution of chiral drugs and solutes has been an area of ongoing interest in pharmaceutical research. The use of proteins as chiral binding agents in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been an approach that has received particular attention in such work. This report provides an overview of proteins that have been used as binding agents to create chiral stationary phases (CSPs) and in the use of chromatographic methods to study these materials and protein-based chiral separations. The supports and methods that have been employed to prepare protein-based CSPs will also be discussed and compared. Specific types of CSPs that are considered include those that employ serum transport proteins (e.g., human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein), enzymes (e.g., penicillin G acylase, cellobiohydrolases, and α-chymotrypsin) or other types of proteins (e.g., ovomucoid, antibodies, and avidin or streptavidin). The properties and applications for each type of protein and CSP will also be discussed in terms of their use in chromatography and chiral separations. PMID:28344977

  13. Characterisation of wax works of art by gas chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed

    Regert, M; Langlois, J; Colinart, S

    2005-10-14

    To identify the various natural and synthetic substances used by sculptors at the end of the 19th century, several contemporary reference samples were investigated by high temperature gas chromatography (HT GC) and HT GC-MS. Using specific chromatographic conditions and minimising sample preparation, we could separate, detect and identify a wide range of biomolecular markers covering a great variety of molecular weights and volatilities, with a minimum amount of sample, in a single run. Beeswax, spermaceti, carnauba, candellila and Japan waxes as well as pine resin derivatives, animal fats, paraffin, ozokerite and stearin, used as additives in wax works of art, were chemically investigated. In the case of low volatile compounds, transbutylation was performed. The structure of long-chain esters of spermaceti was elucidated for the first time by HT GC-MS analysis. Such a method was then carried out on 10 samples collected on a statuette of Junon by Antoine-Louis Barye (Louvre Museum, Paris, France) and on a sculpture by Aimé-Jules Dalou (Musée de la Révolution Française, Vizille, France). The analytical results obtained provide new data on the complex recipes elaborated by sculptors at the end of the 19th century.

  14. Size exclusion chromatographic analysis of polyphenol-serum albumin complexes.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tsutomu; Hori, Mami; Hemingway, Richard W; Yoshida, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    Formation of water-soluble polyphenol-protein complexes was investigated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The combination of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which did not form a precipitate after the solutions were mixed, showed an SEC peak due to complex formation 2-24 h after mixing. Peak size of the complex varied with time, suggesting slow change of the conformation of the protein accompanied by complexation. Formation of the complex was substantiated by ultrafiltration of the mixture; the complex did not pass through a membrane with a 100,000 nominal molecular weight limit (NMWL). The SEC profile varied with the combination of compounds. The peaks due to the complexes showed that the apparent value of the number average molecular weight (M(n)) of the EGCG-BSA complex was 2.8x10(5), while that of a pentagalloylglucose (PGG)-BSA complex was 9.5x10(5) under the conditions used. Dimeric hydrolyzable tannins, oenothein B and cornusiin A, also caused changes in the SEC profile of BSA, although the combinations did not show peaks attributable to formation of such large complexes observed for EGCG and PGG. Procyanidin B3 and (+)-catechin did not cause changes in the SEC profile of BSA. With cytochrome c, EGCG did not show any chromatographic changes.

  15. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatographic analysis of anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Chandré M; Stander, Maria A; Tredoux, Andreas G J; de Villiers, André

    2014-09-12

    Anthocyanins are naturally occurring plant pigments whose accurate analysis is hampered by their complexity and unique chromatographic behaviour associated with on-column conversion reactions. This paper reports the evaluation of off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) for the analysis of anthocyanins. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was used in the first dimension in combination with reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) in the second dimension. For the selective detection of anthocyanins, diode array detection was used, while high resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF) was used for compound identification. As application, the HILIC×RP-LC separation of diverse anthocyanins in blueberries, red radish, black beans, red grape skins and red cabbage is demonstrated. Off-line HILIC×RP-LC revealed information which could not be obtained by one-dimensional HPLC methods, while the structured elution order for the anthocyanins simplifies compound identification and facilitates the comparison of anthocyanin content of natural products by means of contour plots.

  16. Dynamic affinity chromatography in the separation of sulfated lignins binding to thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Aiye; Thakkar, Jay N.; Hindle, Michael; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs), a mixture of chemo-enzymatically prepared oligomers, have been found to be potent antagonists of coagulation. However, structures that induce anticoagulation remain unidentified. The highly polar sulfate groups on these molecules and the thousands of different structures present in these mixtures make traditional chromatographic resolution of sulfated LMWLs difficult. We performed dynamic thrombin affinity chromatography monitored using chromogenic substrate hydrolysis assay to isolate sulfated LMWL fractions that differed significantly in their biophysical and biochemical properties. Three fractions, I35, I55 and Peak II, were isolated from the starting complex mixture. Independent plasma clotting assays suggested that I35 possessed good anticoagulation potential (APTT = 4.2 μM; PT = 6.8 μM), while I55 and Peak II were approximately 10- and 100-fold less potent. The ESI-MS spectrum of this oligomeric fraction showed multiple peaks at 684.8, 610.6, 557.4, 541.4, 536.5, and 519.4 m/z, which most probably arise from variably functionalized (β-O4—β-β-linked trimers and/or a β-O4—β-O4-linked dimers. The first direct observation of these structures in sulfated LMWLs will greatly assist in the discovery of more potent sulfated LMWL-based anticoagulants. PMID:23122400

  17. Affinity purification of human m-calpain through an intrinsically disordered inhibitor, calpastatin

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung Huy; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Calpains are calcium-activated proteases that have biomedical and biotechnological potential. Their activity is tightly regulated by their endogenous inhibitor, calpastatin that binds to the enzyme only in the presence of calcium. Conventional approaches to purify calpain comprise multiple chromatographic steps, and are labor-intensive, leading to low yields. Here we report a new purification procedure for the human m-calpain based on its reversible calcium-mediated interaction with the intrinsically disordered calpastatin. We exploit the specific binding properties of human calpastatin domain 1 (hCSD1) to physically capture human m-calpain from a complex biological mixture. The dissociation of the complex is mediated by chelating calcium, upon which heterodimeric calpain elutes while hCSD1 remains immobilized onto the stationary phase. This novel affinity-based purification was compared to the conventional multistep purification strategy and we find that it is robust, it yields a homogeneous preparation, it can be scaled up easily and it rests on a non-disruptive step that maintains close to physiological conditions that allow further biophysical and functional studies. PMID:28319173

  18. Preparation and affinity identification of glutamic acid-urea small molecule analogs in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zheng; Yang, Deyong; Fan, Weiwei; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Xiancheng; Chen, Xiaochi; Wang, Qifeng; Song, Xishuang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, study concerning activity inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been concentrated on the glutamic urea (Glu-urea-R) small molecule and its analogs. The present study aimed to synthesize 4 analogs of Glu-urea-R and identify the affinities of these compounds to PSMA. The compounds were synthesized from raw materials, and the experimental procedures of the present study were in accordance with standard techniques under anhydrous and anaerobic conditions. Glu-urea-Lysine (Glu-urea-Lys), Glu-urea-Ornithine (Glu-urea-Orn), Glu-urea-Glutamine (Glu-urea-Gln) and Glu-urea-Asparagine (Glu-urea-Asn) were successfully synthesized, and their structures were confirmed to be as desired using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. An affinity assay was performed to detect the affinity between the various compounds and PSMA expressed from the prostate cancer LNCap cell line. Glu-urea-Gln had the highest affinity to PSMA, followed by Glu-urea-Asn, Glu-urea-Orn and Glu-urea-Lys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Glu-urea-R specifically binds PSMA expressed in the LNCap cell line and inhibits its activity. PMID:27446384

  19. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins.

  20. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody to methamphetamine and amphetamine through structure-based antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Nanaware-Kharade, Nisha; Celikel, Reha; Peterson, Eric C; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2014-01-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a worldwide threat, without any FDA approved medications. Anti-METH IgGs and single chain fragments (scFvs) have shown efficacy in preclinical studies. Here we report affinity enhancement of an anti-METH scFv for METH and its active metabolite amphetamine (AMP), through the introduction of point mutations, rationally designed to optimize the shape and hydrophobicity of the antibody binding pocket. The binding affinity was measured using saturation binding technique. The mutant scFv-S93T showed 3.1 fold enhancement in affinity for METH and 26 fold for AMP. The scFv-I37M and scFv-Y34M mutants showed enhancement of 94, and 8 fold for AMP, respectively. Structural analysis of scFv-S93T:METH revealed that the substitution of Ser residue by Thr caused the expulsion of a water molecule from the cavity, creating a more hydrophobic environment for the binding that dramatically increases the affinities for METH and AMP.

  1. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual-Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter we describe a comprehensive methodology that utilizes our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we have demonstrated the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  2. Measuring the electron affinity of organic solids: an indispensable new tool for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    Electron affinity is a fundamental energy parameter of materials. In organic semiconductors, the electron affinity is closely related to electron conduction. It is not only important to understand fundamental electronic processes in organic solids, but it is also indispensable for research and development of organic semiconductor devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. However, there has been no experimental technique for examining the electron affinity of organic materials that meets the requirements of such research. Recently, a new method, called low-energy inverse-photoemission spectroscopy, has been developed. A beam of low-energy electrons is focused onto the sample surface, and photons emitted owing to the radiative transition to unoccupied states are then detected. From the onset of the spectral intensity, the electron affinity is determined within an uncertainty of 0.1 eV. Unlike in conventional inverse-photoemission spectroscopy, sample damage is negligible and the resolution is improved by a factor of 2. The principle of the method and several applications are reported.

  3. PolyCheck: Dynamic Verification of Iteration Space Transformations on Affine Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Wenlei; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Pouchet, Louis-noel; Rastello, Fabrice; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2016-01-11

    High-level compiler transformations, especially loop transformations, are widely recognized as critical optimizations to restructure programs to improve data locality and expose parallelism. Guaranteeing the correctness of program transformations is essential, and to date three main approaches have been developed: proof of equivalence of affine programs, matching the execution traces of programs, and checking bit-by-bit equivalence of the outputs of the programs. Each technique suffers from limitations in either the kind of transformations supported, space complexity, or the sensitivity to the testing dataset. In this paper, we take a novel approach addressing all three limitations to provide an automatic bug checker to verify any iteration reordering transformations on affine programs, including non-affine transformations, with space consumption proportional to the original program data, and robust to arbitrary datasets of a given size. We achieve this by exploiting the structure of affine program control- and data-flow to generate at compile-time lightweight checker code to be executed within the transformed program. Experimental results assess the correctness and effectiveness of our method, and its increased coverage over previous approaches.

  4. On polynomial vector fields having a given affine variety as attractive and invariant set: application to robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possieri, Corrado; Tornambè, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    The main goal of this paper is to compute a class of polynomial vector fields, whose associated dynamical system has a given affine variety as attractive and invariant set, a given point in such an affine variety as invariant and attractive and another given affine variety as invariant set, solving the application of this technique in the robotic area. This objective is reached by using some tools taken from algebraic geometry. Practical examples of how these vector fields can be computed are reported. Moreover, by using these techniques, two feedback control laws, respectively, for a unicycle-like mobile robot and for a car-like mobile robot, which make them move, within the workspace, approaching to a selected algebraic curve, are given.

  5. Reversed-phase liquid chromatographic determination of cromolyn sodium in drug substance and select dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Ng, L L

    1994-01-01

    This study, presented as a technical communication, describes a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method for select commercial formulations, namely, inhalation solution, nasal solution, capsule and inhalation aerosol. Miscellaneous validation parameters are also discussed.

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  10. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  11. A Miniature Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) for Planetary Atmospheres Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simcic, J.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Bae, B.; Nikolic, D.; Darrach, M.

    2016-10-01

    Presented herein are the latest achievements in developing an instrument with the same analytical performance of commercial Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer systems but approximately an order of magnitude smaller and optimized for space missions.

  12. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION OF THE ENANTIOMERS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES ON POLYSACCHARIDE CHIRAL STATIONARY PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the individual enantiomers of 12 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) was obtained on polysaccharide enantioselective HPLC columns using alkane-alcohol mobile phase. The OP pesticides were crotoxyphos, dialifor, fonofos, fenamiph...

  13. Multiple ligand detection and affinity measurement by ultrafiltration and mass spectrometry analysis applied to fragment mixture screening.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; Fu, Xu; Shen, Jie; Chen, Xin; Wang, Quan; Bi, Xin; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Lixin; Liang, Guangxin; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-07-30

    Binding affinity of a small molecule drug candidate to a therapeutically relevant biomolecular target is regarded the first determinant of the candidate's efficacy. Although the ultrafiltration-LC/MS (UF-LC/MS) assay enables efficient ligand discovery for a specific target from a mixed pool of compounds, most previous analysis allowed for relative affinity ranking of different ligands. Moreover, the reliability of affinity measurement for multiple ligands with UF-LC/MS has hardly been strictly evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of K(d) determination through UF-LC/MS by comparison with classical ITC measurement. A single-point K(d) calculation method was found to be suitable for affinity measurement of multiple ligands bound to the same target when binding competition is minimized. A second workflow based on analysis of the unbound fraction of compounds was then developed, which simplified sample preparation as well as warranted reliable ligand discovery. The new workflow implemented in a fragment mixture screen afforded rapid and sensitive detection of low-affinity ligands selectively bound to the RNA polymerase NS5B of hepatitis C virus. More importantly, ligand identification and affinity measurement for mixture-based fragment screens by UF-LC/MS were in good accordance with single ligand evaluation by conventional SPR analysis. This new approach is expected to become a valuable addition to the arsenal of high-throughput screening techniques for fragment-based drug discovery.

  14. Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147

    DOEpatents

    Boll, Rose A [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-14

    A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

  15. High-resolution gas chromatographic profiles of volatile organic compounds produced by microorganisms at refrigerated temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M L; Smith, D L; Freeman, L R

    1979-01-01

    Three different strains of bacteria isolated from spoiled, uncooked chicken were grown in pure culture on Trypticase soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. The volatile organic compounds produced by each culture were concentrated on a porous polymer precolumn and analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. Twenty different compounds were identified. Both qualitative and quantitative differences in the chromatographic profiles from each culture were found. PMID:104660

  16. Affine connection form of Regge calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Regge action is represented analogously to how the Palatini action for general relativity (GR) as some functional of the metric and a general connection as independent variables represents the Einstein-Hilbert action. The piecewise flat (or simplicial) spacetime of Regge calculus is equipped with some world coordinates and some piecewise affine metric which is completely defined by the set of edge lengths and the world coordinates of the vertices. The conjugate variables are the general nondegenerate matrices on the three-simplices which play the role of a general discrete connection. Our previous result on some representation of the Regge calculus action in terms of the local Euclidean (Minkowsky) frame vectors and orthogonal connection matrices as independent variables is somewhat modified for the considered case of the general linear group GL(4, R) of the connection matrices. As a result, we have some action invariant w.r.t. arbitrary change of coordinates of the vertices (and related GL(4, R) transformations in the four-simplices). Excluding GL(4, R) connection from this action via the equations of motion we have exactly the Regge action for the considered spacetime.

  17. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  18. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  19. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  20. Cambrian trilobites with Siberian affinities, southwestern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.R.; Egbert, R.M.; Sullivan, R.; Knoth, J.S.

    1985-02-01

    Cambrian trilobites occur in two levels (about 7 m apart) in the core of a large, complex anticlinal structure in the area between the Taylor Mountains and the Hoholitna River in southwestern Alaska. The lower collection contains Erbia, Macannaia (a species close to Soviet forms described as Pagetia ferox Lermontova), two species of Kootenia (including one perhaps cospecific with forms from the central Brooks range), and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. It is clear that biogeographic affinities are with the transitional facies of the eastern Siberian platform and the south Siberian foldbelt. In Soviet terms, the age of the collection falls in a disputed interval called latest Early Cambrian (Tojonian) by some authors, and earliest Middle Cambrian (Amgan) by others. In North American terms, Macannaia is known only from early Middle Cambrian beds. The younger collection contains abundant agnostids, a variety of conocoryphids, Paradoxides, and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. This is an assemblage of undoubted late Middle Cambrian age, comparable to faunas described from the Maya State of the Siberian platform and the Paradoxides paradoxissimus Stage of the Baltic region. Both faunas are from ocean-facing or outer shelf environments. None of the key non-agnostid or non-pagetiid elements have been seen previously in deposits of Cambrian North America.