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Sample records for affinity chromatographic techniques

  1. Functional chromatographic technique for natural product isolation†

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Eichhorst, Nicole; Engelder, Pearce; Mesa, Celestina; Kithsiri Wijeratne, E. M.; Gunaherath, G. M. Kamal B.; Leslie Gunatilaka, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product discovery arises through a unique interplay between chromatographic purification and biological assays. Currently, most techniques used for natural product purification deliver leads without a defined biological action. We now describe a technique, referred to herein as functional chromatography, that deploys biological affinity as the matrix for compound isolation. PMID:25588099

  2. Recent development in chromatographic techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromatographic techniques play a significant role in the determination of analytes in complex matrices, separating individual sample components prior to their detection. In the analysis of contaminants and chemical residues in foods, gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) are two m...

  3. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  4. Multiple enzyme purifications from muscle extracts by using affinity-elution-chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Scopes, R K

    1977-01-01

    1. Starting with (NH4)2SO4 fractions of muscle extracts, procedures for purifying four to six separate enzymes from each fraction by using affinity-elution-chromatographic techniques are described. 2. Schemes for purifying 12 separate enzymes from rabbit muscle, and eight from chicken muscle extracts, are included. In nearly all cases the overall procedure involves three steps: the initial (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, the ion-exchange chromatography with affinity elution of the enzyme, and gel filtration. The specific activities of the enzymes so purified are comparable with the highest values in the literature. 3. The five schemes described include illustrations of affinity elution of the separate enzymes at different pH values, at different ionic strengths and in combination with conventional gradient elution. They also include stepwise adsorption on columns at different pH values. 4. Separation of two electrophoretically differing forms of phosphoglycerate kinase was achieved by gradient affinity elution from CM-cellulose. The lower-pI form was eluted by a lower concentration of substrate than the higher-pI form. PMID:849261

  5. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  6. Purification of urokinase by combined cation exchanger and affinity chromatographic cartridges.

    PubMed

    Hou, K C; Zaniewski, R

    1990-02-23

    Crude urokinase from human urine processed through foam flotation and ammonium sulfate precipitation containing 720 National Health Institute Committee on Thrombolytic Agents U/mg activity was purified by an SP cation exchanger followed by a zinc-chelated affinity chromatographic cartridge. The cartridges were of a radial-flow type formed by using acrylic and cellulose composite matrices. The high rigidity of the matrix structure permits fast flow of protein solutions (liters per minute) and thus allows processing of a large volume of crude urokinase under low operating pressures. A greater than six-fold increase in specific enzyme activity of urokinase was achieved by adsorbing and eluting 1 l of a 3 mg/ml crude urokinase solution on an SP cartridge. The eluent was further purified by passing through a zinc-chelated affinity cartridge to achieve greater than a eighteen-fold increase in urokinase specific activity. This report demonstrates the combined use of a cation exchanger with zinc-chelated chromatographic cartridges in purifying urokinase on a relatively large scale. The relationship between the amount of zinc chelated in the matrix to its effect on urokinase purification is also discussed. PMID:2329161

  7. Authentication of vegetable oils by chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, R; Aparicio-Ruíz, R

    2000-06-01

    Food authentication has been evolving continually to situations that were basically governed by a global market trend. Analytical techniques have been developed or modified to give plausible solutions to the devious adulterations at each moment. Classical tests have largely been replaced with newer technical procedures, most of which are based on gas chromatography, with some being based on high-performance liquid chromatography. Determination of trans-fatty acid and sterolic composition, together with sterol-dehydration products, have been used most frequently used to detect contamination and adulteration. Sophisticated new adulterations, e.g., olive oil with hazelnut oil, represent a new challenge for the next millennium, although suggestive proposals for detecting these kinds of adulterations are emerging with the contribution of databases and mathematical algorithms. PMID:10905696

  8. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  9. An affinity-based strategy for the design of selective displacers for the chromatographic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, Srinavya; Kate, Sandesh D; McCallum, Scott A; Morrison, Christopher J; Cramer, Steven M; Kane, Ravi S

    2008-06-01

    We describe an affinity-based strategy for designing selective protein displacers for the chromatographic purification of proteins. To design a displacer that is selective for a target protein, we attached a component with affinity for the target protein to a resin-binding component; we then tested the ability of such displacers to selectively retain the target protein on a resin relative to another protein having a similar retention time. In particular, we synthesized displacers based on biotin, which selectively retained avidin as compared to aprotinin on SP Sepharose high performance resin. In addition, we have extended this approach to develop an affinity-peptide-based displacer that discriminates between lysozyme and cytochrome c. Here, a selective displacer was designed from a lysozyme-binding peptide that had been identified and optimized previously using phage-display technology. Our results suggest a general strategy for designing highly selective affinity-based displacers by identifying molecules (e.g., peptides) that bind to a protein of interest and using an appropriate linker to attach these molecules to a moiety that binds to the stationary phase. PMID:18512879

  10. A Chimeric Affinity Tag for Efficient Expression and Chromatographic Purification of Heterologous Proteins from Plants.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Jutras, Philippe V; Vorster, Juan; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of plants as expression hosts for recombinant proteins is an increasingly attractive option for the production of complex and challenging biopharmaceuticals. Tools are needed at present to marry recent developments in high-yielding gene vectors for heterologous expression with routine protein purification techniques. In this study, we designed the Cysta-tag, a new purification tag for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of plant-made proteins based on the protein-stabilizing fusion partner SlCYS8. We show that the Cysta-tag may be used to readily purify proteins under native conditions, and then be removed enzymatically to isolate the protein of interest. We also show that commonly used protease recognition sites for linking purification tags are differentially stable in leaves of the commonly used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, with those linkers susceptible to cysteine proteases being less stable then serine protease-cleavable linkers. As an example, we describe a Cysta-tag experimental scheme for the one-step purification of a clinically useful protein, human α1-antitrypsin, transiently expressed in N. benthamiana. With potential applicability to the variety of chromatography formats commercially available for IMAC-based protein purification, the Cysta-tag provides a convenient means for the efficient and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins from plant tissues. PMID:26913045

  11. A Chimeric Affinity Tag for Efficient Expression and Chromatographic Purification of Heterologous Proteins from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Frank; Jutras, Philippe V.; Vorster, Juan; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of plants as expression hosts for recombinant proteins is an increasingly attractive option for the production of complex and challenging biopharmaceuticals. Tools are needed at present to marry recent developments in high-yielding gene vectors for heterologous expression with routine protein purification techniques. In this study, we designed the Cysta-tag, a new purification tag for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of plant-made proteins based on the protein-stabilizing fusion partner SlCYS8. We show that the Cysta-tag may be used to readily purify proteins under native conditions, and then be removed enzymatically to isolate the protein of interest. We also show that commonly used protease recognition sites for linking purification tags are differentially stable in leaves of the commonly used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, with those linkers susceptible to cysteine proteases being less stable then serine protease-cleavable linkers. As an example, we describe a Cysta-tag experimental scheme for the one-step purification of a clinically useful protein, human α1-antitrypsin, transiently expressed in N. benthamiana. With potential applicability to the variety of chromatography formats commercially available for IMAC-based protein purification, the Cysta-tag provides a convenient means for the efficient and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins from plant tissues. PMID:26913045

  12. Evaluation of Quantitative Performance of Sequential Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatographic Enrichment for Phosphopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zeyu; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a sequential elution protocol from immobilized metal affinity chromatography (SIMAC) employing gallium-based immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) in conjunction with titanium-dioxide-based metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). The quantitative performance of this SIMAC enrichment approach, assessed in terms of repeatability, dynamic range, and linearity, was evaluated using a mixture composed of tryptic peptides from caseins, bovine serum albumin, and phosphopeptide standards. While our data demonstrate the overall consistent performance of the SIMAC approach under various loading conditions, the results also revealed that the method had limited repeatability and linearity for most phosphopeptides tested, and different phosphopeptides were found to have different linear ranges. These data suggest that, unless additional strategies are used, SIMAC should be regarded as a semi-quantitative method when used in large-scale phosphoproteomics studies in complex backgrounds. PMID:24096195

  13. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed. PMID:24630982

  14. Affinity chromatographic selection of carbonylated proteins followed by identification of oxidation sites using tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Regnier, Fred

    2005-04-15

    It has been shown that oxidatively modified forms of proteins accumulate during oxidative stress, aging, and in some age-related diseases. One of the unique features of a wide variety of routes by which proteins are oxidized is the generation of carbonyl groups. This paper reports a method for the isolation of oxidized proteins, which involves (1) biotinylation of oxidized proteins with biotin hydrazide and (2) affinity enrichment using monomeric avidin affinity chromatography columns. The selectivity of the method was validated by adding in vitro oxidized biotinylated BSA to a yeast lysate and showing that the predominant protein recovered was BSA. This method was applied to the question of whether large doses of 2-nitropropane produce oxidized proteins. A study of rat liver homogenates showed that animals dosed with 2-nitropropane produced 17 times more oxidized protein than controls in 6 h. Tryptic digestion of these oxidized proteins followed by reversed-phase chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification of 14 peptides and their parent proteins. Nine of the 14 identified peptides were found to carry 1 or 2 oxidation sites and 5 of the 9 peptides were biotinylated. The significance of this affinity method is that it allows the isolation of oxidized proteins from the rest of the proteome and facilitates their identification. In some cases, it is even possible to identify the site of oxidation. PMID:15828771

  15. Analysis of the Mechanism of Gram Differentiation by Use of a Filter-Paper Chromatographic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, J. W.; Cromwell, Thomas; Gan, Richard

    1965-01-01

    Bartholomew, J. W. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles), Thomas Cromwell, and Richard Gan. Analysis of the mechanism of Gram differentiation by use of a filter-paper chromatographic technique. J. Bacteriol. 90:766–777. 1965.—Data are presented which demonstrate that the mechanism of gram-positivity could not be due solely to factors such as a single, specific gram-positive substrate, specific affinities of crystal violet for certain cellular components, a specific crystal violet-iodine-substrate complex, or to any specific characteristic of the dye, iodine, or solvent molecules. Ruptured cells of gram-positive organisms stain gram-negatively when subjected to a standard Gram-stain procedure. However, when stained fragments of broken cells were deposited in thick layers on the surface of filter-paper strips and exposed to decolorizers, the rate of dye release correlated with the Gram characteristic of the intact cell. Therefore, the intact cell in itself is not an absolute requirement for Gram differentiation. The data are interpreted as indicating that the mechanism of Gram differentiation primarily involves the rate of permeation of molecules (dye, iodine, solvent) through the interstitial spaces of cell-wall material. Images PMID:16562079

  16. Absolutely Exponential Stability and Temperature Control for Gas Chromatograph System Under Dwell Time Switching Techniques.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi-Ming; Wang, Xue-Fang; Tan, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a design strategy for temperature control of the gas chromatograph. Usually gas chromatograph is modeled by a simple first order system with a time-delay, and a proportion integration (PI) controller is widely used to regulate the output of the gas chromatograph to the desired temperature. As the characteristics of the gas chromatograph varies at the different temperature range, the single-model based PI controller cannot work well when output temperature varies from one range to another. Moreover, the presence of various disturbance will further deteriorate the performance. In order to improve the accuracy of the temperature control, multiple models are used at the different temperature ranges. With a PI controller designed for each model accordingly, a delay-dependent switching control scheme using the dwell time technique is proposed to ensure the absolute exponential stability of the closed loop. Experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed switching technique. PMID:26316283

  17. Efficient fabrication of high-capacity immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media: The role of the dextran-grafting process and its manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Jingfei; Huang, Yongdong; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Rongyue; Zhu, Kai; Suo, Jia; Su, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhigang; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-03-01

    Novel high-capacity Ni(2+) immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media were prepared through the dextran-grafting process. Dextran was grafted to an allyl-activated agarose-based matrix followed by functionalization for the immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media. With elaborate regulation of the allylation degree, dextran was completely or partly grafted to agarose microspheres, namely, completely dextran-grafted agarose microspheres and partly dextran-grafted ones, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscope results demonstrated that a good adjustment of dextran-grafting degree was achieved, and dextran was distributed uniformly in whole completely dextran-grafted microspheres, while just distributed around the outside of the partly dextran-grafted ones. Flow hydrodynamic properties were improved greatly after the dextran-grafting process, and the flow velocity increased by about 30% compared with that of a commercial chromatographic medium (Ni Sepharose FF). A significant improvement of protein binding performance was also achieved by the dextran-grafting process, and partly dextran-grafted Ni(2+) chelating medium had a maximum binding capacity for His-tagged lactate dehydrogenase about 2.5 times higher than that of Ni Sepharose FF. The results indicated that this novel chromatographic medium is promising for applications in high-efficiency and large-scale protein purification. PMID:26786724

  18. Cefaclor pharmacokinetic parameters: serum concentrations determined by a new high-performance liquid chromatographic technique.

    PubMed

    Rotschafer, J C; Crossley, K B; Lesar, T S; Zaske, D; Miller, K

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of cefaclor were studied in eight patients after an oral dose of 250 mg. Serum samples were obtained before and on 19 occasions after oral administration. Cefaclor serum concentrations were determined by a new high-performance liquid chromatographic technique. PMID:7081972

  19. Comparison of gas chromatographic hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevado, J J Berzas; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Krupp, E M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Fariñas, N Rodríguez; Moreno, M Jiménez; Wallace, D; Ropero, M J Patiño

    2011-07-15

    In this study, we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of three hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis in different sample matrices using gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) and pyrolysis atomic fluorescence (GC-pyro-AFS) detection. Aqueous ethylation with NaBEt(4) was required in all cases. All systems were validated with respect to precision, with repeatability and reproducibility <5% RSD, confirmed by the Snedecor F-test. All methods proved to be robust according to a Plackett-Burnham design for 7 factors and 15 experiments, and calculations were carried out using the procedures described by Youden and Steiner. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (DORM-2 and DOLT-3) were analyzed after closed-vessel microwave extraction with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). No statistically significant differences were found to the certified values (p=0.05). The suitability for water samples analysis with different organic matter and chloride contents was evaluated by recovery experiments in synthetic spiked waters. Absolute detection and quantification limits were in the range of 2-6 pg for GC-pyro-AFS, 1-4 pg for GC-MS, with 0.05-0.21 pg for GC-ICP-MS showing the best limits of detection for the three systems employed. However, all systems are sufficiently sensitive for mercury speciation in environmental samples, with GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS offering isotope analysis capabilities for the use of species-specific isotope dilution analysis, and GC-pyro-AFS being the most cost effective alternative. PMID:21641604

  20. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques in the examination of engine oils.

    PubMed

    Fall, Jacek; Voelkel, Adam

    2002-09-01

    The emerging market of engine oils consists of a number of products from different viscosity and quality classes. Determination of the base oil used in manufacturing of the final product (engine oil) as well as estimation of mutual miscibility of oils and their solubility could be crucial problems. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques are presented as an interesting and fruitful extension of normalised standard analytical methods used in the oil industry. PMID:12385390

  1. EVALUATION OF THE BASIC GC/MS (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC/MASS SPECTROMETRIC) COMPUTER ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR POLLUTANT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basic gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric/computer technique for the analysis of vapor-phase organic compounds collected on a solid sorbent was evaluated. Emphasis was placed on the assessment of performance and improvement in techniques in the following areas: (1) wide-bo...

  2. Chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques used in the analysis of triazole antifungal agents-a review.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, R J; Krzek, J; Talik, P

    2010-09-15

    Systematic review of literature coupled with integrative research of published data for triazole antifungal agents was done. The investigated literature covered chromatographic and electrophoretic methods developed in the last 10 years (2000-2009). The aim of this review was to compare different methodologies, assess preferences in the selection of analytical methods and to find still existing analytical problems. Last decade is characterized by dynamic development of instrumental methods, that results in advance and diversity of applied analytical procedures. The main focus was given to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the technique of choice in the analysis of most of pharmaceuticals. The review includes literature on 8 triazole antifungal drugs: fluconazole, itraconazole and terconazole from the first generation and posaconazole, voriconazole, ravuconazole, isavuconazole and albaconazole classified in second generation. Investigations of pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples were considered. PMID:20801303

  3. Pharmacognostic Screening of Piper trichostachyon Fruits and its Comparative Analysis with Piper nigrum Using Chromatographic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R.; Ankad, Gireesh M.; Hegde, Harsha V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Piper trichostachyon is a wild, endemic Piper species from Western Ghats of India. The folklore healers of Belagavi region use this plant, similar to Piper nigrum. Aims: The present study investigates the comparison between P. nigrum and P. trichostachyon using pharmacognostic parameters. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic evaluation was carried out in terms of morphological, microscopic characters, and phytochemical analysis using standard methods. Comparative physicochemical analysis between P. trichostachyon and P. nigrum was also carried out through estimation of micro-macro nutrients, high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) investigation and using piperine as a marker compound for reversed phase-ultra flow liquid chromatographic (RP-UFLC) technique. Results: P. trichostachyon grows in the forests, and the fruits are morphologically similar to P. nigrum fruits, so the name in Kannada “Kaadu Kalu menasu” (wild/forest black pepper). The microscopy revealed the presence of stone cells, starch grains, oil cells and globules, beaker cells, and yellowish brown pigment layer, parenchymatous cells. The presence of alkaloids, oil, and tannins were observed in P. trichostachyon fruits. The HPTLC studies visibly indicated differences among two species with 12 peaks and varied banding pattern. RP-UFLC results showed less amount of piperine in P. trichostachyon (0.05 ± 0.002 mg/g) than in P. nigrum (16.14 ± 0.807 mg/g). Conclusion: The study reports on pharmacognostic parameters of P. trichostachyon for the 1st time and will be useful for the identification and authentication. The comparative HPTLC and RP-UFLC studies resolve the differentiation impasse among two species. However, further biological efficacy studies are required to establish its use in traditional medicine. SUMMARY Piper trichostachyon grows in the forests, and the fruits are morphologically similar to Piper nigrum fruitsThe microscopy of P. trichostachyon revealed the

  4. Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bazzali, Ophélie; Thai, Tran Huy; Hoi, Tran Minh; Khang, Nguyen Sinh; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange; Tomi, Félix

    2016-01-01

    In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, (13)C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%), 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-one (17.2%), γ-eudesmol (5.1%), nootkatone (4.7%), valencene (3.5%) and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-11-one (2.6%). The structure of two new compounds-10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran-has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%), phyllocladene (37.8%) or by pimara-6(14)-15-diene (19.4%). PMID:27355937

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Resorcinol from Marketed Hair Tonic Using Liquid Chromatographic Technique

    PubMed Central

    De, Amit Kumar; Chowdhury, Partha Pratim; Chattapadhyay, Shyamaprasad

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of resorcinol from marketed pharmaceutical formulation has been reported in this study. Resorcinol as a pharmaceutical ingredient has a broad spectrum of application but its application is limited due to its toxic side effects. Method for the accurate estimation of resorcinol is therefore essential. In the current study we have developed a chromatographic technique for its estimation from a marketed hair tonic meant for the treatment of several dermatological diseases of the scalp. A stainless steel column 25 cm in length and 4 mm internal diameter packed with octadecylsilane (5 µm) was used for this purpose. The mobile phase was a mixture of phosphate buffer of pH 2.8 and acetonitrile. The flow rate was 0.6 mL·min−1 and the detection wavelength was 280 nm. The method was found to be linear between concentration range 10.28 µg·mL−1 to 71.96 µg·mL−1 with r2 value 0.999. The accuracy of the method and the intraday and interday precession study presents the applicability of the method for the estimation of resorcinol from any pharmaceutical and cosmetic product containing resorcinol. PMID:27379340

  6. Coupling spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for evaluation of the depositional history of hydrocarbons in a subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Doumer, Marta E; Gallice, Wellington C; Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Cabral, Ana Caroline; Cardoso, Fernanda D; Dolci, Natiely N; Camargo, Luana M; Ferreira, Paulo A L; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-10-01

    Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques can be used together to evaluate hydrocarbon inputs to coastal environments such as the Paranaguá estuarine system (PES), located in the SW Atlantic, Brazil. Historical inputs of aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using two sediment cores from the PES. The AHs were related to the presence of biogenic organic matter and degraded oil residues. The PAHs were associated with mixed sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations were related to oil spills, while relatively low levels could be attributed to the decrease in oil usage during the global oil crisis. The results of electron paramagnetic resonance were in agreement with the absolute AHs and PAHs concentrations measured by chromatographic techniques, while near-infrared spectroscopy results were consistent with unresolved complex mixture (UCM)/total n-alkanes ratios. These findings suggest that the use of a combination of techniques can increase the accuracy of assessment of contamination in sediments. PMID:26210796

  7. Purification of pre-miR-29 by a new O-phospho-l-tyrosine affinity chromatographic strategy optimized using design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Adriana; Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Sousa, Ângela; Sousa, Fani

    2014-05-23

    MicroRNAs are the most studied small non-coding RNA molecules that are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of target genes. Their role in Alzheimer's disease is being studied and explored in order to develop a new therapeutic strategy based on specific gene silencing. This disease is characterized by protein deposits, mainly deposits of extracellular Aβ plaques, produced upon endoproteolytic cleavage of APP by ß-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Recent studies have shown that particularly miR-29 cluster can be involved in the decrease of Aβ plaques production, by acting on BACE1 expression silencing. In order to use this microRNA as potential therapeutic it is essential to guarantee its purity, stability and integrity. Hence, the main purpose of this study was the development of a new affinity chromatographic strategy by using an O-phospho-l-tyrosine matrix and applying Box-Behnken design (BBD) to obtain pre-miR-29 with high purity degree and yield, envisioning its application in gene therapy. Thus, after process optimization the best results were achieved with a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient in 10mM Tris buffer, pH 8 (1.6M (NH4)2SO4, 1.11M (NH4)2SO4 and 0M (NH4)2SO4), at 16°C. These experimental conditions allowed the recovery of pre-miR-29 with 52% of purity and 71% of recovery yield. The O-phospho-l-tyrosine matrix was initially chosen to mimic the natural interactions that occur inside the cell, and in fact it was proved a satisfactory selectivity for pre-miR-29. Also the innovative application of BBD for this strategy was efficient (R(2)=0.98 for % relative recovery and R(2)=0.93 for % relative purity) and essential to achieve best purification results in short time, saving lab resources. PMID:24751555

  8. Fluorous-assisted metal chelate affinity extraction technique for analysis of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Ena; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a fluorous affinity-based extraction method for measurement of protein kinase activity. In this method, a fluorescent peptide substrate was phosphorylated by a protein kinase, and the obtained phosphopeptide was selectively captured with Fe(III)-immobilized perfluoroalkyliminodiacetic acid reagent via a metal chelate affinity technique. Next, the captured phosphopeptide was selectively extracted into a fluorous solvent mixture, tetradecafluorohexane and 1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluoro-1-n-octanol (3:1, v/v), using the specificity of fluorous affinity (fluorophilicity). In contrast, the remained substrate peptide in the aqueous (non-fluorous) phase was easily measured fluorimetrically. Finally, the enzyme activity could be assayed by measuring the decrease in fluorescence. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated by applying the method for measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) using its substrate peptide (kemptide) pre-labeled with carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). PMID:27260427

  9. A review of chromatographic characterization techniques for biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    This review surveys chromatographic technology that has been applied to the characterization of biodiesel and its blends. Typically, biodiesel consists of fatty acid methyl esters produced by transesterification of plant or animal derived triacylglycerols. Primary attention is given to the determination of trace impurities in biodiesel, such as methanol, glycerol, mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, and sterol glucosides. The determination of the fatty acid methyl esters, trace impurities in biodiesel, and the determination of the biodiesel content of commercial blends of biodiesel in conventional diesel are also addressed.

  10. Microextraction techniques for the non-chromatographic speciation of ultratraces of elements in waters: some significant cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Vicente-Martinez, Yesica; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel; Martínez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    The speciation of very low concentrations of some elements in waters is of interest due to the different behaviour and toxicity the species can have. This task can be carried out by using liquid chromatographic techniques (LC) for separation together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. However, this combination is not easily available in all laboratories mainly due to the relative high cost of acquisition and maintenance of the ICP-MS spectrometer, and so other alternatives are of practical interest. Present knowledge of microextraction techniques involving minimal (or none) amounts of organic solvents allows, in some cases, speciation to be carried out without the need of such an expensive instrument, and even avoiding the use of a chromatographic stage. The selectivity of the separation (fractionation or speciation) can be achieved by modifying the experimental conditions used for microextraction, and a sensitive final measurement be obtained by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In this way, since an ETAAS instrument is common (and sometimes underused) in all laboratories, the speciation procedures are made available to most laboratories worldwide. The high preconcentration factor achieved by means of the microextraction stage together with the high sensitivity inherent in ETAAS measurements result in extremely sensitive methods that permit the speciation at ultratrace levels. The advantages of this methodology are presented by discussing speciation of chromium and arsenic as representative examples.

  11. Element-selective trace detection of toxic species in environmental samples using chromatographic techniques and derivative diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Zybin, A.; Niemax, K.

    1998-10-01

    Very sensitive laser absorption techniques based on a double-beam scheme with logarithmic processing of the detector signals and wavelength modulation of laser diodes are presented. Detection limits equivalent to 10-7 absorption per square root of detection bandwidth are obtained if sufficient laser power is available and if the absorption is also subject to additional modulation. The analytical versatility of these techniques is demonstrated by quantitative analysis of very low concentrations of (i) Cr(VI) species in tap water and (ii) chlorinated poly-aromatics (chlorophenols) in plant extracts, both after chromatographic separation. The atomic absorption measurements were performed in an air-acetylene flame (Cr) and in a low-pressure microwave-induced plasma (chlorophenols).

  12. Fluorous affinity-based separation techniques for the analysis of biogenic and related molecules.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl-containing compounds have a unique 'fluorous' property that refers to the remarkably specific affinity they share. Fluorous compounds can be easily isolated from non-fluorous species on the perfluoroalkyl-functionalized stationary phases used in fluorous solid-phase extraction and fluorous liquid chromatography by means of fluorous-fluorous interactions (fluorophilicity). Recently, this unique specificity has been applied to the highly selective enrichment and analysis of different classes of biogenic and related compounds in complex samples. Because the biogenic compounds are generally not 'fluorous', they must be derivatized with appropriate perfluoroalkyl group-containing reagent in order to utilize fluorous interaction. In this review, we introduce the application of fluorous affinity techniques including derivatization methods to biogenic sample analysis. PMID:24865313

  13. Solid phase micro extraction - A new technique coupled with gas chromatograph for chloroethene analysis from aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.; Sewell, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    Once the chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene) contamination occurs in the subsurface environment, they tend to retain and form a Pollution plum in the aquifer because of their recalcitrance to aerobic oxidation. Currently, the most promising bioremediation method for chlorinated compounds is through anaerobic reductive biotransformation, in which each chlorine is replaced by a hydrogen. To study the biodegradation process, it is essential to monitor tetrachloroethene and its degradation daughter products frequently. An analytical method has been modified for chloroethene analysis by gas chromatography. Solid Phase Micro Extraction technique has been used to extract aqueous sample onto a fiber and then to desorb the sample directly into a gas chromatograph injection port. The total run time is less than 17 minutes.

  14. Microminiature gas chromatographic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, R. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques commonly used for fabrication of integrated circuits are utilized to produce long capillary tubes for microminiature chromatographs. Method involves bonding of flat silicon plate to top of spirally grooved silicon chip to close groove and form capillary column.

  15. Determination of formate in natural waters by a coupled enzymatic/high-performance liquid chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, D.J.; Vaughan, G.M.; Mopper, K.

    1988-09-01

    An enzymatic method was developed to quantify formic acid in natural water samples at submicromolar concentrations. The method is based on the oxidation of formate by formate dehydrogenase with corresponding reduction of ..beta..-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (..beta..-NAD/sup +/) to reduced ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ (..beta..-NADH); ..beta..-NADH is quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. An important feature of this method is that the enzymatic reaction occurs directly in aqueous media, even sea water, and does not require sample pretreatment other than sample filtration. The reaction proceeds at room temperature at a slightly alkaline pH (7.5 - 8.5) and is specific for formate with a detection limit of 0.5 ..mu..M (S/N = 4) for a 200-..mu..L injection. The precision of the method was 4.6% relative standard deviation (n = 6) for a 0.6 ..mu..M standard addition of formate to Sargasso sea water. Average recoveries of 2 ..mu..M additions of formate to sea water, pore water, or rain were 103, 103, and 87%, respectively. Intercalibration with a Dionex ion chromatographic system showed an excellent agreement of 98%. Concentrations of formate present in natural samples ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sea water, 0.4 to 10.0 ..mu..M for Miami rain, and 0.9 to 8.4 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sediment pore water.

  16. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-05-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific TSP-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect.

  17. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  18. The extraction and chromatographic determination of the essentials oils from Ocimum basilicum L. by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredana Soran, Maria; Codruta Cobzac, Simona; Varodi, Codruta; Lung, Ildiko; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile

    2009-08-01

    Three different techniques (maceration, sonication and extraction in microwave field) were used for extraction of essential oils from Ocimum basilicum L. The extracts were analyzed by TLC/HPTLC technique and the fingerprint informations were obtained. The GC-FID was used to characterized the extraction efficiency and for identify the terpenic bioactive compounds. The most efficient extraction technique was maceration followed by microwave and ultrasound. The best extraction solvent system was ethyl ether + ethanol (1:1, v/v). The main compounds identified in Ocimum basilicum L. extracts were: α and β-pinene (mixture), limonene, citronellol, and geraniol.

  19. [Transfer possibilities of the mobile phases between different liquid chromatographic techniques for the analysis and isolation of compounds of biological matrices].

    PubMed

    Nyiredy, S

    1999-01-01

    After the survey and characterisation of the solid/liquid chromatographic methods, the author summarized the features of overpressure layer chromatography; the disturbing zone and the multi-front effect as well as the elimination of their influence. In light of these effects, the strategy of the mobile phase transfer possibilities is demonstrated between the various analytical and preparative liquid chromatographic methods, with the OPLC playing a central role. The main point of this strategy is that the examination of biological matrices is always begun with unsaturated TLC chamber, in which the compounds to be separated are placed between the Rf values of 0.3 and 0.8. The optimized TLC mobile phase is transferred without changes to the OPLC technique where a prerun is applied. For separation of nonpolar compounds, the prerun can be performed with hexane; for separation of polar substances the prerun can be performed with any component of the mobile phase in which the components are unable to migrate. The selection of this solvent might be considered during optimization of the mobile phase. Using HPTLC chromatoplate and analytical OPLC technique, highly effective separation can be achieved. The scaling-up for the various preparative chromatographic systems can be performed on basis of the applied chromatographic circumstances. The dry-filled preparative (FC, LPLC, MPLC) columns can be equilibrated with the solvent used for the prerun in analytical OPLC, while in case of filling with slurry technique, the slurry has to be prepared using the same solvent as was used for the prerun of OPLC. The air bubbles can be eliminated in both cases by pumping over the appropriate quantity of the solvent used for prerun, afterwards the preparative separation can be started with the optimized unsaturated TLC mobile phase. The author deals separately with the mobile phase transfer possibilities between the different analytical and preparative planar (OPLC and RPC with various

  20. Comparative study of different chromatographic techniques for the analysis of multi-residues of some approved antimicrobials in fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Riad, Safa'a M; Rezk, Mamdouh R; Khattab, Fatma I; Marzouk, Hoda M

    2015-01-01

    Two chromatographic methods were developed, optimized and validated for the simultaneous determination of three approved aquaculture antimicrobials, namely sulphadimethoxine sodium, trimethoprim and florphenicol in fish tissues. The developed methods were based on simple liquid extraction technique. The first method employs thin-layer chromatography as a clean-up procedure coupled with densitometric determination for the separated drugs. The second method is an HPLC one using X-Terra™ C18 column. Several mobile-phase systems and extracting solvents were tried to optimize the separation and the extraction procedures from fish tissues. The procedures were applied for the analysis of spiked fish tissue samples at three different concentration levels (10, 50 and 100 ppm). A comparative study was conducted between the proposed methods to discuss the advantage of each one. The methods were validated according to the international conference on harmonization guidelines. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in spiked fish tissues, pure powders and in their veterinary pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:26184768

  1. Chromatographic Fingerprint Analysis of Marrubiin in Marrubium vulgare L. via HPTLC Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Keyvan; Hamedeyazdan, Sanaz; Torbati, Mohammadali; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study we aimed to quantify marrubiin, as the major active compound, in the aerial parts of Marrubium vulgare from Iran using a HPTLC-densitometry technique. Methods: Quantitative determination of marrubiin in M. vulgare methanol extract was performed by HPTLC analysis via a fully automated TLC scanner. Later on, the in vitro antioxidant activity of the M. vulgare methanol extract was determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. Furthermore, total phenolics and flavonoids contents of the methanol extract were quantified, spectrophotometrically. Results: The amount of marrubiin was calculated as 156 mg/g of M. vulgare extract. The antioxidant assay revealed a strong radical scavenging activity for the M. vulgare methanol extract with RC50 value of 8.24μg/mL. Total phenolics and flavonoids contents for M. vulgare were determined as 60.4 mg gallic acid equivalent and 12.05 mg quercetin equivalent per each gram of the extract, correspondingly. Conclusion: The presented fingerprint of marrubiin in M. vulgare extract developed by HPTLC densitometry afforded a detailed chemical profile, which might be useful in the identification as well as quality evaluation of herbal medications based on M. vulgare. Besides, the considerable antioxidant activity of M. vulgare was associated with the presence of marrubiin along with phenolics and flavonoids exerting a synergistic effect. PMID:27123428

  2. Improved method for the on-line metal chelate affinity chromatography-high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of tetracycline antibiotics in animal products.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A D; Stubbings, G W; Kelly, M; Tarbin, J A; Farrington, W H; Shearer, G

    1998-07-01

    An improved on-line metal chelate affinity chromatography-high-performance liquid chromatography (MCAC-HPLC) method for the determination of tetracycline antibiotics in animal tissues and egg has been developed. Extraction was carried out with ethyl acetate. The extract was then evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in methanol prior to on-line MCAC clean-up and HPLC-UV determination. Recoveries of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, demeclocycline and chlortetracycline in the range 42% to 101% were obtained from egg, poultry, fish and venison tissues spiked at 25 micrograms kg-1. Limits of detection less than 10 microgram kg-1 were estimated for all four analytes. This method has higher throughput, higher recovery and lower limits of detection than a previously reported on-line MCAC-HPLC method which involved aqueous extraction and solid-phase extraction clean-up. PMID:9691328

  3. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided. PMID:27492597

  4. CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES IN PHARMACEUTICAL ANALYSIS IN POIAND: HISTORY AND THE PRESENCE ON THE BASIS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED IN SELECTED POLISH PHARMACEUTICAL JOURNALS IN XX CENTURY.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Maciej; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, chromatographic techniques and techniques related to them have stimulated the development of new procedures in the field of pharmaceutical analysis. The newly developed methods, characterized by improved metrological parameters, allow for more accurate testing of, among others, the composition of raw materials, intermediates and final products. The chromatographic techniques also enable studies on waste generated in research laboratories and factories producing pharmaceuticals and parapharmaceuticals. Based on the review of reports published in Polish pharmaceutical journals, we assessed the impact of chromatographic techniques on the development of pharmaceutical analysis. The first chromatographic technique used in pharmaceutical analysis was a so-called capillary analysis. It was applied in the 1930s to control the identity of pharmaceutical formulations. In the 1940s and 1950s, the chromatographic techniques were mostly a subject of review publications, while their use in experimental work was rare. Paper chromatography and thin layer chromatography were introduced in the 1960s and 1970s, respectively. These new analytical tools have contributed to the intensive development of research in the field of phytochemistry and the analysis of herbal medicines. The development of colunm chromatography-based techniques, i.e., gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography took place in the end of 20th century. Both aforementioned techniques were widely applied in pharmaceutical analysis, for example, to assess the stability of drugs, test for impurities and degradation products as well as in pharmacokinetics studies. The first decade of 21" century was the time of new detection methods in gas and liquid chromatography. The information sources used to write this article were Polish pharmaceutical journals, both professional and scientific, originating from the interwar and post-war period, i.e., "Kronika Farmaceutyczna", "Farmacja Wsp

  5. Rapid screening method for quinolone residues in livestock and fishery products using immobilised metal chelate affinity chromatographic clean-up and liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Gotoh, M; Matsuoka, T

    2011-09-01

    An efficient LC method was developed for screening the presence of quinolones (QLs)--comprising fluoroquinolones (FQs) and acidic quinolones (AQs)--residues in various livestock and fishery products. Targeted analytes were for nine FQs of marbofloxacin (MAR), ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR), ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), danofloxacin (DAN), orbifloxacin (ORB), difloxacin (DIF) and sarafloxacin (SAR), and three AQs of oxolinic acid (OXA), nalidixic acid (NAL) and flumequine (FMQ). Samples comprised ten different food products covering five matrices: muscle (cattle, swine and chicken), liver (chicken), raw fish (shrimp and salmon), egg (chicken), and processed food (ham, sausage and fish sausage). This method involved a simple extraction with (1:1) acetonitrile-methanol, a highly selective clean-up with an immobilised metal chelate affinity column charged with Fe(3+), a fast isocratic LC analysis using a short column (20 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) with a mobile phase of (15:85:0.1) methanol/water/formic acid, and fluorescence detection (excitation/emission wavelengths of 295 nm/455 nm for FQs (495 nm for MAR), and 320 nm/365 nm for AQs). Among FQs, pairs of NOR/OFL, ORB/DIF and ENR/DAN were incompletely resolved. A confirmatory LC run with a Mg(2+) containing methanolic mobile phase was also proposed for the samples suspected of being positive. The optimised method gave satisfactory recoveries of 88.5% (56.1-108.6%) and 78.7% (44.1-99.5%) for intra- and inter-day assays with relative standard deviations of 7.2% (0.7-18.4%) and 6.8% (1.4-16.6%), respectively. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.8 µg kg(-1) (DAN) to 6.5 µg kg(-1) (SAR). This method was successfully employed to analyse 113 real samples and two positive samples were found: fish sausage (CIP 990 µg kg(-1)) and shrimp (ENR 20 µg kg(-1)). PMID:21749230

  6. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  7. Microfabricated packed gas chromatographic column

    DOEpatents

    Kottenstette, Richard; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-16

    A new class of miniaturized gas chromatographic columns has been invented. These chromatographic columns are formed using conventional micromachining techniques, and allow packed columns having lengths on the order of a meter to be fabricated with a footprint on the order of a square centimeter.

  8. Interval-type and affine arithmetic-type techniques for handling uncertainty in expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberio, Martine; Kreinovich, Vladik; Chopra, Sanjeev; Longpre, Luc; Nguyen, Hung T.; Ludascher, Bertram; Baral, Chitta

    2007-02-01

    Expert knowledge consists of statements Sj (facts and rules). The facts and rules are often only true with some probability. For example, if we are interested in oil, we should look at seismic data. If in 90% of the cases, the seismic data were indeed helpful in locating oil, then we can say that if we are interested in oil, then with probability 90% it is helpful to look at the seismic data. In more formal terms, we can say that the implication "if oil then seismic" holds with probability 90%. Another example: a bank A trusts a client B, so if we trust the bank A, we should trust B too; if statistically this trust was justified in 99% of the cases, we can conclude that the corresponding implication holds with probability 99%. If a query Q is deducible from facts and rules, what is the resulting probability p(Q) in Q? We can describe the truth of Q as a propositional formula F in terms of Sj, i.e., as a combination of statements Sj linked by operators like &, [logical or], and [not sign]; computing p(Q) exactly is NP-hard, so heuristics are needed. Traditionally, expert systems use technique similar to straightforward interval computations: we parse F and replace each computation step with corresponding probability operation. Problem: at each step, we ignore the dependence between the intermediate results Fj; hence intervals are too wide. Example: the estimate for P(A[logical or][not sign]A) is not 1. Solution: similar to affine arithmetic, besides P(Fj), we also compute P(Fj&Fi) (or P(Fj1&...&Fjd)), and on each step, use all combinations of l such probabilities to get new estimates. Results: e.g., P(A[logical or][not sign]A) is estimated as 1.

  9. Gas chromatographic techniques for the analysis of hydrocarbons in low-rank coal liquefaction products. Part II. Instrumental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Raynie, D.E.; Farnum, S.A.; Potts, Y.R.

    1984-01-01

    Two long Continuous Processing Unit (CPU) runs were carried out to: (1) study the effect of two different start-up solvents on the composition of the recycle product; and (2) thoroughly characterize any change caused by the start-up solvent during the recycle process. Capillary gas chromatography has been chosen as the major analytical tool in these line-out studies of coal liquefaction products. Initial separations of distillate oils from CPU passes were carried out by the silical gel chromatographic method previously reported. The resulting hydrocarbon fractions were combined into four groups for gas chromatographic analysis. The four groups were chromatographed against the appropriate calibration mixture. Some components of the distillate oil were identified but not quantified due to insufficient amounts of some standards. Over 300 samples also necessitated the use of up to 30 components in a calibration standard. Resulting chromatograms showed near-ideal peak shapes. Peak areas were integrated, ratioed to the internal standard and compared to the appropriate calibration curve. Components were identified by comparing retention times and were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Parameters such as threshold, peak width, and baseline construction mode were adjusted for optimum sensitivity. For valid comparisons to be made conditions were carefully reproduced. Although chromatography is not often thought of as an exact science, chromatographic systems can be optimized for a given analytical situation. In this case, we have successfully used capillary gas chromatography for the automated identification and quantification of up to 30 species in a single coal liquefaction fraction. We have quantified 87 compounds in the distillate oil. This method may also serve as the basis for analysis of other complex samples.

  10. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  11. Column performance study of different variants of liquid chromatographic technique: an application on pharmaceutical ternary mixtures containing tetryzoline.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Lotfy, Hayam M; Saleh, Sarah S

    2015-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and rapid resolution liquid chromatographic (RRLC) methods have been developed and validated for the separation and quantitation of both or either of two ternary mixtures present in ophthalmic solutions. The first mixture contains chloramphenicol, dexamethasone sodium phosphate and tetryzoline HCl (TZH); while the second one contains ofloxacin, prednisolone acetate and TZH. Both preparations contain benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The columns used were a HPLC column (C18 5 µm particle size), a RRLC column (C18 2.6 µm particle size) and a UPLC column (C18 1.7 µm particle size). A comparative study was conducted to illustrate the effect of the change in column particle size and dimensions on the other chromatographic conditions, backpressure and the separation of both ternary mixtures. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, repeatability, interday precision and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits. The RRLC column provided shorter run time and better resolution than HPLC, while the UPLC column gave the shortest run time for all columns. The RRLC column resulted in minimum backpressure, so it could be used with any HPLC instrument, which makes the method more practical and economic. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with official ones where no significant difference was observed. PMID:25217705

  12. Determination of calcium stearate in polyolefin samples by gas chromatographic technique after performing dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ranji, Ali; Ghorbani Ravandi, Mahboobeh; Farajzadeh, Mir Ali

    2008-05-01

    In this study, a gas chromatographic method is presented for the determination of calcium stearate after its conversion to stearic acid in a polymeric matrix. A solution of hydrochloric acid in 2-propanol is used as an extracting solvent of calcium stearate and its converter to stearic acid. For stearic acid preconcentration before its injection to a separation system, a recently presented extraction method, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, using carbon tetrachloride as an extracting solvent is used. Finally, 1 microL of the organic phase collected at the bottom of a conical test tube after centrifuging is injected into a gas chromatograph (GC) for quantification. This method has a relatively broad linear dynamic range (50 - 2000 mg/L) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 15 mg/L for stearic acid in solution. The LOD of the proposed method in a polymeric sample using 10 mg of polymer is 60 ppm as calcium stearate. Some effective parameters, such as the time and temperature of heating, the concentration of hydrochloric acid and the volume of distilled water, were studied. PMID:18469468

  13. Secondary metabolites isolation in natural products chemistry: comparison of two semipreparative chromatographic techniques (high pressure liquid chromatography and high performance thin-layer chromatography).

    PubMed

    Do, Thi Kieu Tiên; Hadji-Minaglou, Francis; Antoniotti, Sylvain; Fernandez, Xavier

    2014-01-17

    Chemical investigations on secondary metabolites in natural products chemistry require efficient isolation techniques for characterization purpose as well as for the evaluation of their biological properties. In the case of phytochemical studies, the performance of the techniques is critical (resolution and yield) since the products generally present a narrow range of polarity and physicochemical properties. Several techniques are currently available, but HPLC (preparative and semipreparative) is the most widely used. To compare the performance of semipreparative HPLC and HPTLC for the isolation of secondary metabolites in different types of extracts, we have chosen carvone from spearmint essential oil (Mentha spicata L.), resveratrol from Fallopia multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson, and rosmarinic acid from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts. The comparison was based on the chromatographic separation, the purity and quantity of isolated compounds, the solvent consumption, the duration and the cost of the isolation operations. The results showed that semipreparative HPTLC can in some case offer some advantages over conventional semipreparative HPLC. PMID:24377738

  14. Separation of carrier-free {sup 90}Y from high level waste by extraction chromatographic technique using 2-ethylhexyl-2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17)

    SciTech Connect

    Achuthan, P.V.; Dhami, P.S.; Kannan, R.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Ramanujam, A.

    2000-01-01

    An extraction chromatographic technique has been developed for the separation of carrier-free {sup 90}Y from the {sup 90}Sr present in the high level waste (HLW) of the Purex process. When a Purex HLW solution in 2--3 M HNO{sub 3} is passed through a CMPO-Chromosorb-102 (CAC) column, all the trivalent, tetravalent, and hexavalent ions are sorbed. The effluent from this experiment, after adjusting the pH to 2 with NaOH, was passed through a 2-ethylhexyl-2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17)-Chromosorb-102 (KSMC) extraction chromatographic column where only {sup 90}Y was sorbed. All the other ions ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 106}Rh, etc.) were washed off with dilute HNO{sub 3} (pH 2), and carrier-free {sup 90}Y was eluted with 0.5 M HNO{sub 3}. This technique can yield {sup 90}Y in mCi levels in pure form for medical applications. The {sup 90}Sr can be used repeatedly after allowing for {sup 90}Y buildup.

  15. Identification of vegetable oil botanical speciation in refined vegetable oil blends using an innovative combination of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Maria Teresa; Haughey, Simon A; Elliott, Christopher T; Koidis, Anastasios

    2015-12-15

    European Regulation 1169/2011 requires producers of foods that contain refined vegetable oils to label the oil types. A novel rapid and staged methodology has been developed for the first time to identify common oil species in oil blends. The qualitative method consists of a combination of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to profile the oils and fatty acid chromatographic analysis to confirm the composition of the oils when required. Calibration models and specific classification criteria were developed and all data were fused into a simple decision-making system. The single lab validation of the method demonstrated the very good performance (96% correct classification, 100% specificity, 4% false positive rate). Only a small fraction of the samples needed to be confirmed with the majority of oils identified rapidly using only the spectroscopic procedure. The results demonstrate the huge potential of the methodology for a wide range of oil authenticity work. PMID:26190602

  16. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L.; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J.; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique. PMID:26287192

  17. Analytical approaches for the determination of pesticide residues in nutraceutical products and related matrices by chromatographic techniques coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Domínguez, Gerardo; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Romero-González, Roberto; Garrido-Frenich, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    A review of sample preparation and analytical techniques currently used to analyze pesticides in nutraceutical products is shown. Different sample treatments are commented, and the QuEChERS method is the most used (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe). For the chromatographic determination, gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) are evaluated. Different detection modes are discussed, and simple quadrupole mass spectrometry (Q-MS) and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS/MS) are the most used. Finally, a review of the occurrence of pesticides (from the revised literature) in real samples is presented, evaluating several matrices, such as nutraceuticals, dietary supplements, medicinal plants, and fish oil. The occurrence of several pesticides was reported: γ-HCH (lindane), endosulfan, procymidone, azoxystrobin, p,p'-DDE, metalaxyl, quintozene, tolclofos-methyl, chlorpyrifos and hexachlorobenzene. PMID:24274299

  18. Dynamics of Spontaneous Peptidization of l-, d- and dl-Serine in an Abiotic Solution as Investigated with Use of TLC-Densitometry and the Auxiliary Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Godziek, Agnieszka; Maciejowska, Anna; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Kowalska, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    From our earlier investigations, it comes out that proteinogenic amino acids can undergo spontaneous oscillatory reactions of chiral inversion and peptidization. l-Serine (l-Ser) is an important proteinogenic amino acid with many vital functions in human and mammalian organisms, e.g., it is responsible for good condition of the nervous cell membranes. It undergoes spontaneous oscillatory processes of chiral inversion and peptidization, and the goal of this study was to compare the dynamics of its peptidization with that of d-Ser and dl-Ser (racemate). The main analytical technique used in our experiment was TLC-densitometry, and the auxiliary chromatographic techniques were HPLC-evaporative light scattering detector and LC-MS. The results obtained witness to the differences in peptidization dynamics of the two Ser enantiomers (l and d) and of the racemic mixture thereof (dl). It was shown that dl-Ser characterizes with the higher, and l- and d-Ser with the lower peptidization yields. PMID:26980722

  19. Chemical and morphological changes in hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose and investigated by chromatographic, spectroscopic and adsorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Diakité, Mamadou; Paul, Andrea; Jäger, Christian; Pielert, Judith; Mumme, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) can be used for converting the biomass into a carbon-rich material, whose application as a fuel requires higher heating value, whereas soil amendment needs stable carbon. This work was focused on the characterization of hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose. The chars were investigated using elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Severity in temperature between 230 and 270°C with reaction times between 2 and 10 h only affect the carbon content moderately. The results show that aromatization of HTC chars correlates well with temperature, which was further supported by the increase of organic radicals with decreasing g values at higher temperatures. Based on these results, the energetic use of chars favors mild HTC (T<230°C and t≤6 h), while the soil amendement favors serve conditions (T≥230°C, and t>6 h). PMID:24157681

  20. Comparison of three chromatographic techniques for the detection of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Carrell, Emily J; Ali, Zulfiqar; Avula, Bharathi; Avonto, Cristina; Parcher, Jon F; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-06-01

    Leaves of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa are used to suppress pain and mitigate opioid withdrawal syndromes. The potential threat of abuse and ready availability of this uncontrolled psychoactive plant have led to the need for improved analytical techniques for the detection of the major active components, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Three independent chromatographic methods coupled to two detection systems, GC with MS, supercritical fluid chromatography with diode array detection, and HPLC with MS and diode array detection, were compared for the analysis of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in M. speciosa plants. The indole alkaloids included two sets of diastereoisomers: (i) paynantheine and 3-isopaynantheine and (ii) mitragynine, speciogynine, and speciociliatine. Two oxindole alkaloid diastereoisomers, corynoxine and corynoxine B, were also studied. The HPLC and supercritical fluid chromatography methods successfully resolved the major components with slightly different elution orders. The GC method was less satisfactory because it was unable to resolve mitragynine and speciociliatine. This separation was difficult by GC with a liquid stationary phase because these diastereoisomers differ only in the orientation of an interior hydrogen atom. The observed lack of resolution of the indole alkaloid diastereoisomers coupled with the likeness of the mass and tandem mass spectra, calls into question proposed GC methods for the analysis of mitragynine based on solely GC with MS separation and identification. PMID:24659356

  1. On-line sample cleanup and enrichment chromatographic technique for the determination of ambroxol in human serum.

    PubMed

    Emara, Samy; Kamal, Maha; Abdel Kawi, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    A sensitive and efficient on-line clean up and pre-concentration method has been developed using column-switching technique and protein-coated µ-Bondapak CN silica pre-column for quantification of ambroxol (AM) in human serum. The method is performed by direct injection of serum sample onto a protein-coated µ-Bondapak CN silica pre-column, where AM is pre-concentrated and retained, while proteins and very polar constituents are washed to waste using a phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4). The retained analyte on the pre-column is directed onto a C(18) analytical column for separation, with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol and distilled deionized water (containing 1% triethylamine adjusted to pH 3.5 with ortho-phosphoric acid) in the ratio of 50:50 (v/v). Detection is performed at 254 nm. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 12-120 ng/mL (r(2) = 0.9995). The recovery, selectivity, linearity, precision, and accuracy of the method are convenient for pharmacokinetic studies or routine assays. PMID:22298756

  2. Study of the Behaviors of Gunshot Residues from Spent Cartridges by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-07-01

    Gunshot residues, produced after shooting activity, have acquired their importance in analysis due to the notoriety of firearms-related crimes. In this study, solid-phase microextraction was performed to extract the headspace composition of spent cartridges using 85-μm polyacrylate fiber at 66°C for 21 min. Organic compounds, that is, naphthalene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, and dibutyl phthalate were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. Evaluation of chromatograms for diphenylamine, dibutyl phthalate, and naphthalene indicates the period after a gunshot was discharged, whether it was 1 days, 2-4 days, <5 days, 10 days, 20 days, or more than 30 days ago. This study revealed the potential effects of environmental factors such as occasional wind blow and direct sunlight on the estimation of time after spent cartridges were discharged. In conclusion, we proposed reliable alternative in analyzing the headspace composition of spent cartridges in a simulated crime scene. PMID:25771708

  3. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides.

  4. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Clemmer, David E

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides. PMID:25840811

  5. Evaluation of the full evaporation technique for quantitative analysis of high boiling compounds with high affinity for apolar matrices.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Niels; Wolfs, Kris; van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2014-06-27

    In order to reduce inaccuracies due to possible matrix effects in conventional static headspace-gas chromatography (sHS-GC), it is standard practice to match the composition of calibration standards towards the composition of the sample to be analysed by adding blank matrix. However, the latter is not always available and in that case the full evaporation technique (FET) could be a solution. With FET a small sample volume is introduced in a HS vial and compounds of interest are completely evaporated. Hence no equilibrium between the condensed phase and vapour phase exists. Without the existence of an equilibrium, matrix effects are less likely to occur. Another issue often encountered with sHS-sampling is that low vapour pressure compounds with a high affinity for the dilution medium show a limited sensitivity. FET has proven to be an appropriate solution to address this problem too. In this work, the applicability of FET for the quantitative analysis of high boiling compounds in different complex apolar matrices is examined. Data show that FET is an excellent tool to overcome matrix effects often encountered with conventional sHS analysis. The tested method shows excellent accuracy with recovery values around 100% as well as repeatability with RSD values around 1% for the quantification of high boiling compounds (bp>200°C) such as camphor, menthol, methyl salicylate and ethyl salicylate in various matrices. LOQ values were found to be around 0.3μg per vial. Following validation of the technique, several topical pharmaceutical formulations like ThermoCream(®), Reflexspray(®), Vicks Vaporub(®) and Radosalil(®) were examined. For the latter, a comparison has been made with a sHS-method described in literature. PMID:24831424

  6. Measurements of relative binding of cohesin and dockerin mutants using an advanced ELISA technique for high-affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Reshef, Dan; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    The cellulosome is a large bacterial extracellular multienzyme complex able to degrade crystalline cellulosic substrates. The complex contains catalytic and noncatalytic subunits, interconnected by high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. In this chapter, we introduce an optimized method for comparative binding among different cohesins or cohesin mutants to the dockerin partner. This assay offers advantages over other methods (such as ELISA, cELIA, SPR, and ITC) for particularly high-affinity binding interactions. In this approach, the high-affinity interaction of interest occurs in the liquid phase during the equilibrated binding step, whereas the interaction with the immobilized phase is used only for detection of the unbound dockerins that remain in the solution phase. Once equilibrium conditions are reached, the change in free energy of binding (ΔΔG(binding)), as well as the affinity constant of mutants, can be estimated against the known affinity constant of the wild-type interaction. In light of the above, we propose this method as a preferred alternative for the relative quantification of high-affinity protein interactions. PMID:22608739

  7. Petasis-Ugi ligands: New affinity tools for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Íris L; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-09-15

    Affinity chromatography is a widespread technique for the enrichment and isolation of biologics, which relies on the selective and reversible interaction between affinity ligands and target molecules. Small synthetic affinity ligands are valuable alternatives due to their robustness, low cost and fast ligand development. This work reports, for the first time, the use of a sequential Petasis-Ugi multicomponent reaction to generate rationally designed solid-phase combinatorial libraries of small synthetic ligands, which can be screened for the selection of new affinity adsorbents towards biological targets. As a proof of concept, the Petasis-Ugi reaction was here employed in the discovery of affinity ligands suitable for phosphopeptide enrichment. A combinatorial library of 84 ligands was designed, synthesized on a chromatographic solid support and screened in situ for the specific binding of phosphopeptides binding human BRCA1C-terminal domains. The success of the reaction on the chromatographic matrix was confirmed by both inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Three lead ligands were identified due to their superior performance in terms of binding capacity and selectivity towards the phosphorylated moiety on peptides, which showed the feasibility of the Petasis-Ugi reaction for affinity ligand development. PMID:27469904

  8. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  9. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy-based high-throughput screening of ligands for use in affinity and displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, Srinavya; Kane, Ravi S

    2008-10-21

    We describe an approach that uses surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for the high-throughput screening of ligands for use in displacement and affinity chromatographic processes. We identified a set of commercially available organic amines and allowed them to react with SAMs presenting interchain carboxylic anhydride groups; the resulting surfaces presented ligands of interest in a background of carboxylic acid groups. We used SPR spectroscopy to determine the extent of adsorption of two model proteinslysozyme and cytochrome conto these "multimodal" surfaces and to select promising "affinity" ligands for further characterization. The attachment of selected ligands to UltraLink Biosupport resulted in beads with a significantly greater affinity for lysozyme than for cytochrome c that would be suitable for use in affinity chromatographic processes. Furthermore, we also used the screens to design "affinity displacers"small molecules that selectively retain lysozyme on chromatographic resins, while displacing cytochrome c. The combination of SPR spectroscopy and SAMs represents a powerful technique for identifying novel ligands that enable the purification of complex protein mixtures. PMID:18788766

  10. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  11. Qualitative assessment of IC50 values of inhibitors of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor using a single chromatographic experiment and multivariate cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Yamaguchi, Rika; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Collins, Jack R; Wainer, Irving W

    2005-05-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that affinity chromatography can be used to derive binding affinities, and that these affinities can be correlated to data obtained using standard techniques such as membrane binding, ultrafiltration and equilibrium dialysis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of immobilized nicotinic acetylcholine receptor stationary phase in chromatographic experiments to assess the functional activity of series of noncompetitive inhibitors (NCIs) as reflected in their IC50 values. Chromatographically determined retention values and computer generated molecular descriptors were obtained for 29 compounds and the data were analyzed by cluster analysis. The approach qualitatively ranked the test compounds as efficient NCIs (low IC50 values) or poor NCIs (high IC50 values). The data obtained with the 29 compounds used in this study demonstrate that the experimental approach had been able to place 25 of these compounds in the correct IC(50) clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first relationship established between chromatographic retention and IC50 for membrane-bound receptors. These results suggest that the chromatographic approach may be useful in development of lead drug candidates including the determination of off-target binding. PMID:15797535

  12. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  13. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  14. Identification of humic-like substances (HULIS) in oxygenated organic aerosols using NMR and AMS factor analyses and liquid chromatographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Sandrini, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Schlag, P.; Piazzalunga, A.; Tagliavini, E.; Henzing, J. S.; Decesari, S.

    2013-06-01

    The atmospheric organic aerosol composition is characterized by a great diversity of functional groups and chemical species challenging simple classification schemes. Traditional off-line chemical methods identified chemical classes based on the retention behavior on chromatographic columns and absorbing beds. Such approach led to the isolation of complex mixtures of compounds such as the humic-like substances (HULIS). More recently, on-line aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) was employed to identify chemical classes by extracting fragmentation patterns from experimental data series using statistical methods (factor analysis), providing simplified schemes for oxygenated organic aerosols (OOAs) classification on the basis of the distribution of oxygen-containing functionalities. The analysis of numerous AMS datasets suggested the occurrence of very oxidized OOAs which were postulated to correspond to the HULIS. However, only a few efforts were made to test the correspondence of the AMS classes of OOAs with the traditional classification from the off-line methods. In this paper, we consider a case study representative for polluted continental regional background environments. We examine the AMS factors for OOAs identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and compare to chemical classes of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) analysed off-line on a set of filters collected in parallel. WSOC fractionation was performed by means of factor analysis applied to H-NMR spectroscopic data, and by applying an ion-exchange chromatographic method for direct quantification of HULIS. Results show that the very oxidized low-volatility OOAs from AMS correlate with the NMR factor showing HULIS features and also with true "chromatographic" HULIS. On the other hand, UV/VIS-absorbing polyacids (or HULIS sensu stricto) isolated on ion-exchange beds were only a fraction of the AMS and NMR organic carbon fractions showing functional groups attributable to highly substituted carboxylic

  15. Identification of humic-like substances (HULIS) in oxygenated organic aerosols using NMR and AMS factor analyses and liquid chromatographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Sandrini, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Schlag, P.; Piazzalunga, A.; Tagliavini, E.; Henzing, J. S.; Decesari, S.

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric organic aerosol composition is characterized by a great diversity of functional groups and chemical species, challenging simple classification schemes. Traditional offline chemical methods identify chemical classes based on the retention behaviour on chromatographic columns and absorbing beds. Such an approach led to the isolation of complex mixtures of compounds such as the humic-like substances (HULIS). More recently, online aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) was employed to identify chemical classes by extracting fragmentation patterns from experimental data series using statistical methods (factor analysis), providing simplified schemes for the classification of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOAs) on the basis of the distribution of oxygen-containing functionalities. The analysis of numerous AMS data sets suggested the occurrence of very oxidized OOAs which were postulated to correspond to HULIS. However, only a few efforts were made to test the correspondence of the AMS classes of OOAs with the traditional classifications from the offline methods. In this paper, we consider a case study representative of polluted continental regional background environments. We examine the AMS factors for OOAs identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and compare them to chemical classes of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) analysed offline on a set of filters collected in parallel. WSOC fractionation was performed by means of factor analysis applied to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic data, and by applying an ion-exchange chromatographic method for direct quantification of HULIS. Results show that the very oxidized low-volatility OOAs from AMS correlate with the NMR factor showing HULIS features and also with true "chromatographic" HULIS. On the other hand, UV/VIS-absorbing polyacids (or HULIS {sensu stricto}) isolated on ion-exchange beds were only a fraction of the AMS and NMR organic carbon fractions showing functional groups

  16. [Development of Selective LC Analysis Method for Biogenic and Related Compounds Based on a Fluorous Affinity Technique].

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A separation-oriented derivatization method combined with LC has been developed for the selective analysis of biogenic and related compounds. In this method, we utilized a specific affinity between perfluoroalkyl-containing compounds, i.e., 'fluorous' compounds (fluorophilicity). Our strategy involves the derivatization of target analytes with perfluoroalkyl reagents, followed by selective retention of the derivatives with a perfluoroalkyl-modified stationary phase LC column. The perfluoroalkylated derivatives are strongly retained on the column owing to their fluorophilicity, whereas non-derivatized species, such as sample matrices, are hardly retained. Therefore, utilizing this derivatization method, target analytes can be determined selectively without interference from matrices. This method has been successfully applied to the LC analysis of some biogenic and related compounds in complex biological samples. PMID:26329550

  17. Analysis of chromatograph systems using orthogonal collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1974-01-01

    Research is generating fundamental engineering design techniques and concepts for the chromatographic separator of a chemical analysis system for an unmanned, Martian roving vehicle. A chromatograph model is developed which incorporates previously neglected transport mechanisms. The numerical technique of orthogonal collocation is studied. To establish the utility of the method, three models of increasing complexity are considered, the latter two being limiting cases of the derived model: (1) a simple, diffusion-convection model; (2) a rate of adsorption limited, inter-intraparticle model; and (3) an inter-intraparticle model with negligible mass transfer resistance.

  18. Affinity engineering of maltoporin: variants with enhanced affinity for particular ligands.

    PubMed

    Clune, A; Lee, K S; Ferenci, T

    1984-05-31

    Affinity-chromatographic selection on immobilized starch was used to selectively enhance the affinity of the maltodextrin-specific pore protein ( maltoporin , LamB protein, or lambda receptor protein) in the outer membrane of E. coli. Selection strategies were established for rare bacteria in large populations producing maltoporin variants with enhanced affinities for both starch and maltose, for starch but not maltose and for maltose but not starch. Three classes of lamB mutants with up to eight-fold increase in affinity for particular ligands were isolated. These mutants provide a unique range of modifications in the specificity of a transport protein. PMID:6375667

  19. Detection and quantification of some plant growth regulators in a seaweed-based foliar spray employing a mass spectrometric technique sans chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kamalesh; Das, Arun Kumar; Oza, Mihir Deepak; Brahmbhatt, Harshad; Siddhanta, Arup Kumar; Meena, Ramavatar; Eswaran, Karuppanan; Rajyaguru, Mahesh Rameshchandra; Ghosh, Pushpito Kumar

    2010-04-28

    The sap expelled from the fresh harvest of Kappaphycus alvarezii , a red seaweed growing in tropical waters, has been reported to be a potent foliar spray. Tandem mass spectrometry of various organic extracts of the sap confirmed the presence of the plant growth regulators (PGRs) indole 3-acetic acid, gibberellin GA(3), kinetin, and zeatin. These PGRs were quantified in fresh state and after 1 year of storage by ESI-MS without recourse to chromatographic separation. Quantification was validated against HPLC data. The results may be useful in correlating with the efficacy of the sap. The methodology was extended to two other seaweeds. The method developed is convenient and precise and may find application in other agricultural formulations containing these growth hormones. PMID:20355716

  20. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  1. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  2. Chromatographic biopanning for the selection of peptides with high specificity to Pb2+ from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Nian, Rui; Kim, Duck Sang; Nguyen, Thuong; Tan, Lihan; Kim, Chan-Wha; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2010-09-17

    Toxic heavy metal pollution is a global problem occurring in air, soil as well as water. There is a need for a more cost effective, renewable remediation technique, but most importantly, for a recovery method that is selective for one specific metal of concern. Phage display technology has been used as a powerful tool in the discovery of peptides capable of exhibiting specific affinity to various metals or metal ions. However, traditional phage display is mainly conducted in batch mode, resulting in only one equilibrium state hence low-efficiency selection. It is also unable to monitor the selection process in real time mode. In this study, phage display technique was incorporated with chromatography procedure with the use of a monolithic column, facilitating multiple phage-binding equilibrium states and online monitoring of the selection process in search of affinity peptides to Pb2+. In total, 17 candidate peptides were found and their specificity toward Pb2+ was further investigated with bead-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA). A highly specific Pb2+ binding peptide ThrAsnThrLeuSerAsnAsn (TNTLSNN) was obtained. Based on our knowledge, this is the first report on a new chromatographic biopanning method coupled with monolithic column for the selection of metal ion specific binding peptides. It is expected that this monolith-based chromatographic biopanning will provide a promising approach for a high throughput screening of affinity peptides cognitive of a wide range of target species. PMID:20709321

  3. Protecting Gas Chromatographic Syringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruekberg, Ben

    1995-12-01

    This article describes the construction of a device which protects gas chromatographic syringes. The device lessens the likelihood of syringes rolling off tables and breaking. If the syringe is dropped, the glass barrel is less apt to be struck and shattered.

  4. Analysis of Reaction between α-Lipoic Acid and 2-Chloro-1-methylquinolinium Tetrafluoroborate Used as a Precolumn Derivatization Technique in Chromatographic Determination of α-Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Godlewska, Magdalena; Odachowska, Angelika; Turkowicz, Monika; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The present study offers results of analysis concerning the course of reaction between reduced α-lipoic acid (LA) and 2-chloro-1-methylquinolinium tetrafluoroborate (CMQT). In water environments, the reaction between CMQT and hydrophilic thiols proceeds very rapidly and the resultant products are stable. For the described analysis, optimum reaction conditions, such as concentration of the reducing agent, environment pH, and concentration of the reagent were carefully selected. The spectrophotometric assay was carried out measuring absorbance at λ = 348 nm (i.e., the spectral band of the obtained reaction product). Furthermore, the calibration curve of lipoic acid was registered. It was concluded that the Lambert-Beer law was observed within the range 1–10 μmol L−1. Later, the reaction between LA and CMQT was used as precolumn derivatization in a chromatographic determination of the lipoic acid in the range 2.5–50 μmol L−1. Practical applicability of the designed methods was evaluated by determining lipoic acid in Revitanerv pharmaceutical preparation which contains 300 mg LA in a single capsule. The error of the determination did not exceed 0.5% in relation to the declared value. PMID:26504616

  5. Analysis of Reaction between α-Lipoic Acid and 2-Chloro-1-methylquinolinium Tetrafluoroborate Used as a Precolumn Derivatization Technique in Chromatographic Determination of α-Lipoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Magdalena; Odachowska, Angelika; Turkowicz, Monika; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The present study offers results of analysis concerning the course of reaction between reduced α-lipoic acid (LA) and 2-chloro-1-methylquinolinium tetrafluoroborate (CMQT). In water environments, the reaction between CMQT and hydrophilic thiols proceeds very rapidly and the resultant products are stable. For the described analysis, optimum reaction conditions, such as concentration of the reducing agent, environment pH, and concentration of the reagent were carefully selected. The spectrophotometric assay was carried out measuring absorbance at λ = 348 nm (i.e., the spectral band of the obtained reaction product). Furthermore, the calibration curve of lipoic acid was registered. It was concluded that the Lambert-Beer law was observed within the range 1-10 μmol L(-1). Later, the reaction between LA and CMQT was used as precolumn derivatization in a chromatographic determination of the lipoic acid in the range 2.5-50 μmol L(-1). Practical applicability of the designed methods was evaluated by determining lipoic acid in Revitanerv pharmaceutical preparation which contains 300 mg LA in a single capsule. The error of the determination did not exceed 0.5% in relation to the declared value. PMID:26504616

  6. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Graça, Vânia C; Sousa, Fani; Santos, Paulo F; Almeida, Paulo S

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography (AC) is one of the most important techniques for the separation and purification of biomolecules, being probably the most selective technique for protein purification. It is based on unique specific reversible interactions between the target molecule and a ligand. In this affinity interaction, the choice of the ligand is extremely important for the success of the purification protocol. The growing interest in AC has motivated an intense research effort toward the development of materials able to overcome the disadvantages of conventional natural ligands, namely their high cost and chemical and biological lability. In this context, synthetic dyes have emerged, in recent decades, as a promising alternative to biological ligands. Herein, detailed protocols for the assembling of a new chromatographic dye-ligand affinity support bearing an immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dye on an agarose-based matrix (Sepharose CL-6B) and for the separation of a mixture o f three standard proteins: lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin are provided. PMID:25749942

  7. [Progresses in screening active compounds from herbal medicine by affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying-shu; Tong, Shan-shan; Xu, Xi-ming; Yu, Jiang-nan

    2015-03-01

    Affinity chromatography is a chromatographic method for separating molecules using the binding characteristics of the stationary phase with potential drug molecules. This method can be performed as a high throughput screening method and a chromatographic separation method to screen a variety of active drugs. This paper summarizes the history of affinity chromatography, screening technology of affinity chromatography, and application of affinity chromatography in screening bio-active compounds in herbal medicines, and then discusses its application prospects, in order to broaden applications of the affinity chromatography in drug screening. PMID:26226740

  8. PATTERN RECOGNITION STUDIES OF COMPLEX CHROMATOGRAPHIC DATA SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromatographic fingerprinting of complex biological samples is an active research area with a large and growing literature. Multivariate statistical and pattern recognition techniques can be effective methods for the analysis of such complex data. However, the classification of ...

  9. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles Obtained by Four Different Techniques from Salvia rosifolia Sm. and Evaluation for Biological Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Salvia rosifolia Sm. (Lamiaceae), endemic to Turkey, were obtained by four different isolation techniques and then analyzed by gas chromatography (GC/FID) and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. Also in scope of the present work, the...

  10. Comparison of three chromatographic techniques for the detection of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in mitragyna speciosa (Kratom) plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) are used to suppress pain and mitigate opioid withdrawal syndromes. The potential threat of abuse and ready availability of this uncontrolled psychoactive plant material in the U.S. have led to the need for improved analytical technique...

  11. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  12. Target Identification of Grape Seed Extract in Colorectal Cancer using Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability (DARTS) Technique: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Molly M.; Somasagara, Ranganatha; Raina, Komal; Kumar, Sushil; Gomez, Joe; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-01-01

    Various natural agents, including grape seed extract (GSE), have shown considerable chemopreventive and anti-cancer efficacy against different cancers in pre-clinical studies; however, their specific protein targets are largely unknown and thus, their clinical usefulness is marred by limited scientific evidences about their direct cellular targets. Accordingly, herein, employing, for the first time, the recently developed drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) technique, we aimed to profile the potential protein targets of GSE in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Unlike other methods, which can cause chemical alteration of the drug components to allow for detection, this approach relies on the fact that a drug bound protein may become less susceptible to proteolysis and hence the enriched proteins can be detected by Mass Spectroscopy methods. Our results, utilizing the DARTS technique followed by examination of the spectral output by LC/MS and the MASCOT data, revealed that GSE targets endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response proteins resulting in overall down regulation of proteins involved in translation and that GSE also causes oxidative protein modifications, specifically on methionine amino acids residues on its protein targets. Corroborating these findings, mechanistic studies revealed that GSE indeed caused ER stress and strongly inhibited PI3k-Akt–mTOR pathway for its biological effects in CRC cells. Furthermore, bioenergetics studies indicated that GSE also interferes with glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism in CRC cells. Together, the present study identifying GSE molecular targets in CRC cells, combined with its efficacy in vast pre-clinical CRC models, further supports its usefulness for CRC prevention and treatment. PMID:24724981

  13. Target identification of grape seed extract in colorectal cancer using drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) technique: role of endoplasmic reticulum stress response proteins.

    PubMed

    Derry, Molly M; Somasagara, Ranganatha R; Raina, Komal; Kumar, Sushil; Gomez, Joe; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-01-01

    Various natural agents, including grape seed extract (GSE), have shown considerable chemopreventive and anti-cancer efficacy against different cancers in pre-clinical studies; however, their specific protein targets are largely unknown and thus, their clinical usefulness is marred by limited scientific evidences about their direct cellular targets. Accordingly, herein, employing, for the first time, the recently developed drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) technique, we aimed to profile the potential protein targets of GSE in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Unlike other methods, which can cause chemical alteration of the drug components to allow for detection, this approach relies on the fact that a drug bound protein may become less susceptible to proteolysis and hence the enriched proteins can be detected by Mass Spectroscopy methods. Our results, utilizing the DARTS technique followed by examination of the spectral output by LC/MS and the MASCOT data, revealed that GSE targets endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response proteins resulting in overall down regulation of proteins involved in translation and that GSE also causes oxidative protein modifications, specifically on methionine amino acids residues on its protein targets. Corroborating these findings, mechanistic studies revealed that GSE indeed caused ER stress and strongly inhibited PI3k-Akt-mTOR pathway for its biological effects in CRC cells. Furthermore, bioenergetics studies indicated that GSE also interferes with glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism in CRC cells. Together, the present study identifying GSE molecular targets in CRC cells, combined with its efficacy in vast pre-clinical CRC models, further supports its usefulness for CRC prevention and treatment. PMID:24724981

  14. A nonlinear model for gas chromatograph systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, M. P.

    1975-01-01

    Fundamental engineering design techniques and concepts were studied for the optimization of a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer chemical analysis system suitable for use on an unmanned, Martian roving vehicle. Previously developed mathematical models of the gas chromatograph are found to be inadequate for predicting peak heights and spreading for some experimental conditions and chemical systems. A modification to the existing equilibrium adsorption model is required; the Langmuir isotherm replaces the linear isotherm. The numerical technique of Crank-Nicolson was studied for use with the linear isotherm to determine the utility of the method. Modifications are made to the method eliminate unnecessary calculations which result in an overall reduction of the computation time of about 42 percent. The Langmuir isotherm is considered which takes into account the composition-dependent effects on the thermodynamic parameter, mRo.

  15. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  16. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatiles obtained by four different techniques from Salvia rosifolia Sm., and evaluation for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Ozek, Gulmira; Demirci, Fatih; Ozek, Temel; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Khan, Shabana I; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Duran, Ahmet; Hamzaoglu, Ergin

    2010-01-29

    Four different isolation techniques, conventional hydrodistillation (HD), microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MWHD), microdistillation (MD) and micro-steam distillation-solid-phase microextraction (MSD-SPME), have been used to analyze the volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Salvia rosifolia Sm. by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. HD and MWHD techniques produced quantitatively (yield, 0.39% and 0.40%) and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar essential oils. alpha-Pinene (15.7-34.8%), 1,8-cineole (16.6-25.1%), beta-pinene (6.7-13.5%), beta-caryophyllene (1.4-5.0%) and caryophyllene oxide (1.4-4.4%) were identified as major constituents of this Turkish endemic species. Besides, the hydrodistilled oil of S. rosifolia was evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The hydrodistilled oil of S. rosifolia showed antibacterial activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with a MIC value of 125microg/mL. Other human pathogenic microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans) were also inhibited within a moderate range (MIC=125-1000microg/mL). Antifungal activity of the oil was also observed against the strawberry anthracnose-causing fungal plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae and C. gloeosporioides. No cytotoxicity was observed for S. rosifolia oil up to 25mg/mL against malignant melanoma, epidermal, ductal and ovary carcinoma. PMID:20015509

  17. Rational design, synthesis, and verification of affinity ligands to a protein surface cleft

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Herbert; Öhrman, Sara; Shinohara, Yasuro; Ersoy, Oguz; Choudhury, Devapriya; Axén, Andreas; Tedebark, Ulf; Carredano, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The structure-based design, synthesis, and screening of a glucuronic acid scaffold library of affinity ligands directed toward the catalytic cleft on porcine pancreas α-amylase are presented. The design was based on the simulated docking to the enzyme active site of 53 aryl glycosides from the Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) selected by in silico screening. Twenty-three compounds were selected for synthesis and screened in solution for binding toward α-amylase using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The designed molecules include a handle outside of the binding site to allow their attachment to various surfaces with minimal loss of binding activity. After initial screening in solution, one affinity ligand was selected, immobilized to Sepharose (Amersham Biosciences), and evaluated as a chromatographic probe. A column packed with ligand-coupled Sepharose specifically retained the enzyme, which could be eluted by a known inhibitor. PMID:12649437

  18. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  19. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  20. Gas chromatographic techniques for the analysis of hydrocarbons in low-rank coal liquefaction products. Part I. Treatment of the data

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, Y.R.; Farnum, S.A.; Raynie, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The project that provided the impetus for this research involved the conversion of coal into refinable oils. The goals of the project were two-fold. First was to study the effects of two very different start-up solvents on the composition of the coal liquefaction product at line-out. Second was to characterize the changes that occurred during the line-out process. A major effort was on the analysis of the hydrocarbons oils by capillary gas chromatography. The distillate oil samples were first separated by silica gel column chromatography into 11 fractions to simplify the complex mixtures. Fractions were combined into four groups so that similar polarities resulted: (1) alkanes; (2) light aromatics; (3) di, tri, and tetra aromatics; and (4) heavy aromatics. Calibration standards, containing up to 30 standard compounds, were prepared and diluted to several different concentrations. An aliquot of the appropriate internal standard was added to each calibration standard as well as to the diluted column fractions. Because the relative response of the internal standard may vary at different concentrations, it was important that the same amount be added every time. To calibrate the GC, the calibration standard dilutions were each injected twice and run with the same temperature program as the samples to be analyzed. There are some limitations to this technique which are linked. 3 references, 1 figure.

  1. Chromatographic behaviors of proteins on cation-exchange column.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Guo-Liang; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2004-12-01

    A weak cation-exchanger (XIDACE-WCX) has been synthesized by the indirect method. The chromatographic characteristics of the synthesized packing was studied in detail. The standard protein mixture and lysozyme from egg white were separated with the prepared chromatographic column. The chromatographic thermodynamics of proteins was studied in a wide temperature range. Thermodynamic parameters standard enthalpy change (deltaH0) and standard entropy change (deltaS0) and compensation temperature (beta) at protein denaturation were determined in the chromatographic system. By using obtained deltaS0, the conformational change of proteins was judged in the chromatographic process. The linear relationship between deltaH0 and deltaS0 can be used to identify the identity of the protein retention mechanism in the weak cation-exchange chromatography. The interaction between weak cation-exchanger and metal ions was investigated. Several metal chelate columns were prepared. The effects of introducing metal ion into the naked column on protein retention and the retention mechanism of proteins in the metal chalet affinity chromatography were discussed. PMID:15689030

  2. Urine sample preparation of tricyclic antidepressants by means of a supported liquid membrane technique for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Trocewicz, J

    2004-03-01

    Supported liquid membrane (SLM) technique for sample work-up and enrichment was used for determination of tricyclic antidepressant drugs in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. The studied antidepressant drugs were amitriptyline, opipramol, noxiptyline and additionally diethazine was used as possible internal standard. Alkaline phosphoric buffer with urine sample, as the donor solution, was passed over the liquid membrane into which investigated substances were extracted. On the other side of the membrane, analyzed compounds were trapped due to creating non-extractable form in acidic acceptor solution. Enriched and cleaned up drugs were then injected into a HPLC system with ultraviolet detection to analyze of their concentration in acceptor solution. Optimum extraction efficiency was determined by changing acceptor and donor solutions pH, application of different flow rates of donor solution and by using different solvents in the membrane. Also, donor solution volume, extraction time and concentration of analytes were varied to check the linearity of extraction process. The highest extraction efficiency: 43% for opipramol, 56% for noxiptyline, 43% for amitriptyline and 42% for diethazine (R.S.D. values were <6% and n=3) was achieved when 0.05 M phosphate buffer pH 4.0 and 9.5 were used as donor and acceptor solutions, respectively, n-undecane with 5% tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) was used as liquid membrane. Limit of quantification (LOQ) for tricyclic antidepressants after enrichment of 100ml of urine sample was about 1 ng/ml. PMID:14751789

  3. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  4. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  5. Challenges and recent advances in affinity purification of tag-free proteins.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongli; Chen, Zhilei

    2014-07-01

    There is currently no generic, simple, lowcost method for affinity chromatographic purification of proteins in which the purified product is free of appended tags. Existing approaches for the purification of tagless proteins fall into two broad categories: (1) direct affinity-based capture of tag-free proteins that utilize affinity ligands specific to the target protein or class of target protein, and (2) removal of an appended affinity tag following tag-mediated protein capture. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art approaches for tagless protein purification in both categories, including specific examples of affinity ligands used for the capture of different classes of proteins and cleavage systems for affinity tag removal following chromatographic capture. A particular focus of this review is on recent developments in affinity tag removal systems utilizing split inteins. PMID:24658742

  6. EVALUATION OF PORTABLE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limits of detection, linearity of responses, and stability of response factors and retention times for five commercially-available portable gas chromatographs (PGC) were determined during laboratory evaluation. he PGCs were also operated at the French Limited Superfund site near ...

  7. Development of Gas Chromatographic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hites, Ronald A

    2016-07-19

    Gas chromatographic mass spectrometry is now widely used for the quantitation and identification of organic compounds in almost any imaginable sample. These applications include the measurement of chlorinated dioxins in soil samples, the identification of illicit drugs in human blood, and the quantitation of accelerants in arson investigations, to name just a few. How did GC/MS get so popular? It turns out that it required parallel developments in mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and computing and that no one person "invented" the technique. This Perspective traces this history from the 1950s until today. PMID:27384908

  8. Concurrent low- and high-affinity sulfate reduction kinetics in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder Tarpgaard, Irene; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    Bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments generally occurs in the presence of high millimolar concentrations of sulfate. Published data indicate that low sulfate concentrations may limit sulfate reduction rates below 0.2-2 mM. Yet, high sulfate reduction rates occur in the 1-100 μM range in freshwater sediments and at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments. Through a combination of 35S-tracer experiments, including initial velocity experiments and time course experiments, we searched for different sulfate affinities in the mixed community of sulfate reducers in a marine sediment. We supported the radiotracer experiments with a highly sensitive ion chromatographic technique for sulfate with a detection limit of 0.15 μM SO 42- in marine pore water. Our results showed that high and low affinities for sulfate co-occur and that the applied experimental approach may determine the observed apparent half saturation constant, Km. Our experimental and model data both show that sulfate reduction in the studied marine sediment could be explained by two dominating affinities for sulfate: a low affinity with a mean half saturation constant, Km, of 430 μM SO 42- and a high affinity with a mean Km of 2.6 μM SO 42-. The high-affinity sulfate reduction was thermodynamically un-constrained down to <1 μM SO 42-, both in our experiments and under in situ conditions. The reduction of radio-labeled sulfate was partly reversible due to concurrent re-oxidation of sulfide by Fe(III) and possibly due to a reversibility of the enzymatic pathway of sulfate reduction. A literature survey of apparent Km values for sediments and pure cultures is presented and discussed.

  9. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  10. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  11. Deconvolution of gas chromatographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S.; Rayborn, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of deconvolution methods on gas chromatographic data to obtain an accurate determination of the relative amounts of each material present by mathematically separating the merged peaks is discussed. Data were obtained on a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. Chromatograms of five xylenes with differing degrees of separation were generated by varying the column temperature at selected rates. The merged peaks were then successfully separated by deconvolution. The concept of function continuation in the frequency domain was introduced in striving to reach the theoretical limit of accuracy, but proved to be only partially successful.

  12. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  13. Localization of Free Field Realizations of Affine Lie Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futorny, Vyacheslav; Grantcharov, Dimitar; Martins, Renato A.

    2015-04-01

    We use localization technique to construct new families of irreducible modules of affine Kac-Moody algebras. In particular, localization is applied to the first free field realization of the affine Lie algebra or, equivalently, to imaginary Verma modules.

  14. Quality improvements of cell membrane chromatographic column.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Chen, Xiaofei; Cao, Yan; Jia, Dan; Wang, Dongyao; Zhu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Juping; Hong, Zhanying; Chai, Yifeng

    2014-09-12

    Cell Membrane Chromatography (CMC) is a biological affinity chromatographic method using a silica stationary phase covered with specific cell membrane. However, its short life span and poor quality control was highlighted in a lot of research articles. In this study, special attention has been paid to the disruption, cell load and packing procedure in order to improve the quality of the CMC columns. Hereto, two newly established CMC models, HSC-T6/CMC and SMMC-7721/CMC have been developed and used in this research project. The optimization of the abovementioned parameters resulted in a better reproducibility of the retention time of the compound GFT (RSD<10%) and improved significantly the quality of the CMC columns. 3.5×10(7)cells were the optimal cell load for the preparation of the CMC columns, the disruption condition was optimized to 5 cycles (400W and 20s interval per cycle) by an ultrasonic processor reducing the total time of cell disruption to 1.5min and the packing flow rate was optimized by applying a linear gradient program. Additionally, 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) was employed to improve the column quality and prolong the column life span. The results showed that the retention time was longer with PFA treated columns than the ones obtained with the control groups. PMID:25115453

  15. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination. PMID:11452998

  16. Quantification of ventricular β2 -adrenoceptor density and ligand binding affinity in wild sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts using a novel modification to the tritiated ligand technique.

    PubMed

    Goulding, A T; Farrell, A P

    2016-05-01

    A new, image-based, tritiated ligand technique for measuring cardiac β2 -adrenoceptor (β2 -AR) binding characteristics was developed and validated with adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss hearts so that the tissue limitation of traditional receptor binding techniques could be overcome and measurements could be made in hearts nearly 14-times smaller than previously used. The myocardial cell-surface (functional) β2 -AR density of O. nerka smolts sampled at the headwaters of the Chilko River was 54·2 fmol mg protein(-1) and about half of that previously found in return migrating adults of the same population, but still more than twice that of adult hatchery O. mykiss (21·1 fmol mg protein(-1) ). This technique now opens the possibility of investigating cardiac receptor density in a much wider range of fish species and life stages. PMID:27095288

  17. The gas-liquid chromatograph and the electron capture detection in equine drug testing.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, J. W.; Tobin, T.

    1976-01-01

    Three gas-liquid chromatographic (G.L.C.) procedures discussed have been designed around the four "esses" of detection tests--speed, sensitivity, simplicity, and specificity. These techniques are admirably applicable to the very low plasma drug levels encountered in blood testing under pre-race conditions. The methods are equally applicable to post-race testing procedures, where both blood and urine samples are tested. Drugs can only rarely be detected by the electron capture detector (E.C.D.) without a prior derivatization step, which conveys to the drug(s) high electron affinity. Because of broad applicability, two derivatizing agents, heptafluorobutyric (HFBA) and pentafluorpropionic (PFPA) anhydrides are employed. The three techniques, allowing broad coverage of various drug classes are: 1) direct derivatization of drugs to form strongly electron capturing amides and esters. 2) reductive fragmentation of drugs with lithium aluminum hydride to form alcohols, with conversion to ester derivatives. 3) oxidative fragmentation of drugs with potassium dichromate to form derivatizable groups, followed by direct derivatization. PMID:1000157

  18. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  20. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  1. Affinity purification of 101 residue rat cpn10 using a reversible biotinylated probe.

    PubMed

    Ball, H L; Bertolini, G; Mascagni, P

    1995-01-01

    The purification of large synthetic peptides using conventional separation techniques often results in poor yields and homogeneity due to the accumulation of chromatographically similar deletion and truncated impurities. We have developed a highly effective synthetic strategy and one-step purification procedure that is based on (i) the application of single coupling using HBTU/HOBt activation to reduce incomplete couplings, (ii) the use of N-(2-chlorobenzyloxycarbonyloxy)succinimide as a capping agent to terminate deletion sequences and (iii) the N-terminal derivatization of the complete peptidyl-resin with a reversible Fmoc-based chromatographic probe possessing enhanced physico-chemical properties (i.e. hydrophobicity, charge or affinity label). We report the application of a biotinylated probe, activated as the succinimidyl carbonate, for the purification of a 101 residue chaperonin protein from Rattus norvegicus (rat cpn10), previously synthesized using an optimized synthetic protocol. Biotinylated rat cpn10 was separated from underivatized impurities on an immobilized monomeric avidin column. Free rat cpn10 was released from avidin-agarose column with 5% aqueous triethylamine and after desalting by RP-HPLC gave 9.9% recovery. Characterization and assessment of homogeneity was achieved using ESI-MS, CZE and RP-HPLC. PMID:9223007

  2. High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Applications in Drug-Protein Binding Studies and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya R; Bi, Cong; Suresh, D; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins and other agents in serum is of interest in personalized medicine because this process can affect the dosage and action of drugs. The extent of this binding may also vary with a given disease state. These interactions may involve serum proteins, such as human serum albumin or α1-acid glycoprotein, or other agents, such as lipoproteins. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tool that has received increasing interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review discusses the general principles of HPAC and the various approaches that have been used in this technique to examine drug-protein binding and in work related to personalized medicine. These approaches include frontal analysis and zonal elution, as well as peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, and chromatographic immunoassays. The operation of each method is described and examples of applications for these techniques are provided. The type of information that can be obtained by these methods is also discussed, as related to the analysis of drug-protein binding and the study of clinical or pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26827600

  3. Affinity purification of heme-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2014-01-01

    Protein affinity purification techniques are widely used for isolating pure target proteins for biochemical and structural characterization. Herein, we describe the protocol for affinity-based purification of proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a peptide tag covalently modified with heme c, known as a heme-tag, to an L-histidine immobilized Sepharose resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. In addition, we describe methods for specifically detecting heme-tagged proteins in SDS-PAGE gels using a heme-staining procedure and for quantifying the proteins using a pyridine hemochrome assay. PMID:24943311

  4. Combined liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer for involatile biological samples.

    PubMed

    Blakley, C R; Carmody, J C; Vestal, M L

    1980-09-01

    A new liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer has been developed in our laboratory for application to analysis of biological molecules of extremely low volatility. Oxyhydrogen flames rapidly vaporize the total liquid-chromatographic effluent, and molecular and particle beam techniques are used to efficiently transfer the sample to the ionization source of the mass spectrometer. This new instrument is comparable in cost and complexity to a combined gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, but extends the capabilities of combined chromatography/mass spectrometry to a broad range of compounds not previously accessible. We are currently testing biologically significant samples with this instrument, using reversed-phase liquid-chromatographic separation and both positive and negative ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. Results have been obtained from mixtures of nucleic acid components--bases, nucleosides, and nucleotides--and from amino acids, peptides, saccharides, fatty acids, vitamins, and antibiotics. In all cases investigated to date, ions indicative of molecular mass are obtained in at least one of the operating modes available. Detection limits are typically in the 1-10 ng range for full mass scans (about 80-600 amu); sub-nanogram quantities are usually detectable with single-ion monitoring. PMID:7408175

  5. Confocal Raman microscopy of protein adsorbed in chromatographic particles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuewu; Stone, Thomas; Bell, David; Gillespie, Christopher; Portoles, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a nondestructive analytical technique that combines the chemical information from vibrational spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of confocal microscopy. It was applied, for the first time, to measure conformation and distribution of protein adsorbed in wetted chromatographic particles. Monoclonal antibody was loaded into the Fractogel EMD SO(3) (M) cation exchanger at 2 mS/cm or 10 mS/cm. Amide I and III frequencies in the Raman spectrum of the adsorbed protein suggest that there are no detectable changes of the original β-sheet conformation in the chromatographic particles. Protein depth profile measurements indicate that, when the conductivity is increased from 2 mS/cm to 10 mS/cm, there is a change in mass transport mechanism for protein adsorption, from the shrinking-core model to the homogeneous-diffusion model. In this study, the use of confocal Raman microscopy to measure protein distribution in chromatographic particles fundamentally agrees with previous confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations, but confocal Raman spectroscopy enjoys additional advantages: use of unlabeled protein to eliminate fluorescent labeling, ability for characterization of protein secondary structure, and ability for spectral normalization to provide a nondestructive experimental approach to correct light attenuation effects caused by refractive index (RI) mismatching in semiopaque chromatographic particles. PMID:22803776

  6. Chromatographic methods for the bioanalysis of pyrethroid pesticides.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Darren R; Mott, Kyle B; Bartlett, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Reliable analytical methods are needed for the determination of pyrethroid pesticides residues in biological tissues such as whole blood and plasma, meat, eggs, milk, brain, liver, and adipose tissue for monitoring of levels in livestock and for human risk assessment. A review of the current literature is given, with consideration to extraction techniques, sample preparation, and chromatographic approaches including both conventional and new technologies. PMID:26916501

  7. Evaluation of portable gas chromatographs

    SciTech Connect

    Berkley, R.E.; Miller, M.; Chang, J.C.; Oliver, K.; Fortune, C.

    1993-01-01

    Limits of detection, linearity of responses, and stability of response factors and retention times for five commercially-available portable gas chromatographs (PGC) were determined during laboratory evaluation. The PGCs were also operated at the French Limited Superfund site near Houston, TX during startup of bioremediation. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) at the site were slightly above ambient background levels. Concurrent collocated grab samples were collected periodically in canisters and analyzed by Method TO-14 using a mass-selective detector. Canister data were taken to indicate correct concentrations and were used to assess the accuracy of PGC data. Durability, reliability, and complexity of operation of PGCs were also evaluated. The principal goal of the study was to determine the best way to use each instrument as a monitor for airborne VOCs.

  8. [Determining thorium level in urine with its preliminary chromatographic extraction].

    PubMed

    Kononykina, N N; Astafurov, V I; Zablotskaia, I D; Popov, V I

    1990-01-01

    The contributors propose a radiometric technique of detecting thorium in urine. The technique is based on a prior concentrating of the nuclide on phosphate residues, with its further separation in extraction-chromatographic vessel filled with diethylhexylphosphorus acid, and reextraction with oxalic acid. Measurements were made in the hard scintillator layer at 90 percent effectiveness. Thorium chemical output was at 85 +/- 3 percent, sensitivity at 5 mBk for a sample. If the sample contained an equal quantity of uranium, the percentage of cleaning thorium from uranium was 100. The proposed technique is economical, simple to perform, and is designed for natural thorium content measurements in human organism. PMID:2086364

  9. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Dedieu, Alain; Guérin, Philippe; Quéméneur, Eric; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude

    2008-03-28

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO2(2+)) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of aminophosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:18308325

  10. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  11. Chromatographic resolution of altered forms of protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashendel, C.L.; Minor, P.L.; Baudoin, P.A.; Carlos, M.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid chromatographic resolution of protein kinase C (PKC) in extracts of rat brain on DEAE-cellulose yielded two major peaks of activity. These fractions bound phorbol esters with identical affinity and specificity and had similar ratios of PKC to phorbol ester-binding activities. Chicken egg yolk antibodies raised to PKC in the first fraction reacted with 74 to 76 kilodalton peptides in the second fraction. Chromatography of each fraction on hydroxylapatite yielded similar distributions of three PKC isozymes. Rechromatography of the DEAE-cellulose fractions on DEAE-cellulose confirmed that these forms of PKC were not rapidly interconvertible. Results of experiments in which extracts or fractions were incubated with MgATP and phosphatase inhibitors were consistent with elution of dephospho-PKC in the first fraction while the second fraction contained phospho-PKC. If confirmed, this suggests that a substantial fraction of PKC in rat and mouse tissues exists in the phosphorylated form.

  12. Gas chromatographic concepts for the analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.; Cullers, D. K.; Hall, K. W.; Krekorian, R. L.; Phillips, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last few years, new gas chromatographic (GC) concepts were developed for use on board spacecraft or any other restricted environments for determining the chemical composition of the atmosphere and surface material of various planetary bodies. Future NASA Missions include an entry probe that will be sent to Titan and various spacecraft that will land on Mars. In order to be able to properly respond to the mission science requirements and physical restrictions imposed on the instruments by these missions, GC analytical techniques are being developed. Some of these techniques include hardware and mathematical techniques that will improve GC sensitivity and increase the sampling rate of a GC descending through a planetary atmosphere. The technique of Multiplex Gas Chromatography (MGC) is an example of a technique that was studied in a simulated Titan atmosphere. In such an environment, the atmospheric pressure at instrument deployment is estimated to be a few torr. Thus, at such pressures, the small amount of sample that is acquired might not be enough to satisfy the detection requirements of the gas chromatograph. In MGC, many samples are pseudo-randomly introduced to the chromatograph without regard to elution of preceding components. The resulting data is then reduced using mathematical techniques such as cross-correlation of Fourier Transforms. Advantages realized from this technique include: improvement in detection limits of several orders of magnitude and increase in the number of analyses that can be conducted in a given period of time. Results proving the application of MGC at very low pressures emulating the same atmospheric pressures that a Titan Probe will encounter when the instruments are deployed are presented. The sample used contained hydrocarbons that are expected to be found in Titan's atmosphere. In addition, a new selective modulator was developed to monitor water under Martian atmospheric conditions. Since this modulator is selective only

  13. ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY ULTRAFAST AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY USING IMMOBILIZED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Rangan; Yoo, Michelle J.; Briscoe, Chad J.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was explored for use as a stationary phase and ligand in affinity microcolumns for the ultrafast extraction of free drug fractions and the use of this information for the analysis of drug-protein binding. Warfarin, imipramine, and ibuprofen were used as model analytes in this study. It was found that greater than 95% extraction of all these drugs could be achieved in as little as 250 ms on HSA microcolumns. The retained drug fraction was then eluted from the same column under isocratic conditions, giving elution in less than 40 s when working at 4.5 mL/min. The chromatographic behavior of this system gave a good fit with that predicted by computer simulations based on a reversible, saturable model for the binding of an injected drug with immobilized HSA. The free fractions measured by this method were found to be comparable to those determined by ultrafiltration, and equilibrium constants estimated by this approach gave good agreement with literature values. Advantages of this method include its speed and the relatively low cost of microcolumns that contain HSA. The ability of HSA to bind many types of drugs also creates the possibility of using the same affinity microcolumn to study and measure the free fractions for a variety of pharmaceutical agents. These properties make this technique appealing for use in drug binding studies and in the high-throughput screening of new drug candidates. PMID:20227701

  14. Affinity-based screening of combinatorial libraries using automated, serial-column chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.M.; Williams, K.P.; McGuinness, B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors have developed an automated serial chromatographic technique for screening a library of compounds based upon their relative affinity for a target molecule. A {open_quotes}target{close_quotes} column containing the immobilized target molecule is set in tandem with a reversed-phase column. A combinatorial peptide library is injected onto the target column. The target-bound peptides are eluted from the first column and transferred automatically to the reversed-phase column. The target-specific peptide peaks from the reversed-phase column are identified and sequenced. Using a monoclonal antibody (3E-7) against {beta}-endorphin as a target, we selected a single peptide with sequence YGGFL from approximately 5800 peptides present in a combinatorial library. We demonstrated the applicability of the technology towards selection of peptides with predetermined affinity for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). We expect that this technology will have broad applications for high throughput screening of chemical libraries or natural product extracts. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Use of Tandem Affinity Chromatography for Purification of Cannabinoid Receptor CB2

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia C.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has been increasingly applied to isolation of recombinant proteins. It relies on two consecutive chromatographic steps that take advantage of the affinity tags placed at opposing ends of the target protein. This allows for efficient removal of contaminating proteins, including products of proteolytic degradation of the fusion that lack either N- or C-terminal tags. Here, we describe the use of two small affinity tags, a poly-histidine tag and a Strep-tag for expression and purification of the human cannabinoid receptor CB2, an integral membrane G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:24943318

  16. An open tubular ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Min; Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-01

    We describe an open tubular ion chromatograph (OTIC) that uses anion exchange latex coated 5 μm radius silica and 9.8 μm radius poly(methyl methacrylate) tubes and automated time/pressure based hydrodynamic injection for pL-nL scale injections. It is routinely possible to generate 50,000 plates or more (up to 150,000 plates/m, columns between 0.3 and 0.8 m have been used), and as such, fast separations are possible, comparable to or in some cases better than the current practice of IC. With an optimized admittance detector, nonsuppressed detection permits LODs of submicromolar to double digit micromolar for a variety of analytes. However, large volume injections are possible and can significantly improve on this. A variety of eluents, the use of organic modifiers, and variations of eluent pH can be used to tailor a given separation. The approach is discussed in the context of extraterrestrial exploration, especially Mars, where the existence of large amounts of perchlorate in the soil needs to be confirmed. These columns can survive drying and freezing, and small footprint, low power consumption, and simplicity make OTIC a good candidate for such a mission. PMID:25394230

  17. Aptamer Affinity Maturation by Resampling and Microarray Selection.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Liang, Shaolin; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Fraser, Lewis A; Shiu, Simon Chi-Chin; Tang, Marco S L; Tanner, Julian A

    2016-07-19

    Aptamers have significant potential as affinity reagents, but better approaches are critically needed to discover higher affinity nucleic acids to widen the scope for their diagnostic, therapeutic, and proteomic application. Here, we report aptamer affinity maturation, a novel aptamer enhancement technique, which combines bioinformatic resampling of aptamer sequence data and microarray selection to navigate the combinatorial chemistry binding landscape. Aptamer affinity maturation is shown to improve aptamer affinity by an order of magnitude in a single round. The novel aptamers exhibited significant adaptation, the complexity of which precludes discovery by other microarray based methods. Honing aptamer sequences using aptamer affinity maturation could help optimize a next generation of nucleic acid affinity reagents. PMID:27346322

  18. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, T.G.; Ives, J.T.

    1993-12-28

    A method and apparatus are presented for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means. 16 figures.

  19. Preliminary numerical analysis of improved gas chromatograph model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for the gas chromatograph was developed which incorporates the heretofore neglected transport mechanisms of intraparticle diffusion and rates of adsorption. Because a closed-form analytical solution to the model does not appear realizable, techniques for the numerical solution of the model equations are being investigated. Criteria were developed for using a finite terminal boundary condition in place of an infinite boundary condition used in analytical solution techniques. The class of weighted residual methods known as orthogonal collocation is presently being investigated and appears promising.

  20. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, Thomas G.; Ives, Jeffrey T.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means.

  1. Mechanism and kinetics of protein transport in chromatographic media studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Part II. Impact on chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Hubbuch, Jürgen; Linden, Thomas; Knieps, Esther; Thömmes, Jörg; Kula, Maria-Regina

    2003-12-22

    The impact of different transport mechanism on chromatographic performance was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for solutions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal IgG 2a under different solid- and fluid-phase conditions. During this investigation, a clear influence of the uptake mechanism on the affinity of the respective proteins for the different adsorbents and thus separation performance of the chromatographic process could be observed. For the system SP Sepharose Fast Flow at pH 4.5 pore diffusion could be ascribed to be the dominant transport mechanism for both proteins and the adsorption profiles resembled a pattern similar to that described by the 'shrinking core' model. Under these conditions a significantly higher affinity towards the adsorbent was found for BSA when compared to IgG 2a. With changing fluid- and solid-phase conditions, however, a change of the transport mode for IgG 2a could be detected. While the exact mechanism is still unresolved it could be concluded that both occurrence and magnitude of the now governing transport mechanism depended on protein properties and interaction with the adsorbent surface. For the system SP Sepharose XL at pH 5.0 both parameters leading to the change in IgG 2a uptake were combined resulting in a clear change of the system affinity towards the IgG 2a molecule, while BSA adsorption was restricted to the most outer shell of the sorbent. PMID:14735979

  2. Exploring Fluorous Affinity by Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Catani, Martina; Guzzinati, Roberta; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Terms such as "fluorous affinity" and "fluorophilicity" have been used to describe the unique partition and sorption properties often exhibited by highly fluorinated organic compounds, that is molecules rich in sp(3) carbon-fluorine bonds. In this work, we made use of a highly fluorinated stationary phase and a series of benzene derivatives to study the effect of one single perfluorinated carbon on the chromatographic behavior and adsorption properties of molecules. For this purpose, the adsorption equilibria of α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, toluene, and other alkylbenzenes have been studied by means of nonlinear chromatography in a variety of acetonitrile/water eluents. Our results reveal that one single perfluorinated carbon is already enough to induce a drastic change in the adsorption properties of molecules on the perfluorinated stationary phase. In particular, it has been found that adsorption is monolayer if the perfluoroalkyl carbon is present but that, when this unit is missing, molecules arrange as multilayer stack structures. These findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of fluorous affinity. PMID:26047527

  3. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  4. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Enrivonmentally Significant Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Walter E.; Beu, Steve

    1982-01-01

    A chromatographic procedure for analyzing organophosphorus pesticides (such as PCB's, nitrosamines, and phthalate esters) in orange juice is described, including a summary of the method, instrumentation, methodology, results/discussion, and calculations. (JN)

  5. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  6. Gas chromatograph injection port protective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. D.; Welz, E. A.

    1969-01-01

    To prevent samples containing foreign matter from poisoning the gas chromatographic columns, a pre-filter insertion is placed in the injection port. The packing becomes a variable reactant, for example, acids are removed by using an alkaline liquid.

  7. Nanofluidic Size-Exclusion Chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Svehla, Danielle; Grunthaner, Frank; Feldman, Jason; Shakkottai, P.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a nanofluidic size-exclusion chromatograph (SEC), which would be a compact, robust, lightweight instrument for separating molecules of interest according to their sizes and measuring their relative abundances in small samples. About as large as a deck of playing cards, the nanofluidic SEC would serve, in effect, as a laboratory on a chip that would perform the functions of a much larger, conventional, bench-top SEC and ancillary equipment, while consuming much less power and much smaller quantities of reagent and sample materials. Its compactness and low power demand would render it attractive for field applications in which, typically, it would be used to identify and quantitate a broad range of polar and nonpolar organic compounds in soil, ice, and water samples. Size-exclusion chromatography is a special case of high-performance liquid chromatography. In a conventional SEC, a sample plug is driven by pressure along a column packed with silica or polymer beads that contain uniform nanopores. The interstices between, and the pores in, the beads collectively constitute a size-exclusion network. Molecules follow different paths through the size-exclusion network, such that characteristic elution times can be related to sizes of molecules: basically, smaller molecules reach the downstream end of the column after the larger ones do because the smaller ones enter minor pores and stay there for a while, whereas the larger ones do not enter the pores. The volume accessible to molecules gradually diminishes as their size increases. All molecules bigger than a pore size elute together. For most substances, the elution times and sizes of molecules can be correlated directly with molecular weights. Hence, by measuring the flux of molecules arriving at the downstream end as a function of time, one can obtain a liquid mass spectrum for the molecules present in a sample over a broad range of molecular weights.

  8. Shrinking-core modeling of binary chromatographic breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Traylor, Steven J; Xu, Xuankuo; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-04-22

    Most chromatographic processes involve separation of two or more species, so development of a simple, accurate multicomponent chromatographic model can be valuable for improving process efficiency and yield. We consider the case of breakthrough chromatography, which has been considered in great depth for single-component modeling but to a much more limited degree for multicomponent breakthrough. We use the shrinking core model, which provides a reasonable approximation of particle uptake for proteins under strong binding conditions. Analytical column solutions for single-component systems are extended here to predict binary breakthrough chromatographic behavior for conditions under which the external transport resistance is negligible. Analytical results for the location and profile of displacement effects and expected breakthrough curves are derived for limiting cases. More generally, straightforward numerical results have also been obtained through simultaneous solution of a set of simple ordinary differential equations. Exploration of the model parameter space yields results consistent with theoretical expectations. Additionally, both analytical and numerical predictions compare favorably with experimental column breakthrough data for lysozyme-cytochrome c mixtures on the strong cation exchanger SP Sepharose FF. Especially significant is the ability of the model to predict experimentally observed displacement profiles of the more weakly adsorbed species (in this case cytochrome c). The ability to model displacement behavior using simple analytical and numerical techniques is a significant improvement over current methods. PMID:21411102

  9. [A chromatographic analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from an outbreak in HIV patients in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Mederos, L M; Quiñones, Y; Ruiz, A; Teja, I; Valdivia, J A

    1998-01-01

    A group of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from an outbreak in HIV-infected patients was studied by chromatographic techniques. A group of strains of M. Tuberculosis from symptomatic respiratory patients (SR+ 14) and patterns strains from the laboratory collection were used as a reference aimed at making a qualitative comparison of the chromatographic patterns described by the strains isolated from patients. The chromatographic profiles of the strains isolated from patients (SR+) and fro HIV+ were obtained and compared by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Each of the present fatty acids was identified by using the gas chromatography technique (GC) coupled to mass spectrum analysis. All the studied strains were classified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. According to the results attained, the usefulness of the chromatographic techniques as alternative techniques for the mycobacterial diagnosis is demonstrated. PMID:10349430

  10. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  11. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  12. Virus elimination during the recycling of chromatographic columns used during the manufacture of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    Various chromatographic procedures are used during the purification and manufacture of plasma products such as coagulation factors. These steps contribute to the overall safety of such products by removing potential virus contamination. Virus removal by two affinity chromatography procedures, i.e. monoclonal antibody chromatography and metal chelate chromatography (immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography), used during the manufacture of the high purity factor VIII (Replenate®) and factor IX (Replenine®-VF), respectively, has been investigated. In addition, as these columns are recycled after use, the effectiveness of the sanitisation procedures for preventing possible cross-contamination, has also been investigated. Both chromatographic steps proved effective for eliminating a range of model enveloped and non-enveloped viruses by 4 to >6 and 5 to >8 log for the monoclonal and metal chelate columns, respectively. The effectiveness of the relatively mild column sanitisation conditions used, i.e. ethanol for factor IX and acetic acid for factor VIII, was confirmed using non-spiked column runs. The chemicals used contributed to virus elimination by inactivation and/or by physical removal of the virus. In summary, these studies demonstrate that potential virus contamination between chromatographic runs can be prevented when an effective column recycling and sanitisation procedure is included. PMID:24981392

  13. Non-chromatographic atomic spectrometric methods in speciation analysis: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Grinberg, Patricia; Bobeda, Cláudio R. R.; Reyes, Mariela N. M.; Campos, Reinaldo C.

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, knowledge of the different chemical forms of the elements has gained increasing importance. There has been significant progress in methods that hyphenate chromatographic separations with atomic spectrometry. These hyphenated methods can provide the most complete information on the species distribution and even structure. However, they can be lengthy, relatively costly and difficult to bring to the routine. On the other hand, it is important to remember that chromatographic techniques represent only a minor part of the separation procedures available and, in certain cases, the application of basic chemistry to sample treatments can give quantitative information about specific chemical forms. In this sense, non-chromatographic procedures can provide methods that offer sufficient information on the elemental speciation for a series of situations. Moreover, these non-chromatographic strategies can be less time consuming, more cost effective and available, and present competitive limits of detection. Thus, non-chromatographic speciation analysis continues to be a promising research area and has been applied to the development of several methodologies that facilitate this type of analytical approach. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different non-chromatographic methods as alternatives for the speciation analysis of clinical, environmental and food samples using atomic spectrometry for detection.

  14. New monolithic chromatographic supports for macromolecules immobilization: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Calleri, E; Ambrosini, S; Temporini, C; Massolini, G

    2012-10-01

    This mini-review reports on some recent advances in the field of immobilized protein employing both silica and polymer-based monoliths as supports, and their application in affinity chromatography and immobilized enzyme reactors (IMERs) developments. The major emphasis is put on some interesting challenges and opportunities related to the development of new monolithic affinity supports based on biofriendly sol-gel inorganic monoliths with entrapped proteins and on organic monolithic supports with improved hydrophilicity for IMERs development in proteomic studies. The ease of preparation of monoliths and the multitude of functionalization techniques, make monoliths interesting for an increasing number of biochemical and medical applications. PMID:22386208

  15. Gas chromatographic analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Laurens, J B; de Coning, J P; Swinley, J M

    2001-03-01

    Highly reactive fluorinated gaseous matrices require special equipment and techniques for the gas chromatographic analysis of trace impurities in these gases. The impurities that were analysed at the low-microg/l levels included oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen. This paper describes the use of a system utilising backflush column switching to protect the columns and detectors in the analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride. Two separate channels were used for the analysis of H2, O2, N2, CO, CO2 and SF6 impurities with pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection. PMID:11269587

  16. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  17. Chromatographic separation of germanium and arsenic for the production of high purity (77)As.

    PubMed

    Gott, Matthew D; DeGraffenreid, Anthony J; Feng, Yutian; Phipps, Michael D; Wycoff, Donald E; Embree, Mary F; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2016-04-01

    A simple column chromatographic method was developed to isolate (77)As (94±6% (EtOH/HCl); 74±11 (MeOH)) from germanium for potential use in radioimmunotherapy. The separation of arsenic from germanium was based on their relative affinities for different chromatographic materials in aqueous and organic environments. Using an organic or mixed mobile phase, germanium was selectively retained on a silica gel column as germanate, while arsenic was eluted from the column as arsenate. Subsequently, enriched (76)Ge (98±2) was recovered for reuse by elution with aqueous solution (neutral to basic). Greater than 98% radiolabeling yield of a (77)As-trithiol was observed from methanol separated [(77)As]arsenate [17]. PMID:26947162

  18. Engineering a recyclable elastin-like polypeptide capturing scaffold for non-chromatographic protein purification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Chen, Wilfred

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported a non-chromatographic protein purification method exploiting the highly specific interaction between the dockerin and cohesin domains from Clostridium thermocellum and the reversible aggregation property of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) to provide fast and cost-effective protein purification. However, the bound dockerin-intein tag cannot be completely dissociated from the ELP-cohesin capturing scaffold due to the high binding affinity, resulting in a single-use approach. In order to further reduce the purification cost by recycling the ELP capturing scaffold, a truncated dockerin domain with the calcium-coordinating function partially impaired was employed. We demonstrated that the truncated dockerin domain was sufficient to function as an effective affinity tag, and the target protein was purified directly from cell extracts in a single binding step followed by intein cleavage. The efficient EDTA-mediated dissociation of the bound dockerin-intein tag from the ELP-cohesin capturing scaffold was realized, and the regenerated ELP capturing scaffold was reused in another purification cycle without any decrease in the purification efficiency. This recyclable non-chromatographic based affinity method provides an attractive approach for efficient and cost-effective protein purification. PMID:23801586

  19. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  20. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  1. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  2. Affinity chromatography based on a combinatorial strategy for rerythropoietin purification.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ceron, María C; Marani, Mariela M; Taulés, Marta; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Albericio, Fernando; Cascone, Osvaldo; Camperi, Silvia A

    2011-05-01

    Small peptides containing fewer than 10 amino acids are promising ligand candidates with which to build affinity chromatographic systems for industrial protein purification. The application of combinatorial peptide synthesis strategies greatly facilitates the discovery of suitable ligands for any given protein of interest. Here we sought to identify peptide ligands with affinity for recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), which is used for the treatment of anemia. A combinatorial library containing the octapeptides X-X-X-Phe-X-X-Ala-Gly, where X = Ala, Asp, Glu, Phe, His, Leu, Asn, Pro, Ser, or Thr, was synthesized on HMBA-ChemMatrix resin by the divide-couple-recombine method. For the library screening, rhEPO was coupled to either Texas Red or biotin. Fluorescent beads or beads showing a positive reaction with streptavidin-peroxidase were isolated. After cleavage, peptides were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Fifty-seven beads showed a positive reaction. Peptides showing more consensuses were synthesized, and their affinity to rhEPO was assessed using a plasma resonance biosensor. Dissociation constant values in the range of 1-18 μM were obtained. The best two peptides were immobilized on Sepharose, and the resultant chromatographic matrixes showed affinity for rhEPO with dissociation constant values between 1.8 and 2.7 μM. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was spiked with rhEPO, and the artificial mixture was loaded on Peptide-Sepharose columns. The rhEPO was recovered in the elution fraction with a yield of 90% and a purity of 95% and 97% for P1-Sepharose and P2-Sepharose, respectively. PMID:21495625

  3. Morphometric affinities of gigantopithecus.

    PubMed

    Gelvin, B R

    1980-11-01

    Multivariate analyses, supplemented by univariate statistical methods, of measurements from mandibular tooth crown dimensions and the mandible of Gigantopithecus blacki, G. bilaspurensis, Plio-Plelstocene hominids, Homo erectus, and seven Neogene ape species from the genera Proconsul, Sivapithecus, Ouranopithecus, and Dryopithecus were used to assess the morphometric affinities of Gigantopithecus. The results show that Gigantopithecus displays affinities to Ouranopithecus and to the hominids, particularly the Plio-Plelstocene hominids, rather than to the apes. Ouranopithecus demonstrated dental resemblances to G. bilaspurensis and the Plio-Pleistocene hominids but mandibular similarities to the apes. Results of analyses of tooth and mandibular shape indices, combined with multivariate distance and temporal relationships, suggest that Ouranopithecus is a more likely candidate for Gigantopithecus ancestry than is Silvapithecus indicus. Shape and allometric differences between G. bilaspurensis and the robust australopithecines weaken the argument for an ancestral-descendant relationship between these groups. The results support the hypothesis that Gigantopithecus is an extinct side branch of the Hominidae. PMID:7468790

  4. Ion chromatographic determination of sulfur in fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizisin, C. S.; Kuivinen, D. E.; Otterson, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The sulfur content of fuels was determined using an ion chromatograph to measure the sulfate produced by a modified Parr bomb oxidation. Standard Reference Materials from the National Bureau of Standards, of approximately 0.2 + or - 0.004% sulfur, were analyzed resulting in a standard deviation no greater than 0.008. The ion chromatographic method can be applied to conventional fuels as well as shale-oil derived fuels. Other acid forming elements, such as fluorine, chlorine and nitrogen could be determined at the same time, provided that these elements have reached a suitable ionic state during the oxidation of the fuel.

  5. Planar chromatographic method development using the PRISMA optimization system and flow charts.

    PubMed

    Nyiredy, Sz

    2002-01-01

    This study presents a modern planar chromatographic method-development procedure, based on the "PRISMA" optimization system, in which the optimum separation is achieved systematically and the structures and properties of the substances to be separated are not known. The procedure consists of three stages. In the first of these the basic conditions the stationary phase, vapor phase, and individual solvents are selected with a TLC procedure (generally in nonsaturated chromatographic chambers). In the second stage, the optimum combination of the selected solvents is determined with the PRISMA model. The third part of the procedure includes the selection of the development mode (circular, linear, or anticircular); the selection of an appropriate forced-flow chromatographic technique (over-pressured layer chromatography or rotation planar chromatography) with high-performance thin-layer chromatographic plates; the transfer of the optimized mobile phase to the various analytical, planar, or column preparative liquid chromatographic techniques; and the selection of the operating conditions. For practical reasons, the optimization process is presented with the help of flow charts. PMID:12515358

  6. Analysis of Free Fractions for Chiral Drugs Using Ultrafast Extraction and Multi-Dimensional High-Performance Affinity Chromatography†

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Yoo, Michelle J.; Hage, David S.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-dimensional chromatographic approach was developed to measure the free fractions of drug enantiomers in samples that also contained a binding protein or serum. This method, which combined ultrafast affinity extraction with a chiral stationary phase, was demonstrated using the drug warfarin and the protein human serum albumin. PMID:23979112

  7. NON-COMPETITIVE PEAK DECAY ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN DISSOCIATION BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The peak decay method is an affinity chromatographic technique that has been used to examine the dissociation of solutes from immobilized ligands in the presence of excess displacing agent. However, it can be difficult to find a displacing agent that does not interfere with detection of the eluting analyte. In this study, a non-competitive peak decay method was developed in which no displacing agent was required for analyte elution. This method was evaluated for the study of drug-protein interactions by using it along with high-performance affinity chromatography to measure the dissociation rate constants for R- and S-warfarin from columns containing immobilized human serum albumin (HSA). Several factors were considered in the optimization of this method, including the amount of applied analyte, the column size, and the flow rate. The dissociation rate constants for R- and S-warfarin from HSA were measured at several temperatures by this approach, giving values of 0.56 (± 0.01) and 0.66 (± 0.01) s−1 at pH 7.4 and 37°C. These results were in good agreement with previous values obtained by other methods. This approach is not limited to warfarin and HSA but could be employed in studying additional drug-protein interactions or other systems with weak-to-moderate binding. PMID:19472288

  8. Evaluation of selectivity in homologous multimodal chromatographic systems using in silico designed antibody fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Woo, James; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-12-24

    This study describes the in silico design, surface property analyses, production and chromatographic evaluations of a diverse set of antibody Fab fragment variants. Based on previous findings, we hypothesized that the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) constitute important binding sites for multimodal chromatographic ligands. Given that antibodies are highly diversified molecules and in particular the CDRs, we set out to examine the generality of this result. For this purpose, four different Fab fragments with different CDRs and/or framework regions of the variable domains were identified and related variants were designed in silico. The four Fab variant libraries were subsequently generated by site-directed mutagenesis and produced by recombinant expression and affinity purification to enable examination of their chromatographic retention behavior. The effects of geometric re-arrangement of the functional moieties on the multimodal resin ligands were also investigated with respect to Fab variant retention profiles by comparing two commercially available multimodal cation-exchange ligands, Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime, and two novel multimodal ligand prototypes. Interestingly, the chromatographic data demonstrated distinct selectivity trends between the four Fab variant libraries. For three of the Fab libraries, the CDR regions appeared as major binding sites for all multimodal ligands. In contrast, the fourth Fab library displayed a distinctly different chromatographic behavior, where Nuvia cPrime and related multimodal ligand prototypes provided markedly improved selectivity over Capto MMC. Clearly, the results illustrate that the discriminating power of multimodal ligands differs between different Fab fragments. The results are promising indications that multimodal chromatography using the appropriate multimodal ligands can be employed in downstream bioprocessing for challenging selective separation of product related variants. PMID:26654254

  9. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  11. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; dle Castillo, L.; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This poster describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through a microcolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristics elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight.

  12. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  13. Chromatographic methods for the isolation, separation and characterisation of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Sandron, Sara; Rojas, Alfonso; Wilson, Richard; Davies, Noel W; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Kelleher, Brian P; Paull, Brett

    2015-09-01

    This review presents an overview of the separation techniques applied to the complex challenge of dissolved organic matter characterisation. The review discusses methods for isolation of dissolved organic matter from natural waters, and the range of separation techniques used to further fractionate this complex material. The review covers both liquid and gas chromatographic techniques, in their various modes, and electrophoretic based approaches. For each, the challenges that the separation and fractionation of such an immensely complex sample poses is critically reviewed. PMID:26290053

  14. A Small-Scale Low-Cost Gas Chromatograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gros, Natasa; Vrtacnik, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    The design and application of a small-scale portable gas chromatograph for learning of the basic concepts of chromatography is described. The apparatus consists of two basic separable units, which includes a chromatographic unit and an electronic unit.

  15. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  16. Chromatographic removal and heat inactivation of hepatitis A virus during manufacture of human albumin.

    PubMed

    Adcock, W L; MacGregor, A; Davies, J R; Hattarki, M; Anderson, D A; Goss, N H

    1998-08-01

    CSL Limited, an Australian biopharmaceutical company, has recently converted its method of manufacture for human albumin from a traditional Cohn-ethanol fractionation method to a method employing chromatographic techniques. Studies were undertaken to determine the efficiency of the chromatographic and pasteurization steps used in the manufacture of Albumex(R) (CSL's trade name for albumin) in removing and inactivating the potential viral contaminant, hepatitis A virus (HAV). The manufacturing process for Albumex(R) includes three chromatographic steps, two of which are ion-exchange steps (DEAE-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow and CM-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow) and the third is a gel-filtration step (Sephacryl(R) S200 HR). The final stage of the Albumex(R) process involves a bulk pasteurization step where product is held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. HAV partitioning experiments on the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF and CM-Sepharose(R) FF ion-exchange and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR gel-filtration columns were performed with scaled-down models of the production-scale chromatographic Albumex(R) process. Production samples collected before each of the chromatographic steps were spiked with HAV and processed through each of the scaled-down chromatographic columns. Samples collected during processing were assayed and the log10 reduction factors calculated. Inactivation kinetics of HAV were examined during the pasteurization of Albumex(R) 5 and 20 [5% and 20% (w/v) albumin solutions] held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. Log10 reductions for HAV through the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF, CM-Sepharose(R) FF and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR chromatographic columns were 5.3, 1.5 and 4.2 respectively, whereas a 4.4 and a greater than 3.9 log10 reduction in HAV in Albumex(R) 5 and 20 respectively were achieved during pasteurization. PMID:9693093

  17. ON-LINE MEASUREMENT OF THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ELUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Techniques for increasing the sensitivity of the interface between a gas chromatograph and a rapid-scanning Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (GC-IR) have been developed. A single-beam system, in which a triglycine sulfate (TGS) detector is used to measure the interferogram...

  18. Thin-Layer Chromatographic Separation of Phenols: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Mark J.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and equipment needed are provided for an experiment in which a series of readily available, inexpensive, and relatively nontoxic phenols are separated using thin-layer chromatographic techniques. The experiment permits a discussion of how relative Rf values may be rationalized by considering a molecule's…

  19. Specific recognition of supercoiled plasmid DNA by affinity chromatography using a synthetic aromatic ligand.

    PubMed

    Caramelo-Nunes, Catarina; Tomaz, Cândida T

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography is the method of choice for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA), since it is simple, robust, versatile, and highly reproducible. The most important features of a chromatographic procedure are the use of suitable stationary phases and ligands. As conventional purification protocols are being replaced by more sophisticated and selective procedures, the focus changes toward designing and selecting ligands of high affinity and specificity. In fact, the chemical composition of the chromatographic supports determines the interactions established with the target molecules, allowing their preferential retention over the undesirable ones. Here it is described the selective recognition and purification of supercoiled pDNA by affinity chromatography, using an intercalative molecule (3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridine) as ligand. PMID:25749945

  20. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography without chelating ligands: purification of soybean trypsin inhibitor on zinc alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Munishwar N; Jain, Sulakshana; Roy, Ipsita

    2002-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is a widely used technique for bioseparation of proteins in general and recombinant proteins with polyhistidine fusion tags in particular. An expensive and critical step in this process is coupling of a chelating ligand to the chromatographic matrix. This chelating ligand coordinates metal ions such as Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+), which in turn bind proteins. The toxicity of chemicals required for coupling and their slow release during the separation process are of considerable concern. This is an important issue in the context of purification of proteins/enzymes which are used in food processing or pharmaceutical purposes. In this work, a simpler IMAC design is described which should lead to a paradigm shift in the application of IMAC in separation. It is shown that zinc alginate beads (formed by chelating alginate with Zn(2+) directly) can be used for IMAC. As "proof of concept", soybean trypsin inhibitor was purified 18-fold from its crude extract with 90% recovery of biological activity. The dynamic binding capacity of the packed bed was 3919 U mL(-1), as determined by frontal analysis. The media could be regenerated with 8 M urea and reused five times without any appreciable loss in its binding capacity. PMID:11822903

  1. MEASUREMENT OF DRUG-PROTEIN DISSOCIATION RATES BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND PEAK PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Ohnmacht, Corey M.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The rate at which a drug or other small solute interacts with a protein is important in understanding the biological and pharmacokinetic behavior of these agents. One approach that has been developed for examining these rates involves the use of high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) and estimates of band-broadening through peak profiling. Previous work with this method has been based on a comparison of the statistical moments for a retained analyte versus non-retained species at a single, high flow rate to obtain information on stationary phase mass transfer. In this study an alternative approach was created that allows a broad range of flow rates to be used for examining solute-protein dissociation rates. Chromatographic theory was employed to derive equations that could be used with this approach on a single column, as well as with multiple columns to evaluate and correct for the impact of stagnant mobile phase mass transfer. The interaction of L-tryptophan with human serum albumin was used as a model system to test this method. A dissociation rate constant of 2.7 (± 0.2) s−1 was obtained by this approach at pH 7.4 and 37°C, which was in good agreement with previous values determined by other methods. The techniques described in this report can be applied to other biomolecular systems and should be valuable for the determination of drug-protein dissociation rates. PMID:19422253

  2. [Analysis of proteins in food with electrophoretic and chromatographic methods].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, K P; Krause, I

    1985-03-01

    The efficiency of electrophoretic methods (gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, twodimensional techniques) and of chromatographic methods (size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography, reversed phase HPLC) to analyze proteins in foods is reviewed. Several selected applications are discussed in detail. The large diversity of proteins in a particular food results in a unique electrophoretic or chromatographic pattern, that can be used for identification purposes, by means of the so called indicator proteins. The adaptability and resolving power of the methods assure their extended application to many protein containing foods. The uniqueness of the patterns obtained warranties differentiations of even closely related animal or plant foods as well as mixtures of them. The methods also allow quantitative determinations of mixtures of foods. Their ease of handling and good reproducibility and reliability favours their use in routine analyses. Numerous investigations on fish, meat and derived products, non-meat proteins in meat products, milk, cheese, cereals and products made of cereals, oilseed proteins, legumes, fruits and vegetables described in the literature are here presented. PMID:3890408

  3. Two chromatographic methods for the determination of some antimigraine drugs.

    PubMed

    El-Bagary, Ramzia I; Mohammed, Nashwah G; Nasr, Heba A

    2012-01-01

    Two stability indicating chromatographic methods were proposed for the determination of almotriptan, eletriptan, and rizatriptan, in presence of their acid degradation products. The first method is a quantitative densitometric thin layer chromatography. The developing systems were; acetonitrile: methanol: dichloromethane: ammonia (10:6:3:1 v/v), ethyl acetate: methanol: ammonia (15:4:1 v/v), and methanol: acetonitrile: ammonia (9:4:1 v/v) for almotriptan, eletriptan and rizatriptan respectively. The TLC plates were scanned at 235 nm. Linear relationships were obtained over concentration ranges (5-50 μg/spot) for almotriptan and rizatriptan, and (5-60 μg/spot) for eletriptan. The second method based on the separation and determination of the studied drugs, using RP-HPLC technique. The separation was achieved on C18 Hypersil column, elution was carried out using phosphate buffer pH 3: methanol: acetonitrile (2: 1:1 v/v) at flow rate 2 mL/min and UV detection at 235 nm. Linear relationships were obtained over concentration ranges (10-200 μg/mL) for almotriptan and eletriptan, and (10-180 μg/mL) for rizatriptan. The chromatographic methods were successfully applied for the determination of each of the studied drugs in pure form, tablet form, and in laboratory prepared mixtures with their acid degradation products. PMID:22654488

  4. Two Chromatographic Methods for the Determination of Some Antimigraine Drugs

    PubMed Central

    El-Bagary, Ramzia I.; Mohammed, Nashwah G.; Nasr, Heba A.

    2012-01-01

    Two stability indicating chromatographic methods were proposed for the determination of almotriptan, eletriptan, and rizatriptan, in presence of their acid degradation products. The first method is a quantitative densitometric thin layer chromatography. The developing systems were; acetonitrile: methanol: dichloromethane: ammonia (10:6:3:1 v/v), ethyl acetate: methanol: ammonia (15:4:1 v/v), and methanol: acetonitrile: ammonia (9:4:1 v/v) for almotriptan, eletriptan and rizatriptan respectively. The TLC plates were scanned at 235 nm. Linear relationships were obtained over concentration ranges (5–50 μg/spot) for almotriptan and rizatriptan, and (5–60 μg/spot) for eletriptan. The second method based on the separation and determination of the studied drugs, using RP-HPLC technique. The separation was achieved on C18 Hypersil column, elution was carried out using phosphate buffer pH 3: methanol: acetonitrile (2: 1:1 v/v) at flow rate 2 mL/min and UV detection at 235 nm. Linear relationships were obtained over concentration ranges (10–200 μg/mL) for almotriptan and eletriptan, and (10–180 μg/mL) for rizatriptan. The chromatographic methods were successfully applied for the determination of each of the studied drugs in pure form, tablet form, and in laboratory prepared mixtures with their acid degradation products. PMID:22654488

  5. Enhanced DR5 binding capacity of nanovectorized TRAIL compared to its cytotoxic version by affinity chromatography and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Albatoul; Picaud, Fabien; Guillaume, Yves Claude; Gharbi, Tijani; Micheau, Olivier; Herlem, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis of cancer cells when bound to its cognate receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 (DR4 and DR5), without being toxic to healthy cells. Nanovectorized TRAIL (abbreviated as NPT) is 10 to 20 times more efficient than one of the most potent soluble TRAIL used in preclinical studies (His-TRAIL). To determine whether differences in affinity may account for NPT superiority, a thermodynamic study was undertaken to evaluate NPT versus TRAIL binding affinity to DR5. Docking calculations showed that TRAIL in homotrimer configuration was more stable than in heterotrimer, because of the presence of one Zn ion in its structure. Indeed, TRAIL trimers can have head-to-tail orientations when Zn is missing. Altogether these data suggest that TRAIL homotrimer structures are predominant in solution and then are grafted on NPT. When docked to DR5, NPT carrying TRAIL homotrimer leads to a more stable complex than TRAIL monomer-based NPT. To comfort these observations, the extracellular domain of DR5 was immobilized on a chromatographic support using an "in situ" immobilization technique. The determination of the thermodynamic data (enthalpy ∆H° and entropy ∆S°*) of TRAIL and NPT binding to DR5 showed that the binding mechanism was pH dependent. The affinity of NPT to DR5 increased with pH, and the ionized energy was more important for NPT than for soluble TRAIL. Moreover, because of negative values of ∆H° and ∆S°* quantities, we demonstrated that van der Waals and hydrogen bonds governed the strong NPT-DR5 association for pH > 7.4 (as for TRAIL alone). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26952193

  6. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of Pycnogenol dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Song, Fenhong; Lin, Long-Ze

    2009-01-01

    The bark of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) has been widely used as a remedy for various degenerative diseases. A standard high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure for Pycnogenol analysis is a method specified in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph, which requires measurement of peak areas and identification of four components of the extract: caffeic acid, catechin, ferulic acid, and taxifolin. In this study, a fingerprint analysis using an HPLC method based on the USP monograph has been developed to provide additional qualitative information for the analysis of Pycnogenol-containing dietary supplements (PDS). Twelve commercially available PDS samples were purchased and analyzed along with a standard Pycnogenol extract. Their chromatographic fingerprints were analyzed using principal component analysis. The results showed that two of the samples were not consistent with the standard reference Pycnogenol extract. One contained other active ingredients in addition to Pycnogenol, and the other may have resulted from a quality control issue in manufacturing. PMID:19485224

  7. Chromatographic Purification of Highly Active Yeast Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes. PMID:22042245

  8. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  9. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; Castillo, L. del; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through amicrocolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristic elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight. Compared to conventional size exclusion chromatography, the nSEC offers greater control over the size exclusion process; mass fabrication; integration of the separation column with associated valves, pumps, and detectors; and dramatic reductions in instrument mass and power requirements.

  11. PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: RECENT TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe A.; Bi, Cong; Li, Rong; Matsuda, Ryan; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Vargas, John; Zheng, Xiwei

    2012-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a separation technique that has become increasingly important in work with biological samples and pharmaceutical agents. This method is based on the use of a biologically-related agent as a stationary phase to selectively retain analytes or to study biological interactions. This review discusses the basic principles behind affinity chromatography and examines recent developments that have occurred in the use of this method for biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis. Techniques based on traditional affinity supports are discussed, but an emphasis is placed on methods in which affinity columns are used as part of HPLC systems or in combination with other analytical methods. General formats for affinity chromatography that are considered include step elution schemes, weak affinity chromatography, affinity extraction and affinity depletion. Specific separation techniques that are examined include lectin affinity chromatography, boronate affinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography, and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Approaches for the study of biological interactions by affinity chromatography are also presented, such as the measurement of equilibrium constants, rate constants, or competition and displacement effects. In addition, related developments in the use of immobilized enzyme reactors, molecularly imprinted polymers, dye ligands and aptamers are briefly considered. PMID:22305083

  12. A new method of synthesizing biopolymeric affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Guzman, R; Porath, J O

    1997-08-01

    (1) A new concept for producing soluble polymeric affinity ligands is proposed and exemplified. By solid-phase synthesis, an insoluble hydrophilic polymer is converted into an affinity gel. The gel is hydrolytically degraded to water-soluble affinity polymeric ligands which are recovered and purified. (2) A water-soluble biopolymeric metal-affinity carrier based on an iminodiacetic acid (IDA) derivative of dextran has been synthesized through the modification of Sephadex G-200 by IDA, followed by hydrolysis with dextranase and size-exclusion-chromatographic purification of the high-molecular-mass fragments. (3) The molecular size of the soluble products as a function of hydrolysis time with dextranase from Penicillium sp. was determined. The range of molecular size of the biopolymeric chelating ligand varies from around 200 Da to greater than 580 kDa. (4) The influence of three metal ions chelated with the Sephadex derivative on the hydrolysis rate and the molecular-size distribution of end products was studied. Eu3+ was found to improve the rate of solubilization. Ni2+ and Cu2+ decreased the hydrolysis rate, as compared with that of the metal-free IDA-Sephadex. (5) The method introduced here has the potential of being developed and applied as a general technology for synthesis of soluble multifunctional affinity ligands. Such ligands should be useful for liquid-phase extraction as well as for the synthesis of adsorbents with localized multiple binding sites. Other possible fields of applications are to be found in medicine, where they could be used for slow drug delivery or detoxification, and in analytical chemistry, where they could be used in various assays. PMID:9261997

  13. Host cell protein impurities in chromatographic polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicholas E; Valente, Kristin N; Lee, Kelvin H; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-06-01

    Downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is normally performed using a platform process that is empirically tuned to optimize impurity removal for each new product. A more fundamental understanding of impurities and the product itself would provide insights into the rational design of efficient downstream processes. This work examines the chromatographic properties of Chinese hamster ovary host cell protein (HCP) impurities in non-affinity chromatographic resins commonly used in polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification: ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and multimodal. Using proteomic analysis, the specific HCP impurities that elute close to mAb products are identified for these resins at typical downstream processing conditions. Additionally, the interactions of HCP impurities with mAb products are profiled to determine the total extent of product association and the specific HCP species that form associative complexes under conditions encountered in polishing columns. Product association and co-elution were both identified as viable mechanisms of HCP retention for the non-affinity resins tested here. A relatively large sub-population of HCP impurities was found to co-elute or associate with mAbs in each polishing column, but only a small population of HCPs-including lipoprotein lipase, chrondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, nidogen-1, and SPARC-were identified as difficult to remove across an entire downstream mAb process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1260-1272. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26550778

  14. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  15. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L; White, Christopher J; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S

    2014-10-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  16. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  17. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  18. Flight contaminant trace analyser. Phase 1: Chromatographic input system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development of a chromatographic column capable of resolving compounds associated with spacecraft atmospheres is presented. Consideration is given to sampling techniques, column parameters and operation, and column interface with a mass spectrometer. A capillary column coated with a mixture of polyalkylene glycols is found to provide the best selectivity for resolving multicomponent mixtures found in spacecraft atmospheres. Temperature programming and isothermal operation of the column are evaluated and it is found that temperature programming has a shorter analysis time for a given carrier gas flow rate and overall superior resolution. It is observed that hydrogen provides a 15% savings in analysis time over helium. Following the optimization of column operational parameters, a mixed phase Ucon capillary is prepared for evaluation during the column test period in which the test sample is automatically analyzed. Analysis of the multicomponent test mixture is completed within 45 minutes provided temperature programming is used. All but two of the test compounds are well resolved.

  19. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Prateek A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodopetra frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp c-DNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9MRP1), CMAC(Sf9MRP2) and CMAC(Sf9BCRP) columns and a control column produced using membrane fragments from non-transfected Sf9 cells, CMAC(Sf9), were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography using [3H]-etoposide as the marker ligand and etoposide, benzbromarone and MK571 as the displacers on the CMAC(Sf9MRP1) column, etoposide and furosemide on the CMAC(Sf9MRP2) column and etoposide and fumitremorgin C on the CMAC(Sf9BCPR) column The binding affinities (Ki values) obtained from the chromatographic studies were consistent with the data obtained using non-chromatographic techniques and the results indicate that the immobilized MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters retained their ability to selectively bind known ligands. (S)-verapamil displaced [3H]-etoposide on the CMAC(Sf9MRP1) column to a greater extent than (R)-verapamil and the relative IC50 values of the enantiomers were calculated using the changes in the retention times of the marker. The observed enantioselectivity and calculated IC50 values were consistent with previously reported data. The results indicated that the CMAC(Sf9MRP1), CMAC(Sf9MRP2) and CMAC(Sf9BCRP) columns can be used for the study of binding to the MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters and that membranes from the Sf9 cell line can be used to prepare CMAC columns. This is the first example of the use of membranes from a non-mammalian cell line in an affinity chromatographic system. PMID:20441926

  20. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  1. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  2. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  3. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  4. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  5. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  6. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv. PMID:16509343

  7. Estimating optimal time for fast chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Welch, Christopher J; Regalado, Erik L

    2014-09-01

    The term t(min cc) provides a ready estimate of the shortest time that can be obtained by "column cutting" for baseline resolution of two components showing excess chromatographic resolution. While actual column cutting is impractical, the t(min cc) value is shown to be closely related to the minimum separation time obtainable by adjusting other parameters such as flow rate, mobile phase composition, and temperature, affording scientists interested in the development of fast chromatographic separations a convenient tool for estimating the minimum separation time that can be obtained by modifying a given method development screening result. Furthermore, the relationship between t(min cc) and the minimum separation time obtainable by adjusting other parameters is shown to be dependent on the speed of the screening method, with aggressive screening gradients affording t(min cc) estimates that match the actual minimum separation time, and "lazy" screening gradients affording t(min cc) values that overestimate minimum separation time. Consequently, the analysis of the relationship between t(min cc) and actual minimum separation time may be a useful tool for determining the "fitness" of method development screening methods. PMID:24995384

  8. High-performance liquid-chromatographic separation of subcomponents of antimycin-A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Using a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique, a mixture of antimycins A was separated into eight hitherto unreported subcomponents, Ala, Alb, A2a, A2b, A3a, A3b, A4a, and A4b. Although a base-line resolution of the known four major antimycins Al, A2, A3, and A4 was readily achieved with mobile phases containing acetate buffers, the separation of the new antibiotic subcomponents was highly sensitive to variation in mobile phase conditions. The type and composition of organic modifiers, the nature of buffer salts, and the concentration of added electrolytes had profound effects on capacity factors, separation factors, and peak resolution values. Of the numerous chromatographic systems examined, a mobile phase consisting of methanol-water (70:30) and 0.005 M tetrabutylammonium phosphate at pH 3.0 yielded the most satisfactory results for the separation of the subcomponents. Reversed-phase gradient HPLC separation of the dansylated or methylated antibiotic compounds produced superior chromatographic characteristics and the presence of added electrolytes was not a critical factor for achieving separation. Differences in the chromatographic outcome between homologous and structural isomers were interpretated based on a differential solvophobic interaction rationale. Preparative reversed-phase HPLC under optimal conditions enabled isolation of pure samples of the methylated antimycin subcomponents for use in structural studies.

  9. Chromatographic removal and heat inactivation of hepatitis B virus during the manufacture of human albumin.

    PubMed

    Adcock, W L; MacGregor, A; Davies, J R; Hattarki, M; Anderson, D A; Goss, N H

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy of the chromatographic and pasteurization steps, employed in the manufacture of human albumin, in the removal and/or inactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Most human albumins manufactured today are prepared from donor plasma by fractionation methods that use precipitation with cold ethanol. CSL Limited, an Australian biopharmaceutical company, has recently converted its method of manufacture for albumin from a traditional Cohn fractionation method to a method employing chromatographic techniques. A step-by-step validation of virus removal and inactivation was performed on this manufacturing process, which includes a DEAE-Sepharose(R) and CM-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow ion-exchange step, a Sephacryl(R) S200 High-Resolution gel-filtration step and a bulk pasteurization step where product is held at 60 degreesC for 10 h. HBV partitioning experiments were conducted on scaled-down chromatographic columns with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) as a marker, whereas the HBV model virus, duck HBV, was used to study the inactivation kinetics during pasteurization. Reductions for HBsAg through the three chromatographic steps resulted in a total log10 decrease of 1.5 log10, whereas more than 6.5 log10 decrease in duck HBV in Albumex(R)5 was achieved during pasteurization. PMID:9756468

  10. Simple automatic strategy for background drift correction in chromatographic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai-Yan; Li, He-Dong; Yu, Yong-Jie; Wang, Bing; Lu, Peng; Cui, Hua-Peng; Liu, Ping-Ping; She, Yuan-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Chromatographic background drift correction, which influences peak detection and time shift alignment results, is a critical stage in chromatographic data analysis. In this study, an automatic background drift correction methodology was developed. Local minimum values in a chromatogram were initially detected and organized as a new baseline vector. Iterative optimization was then employed to recognize outliers, which belong to the chromatographic peaks, in this vector, and update the outliers in the baseline until convergence. The optimized baseline vector was finally expanded into the original chromatogram, and linear interpolation was employed to estimate background drift in the chromatogram. The principle underlying the proposed method was confirmed using a complex gas chromatographic dataset. Finally, the proposed approach was applied to eliminate background drift in liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight samples used in the metabolic study of Escherichia coli samples. The proposed method was comparable with three classical techniques: morphological weighted penalized least squares, moving window minimum value strategy and background drift correction by orthogonal subspace projection. The proposed method allows almost automatic implementation of background drift correction, which is convenient for practical use. PMID:27139215

  11. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods

    PubMed Central

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  12. Analysis of free drug fractions in human serum by ultrafast affinity extraction and two-dimensional affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast affinity extraction and a two-dimensional high performance affinity chromatographic system were used to measure the free fractions for various drugs in serum and at typical therapeutic concentrations. Pooled samples of normal serum or serum from diabetic patients were utilized in this work. Several drug models (i.e., quinidine, diazepam, gliclazide, tolbutamide, and acetohexamide) were examined that represented a relatively wide range of therapeutic concentrations and affinities for human serum albumin (HSA). The two-dimensional system consisted of an HSA microcolumn for the extraction of a free drug fraction, followed by a larger HSA analytical column for the further separation and measurement of this fraction. Factors that were optimized in this method included the flow rates, column sizes, and column switching times that were employed. The final extraction times used for isolating the free drug fractions were 333-665 ms or less. The dissociation rate constants for several of the drugs with soluble HSA were measured during system optimization, giving results that agreed with reference values. In the final system, free drug fractions in the range of 0.7-9.5% were measured and gave good agreement with values that were determined by ultrafiltration. Association equilibrium constants or global affinities were also estimated by this approach for the drugs with soluble HSA. The results for the two-dimensional system were obtained in 5-10 min or less and required only 1-5 μL of serum per injection. The same approach could be adapted for work with other drugs and proteins in clinical samples or for biomedical research. PMID:26462924

  13. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  14. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  15. FIELD COMPARISON OF PORTABLE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHS WITH METHOD TO-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-deployable prototype fast gas chromatograph (FGC) and two commercially-available portable gas chromatographs (PGC) were evaluated by measuring organic vapors in ambient air at a field monitoring site in metropolitan San Juan, Puerto Rico. he data were compared with simult...

  16. Gas-Chromatographic Determination Of Water In Freon PCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic apparatus measures small concentrations of water in specimens of Freon PCA. Testing by use of apparatus faster and provides greater protection against accidental contamination of specimens by water in testing environment. Automated for unattended operation. Also used to measure water contents of materials, other than Freon PCA. Innovation extended to development of purgeable sampling accessory for gas chromatographs.

  17. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  18. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  19. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  20. Chymopapain. Chromatographic purification and immunological characterization.

    PubMed

    Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1984-10-01

    Chymopapain (EC 3.4.22.6) was purified from commercially available spray-dried latex of papaya (Carica papaya) fruit by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and fast protein chromatography on the Mono S cation-exchange column. Multiple forms of chymopapain separated chromatographically were shown to be immunologically identical. A major form was isolated and found to be homogeneous by several criteria, and fully active, and its N-terminal amino acid was identified as tyrosine. Latex from fresh unripe papaya fruit contained predominantly one form of chymopapain, and it is concluded that chymopapain is a single enzyme distinct from the other cysteine proteinases of C. papaya latex. PMID:6437389

  1. Multiscale peak alignment for chromatographic datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Lu, Hong-Mei; Tan, Bin-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Na; Ferro, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Chromatography has been extensively applied in many fields, such as metabolomics and quality control of herbal medicines. Preprocessing, especially peak alignment, is a time-consuming task prior to the extraction of useful information from the datasets by chemometrics and statistics. To accurately and rapidly align shift peaks among one-dimensional chromatograms, multiscale peak alignment (MSPA) is presented in this research. Peaks of each chromatogram were detected based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and aligned against a reference chromatogram from large to small scale gradually, and the aligning procedure is accelerated by fast Fourier transform cross correlation. The presented method was compared with two widely used alignment methods on chromatographic dataset, which demonstrates that MSPA can preserve the shapes of peaks and has an excellent speed during alignment. Furthermore, MSPA method is robust and not sensitive to noise and baseline. MSPA was implemented and is available at http://code.google.com/p/mspa. PMID:22222564

  2. Detection system for a gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John M.; Small, Gerald J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

  3. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  4. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  5. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  6. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 17 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  7. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 9 figures, 1 table.

  8. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everwhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separation components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m0-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory.

  9. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion. PMID:2888155

  10. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  11. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems. PMID:21117653

  12. Liposome-based immunoaffinity chromatographic assay for the quantitation of immunoglobulin E in human serum.

    PubMed

    Annie Ho, Ja-an; Wu, Li-Chen; Chang, Li-Hui; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Reuben Hwu, Jih-Ru

    2010-01-15

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I allergies affect over 25% of the world's population; they are among the most common diseases in developed countries. Therefore, simple and rapid in vivo and in vitro methods for diagnosing allergies are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using sulforhodamine B, a fluorescent dye, entrapped inside immunoliposomes, the outer surfaces of which were sensitized with IgE, as a signal amplifier for the development of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive colorimetric affinity chromatographic immunoassay for the detection of total IgE in serum. This assay operates based on competition between standards (or human serum samples) containing IgE and IgE-sensitized immunoliposomes for the limited number of antigen binding sites of immobilized anti-IgE antibodies at the antigen capture (AC) zone on the nitrocellulose membranes. The color density of the AC zone is indirectly proportional to the number of IgE units present in the test sample. The detection limit of this liposome-based immunoaffinity chromatographic assay was 0.37ng in IgE-free serum solution (equivalent to 20microL of a 18.5ngmL(-1) solution). A commercially available ELISA kit was used as a reference method to validate the proposed assay through the analysis of three human serum samples. PMID:19683481

  13. High-productivity membrane adsorbers: Polymer surface-modification studies for ion-exchange and affinity bioseparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenette, Heather C. S.

    This dissertation centers on the surface-modification of macroporous membranes to make them selective adsorbers for different proteins, and the analysis of the performance of these membranes relative to existing technology. The common approach used in these studies, which is using membrane technology for chromatographic applications and using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) as a surface modification technique, will be introduced and supported by a brief review in Chapter 1. The specific approaches to address the unique challenges and motivations of each study system are given in the introduction sections of the respective dissertation chapters. Chapter 2 describes my work to develop cation-exchange membranes. I discuss the polymer growth kinetics and characterization of the membrane surface. I also present an analysis of productivity, which measures the mass of protein that can bind to the stationary phase per volume of stationary phase adsorbing material per time. Surprisingly and despite its importance, this performance measure was not described in previous literature. Because of the significantly shorter residence time necessary for binding to occur, the productivity of these cation-exchange membrane adsorbers (300 mg/mL/min) is nearly two orders of magnitude higher than the productivity of a commercial resin product (4 mg/mL/min). My work studying membrane adsorbers for affinity separations was built on the productivity potential of this approach, as articulated in the conclusion of Chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on the chemical formulation work to incorporate glycoligands into the backbone of polymer tentacles grown from the surface of the same membrane stationary phase. Emphasis is given to characterizing and testing the working formulation for ligand incorporation, and details about how I arrived at this formulation are given in Appendix B. The plant protein, or lectin, Concanavalin A (conA) was used as the target protein. The carbohydrate affinity

  14. Chromatographic Separations of Enantiomers and Underivatized Oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Ying Liu

    2004-12-19

    My graduate research has focused on separation science and bioanalytical analysis, which emphasized in method development. It includes three major areas: enantiomeric separations using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Super/subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE); drug-protein binding behavior studies using CE; and carbohydrate analysis using liquid chromatograph-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Enantiomeric separations continue to be extremely important in the pharmaceutical industry. An in-depth evaluation of the enantiomeric separation capabilities of macrocyclic glycopeptides CSPs with SFC mobile phases was investigated using a set of over 100 chiral compounds. It was found that the macrocyclic based CSPs were able to separate enantiomers of various compounds with different polarities and functionalities. Seventy percent of all separations were achieved in less than 4 min due to the high flow rate (4.0 ml/min) that can be used in SFC. Drug-protein binding is an important process in determining the activity and fate of a drug once it enters the body. Two drug/protein systems have been studied using frontal analysis CE method. More sensitive fluorescence detection was introduced in this assay, which overcame the problem of low sensitivity that is common when using UV detection for drug-protein studies. In addition, the first usage of an argon ion laser with 257 nm beam coupled with CCD camera as a frontal analysis detection method enabled the simultaneous observation of drug fluorescence as well as the protein fluorescence. LC-ESI-MS was used for the separation and characterization of underivatized oligosaccharide mixtures. With the limits of detection as low as 50 picograms, all individual components of oligosaccharide mixtures (up to 11 glucose-units long) were baseline resolved on a Cyclobond I 2000 column and detected using ESI-MS. This system is characterized by high chromatographic

  15. Chromatographic separation of cholesterol in foods.

    PubMed

    Fenton, M

    1992-10-30

    Based on the current literature and on experience gained in the laboratory, a simplified procedure using direct saponification (0.4 M potassium hydroxide in ethanol and heating at 60 degrees C for 1 h) is the most appropriate method for the determination of total cholesterol in foods. Extraction of the unsaponifiable matter with hexane is efficient and no extra clean-up is required before quantification. An internal standard, 5 alpha-cholestane or epicoprostanol, should be added to the sample prior to saponification and, together with reference standards, carried through the entire procedure to ensure accurate results. A significant improvement in cholesterol methodology has been achieved by decreasing the sample size and performing all the sample preparation steps in a single tube. The method has the advantages of elimination of an initial solvent extraction for total lipids and errors resulting from multiple extractions, transfers, filtration and wash steps after saponification. The resulting hexane extract, which contains a variety of sterols and fat soluble vitamins, requires an efficient capillary column for complete resolution of cholesterol from the other compounds present. The development of fused-silica capillary columns using cross-linked and bonded liquid phases has provided high thermal stability, inertness and separation efficiency and, together with automated cold on-column gas chromatographic injection systems, has resulted in reproducible cholesterol determinations in either underivatized or derivatized form. If free cholesterol and its esters need to be determined separately, they are initially extracted with other lipids with chloroform-methanol followed by their separation by column or thin-layer chromatography and subsequently analysed by gas or liquid chromatography. Although capillary gas chromatography offers superior efficiency in separation, the inherent benefits of liquid chromatography makes it a potential alternative. Isotope dilution

  16. Optimization of an improved single-column chromatographic process for the separation of enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Monzure-Khoda; Medi, Bijan; Amanullah, Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    This work addresses optimization of an improved single-column chromatographic (ISCC) process for the separation of guaifenesin enantiomers. Conventional feed injection and fraction collection systems have been replaced with customized components facilitating simultaneous separation and online monitoring with the ultimate objective of application of an optimizing controller. Injection volume, cycle time, desorbent flow rate, feed concentration, and three cut intervals are considered as decision variables. A multi-objective optimization technique based on genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to achieve maximum productivity and minimum desorbent requirement in the region constrained by product specifications and hardware limitations. The optimization results along with the contribution of decision variables are discussed using Pareto fronts that identify non-dominated solutions. Optimization results of a similar simulated moving bed process have also been included to facilitate comparison with a continuous chromatographic process. PMID:22364669

  17. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this aim, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to a thousand domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. Extracts of overexpressed domains are incubated with peptide-coated resins and subjected to filtration. Binding affinities are deduced from microfluidic capillary electrophoresis of flow-throughs. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from Human Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human PDZome. We obtained exquisite sequence-dependent binding profiles, describing quantitatively the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has a wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes. PMID:26053890

  18. Sub 2-μm macroporous silica particles derivatized for enhanced lectin affinity enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Benjamin F; Mann, Amanda K P; Skrabalak, Sara E; Novotny, Milos V

    2013-02-01

    A new, mechanically stable silica microparticle with macrosized internal pores (1.6 μm particles with 100 nm pores) has been developed for chromatography. The particles are characterized by an extensive network of interconnected macropores with a high intraparticle void volume, as observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They are synthesized by an aerosol assembly technique called ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP). The particles have a high surface area for a macroporous material, ∼200 m(2)/g, making them suitable for large biomolecular separations. To demonstrate their potential for bioseparations, they have been functionalized with lectins for affinity enrichment of glycoproteins. The material was derivatized with two lectins, Concanavalin A (Con A) and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), and binding properties were tested with standard glycoproteins. The columns exhibited excellent binding capacities for microaffinity enrichment: Con A was able to bind 75 μg of a standard glycoprotein in a 50 × 1 mm column. Following initial tests, the lectin microcolumns were utilized for enrichment of glycoproteins from 1 μL volumes of blood serum samples, performed in triplicate for each lectin. The enriched serum fractions were subjected to side-by-side glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling analyses with mass spectrometry to show that the new particles offer excellent sensitivity for microscale analyses of precious biological sample materials. The unique combination of the macroporous architecture and small particle diameter suggests the material may have advantages for conventional modes of chromatographic separation of macromolecules in an ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) format. PMID:23278114

  19. Liquid chromatographic determination of nicarbazin in feeds.

    PubMed

    Krabel, B J; Dickson, D A; Zimmermann, A G; Coleman, M R

    2000-01-01

    A new liquid chromatographic method has been developed for determination of nicarbazin in feeds. Approximately 40 g feed is extracted with 200 mL acetonitrile-water (80 + 20, v/v). An aliquot of the extract is filtered and assayed using a reversed-phase isocratic method that measures the 4,4'-dinitrocarbanilide moiety of nicarbazin at a wavelength of 340 nm. For medicated feeds, the method uses a standard linear range of 5 to 100 microg/mL. For lower levels, a linear range of 50 to 150 ng/mL can be used. The method has a limit of detection of 250 ng/g and a limit of quantitation of 500 ng/g in a 40 g feed sample. Recovery was 99.1%, with a range of 95.2 to 101.8%. In the typical U.S. dosing range of 27 to 113.5 g/ton, the precision of the method based on one analyst, one day, and 2 weighings ranged from 2.8% (113.5 g/ton) to 4.7% (27 g/ton). PMID:11048841

  20. Hydrophilic interaction chromatographic analysis of anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Chandré M; Stander, Maria A; de Villiers, André

    2013-12-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) provides an alternative separation mode for the analysis of phenolic compounds, in which aqueous-organic mobile phases with polar stationary phases are used. This paper reports the evaluation of HILIC for the analysis of the natural pigments anthocyanins, which are of importance because of their chromophoric properties and a range of health benefits associated with their consumption. Several HILIC stationary phases (silica, diol, amine, cyanopropyl and amide) and mobile phase combinations were evaluated, with the latter proving particularly important due to the distinctive chromatographic behaviour of anthocyanins. Diode array detection was used for selective detection of anthocyanins, while high resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS) was used for compound identification. The potential of HILIC separation is demonstrated for a range of anthocyanins varying in glycosylation and acylation patterns found in blueberries, grape skins, black beans, red cabbage and red radish. HILIC is shown to be a complementary separation method to reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) due to the alternative retention mechanism. PMID:24188998

  1. Simple gas chromatographic method for furfural analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Elvira M S M; Lopes, João F

    2009-04-01

    A new, simple, gas chromatographic method was developed for the direct analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), 2-furfural (2-F) and 5-methylfurfural (5-MF) in liquid and water soluble foods, using direct immersion SPME coupled to GC-FID and/or GC-TOF-MS. The fiber (DVB/CAR/PDMS) conditions were optimized: pH effect, temperature, adsorption and desorption times. The method is simple and accurate (RSD<8%), showed good recoveries (77-107%) and good limits of detection (GC-FID: 1.37 microgL(-1) for 2-F, 8.96 microgL(-1) for 5-MF, 6.52 microgL(-1) for 5-HMF; GC-TOF-MS: 0.3, 1.2 and 0.9 ngmL(-1) for 2-F, 5-MF and 5-HMF, respectively). It was applied to different commercial food matrices: honey, white, demerara, brown and yellow table sugars, and white and red balsamic vinegars. This one-step, sensitive and direct method for the analysis of furfurals will contribute to characterise and quantify their presence in the human diet. PMID:18976770

  2. Liquid chromatographic assay for dicloxacillin in plasma.

    PubMed

    Alderete, Oscar; González-Esquivel, Dinora F; Del Rivero, L Misael; Castro Torres, Nelly

    2004-06-15

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of dicloxacillin in plasma has been developed. The method only requires 0.5 ml of plasma, phosphate buffer solution (pH = 4.7), acidification with 0.5N hydrochloride acid and liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Posterior evaporation of organic under nitrogen steam and redissolution in mobile phase is carried out. The analysis was performed on a Spherisorb C18 (5 microm) column, using methanol -0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH = 4.7 (75:25; v/v) as mobile phase, with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. Results showed that the assay is sensitive: 0.5 microg/ml. The response is linear in the range of 0.5 - 10 microg/ml. Maximum inter-day coefficient of variation was 12.4%. Mean extraction recovery obtained was 96.95%. Stability studies showed that the loss was not higher than 10%, samples are stable at room temperature for 6 h, at -20 Celsius for 2 months, processed samples were stable at least for 24 h and also after two freeze-thaw cycles. The method has been used to perform pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in humans. PMID:15135112

  3. Preconcentration procedures for phthalate esters combined with chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xueju; Hao, Yi; Jia, Qiong

    2013-08-01

    Phthalate esters are endocrine disrupters or mutagens. They are widely used as plasticizers and can be usually found in environmental samples, such as food, soil and polluted air. However, it is difficult to directly determine phthalate esters owing to their relatively low concentration and complex matrices. Therefore, preconcentration and separation have become increasingly important. In recent years, many preconcentration methods have been successfully developed and widely used, such as liquid-liquid extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and solid-phase extraction. These preconcentration methods for phthalate esters can be applied to various real samples, water, soil, air, food and cosmetics. The aim of this paper is to review recent literature studies (primarily from the last five years) about preconcentration techniques for phthalate esters coupled with chromatographic analysis. The following text describes several preconcentration approaches, including liquid-liquid extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, cloud point extraction, solid-phase extraction, solid-phase microextraction and stir bar sorptive extraction. Their advantages and disadvantages are also summarized. PMID:23696389

  4. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  5. Recent advances in affinity capillary electrophoresis for binding studies.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; El Deeb, Sami; AlGarabli, Noura; AlAstal, Raghda; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The present review covers recent advances and important applications of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). It provides an overview about various ACE types, including ACE-MS, the multiple injection mode, the use of microchips and field-amplified sample injection-ACE. The most common scenarios of the studied affinity interactions are protein-drug, protein-metal ion, protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-carbohydrate, carbohydrate-drug, peptide-peptide, DNA-drug and antigen-antibody. Approaches for the improvements of ACE in term of precision, rinsing protocols and sensitivity are discussed. The combined use of computer simulation programs to support data evaluation is presented. In conclusion, the performance of ACE is compared with other techniques such as equilibrium dialysis, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, high-performance affinity chromatography as well as surface plasmon resonance, ultraviolet, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, MS and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:25534793

  6. CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND MASS SPECTRAL STUDIES OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE AND THREE PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONAMIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chromatographic and mass spectral characteristics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and three nitrogen-substituted perfluorooctanesulfonamides have been obtained. A methyl/phenol mixed phase fused silica capillary column was used for GC analysis, while a C18 reversed phase ...

  7. NEW LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resonance enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectrometry (CARS) has been demonstrated as a specific identification system for liquid chromatography for water pollution identification. To achieve this, liquid chromatographic preconcentration and separation and computer control o...

  8. AUTOMATED MEASUREMENTS OF INFRARED SPECTRA OF CHROMATOGRAPHICALLY SEPARATED FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid identification of trace organic pollutants in water presents one of the more severe problems for environmental analytical chemists today. Spectroscopic identifications of chromatographically separated fractions, preferably without trapping each sample, yields more certa...

  9. Advanced hyphenated chromatographic-mass spectrometry in mycotoxin determination: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Zhaowei; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques are essential for advanced research in food safety and environmental monitoring. These fields are important for securing the health of humans and animals, and for ensuring environmental security. Mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi, are major contaminants of agricultural products, food and feed, biological samples, and the environment as a whole. Mycotoxins can cause cancers, nephritic and hepatic diseases, various hemorrhagic syndromes, and immune and neurological disorders. Mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed can provoke trade conflicts, resulting in massive economic losses. Risk assessment of mycotoxin contamination for humans and animals generally depends on clear identification and reliable quantitation in diversified matrices. Pioneering work on mycotoxin quantitation using mass spectrometry (MS) was performed in the early 1970s. Now, unambiguous confirmation and quantitation of mycotoxins can be readily achieved with a variety hyphenated techniques that combine chromatographic separation with MS, including liquid chromatography (LC) or gas chromatography (GC). With the advent of atmospheric pressure ionization, LC-MS has become a routine technique. Recently, the co-occurrence of multiple mycotoxins in the same sample has drawn an increasing amount of attention. Thus, modern analyses must be able to detect and quantitate multiple mycotoxins in a single run. Improvements in tandem MS techniques have been made to achieve this purpose. This review describes the advanced research that has been done regarding mycotoxin determination using hyphenated chromatographic-MS techniques, but is not a full-circle survey of all the literature published on this topic. The present work provides an overview of the various hyphenated chromatographic-MS-based strategies that have been applied to mycotoxin analysis, with a focus on recent developments. The use of chromatographic-MS to measure levels of mycotoxins, including

  10. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  12. Liquid chromatographic analysis and characterization of inorganic nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Craft, S.A.

    1996-07-01

    We describe the application of the techniques of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to analyze and characterize various types of inorganic nanoclusters. Both metal and semiconductor nanoclusters were grown in inverse micelles and we demonstrate how the nanoclusters can be separated from the surfactants and other byproducts of the reaction by using a variety of HPLC columns. We also discuss passivation of the cluster surface to prevent aggregation. The HPLC columns separate the clusters based upon a combination of size exclusion and chemical affinity mechanisms and the optical properties of the purified clusters are determined on- line using a variety of detectors. These include a photodiode array for collecting absorbance spectra, a fluorescence detector to monitor luminescence, and a conductivity detector to monitor surface charge on the nanoclusters. We illustrate the analysis of nanoclusters using HPLC by showing data from semiconductor Si, MoS{sub 2} nanoclusters and Au nanoclusters. An extremely novel luminescence was observed from very small metal nanoclusters.

  13. Mars Solar Balloon Landed Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Harpold, D.; Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Gorevan, S.; Israel, G.; Bertaux, J. L.; Jones, J.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.

    1999-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload. The GCMS would obtain samples directly from the atmosphere at the surface and also from gases evolved from solid phase material collected from well below the surface with a Sample Acquisition and Transport Mechanism (SATM). The experiment envisioned in the Mars Micromission described would obtain samples from a much greater depth of up to one meter below the surface, and would search for organic molecules trapped in ancient stratified layers well below the oxidized surface. Insitu instruments on upcoming NASA missions working in concert with remote sensing measurement techniques have the potential to provide a more detailed investigation of mineralogy and the extent of simple volatiles such as CO2 and H2O in surface and subsurface solid phase materials. Within the context of subsequent mission opportunities such as those provided by the Ariane 5 piggyback

  14. Predictability of enantiomeric chromatographic behavior on various chiral stationary phases using typical reversed phase modeling software.

    PubMed

    Wagdy, Hebatallah A; Hanafi, Rasha S; El-Nashar, Rasha M; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-09-01

    Pharmaceutical companies worldwide tend to apply chiral chromatographic separation techniques in their mass production strategy rather than asymmetric synthesis. The present work aims to investigate the predictability of chromatographic behavior of enantiomers using DryLab HPLC method development software, which is typically used to predict the effect of changing various chromatographic parameters on resolution in the reversed phase mode. Three different types of chiral stationary phases were tested for predictability: macrocyclic antibiotics-based columns (Chirobiotic V and T), polysaccharide-based chiral column (Chiralpak AD-RH), and protein-based chiral column (Ultron ES-OVM). Preliminary basic runs were implemented, then exported to DryLab after peak tracking was accomplished. Prediction of the effect of % organic mobile phase on separation was possible for separations on Chirobiotic V for several probes: racemic propranolol with 97.80% accuracy; mixture of racemates of propranolol and terbutaline sulphate, as well as, racemates of propranolol and salbutamol sulphate with average 90.46% accuracy for the effect of percent organic mobile phase and average 98.39% for the effect of pH; and racemic warfarin with 93.45% accuracy for the effect of percent organic mobile phase and average 99.64% for the effect of pH. It can be concluded that Chirobiotic V reversed phase retention mechanism follows the solvophobic theory. PMID:23775938

  15. Evaluation of coverage, retention patterns, and selectivity of seven liquid chromatographic methods for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wernisch, Stefanie; Pennathur, Subramaniam

    2016-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics studies require highly selective and efficient chromatographic techniques. Typically employed reversed-phase (RP) methods fail to target polar metabolites, but the introduction of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is slow due to perceived issues of reproducibility and ruggedness and a limited understanding of the complex retention mechanisms. In this study, we present a comparison of the chromatographic performance of a traditional RP-C18 column with zwitterionic, amide-, alkyl diol-, and aminoalkyl-based HILIC and mixed-mode columns. Our metabolite library represents one of the largest analyte sets available and consists of 764 authentic metabolite standards, including amino acids, nucleotides, sugars, and other metabolites, representing all major biological pathways and commonly observed exogenous metabolites (drugs). The coverage, retention patterns, and selectivity of the individual methods are highly diverse even between conceptually related HILIC methods. Furthermore, we show that HILIC sorbents having highly orthogonal selectivity and specificity enhance the coverage of major metabolite groups in (semi-) targeted applications compared to RP. Finally, we discuss issues encountered in the analysis of biological samples based on the results obtained with human plasma extracts. Our results demonstrate that fast and highly reproducible separations on zwitterionic columns are feasible, but knowledge of analyte properties is essential to avoid chromatographic bias and exclusion of key analytes in metabolomics studies. Graphical Abstract The chromatographic parameters of 764 authentic metabolite standards provide the basis for a comparison of coverage, selectivity and orthogonality of 7 reversed-phase (RP), mixed-mode (MM) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) methods. PMID:27370688

  16. Chromatographic fingerprinting: An innovative approach for food 'identitation' and food authentication - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis; Ruiz-Samblás, Cristina; Valverde-Som, Lucia; Pérez-Castaño, Estefanía; González-Casado, Antonio

    2016-02-25

    Fingerprinting methods describe a variety of analytical methods that provide analytical signals related to the composition of foodstuffs in a non-selective way such as by collecting a spectrum or a chromatogram. Mathematical processing of the information in such fingerprints may allow the characterisation and/or authentication of foodstuffs. In this context, the particular meaning of 'fingerprinting', in conjunction with 'profiling', is different from the original meanings used in metabolomics. This fact has produced some confusion with the use of these terms in analytical papers. Researchers coming from the metabolomic field could use 'profiling' or 'fingerprinting' on a different way to researchers who are devoted to food science. The arrival of an eclectic discipline, named 'foodomics' has not been enough to allay this terminological problem, since the authors keep on using the terms with both meanings. Thus, a first goal of this tutorial is to clarify the difference between both terms. In addition, the chemical approaches for food authentication, i.e., chemical markers, component profiling and instrumental fingerprinting, have been described. A new term, designated as 'food identitation', has been introduced in order to complete the life cycle of the chemical-based food authentication process. Chromatographic fingerprinting has been explained in detail and some strategies which could be applied has been clarified and discussed. Particularly, the strategies for chromatographic signals acquisition and chromatographic data handling are unified in a single framework. Finally, an overview about the applications of chromatographic (GC and LC) fingerprints in food authentication using different chemometric techniques has been included. PMID:26851080

  17. Indian craniometric variability and affinities.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with "Caucasoid" populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  18. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  19. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  20. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  1. Affinity Chromatography of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alexander J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a laboratory technique of enzyme purification by affinity chromatography as part of an undergraduate biochemical methodology course. Provides preparation details of the rat muscle homogenate and reagents. Proposes column requirements and assaying information. (MVL)

  2. Fundamental studies of chalcogenide nanocrystals, carbonaceous nanoparticles, and chromatographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Jared Scott

    2011-12-01

    The development of novel nanomaterials and the understanding of their fundamental physical and chemical properties represent an exciting area of research. These materials are continuously being sought for ever-increasing applications; finding their way into uses that influence mankind on a daily basis. Combining elements from traditional nanoparticle characterization with electrophoretic-based techniques, this dissertation presents the analysis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) generated from a novel source (candle soot) as well as a unique perspective on the reactivity and degradation process of magic-sized cadmium chalcogenide nanocrystals. One potential application of CNPs is their use as an alternative fluorophore in a separation-based sensor system. Laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) is a commonly used manner of detection in this type of platform, but is limited in many cases by problems associated with the fluorophore. Carbon-based nanoparticles have the potential to improve upon traditional fluorophores in applications that make use of LIF as the detection scheme. CNPs were extracted from the carbonaceous material produced by the incomplete combustion of a candle. The soot was submitted to an oxidizing treatment and extraction/filtration procedures rendering watersoluble luminescent species. Electron microscopy was used to identify globular, amorphous structures in the nanometer size-range. An aqueous suspension of CNPs demonstrated excellent stability in terms of its electronic properties, showing little change in absorption and emission spectra upon storage under ambient conditions over a two-year period. Capitalizing on the strengths of capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a characterization technique, we have analyzed the negatively-charged CNPs in terms of charge and size by studying the influence of variable CE conditions on the resulting separation. Separations at different pH revealed a highly complex mixture of CNPs, containing species with large

  3. Affine hypersurfaces with parallel difference tensor relative to affine α-connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cece

    2014-12-01

    Li and Zhang (2014) studied affine hypersurfaces of R n + 1 with parallel difference tensor relative to the affine α-connection ∇ (α), and characterized the generalized Cayley hypersurfaces by K n - 1 ≠ 0 and ∇ (α) K = 0 for some nonzero constant α, where the affine α-connection ∇ (α) of information geometry was introduced on affine hypersurface. In this paper, by a slightly different method we continue to study affine hypersurfaces with ∇ (α) K = 0, if α = 0 we further assume that the Pick invariant vanishes and affine metric is of constant sectional curvature. It is proved that they are either hyperquadrics or improper affine hypersphere with flat indefinite affine metric, the latter can be locally given as a graph of a polynomial of at most degree n + 1 with constant Hessian determinant. In particular, if the affine metric is definite, Lorentzian, or its negative index is 2, we complete the classification of such hypersurfaces.

  4. Development and evaluation of a gas chromatographic method for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Brooks, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-residue method is described for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples. The technique uses solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection employing nitrogen-selective devices. Seven compounds can be determined simultaneously at a nominal detection limit of 0.1 ??g/L in a 1-litre sample. Three different natural water samples were used for error analysis via evaluation of recovery efficiencies and estimation of overall method precision. As an alternative to liquid-liquid partition (solvent extraction) for removal of compounds of interest from water, solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques employing chromatographic grade silicas with chemically modified surfaces have been examined. SPE is found to provide rapid and efficient concentration with quantitative recovery of some triazine herbicides from natural water samples. Concentration factors of 500 to 1000 times are obtained readily by the SPE technique.A multi-residue method is described for the determination of triazine herbicides in natural water samples. The technique uses solvent extraction followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection employing nitrogen-selective devices. Seven compounds can be determined simultaneously at a nominal detection limit of 0. 1 mu g/L in a 1-litre sample. As an alternative to liquid-liquid partition (solvent extraction) for removal of compounds of interest from water, solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques employing chromatographic grade silicas with chemically modified surfaces have been examined. SPE is found to provide rapid and efficient concentration with quantitative recovery of some triazine herbicides from natural water samples. Concentration factors of 500 to 1000 times are obtained readily by the SPE technique.

  5. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  6. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  7. Measurement of cardiac output using improved chromatographic analysis of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).

    PubMed

    Klocke, F J; Roberts, D L; Farhi, E R; Naughton, B J; Sekovski, B; Klocke, R A

    1977-06-01

    A constant current variable frequency pulsed electron capture detector has been incorporated into the gas chromatographic analysis of trace amounts of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in water and blood. The resulting system offers a broader effective operating range than more conventional electron capture units and has been utilized for measurements of cardiac output employing constant-rate infusion of dissolved SF6. The SF6 technique has been validated against direct volumetric measurements of cardiac output in a canine right-heart bypass preparation and used subsequently for rapidly repeated measurements in conscious animals and man. PMID:877454

  8. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  9. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  10. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  11. Compact noncontraction semigroups of affine operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynov, A. S.; Protasov, V. Yu

    2015-07-01

    We analyze compact multiplicative semigroups of affine operators acting in a finite-dimensional space. The main result states that every such semigroup is either contracting, that is, contains elements of arbitrarily small operator norm, or all its operators share a common invariant affine subspace on which this semigroup is contracting. The proof uses functional difference equations with contraction of the argument. We look at applications to self-affine partitions of convex sets, the investigation of finite affine semigroups and the proof of a criterion of primitivity for nonnegative matrix families. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  12. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  13. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  14. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  15. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of morphine, heroin, and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Prager, M J; Harrington, S M; Governo, T F

    1979-03-01

    Morphine, heroin, and cocaine are quantitatively determined with the same gas-liquid chromatographic system. The compounds are separated on a 6 ft X 2 mm id glass column packed with a 1:1 mixture of 5% SE-30 on 80--100 mesh Chromosorb W and 3% OV-17 on 80--100 mesh Varaport 30. The column is temperature-programmed. Flame ionization detector responses are measured with a computer-based data system. Heroin and cocaine are chromatographed directly; morphine is derivatized first. The procedure was evaluated with previously analyzed commercial and forensic samples. Accuracy and precision were 5 and 3%, respectively. PMID:447602

  16. Comparison of enzymatic and liquid chromatographic chloramphenicol assays

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.F.; Opheim, K.E.; Koup, J.R.; Smith, A.L.

    1981-02-01

    A radioenzymatic assay and a ''high-performance'' liquid chromatographic assay for chloramphenicol were compared by using 52 patient specimens, 24 mock unknowns, and 13 quality control samples. Both methods were found to be rapid, precise, accurate, and sensitive, and either would be suitable for monitoring chloramphenicol concentrations in small volumes of serum. Linear regression analysis of serum chloramphenicol concentrations in patients receiving chloramphenicol succinate yielded a regression equation of Y . 1.04X + 0.274 (X . high-performance liquid chromatographic assay; Y . radioenzymatic assay), with a correlation coefficient of 0.971.

  17. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne V.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  18. A novel gigaporous GSH affinity medium for high-speed affinity chromatography of GST-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Juan; Li, Qiang; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-03-01

    Novel GSH-AP (phenoxyl agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene, Agap-co-PSt) microspheres were successfully prepared by introducing GSH ligand into hydrophilic AP microspheres pre-activated with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of GSH-AP medium were evaluated and compared with commercial GSH Sepharose FF (GSH-FF) medium. The macropores (100-500nm) of gigaporous PSt microspheres were well maintained after coating with agarose and functionalized with GSH ligand. Hydrodynamic experiments showed that GSH-AP column had less backpressure and plate height than those of GSH-FF column at high flow velocity, which was beneficial for its use in high-speed chromatography. The presence of flow-through pores in GSH-AP microspheres also accelerated the mass transfer rate of biomolecules induced by convective flow, leading to high protein resolution and high dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of glutathione S-transferase (GST) at high flow velocity. High purity of GST and GST-tagged recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) were obtained from crude extract with an acceptable recovery yield within 1.5min at a velocity up to 1400cm/h. GSH-AP medium is promising for high-speed affinity chromatography for the purification of GST and GST-tagged proteins. PMID:24269760

  19. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set. PMID:20866473

  20. Affine root systems and dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyakov, I. V.; Gromov, N. A.; Kuratov, V. V.

    The root systems in Carroll spaces with degenerate metric are defined. It is shown that their Cartan matrices and reflection groups are affine. Due to the geometric consideration the root system structure of affine algebras is determined by a sufficiently simple algorithm.

  1. Loop realizations of quantum affine algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Cautis, Sabin; Licata, Anthony

    2012-12-15

    We give a simplified description of quantum affine algebras in their loop presentation. This description is related to Drinfeld's new realization via halves of vertex operators. We also define an idempotent version of the quantum affine algebra which is suitable for categorification.

  2. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  3. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography on collapsed Langmuir-Blodgett iron(III) stearate films and iron(III) oxide nanoparticles for bottom-up phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Gladilovich, Vladimir; Greifenhagen, Uta; Sukhodolov, Nikolai; Selyutin, Artem; Singer, David; Thieme, Domenika; Majovsky, Petra; Shirkin, Alexey; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Bonitenko, Evgeny; Podolskaya, Ekaterina; Frolov, Andrej

    2016-04-22

    Phosphorylation is the enzymatic reaction of site-specific phosphate transfer from energy-rich donors to the side chains of serine, threonine, tyrosine, and histidine residues in proteins. In living cells, reversible phosphorylation underlies a universal mechanism of intracellular signal transduction. In this context, analysis of the phosphoproteome is a prerequisite to better understand the cellular regulatory networks. Conventionally, due to the low contents of signaling proteins, selective enrichment of proteolytic phosphopeptides by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is performed prior to their LC-MS or -MS/MS analysis. Unfortunately, this technique still suffers from low selectivity and compromised analyte recoveries. To overcome these limitations, we propose IMAC systems comprising stationary phases based on collapsed Langmuir-Blodgett films of iron(III) stearate (FF) or iron(III) oxide nanoparticles (FO) and mobile phases relying on ammonia, piperidine and heptadecafluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). Experiments with model phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein tryptic digests showed superior binding capacity, selectivity and recovery for both systems in comparison to the existing commercial analogs. As evidenced by LC-MS/MS analysis of the HeLa phosphoproteome, these features of the phases resulted in increased phosphoproteome coverage in comparison to the analogous commercially available phases, indicating that our IMAC protocol is a promising chromatographic tool for in-depth phosphoproteomic research. PMID:27016113

  4. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag) by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages) document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity chromatography can be

  5. Evaluation of practical chromatographic procedures for identification of clinical isolates of mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Luquin, M; Ausina, V; López Calahorra, F; Belda, F; García Barceló, M; Celma, C; Prats, G

    1991-01-01

    After experimental conditions were established, 366 strains of mycobacteria belonging to 23 different species were studied for fatty acids, secondary alcohols, and mycolic acid cleavage products by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Additionally, the mycolic acid pattern was studied by thin-layer chromatography. Capillary gas-liquid chromatography allowed direct identification of the following Mycobacterium spp.: M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. szulgai, M. xenopi, M. malmoense, and M. gordonae. The patterns of mycolic acid methyl esters recorded for the test strains of M. chelonae and M. agri may be of value in the identification of these species. Moreover, the combined use of the two chromatographic techniques provided precise identification of the M. tuberculosis complex, M. simiae, M. fallax, M. triviale, and M. chelonae-like organisms. A minimal set of biochemical tests is usually required to obtain identification to the species level when chromatographic procedures alone are not sufficient. Under the reported experimental conditions, thin-layer chromatography and capillary gas-liquid chromatography are rapid and very useful techniques for the identification of mycobacteria. Images PMID:1993746

  6. Toward a Micro Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, D. V.; Eyre, F. B.; Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Garkarian, V.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature mass filters (e.g., quadrupoles, ion traps) have been the subject of several miniaturization efforts. A project is currently in progress at JPL to develop a miniaturized Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) system, incorporating and/or developing miniature system components including turbomolecular pumps, scroll type roughing pump, quadrupole mass filter, gas chromatograph, precision power supply and other electronic components. The preponderance of the system elements will be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The quadrupole mass filter will be fabricated using an X-ray lithography technique producing high precision, 5x5 arrays of quadrupoles with pole lengths of about 3 mm and a total volume of 27 cubic mm. The miniature scroll pump will also be fabricated using X-ray lithography producing arrays of scroll stages about 3 mm in diameter. The target detection range for the mass spectrometer is 1 to 300 atomic mass units (AMU) with are solution of 0.5 AMU. This resolution will allow isotopic characterization for geochronology, atmospheric studies and other science efforts dependant on the understanding of isotope ratios of chemical species. This paper will discuss the design approach, the current state-of-the art regarding the system components and the progress toward development of key elements. The full system is anticipated to be small enough in mass, volume and power consumption to allow in situ chemical analysis on highly miniaturized science craft for geochronology, atmospheric characterization and detection of life experiments applicable to outer planet roadmap missions.

  7. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  8. Development and application of high-performance affinity beads: toward chemical biology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Satoshi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Hatakeyama, Mamoru; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In drug development research, the elucidation and understanding of the interactions between physiologically active substances and proteins that numerous genes produce is important. Currently, most commercially available drugs and physiologically active substances have been brought to market without knowledge of factors interacting with the drugs and the substances. Affinity purification is a useful and powerful technique employed to understand factors that are targeted by drugs and physiologically active substances. However, use of conventional matrices for affinity chromatography often causes a decrease in efficiency of affinity purification and, as a result, more practical matrices for affinity purification have been developed for application in drug discovery research. In this paper, we describe the development of high-performance affinity beads (SG beads and FG beads) that enable one-step affinity purification of drug targets and the elucidation of the mechanism of the action of the drugs. We also describe a chemical screening system using our affinity beads. We hope that utilization of the affinity beads will contribute to the progress of research in chemical biology. PMID:19243077

  9. Automatic segmentation of chromatographic images for region of interest delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Ana M.; Sousa, António V.; Sá-Miranda, M. Clara; Campilho, Aurélio C.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a segmentation method for automating the region of interest (ROI) delineation in chromatographic images, thus allowing the definition of the image area that contains the fundamental information for further processing while excluding the frame of the chromatographic plate that does not contain relevant data for disease identification. This is the first component of a screening tool for Fabry disease, which will be based on the automatic analysis of the chromatographic patterns extracted from the image ROI. Image segmentation is performed in two phases, where each individual pixel is finally considered as frame or ROI. In the first phase, an unsupervised learning method is used for classifying image pixels into three classes: frame, ROI or unknown. In the second phase, distance features are used for deciding which class the unknown pixels belong to. The segmentation result is post-processed using a sequence of morphological operators in order to obtain the final ROI rectangular area. The proposed methodology was successfully evaluated in a dataset of 41 chromatographic images.

  10. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC MICROMETHOD FOR TRACE DETERMINATIONS OF PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatographic procedure is described for the analysis of a variety of substituted phenols from water samples. The method was designed for situations when the sample size is very limited (0.5 to 1.0 ml), such as in laboratory microcosm experiments on transport and fate of ...

  11. Chromatographic profiles of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An LC-DAD-ESI/MS method was developed to obtain chromatographic profiles for the flavonoids and terpene lactones of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected G. biloba products. The method was used to identify 46 glycosylated flavonols and flavones, 3 free flavonol aglycones, catechin, 10 biflavones, a dihy...

  12. Chromatographic fingerprints analysis for evaluation of Ginkgo Biloba products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leaf extract of Ginkgo biloba has purported value for improving mental capacities in Alzheimer’s patients. The flavonoids and the terpene lactones are considered to be the two main active components that influence human health. This paper compared an LC/UV chromatographic fingerprint method wi...

  13. [A gas chromatographic method for determining acetaldehyde in cadaver blood].

    PubMed

    Savich, V I; Valladares, Kh A; Gusakov, Iu A; Skachko, Z M

    1990-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic method of acetaldehyde detection in blood of subjects who died of alcoholic intoxication is suggested. Method is simple, does not require additional expenses, can be readily used in medicolegal practice and in difficult cases it may help the expert to make an objective conclusion on the cause of death. PMID:2087747

  14. Bioanalytical method transfer considerations of chromatographic-based assays.

    PubMed

    Williard, Clark V

    2016-07-01

    Bioanalysis is an important part of the modern drug development process. The business practice of outsourcing and transferring bioanalytical methods from laboratory to laboratory has increasingly become a crucial strategy for successful and efficient delivery of therapies to the market. This chapter discusses important considerations when transferring various types of chromatographic-based assays in today's pharmaceutical research and development environment. PMID:27277876

  15. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Gas chromatographic column for the Viking 1975 molecular analysis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Bruner, F.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    A gas chromatographic column has been developed for use in the remote analysis of the Martian surface. The column, which utilizes a liquid-modified organic adsorbent (Tenax) as the stationary phase, provides efficient transmission and resolution of nanogram quantities of organic materials in the presence of millionfold excesses of water and carbon dioxide.

  17. Economic gas chromatograph system for subambient pressure gas sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Gas chromatograph sampling system consists of a manifold with a gas-sample valve, a minimum-volume pressure transducer with a portable monitor, a vacuum-source valve, and a sample inlet valve. Increased accuracy of analysis is obtained by better control of sample size.

  18. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  19. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1992-04-07

    The main objectives of this proposed research work are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate flotability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Coals such as Pittsburgh seam coal, Illinois No. 6 coal, Wyodak coal are chosen as representatives of high-rank bituminous coal, high volatile bituminous coal and subbituminous coal, respectively. Coal minerals such as pyrite and dolomite are chosen as representative coal minerals.

  20. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO. PMID:26851523

  1. A Lectin Purified from Blood Red Bracket Mushroom, Pycnoporus sanguineus (Agaricomycetidae), Mycelium Displayed Affinity Toward Bovine Transferrin.

    PubMed

    Albores, Silvana; Moros, Maria; Cerdeiras, Maria Pia; de la Fuente, Jesus Martinez; Grazu, Valeria; Fraguas, Laura Franco

    2016-01-01

    Fungal lectins constitute excellent ligands for development of affinity adsorbents useful in affinity chromatography. In this work, a lectin was purified from Pycnoporus sanguineus (PSL) mycelium using 3 procedures: by affinity chromatography, using magnetic galactosyl-nanoparticles or galactose coupled to Sepharose, and by ionic exchange chromatography (IEC). The highest lectin yield was achieved by IEC (55%); SDS-PAGE of PSL showed 2 bands with molecular mass of 68.7 and 55.2 kDa and IEC displayed 2 bands at pi 5.5 and 5.2. The lectin agglutinates rat erythrocytes, exhibiting broad specificity toward several monosaccharides, including galactose. The agglutination was also inhibited by the glycoproteins fetal calf fetuin, bovine lactoferrin, bovine transferrin, and horseradish peroxidase. The lectin was then used to synthesize an affinity adsorbent (PSL-Sepharose) and the interaction with glycoproteins was evaluated by analyzing their chromatographic behaviors. The strongest interaction with the PSL-derivative was observed with transferrin, although lower interactions were also displayed toward fetuin and lactoferrin. These results indicate that the purified PSL constitutes an interesting ligand for the design of affinity adsorbents to be used (i.e., in glycoprotein purification). PMID:27279446

  2. Affinity Propagation Clustering of Measurements for Multiple Extended Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Renbiao

    2015-01-01

    More measurements are generated by the target per observation interval, when the target is detected by a high resolution sensor, or there are more measurement sources on the target surface. Such a target is referred to as an extended target. The probability hypothesis density filter is considered an efficient method for tracking multiple extended targets. However, the crucial problem of how to accurately and effectively partition the measurements of multiple extended targets remains unsolved. In this paper, affinity propagation clustering is introduced into measurement partitioning for extended target tracking, and the elliptical gating technique is used to remove the clutter measurements, which makes the affinity propagation clustering capable of partitioning the measurement in a densely cluttered environment with high accuracy. The Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density filter is implemented for multiple extended target tracking. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, which provides improved performance, while obviously reducing the computational complexity. PMID:26370998

  3. Affinity Propagation Clustering of Measurements for Multiple Extended Target Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Renbiao

    2015-01-01

    More measurements are generated by the target per observation interval, when the target is detected by a high resolution sensor, or there are more measurement sources on the target surface. Such a target is referred to as an extended target. The probability hypothesis density filter is considered an efficient method for tracking multiple extended targets. However, the crucial problem of how to accurately and effectively partition the measurements of multiple extended targets remains unsolved. In this paper, affinity propagation clustering is introduced into measurement partitioning for extended target tracking, and the elliptical gating technique is used to remove the clutter measurements, which makes the affinity propagation clustering capable of partitioning the measurement in a densely cluttered environment with high accuracy. The Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density filter is implemented for multiple extended target tracking. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, which provides improved performance, while obviously reducing the computational complexity. PMID:26370998

  4. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  5. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  6. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  7. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  8. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-07-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with (3H)folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin.

  9. A new affinity gel for the purification of α-carbonic anhdrases.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Aysegul; Isık, Semra; Arslan, Oktay; Supuran, Claudiu T; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy

    2015-04-01

    The new affinity gel reported in this study was prepared using EUPERGIT C250L as a chromatographic bed material, to which etylenediamine spacer arms were attached to prevent steric hindrance between the matrix and ligand, and to facilitate effective binding of the CA-specific ligand, of the aromatic sulfonamide type for the purification of α-carbonic anhydrases (Cas; EC 4.2.1.1). Indeed, the aminoethyl moieties of the affinity gel were derivatized by reaction with 4-isothiocyanatobenzenesulfonamide, with the formation of a thiourea-based gel, having inhibitory effects against CAs. Both bovine erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase BCA and human (h) erythrocyte CA isoforms I, II (hCA I and II) have been purified from hemolysates, by using this affinity gel. The greatest purification fold and column yields for BCA and for cytosolic (hCA I + II) enzymes were of 181-fold (21.07%) and 184-fold (9.49%), respectively. Maximum binding was achieved at 15 °C and I = 0.3 ionic strength for α-carbonic anhydrases. PMID:24936879

  10. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Indig, F E; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R; Shimmo, R

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized onto immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary, resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC (U87MG) column, and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08±0.49 and 0.0086±0.0006μM, respectively, consistent with previously reported values. Furthermore, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX, and rotenone. In addition, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC (U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  11. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  12. Selective and sensitive liquid chromatographic determination method of 5-hydroxyindoles with fluorous and fluorogenic derivatization.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Ikenaga, Jun; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Hayama, Tadashi; Itoyama, Miki; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2015-10-10

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method with improved selectivity for the simultaneous determination of 5-hydroxyindoles (5-HIs; 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptamine, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) is described. This method involves precolumn derivatization with 4-(3',3',4',4',5',5',6',6',7',7',8',8',9',9',10',10',10'-heptadecafluorodecyl)benzylamine (HFBA) and separation of the derivatives using a fluorous LC column. In this study, stable benzoxazole derivatives of 5-HIs with HFBA have been obtained by a simple derivatization procedure; their fluorescent properties enabled highly sensitive detection. In addition, only the HFBA derivatives of 5-HIs has been selectively retained on the fluorous LC column via fluorous interaction whereby perfluoroalkyl compounds show affinities with each other, while the non-fluorous compounds did not. The HFBA derivatives were separated within 30 min and the detection limits for 5-HIs in a 20-μL injection volume were 1.2-14 fmol (S/N=3). Furthermore, this method was applied to the analysis of 5-HIs in the human plasma from healthy subjects. PMID:26112924

  13. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  14. Minimal information to determine affine shape equivalence.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, J; Van Gool, L; Lamote, C; Foster, D H

    2000-04-01

    Participants judged the affine equivalence of 2 simultaneously presented 4-point patterns. Performance level (d') varied between 1.5 and 2.7, depending on the information available for solving the correspondence problem (insufficient in Experiment 1a, superfluous in Experiment 1b, and minimal in Experiments 1c, 2a, 2b) and on the exposure time (unlimited in Experiments 1 and 2a and 500 ms in Experiment 2b), but it did not vary much with the complexity of the affine transformation (rotation and slant in Experiment 1 and same plus tilt in Experiment 2). Performance in Experiment 3 was lower with 3-point patterns than with 4-point patterns, whereas blocking the trials according to the affine transformation parameters had little effect. Determining affine shape equivalence with minimal-information displays is based on a fast assessment of qualitatively or quasi-invariant properties such as convexity/ concavity, parallelism, and collinearity. PMID:10811156

  15. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  16. Visualizing antibody affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Tas, Jeroen M J; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Mano, Yasuko M; Chen, Casie S; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with nonimmunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  17. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples. PMID:25849823

  18. A novel matrix derivatized from hydrophilic gigaporous polystyrene-based microspheres for high-speed immobilized-metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Huang, Yong-Dong; Jing, Guang-Lun; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Wei-Qing; Zhu, Hu; Lu, Jian-Ren

    2011-05-01

    Agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene microspheres were evaluated as a novel matrix for immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). With four steps, nickel ions were successfully immobilized on the microspheres. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of IMAC medium were characterized. A column packed with the matrix showed low column backpressure and high column efficiency at high flow velocity. Furthermore, this matrix was used for purifying superoxide dismutase (SOD), which was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) in submerged fermentation, on an Äkta purifier 100 system under different flow velocities. The purity of the SOD from this one-step purification was 79% and the recovery yield was about 89.6% under the superficial flow velocity of 3251 cm/h. In conclusion, all the results suggested that the gigaporous matrix has considerable advantages for high-speed immobilized-metal affinity chromatography. PMID:21454141

  19. Natural poly-histidine affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins on cobalt(II)-carboxymethylaspartate crosslinked agarose.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Bochkariov, D E; Jokhadze, G G; Hopp, J; Nelson, P

    1999-12-24

    A natural 19-amino-acid poly-histidine affinity tag was cloned at the N-terminus of three recombinant proteins. The vectors containing the DNA of the fusion proteins were used for transformation of Escherichia coli DH5alpha cells. Each protein was expressed, extracted and purified in one chromatographic step. The purification procedure for each protein can be accomplished in less than 1 h. A new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography adsorbent--Co2+-carboxymethylaspartate agarose Superflow--was utilized at linear flow-rates as high as 5 cm/min. The final preparation of each protein is with purity greater than 95% as ascertained by sodium dodecyl sulfate-electrophoresis. Recovery for each purified protein was higher than 77% of the initial loaded amount as judged by biological activity. The operational capacity of Co2+-carboxymethylaspartate agarose for each protein was determined. PMID:10669292

  20. Sequential injection chromatographic determination of ambroxol hydrochloride and doxycycline in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Satínský, Dalibor; Santos, Lucia M L Dos; Sklenárová, Hana; Solich, Petr; Montenegro, M Conceição B S M; Araújo, Alberto N

    2005-12-15

    A new separation method based on a novel reversed-phase sequential injection chromatography (SIC) technique was used for simultaneous determination of ambroxol hydrochloride and doxycycline in pharmaceutical preparations in this contribution. The coupling of short monolith with SIA system results in an implementation of separation step to until no-separation low-pressure method. A Chromolith((R)) Flash RP-18e, 25-4.6mm column (Merck, Germany) and a FIAlab((R)) 3000 system (USA) with a six-port selection valve and 5ml syringe were used for sequential injection chromatographic separations in our study. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile-water (20:90, v/v), pH 2.5 adjusted with 98% phosphoric acid, flow rate 0.48mlmin(-1), UV detection was at 213nm. The validation parameters have shown good results: linearity of determination for both compounds including internal standard (ethylparaben) >0.999; repeatability of determination (R.S.D.) in the range 0.5-5.4% at three different concentration levels, detection limits in the range 0.5-2.0mugml(-1), and recovery from the pharmaceutical preparation in the range 99.3-99.9%. The chromatographic resolution between peak compounds was >5.0 and analysis time was <9min under the optimal conditions. The method was found to be applicable for routine analysis of the active compounds ambroxol hydrochloride and doxycycline in various pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:18970307

  1. Processing of chromatographic data for chemometric analysis of peptide profiles from cheese extracts: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Piraino, Paolo; Parente, Eugenio; McSweeney, Paul L H

    2004-11-17

    Chemometric analysis of chromatograms plays a fundamental role in characterization of foods or in detection of adulteration. Data for multivariate analysis of chromatographic profiles are usually obtained by visual matching (VM) of peaks, the identities of which, as for peptide profiles from cheese extracts, are often unknown. To avoid the main disadvantages of VM, which is subjective and time-consuming, a novel approach was developed. Fuzzy logic was employed to handle in a systematic way uncertainty in the position of peptide peaks, and chromatograms were processed by a rule-based membership function. Processed data consisted of classes of retention time wherein peak heights were accumulated by using the distance from the center of the class as a weight. The novel approach (fuzzy approach, FA) was compared with VM by using a real data set and by performing multivariate descriptive statistical techniques (principal component analysis, multidimensional scaling, and nonhierarchical cluster analysis). FA provided a fast, reliable, and objective alternative to VM and could be successfully applied for chemometric analysis of chromatographic profiles whenever knowledge of the identity of peaks is lacking or unnecessary. PMID:15537294

  2. Artificial neural network model for photosynthetic pigments identification using multi wavelength chromatographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Hariyanto, S.; Natali, F. D. D.; Indriatmoko, Adhiwibawa, M. A. S.; Limantara, L.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.

    2016-04-01

    The development of rapid and automatic pigment characterization method become an important issue due to the fact that there are only less than 1% of plant pigments in the earth have been explored. In this research, a mathematical model based on artificial intelligence approach was developed to simplify and accelerate pigment characterization process from HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) procedure. HPLC is a widely used technique to separate and identify pigments in a mixture. Input of the model is chromatographic data from HPLC device and output of the model is a list of pigments which is the spectrum pattern is discovered in it. This model provides two dimensional (retention time and wavelength) fingerprints for pigment characterization which is proven to be more accurate than one dimensional fingerprint (fixed wavelength). Moreover, by mimicking interconnection of the neuron in the nervous systems of the human brain, the model have learning ability that could be replacing expert judgement on evaluating spectrum pattern. In the preprocessing step, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the huge dimension of the chromatographic data. The aim of this step is to simplify the model and accelerate the identification process. Six photosynthetic pigments i.e. zeaxantin, pheophytin a, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene and lutein could be well identified by the model with accuracy up to 85.33% and processing time less than 1 second.

  3. Flight contaminant trace analyser. Phase 1: Chromatographic input system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop two chromatographic columns which would enable a mass spectral identification of 40 specified compounds. The columns are for use in a toxic gas analyzer, which incorporates an automated gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Different types of stationary phases were investigated. The columns used were of the open tubular capillary type and were made of nickel. Limitations of initial and final temperature of operation led to final development of a column which could resolve most of the compounds required. The few unresolved components are capable of resolution and identification by the mass spectrometer. The columns (182m Ni x 0.8m 0.D x 0.5mm I.D) coated with Witconal La 23, yielded in excess of 200,000 theoretical plates and completed the analysis in less than 90 minutes using a carrier gas flow rate of 4 cc/min hydrogen.

  4. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    1982-08-12

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a microcolumn liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit is claimed. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, K; Robertson, J H

    1975-09-01

    A high-pressure liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of ampicillin is described. The method uses a 1-m long stainless steel column packed with anionic exchange resin, with a mobile phase of 0.02 M NaNO3 in 0.01 M pH 9.15 borate buffer at a flow rate of 0.45 ml/min. The degradation products of ampicillin, penicillenic and penicilloic acids of ampicillin, can be separated and quantitated in less than 12 min of chromatographic time. The relative standard deviation for the analysis of ampicillin is less than 1%, and the method is sensitive to approximately 20 ng of ampicillin/sample injected. The method was applied to the analysis of various pharmaceutical preparations of ampicillin. It is also applicable, with a slight modification, for the analysis of penicillins G and V. PMID:1185575

  6. Affitins for protein purification by affinity magnetic fishing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Dos Santos, Raquel; Ottengy, Stella; Viecinski, Aline Canani; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-07-29

    Currently most economical and technological bottlenecks in protein production are placed in the downstream processes. With the aim of increasing the efficiency and reducing the associated costs, various affinity ligands have been developed. Affitins are small, yet robust and easy to produce, proteins derived from the archaeal extremophilic "7kDa DNA-binding" protein family. By means of combinatorial protein engineering and ribosome display selection techniques, Affitins have shown to bind a diversity of targets. In this work, two previously developed Affitins (anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG) were immobilized onto magnetic particles to assess their potential for protein purification by magnetic fishing. The optimal lysozyme and human IgG binding conditions yielded 58mg lysozyme/g support and 165mgIgG/g support, respectively. The recovery of proteins was possible in high yield (≥95%) and with high purity, namely ≥95% and 81%, when recovering lysozyme from Escherichia coli supernatant and IgG from human plasma, respectively. Static binding studies indicated affinity constants of 5.0×10(4)M(-1) and 9.3×10(5)M(-1) for the anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG magnetic supports. This work demonstrated that Affitins, which can be virtually evolved for any protein of interest, can be coupled onto magnetic particles creating novel affinity adsorbents for purification by magnetic fishing. PMID:27342136

  7. Model-based rational strategy for chromatographic resin selection.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Beckley K; Zuluaga, Diego S; Verheijen, Peter J T; Verhaert, Peter D E M; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Ottens, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    A model-based rational strategy for the selection of chromatographic resins is presented. The main question being addressed is that of selecting the most optimal chromatographic resin from a few promising alternatives. The methodology starts with chromatographic modeling,parameters acquisition, and model validation, followed by model-based optimization of the chromatographic separation for the resins of interest. Finally, the resins are rationally evaluated based on their optimized operating conditions and performance metrics such as product purity, yield, concentration, throughput, productivity, and cost. Resin evaluation proceeds by two main approaches. In the first approach, Pareto frontiers from multi-objective optimization of conflicting objectives are overlaid for different resins, enabling direct visualization and comparison of resin performances based on the feasible solution space. The second approach involves the transformation of the resin performances into weighted resin scores, enabling the simultaneous consideration of multiple performance metrics and the setting of priorities. The proposed model-based resin selection strategy was illustrated by evaluating three mixed mode adsorbents (ADH, PPA, and HEA) for the separation of a ternary mixture of bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, and amyloglucosidase. In order of decreasing weighted resin score or performance, the top three resins for this separation were ADH [PPA[HEA. The proposed model-based approach could be a suitable alternative to column scouting during process development, the main strengths being that minimal experimentation is required and resins are evaluated under their ideal working conditions, enabling a fair comparison. This work also demonstrates the application of column modeling and optimization to mixed mode chromatography. PMID:22238769

  8. Basicity of aromatic amines from liquid chromatographic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Mcnair, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic investigation was conducted to determine whether the adsorption of weakly basic aromatic amines on slightly acidic silica gel adsorbents could be used to study their relative basicity. Under proper conditions, a linear correlation between pKb and log of capacity factor was observed. This finding may prove useful in helping to predict the relative basicity of closely related aromatic diamines, especially new amines being synthesized for polymer synthesis.

  9. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  10. Kinetic analysis of drug-protein interactions by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-10-01

    Information on the kinetics of drug-protein interactions is of crucial importance in drug discovery and development. Several methods based on affinity chromatography have been developed in recent years to examine the association and dissociation rates of these processes. These techniques include band-broadening measurements, the peak decay method, peak fitting methods, the split-peak method, and free fraction analysis. This review will examine the general principles and applications of these approaches and discuss their use in the characterization, screening and analysis of drug-protein interactions in the body. PMID:26724332

  11. High throughput solution-based measurement of antibody-antigen affinity and epitope binning.

    PubMed

    Estep, Patricia; Reid, Felicia; Nauman, Claire; Liu, Yuqi; Sun, Tingwan; Sun, Joanne; Xu, Yingda

    2013-01-01

    Advances in human antibody discovery have allowed for the selection of hundreds of high affinity antibodies against many therapeutically relevant targets. This has necessitated the development of reproducible, high throughput analytical techniques to characterize the output from these selections. Among these characterizations, epitopic coverage and affinity are among the most critical properties for lead identification. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is an attractive technique for epitope binning due to its speed and low antigen consumption. While surface-based methods such as BLI and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are commonly used for affinity determinations, sensor chemistry and surface related artifacts can limit the accuracy of high affinity measurements. When comparing BLI and solution equilibrium based kinetic exclusion assays, significant differences in measured affinity (10-fold and above) were observed. KinExA direct association (k(a)) rate constant measurements suggest that this is mainly caused by inaccurate k(a) measurements associated with BLI related surface phenomena. Based on the kinetic exclusion assay principle used for KinExA, we developed a high throughput 96-well plate format assay, using a Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) instrument, to measure solution equilibrium affinity. This improved method combines the accuracy of solution-based methods with the throughput formerly only achievable with surface-based methods. PMID:23575269

  12. Rational stabilization of the C-LytA affinity tag by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Maestro, Beatriz; Mollá-Morales, Almudena; Sanz, Jesús M

    2008-12-01

    The C-LytA protein constitutes the choline-binding module of the LytA amidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Owing to its affinity for choline and analogs, it is regularly used as an affinity tag for the purification of proteins in a single chromatographic step. In an attempt to build a robust variant against thermal denaturation, we have engineered several salt bridges on the protein surface. All the stabilizing mutations were pooled in a single variant, C-LytAm7, which contained seven changes: Y25K, F27K, M33E, N51K, S52K, T85K and T108K. The mutant displays a 7 degrees C thermal stabilization compared with the wild-type form, together with a complete reversibility upon heating and a higher kinetic stability. Moreover, the accumulation of intermediates in the unfolding of C-LytA is virtually abolished for C-LytAm7. The differences in stability become more evident when the proteins are bound to a DEAE-cellulose affinity column, as most of wild-type C-LytA is denatured at approximately 65 degrees C, whereas C-LytAm7 may stand temperatures up to 90 degrees C. Finally, the change in the isoelectric point of C-LytAm7 enhances its solubility at acidic pHs. Therefore, C-LytAm7 behaves as an improved affinity tag and supports the engineering of surface salt bridges as an effective approach for protein stabilization. PMID:18840883

  13. SwellGel: a sample preparation affinity chromatography technology for high throughput proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Haney, Paul J; Draveling, Connie; Durski, Wendy; Romanowich, Kathryn; Qoronfleh, M Walid

    2003-04-01

    Development of high throughput systems for purification and analysis of proteins is essential for the success of today's proteomic research. We have developed an affinity chromatography technology that allows the customization of high capacity/high throughput chromatographic separation of proteins. This technology utilizes selected chromatography media that are dehydrated to form uniform SwellGel discs. Unlike wet resin slurries, these discs are easily adaptable to a variety of custom formats, eliminating problems associated with resin dispensing, equilibration, or leakage. Discs can be made in assorted sizes (resin volume 15 microl-3 ml) dispensed in various formats (384-, 96-, 48-, and 24-well microplates or columns) and different ligands can be attached to the matrix. SwellGel discs rapidly hydrate upon addition of either water or the protein sample, providing dramatically increased capacity compared to coated plates. At the same time, the discs offer greater stability, reproducibility, and ease of handling than standard wet chromatography resins. We previously reported the development of SwellGel for the purification of 6x His- and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion proteins [Prot. Exp. Purif. 22 (2001) 359-366]. In this paper, we discuss an expanded list of SwellGel stabilized chromatographic methods that have been adapted to high throughput formats for processing protein samples ranging from 10 microl to 10 ml (1 microg to 50 mg protein). Data are presented applying SwellGel discs to high throughput proteomic applications such as affinity tag purification, protein desalting, the removal of abundant proteins from serum including albumin and immunoglobulin, and the isolation of phosphorylated peptides for mass spectrometry. PMID:12699691

  14. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  15. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  16. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  17. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same time,…

  18. Bioengineering of bacteria to assemble custom-made polyester affinity resins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Iain D; Du, Jinping; Burr, Natalie; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2015-01-01

    Proof of concept for the in vivo bacterial production of a polyester resin displaying various customizable affinity protein binding domains is provided. This was achieved by engineering various protein binding domains into a bacterial polyester-synthesizing enzyme. Affinity binding domains based on various structural folds and derived from molecular libraries were used to demonstrate the potential of this technique. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), engineered OB-fold domains (OBodies), and VHH domains from camelid antibodies (nanobodies) were employed. The respective resins were produced in a single bacterial fermentation step, and a simple purification protocol was developed. Purified resins were suitable for most lab-scale affinity chromatography purposes. All of the affinity domains tested produced polyester beads with specific affinity for the target protein. The binding capacity of these affinity resins ranged from 90 to 600 nmol of protein per wet gram of polyester affinity resin, enabling purification of a recombinant protein target from a complex bacterial cell lysate up to a purity level of 96% in one step. The polyester resin was efficiently produced by conventional lab-scale shake flask fermentation, resulting in bacteria accumulating up to 55% of their cellular dry weight as polyester. A further proof of concept demonstrating the practicality of this technique was obtained through the intracellular coproduction of a specific affinity resin and its target. This enables in vivo binding and purification of the coproduced "target protein." Overall, this study provides evidence for the use of molecular engineering of polyester synthases toward the microbial production of specific bioseparation resins implementing previously selected binding domains. PMID:25344238

  19. On Affine Fusion and the Phase Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Mark A.

    2012-11-01

    A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the su(n) Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The Yang-Baxter equation leads to the construction of commuting operators as Schur polynomials, with noncommuting hopping operators as arguments. The algebraic Bethe ansatz diagonalizes them, revealing a connection to the modular S matrix and fusion of the su(n) WZNW model. The noncommutative Schur polynomials play roles similar to those of the primary field operators in the corresponding WZNW model. In particular, their 3-point functions are the su(n) fusion multiplicities. We show here how the new phase model realization of affine fusion makes obvious the existence of threshold levels, and how it accommodates higher-genus fusion.

  20. Evidence for the Presence of Colloidal Metacinnabar in Mercury-DOM-Sulfide Systems as Determined by a Chromatographic-EXAFS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, C. A.; Kim, C. S.; Moreau, J. W.; Aiken, G. R.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Nagy, K. L.; Ryan, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury speciation and bioavailability is frequently thought to be controlled by the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and sulfide. However, the speciation of mercury in these systems is poorly understood due to the complex interactions of mercury, DOM, and sulfide. We have developed a combined chromatographic-extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy approach to determine the speciation of the hydrophobic fraction of mercury species in both sulfide-free and sulfide-rich (100 μM) experimental systems that also contain dissolved organic matter isolated from several locations, including the Florida Everglades. Chromatographic experiments were carried out with and without sulfide at varied mercury concentrations ranging from 0.1 nM to 1 μM in the presence of 10 mg L-1 DOM. The method consists of equilibrating the mercury-DOM with or without sulfide for 20 h (pH 6.5, I 0.1M) followed by chromatographic fractionation and concentration on a small column of C18 resin. Greater than 80% of the mercury in all solutions was found to be hydrophobic with respect to the resin when the mercury was interacting with the strong-binding DOM sites. The chromatographic behavior of solutions with and without sulfide was distinctly different. Sulfide-free mercury-DOM systems exhibited typical chromatographic behavior exemplified by resin saturation and subsequent breakthrough of mercury species. The sulfide-rich system exhibited very high resin affinity for almost all mercury species in solution and no apparent breakthrough, regardless of the ratio of mercury to DOM. Similar chromatographic experiments were carried out with and without sulfide at mercury concentrations as low as 250 nM and a DOM concentration of 50 mg L-1. EXAFS spectroscopy at the mercury LIII edge clearly showed spectra consistent with metacinnabar (HgS) as the dominant form of mercury adsorbed to the resin under sulfidic conditions despite the fact that no bulk precipitation was observed

  1. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. > The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. > Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. > f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy theories to

  2. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  3. Analytical high-performance affinity chromatography: evaluation by studies of neurophysin self-association and neurophysin-peptide hormone interaction using glass matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Swaisgood, H.E.; Chaiken, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    Bovine neurophysin II (BNP II) was covalently immobilized on both nonporous and porous (200-nm pore diameter) glass beads and incorporated in a high-performance liquid chromatograph to evaluate analytical high-performance affinity chromatography as a microscale method for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The self-association of neurophysin and its binding of the peptide hormone vasopressin were characterized by using a single chromatograhic column containing immobilized neurophysin predominantly in the monomer form. Both (/sup 3/H)(Arg/sup 8/)vasopressin (AVP) and /sup 125/I-BNP II were rapidly eluted (<25 min). The relatively symmetrical elution peaks obtained allowed calculation of both equilibrium dissociation constants and kinetic dissociation rate constants. In contrast to the agreement of chromatographic equilibrium binding constants with those measured in solution, the dissociation rate, k..sqrt../sub 3/, determined from the variance of the affinity chromatographic elution profile with nonporous beads, was several orders of magnitude smaller than the solution counterpart. This latter difference may reflect the probability of rebinding to contiguous sites immobilized on a surface, a feature which would be related to that for contiguous sites on a membrane.

  4. Comparison of a gas chromatographic and colorimetric method for the determination of plasma paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R E; Jones, K

    1976-07-01

    Plasma paracetamol levels have generally been determined either by gas chromatography (Stewart and Willis, 1975), which relies on complex equipment, or by spectrophotometry (Knepil, 1974), which can be time-consuming. The introduction by Glynn and Kendal (1975) of a simple colorimetric method based on the reaction of paracetamol with nitrous acid to give 2-nitro-4-acetamidophenol appears to have overcome these disadvantages, thereby providing a suitable procedure for the rapid measurement of plasma paracetamol in cases of overdose. The method was reported to be specific for paracetamol, no interference being caused either by the sulphate and glucuronide conjugates of paracetamol or by a large number of other commonly found drugs. This communication presents the results of a study in which plasma paracetamol levels determined by the colorimetric method were compared with those determined by an established gas chromatographic technique. PMID:952476

  5. Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) in chromatographic analysis of essential oils in herbs.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina

    2010-05-01

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) is a simple and cheap sample preparation procedure allowing for the reduction of organic solvent consumption, exclusion of sample component degradation, improvement of extraction efficiency and selectivity, elimination of additional sample clean-up and pre-concentration step before chromatographic analysis. The paper shows the possibility of MSPD application for qualitative and quantitative analysis of essential oil components in the following herbs: thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), mint (Mentha piperita), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L.), marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), savory (Satureja hortensis L.), and oregano (Origanum vulgare). The results obtained using MSPD are compared to two other sample preparation methods: steam distillation (SD) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). The results presented in the paper prove that the total amount and the composition of the essential oil component obtained by MSPD are equivalent to those gained by one of the most effective extraction technique, PLE. PMID:20071125

  6. The current practice in the application of chemometrics for correlation of sensory and gas chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Vene, Kristel; Koppel, Kadri

    2016-11-01

    A lot of research has been conducted in correlating the sensory properties of food with different analytical measurements in recent years. Various statistical methods have been used in order to get the most reliable results and to create prediction models with high statistical performance. The current review summarises the latest practices in the field of correlating attributes from sensory analysis with volatile data obtained by gas chromatographic analysis. The review includes the origin of the data, different pre-processing and variable selection methods and finally statistical methods of analysis and validation. Partial least squares regression analysis appears as the most commonly used statistical method in the area. The main shortcomings were identified in the steps of pre-processing, variable selection and also validation of models that have not gained enough attention. As the association between volatiles and sensory perception is often nonlinear, future studies should test the application of different nonlinear techniques. PMID:27211679

  7. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  8. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  9. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  10. The affinity of magnetic microspheres for Schistosoma eggs.

    PubMed

    Candido, Renata R F; Favero, Vivian; Duke, Mary; Karl, Stephan; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Woodward, Robert C; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Jones, Malcolm K; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease of humans, with two species primarily causing the intestinal infection: Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Traditionally, diagnosis of schistosomiasis is achieved through direct visualisation of eggs in faeces using techniques that lack the sensitivity required to detect all infections, especially in areas of low endemicity. A recently developed method termed Helmintex™ is a very sensitive technique for detection of Schistosoma eggs and exhibits 100% sensitivity at 1.3 eggs per gram of faeces, enough to detect even low-level infections. The Helminthex™ method is based on the interaction of magnetic microspheres and schistosome eggs. Further understanding the underlying egg-microsphere interactions would enable a targeted optimisation of egg-particle binding and may thus enable a significant improvement of the Helmintex™ method and diagnostic sensitivity in areas with low infection rates. We investigated the magnetic properties of S. mansoni and S. japonicum eggs and their interactions with microspheres with different magnetic properties and surface functionalization. Eggs of both species exhibited higher binding affinity to the magnetic microspheres than the non-magnetic microspheres. Binding efficiency was further enhanced if the particles were coated with streptavidin. Schistosoma japonicum eggs bound more microspheres compared with S. mansoni. However, distinct differences within eggs of each species were also observed when the distribution of the number of microspheres bound per egg was modelled with double Poisson distributions. Using this approach, both S. japonicum and S. mansoni eggs fell into two groups, one having greater affinity for magnetic microspheres than the other, indicating that not all eggs of a species exhibit the same binding affinity. Our observations suggest that interaction between the microspheres and eggs is more likely to be related to surface charge-based electrostatic

  11. Fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Bandodkar, Amay Jairaj; Gupta, Vinay; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2012-02-01

    Organization of biomolecules in two/three dimensional assemblies has recently aroused much interest in nanobiotechnology. In this context, the development of techniques for controlling spatial arrangement and orientation of the desired molecules to generate highly-ordered nanostructures in the form of a mono/multi layer is considered highly significant. The studies of monolayer films to date have focused on three distinct methods of preparation: (i) the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, involving the transfer of a monolayer assembled at the gas-liquid interface; (ii) self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, based on spontaneous adsorption of desired molecules from a solution directly onto a solid surface; and (iii) Layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly at a liquid-solid interface, based on inter-layer electrostatic attractions for fabrication of multilayers. A variety of monolayers have been utilized to fabricate biomolecular electronic devices including biosensors. The composition of a monolayer based matrix has been found to influence the activity(ies) of biomolecule(s). We present comprehensive and critical analysis of ordered molecular assemblies formed by LB and self-assembly with potential applications to affinity biosensing. This critical review on fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing is likely to benefit researchers working in this as well as related fields of research (401 references). PMID:22105315

  12. Rotating annular chromatograph for continuous metal separations and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. By continuously introducing the feed material to be separated at a stationary point at the top of the bed and eluent everywhere else around the annulus, elution chromatography occurs. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence, the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effect of annulus width and diameter has recently been studied using the same device with a 50.8-mm-wide annulus and another 0.6-m-long chromatograph with an 89-mm diameter and annulus widths of 6.4, 12.7, and 22.2 mm. These columns have been constructed of Plexiglas and typically operate at a gauge pressure of 175 kPa. To further study the effect of size and pressure, a new 445-mm-diam by 1-m-long column with a 31.8-mm-wide annulus has been fabricated. Its metal construction allows preparative-scale operation with a wide variety of liquids at pressures to 1.3 MPa. Three metal recovery systems have been explored: (1) separation of iron and aluminum in ammonium sulfate-sulfuric acid solutions; (2) separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions; and (3) the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt in ammonium carbonate solutions. This last system simulates the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. It has been studied, using similar conditions, on each of the chromatographs, and the results demonstrate the effect of column dimensions on the quality and quantity of the separation. 8 figures, 1 table.

  13. A universal comparison study of chromatographic response functions.

    PubMed

    Tyteca, Eva; Desmet, Gert

    2014-09-26

    We report on a large scale in silico comparison study of so-called chromatographic response functions (CRFs). These are single number descriptors of the separation quality that can be used to guide search-based optimizations for chromatographic separations. A comprehensive set of literature and new CRFs were compared for their ability to guide a search based on first order chromatographic data (i.e., no spectral information available) and for cases where the number of sample compounds is not known beforehand. The results are discussed based on the available separation power. It was found that CRFs increasing monotonically with the number of observed peaks perform significantly better than those that do not possess this property. CRFs based on the discrimination factor or the peak-to-valley ratio can better cope with peak asymmetry than CRFs based on Snyder resolution Rs. Unfortunately, the former lose their advantage as soon as the noise level becomes significant. Most CRFs perform best when the search is conducted on a column offering just, or, even better, a bit less than the required efficiency to baseline separate the sample. The best results over the entire range of possible efficiencies are obtained with a CRF giving preference to the number of observed compounds before further ranking the conditions based on the achieved separation resolution or the required analysis time. When the search is conducted on columns with an insufficient efficiency, even the best possible CRFs suffer from the incomplete information about the sample, and deviating searches cannot be avoided without resorting to spectral information of the sample. PMID:25171945

  14. A new integrated membrane filtration and chromatographic device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanke; Sirkar, Kamalesh K; Dai, Xiao-Ping; Luo, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    To improve protein separation, a novel integrated device combining membrane filtration and chromatography has been developed. The device basically consists of a hollow fiber filtration module whose shell side is filled with chromatographic resin beads. However, there is an essentially impermeable coated zone near the hollow fiber module outlet. The integrated device enjoys the advantages of both membrane filtration and chromatography; it also allows one to load the chromatographic media directly from the fermentation broth or lysate and separate the adsorbed proteins through the subsequent elution step in a cyclic process. Interfacial polymerization was carried out to coat the bottom section of the hollow fiber membrane; the rest of the hollow fiber membrane remained unaffected. Myoglobin (Mb) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) were primarily used as model proteins in a binary mixture; binary mixtures of Mb and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also investigated. Separation behaviors of binary protein mixtures were studied in devices having either an ultrafiltration (UF) or a microfiltration (MF) membrane. Experimental results show that the breakthrough time and the protein loading capacities were dramatically improved after introducing the impermeable coating in both UF and MF modules. For a synthetic yeast fermentation broth feed, four loading-washing-elution-reequilibration-based cyclic runs for separation of Mb and alpha-LA were performed in the device using a MF membrane with a coated zone without cleaning in between. The Mb and alpha-LA elution profiles for the four consecutive runs were almost superimposable. Due to lower transmembrane flux in this device plus the periodical washing-elution during the chromatographic separation, fouling was not a problem, unlike in conventional microfiltration. PMID:15801803

  15. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T; Vinci, Chris R; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the "affinity maturation" step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  16. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T.; Vinci, Chris R.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the “affinity maturation” step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  17. Liquid chromatographic determination of clobetasone-17-butyrate in ointments.

    PubMed

    Patel, A G; Patel, R B; Patel, M R

    1990-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method has been developed for determination of clobetasone-17-butyrate in ointment using clobetasone propionate as an internal standard. Separation was carried out on a C18 reverse-phase column using water-methanol as a mobile phase. Methylparaben and propylparaben (both sodium salt) used as preservatives did not interfere with separation. Compounds are detected photometrically at 235 nm. Mean assay results for 0.05% commercial ointments were 100.36% (n = 5). Mean recovery of clobetasone-17-butyrate added to commercial ointment was 99.89%. PMID:2289922

  18. High affinity of lead for fetal haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, C N; Lee, W R

    1980-01-01

    In-vitro experiments using 203Pb were performed to identify lead-binding components in human haemoglobin. Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography of haemolysate showed that different types of haemoglobin had different affinities for lead. For the haemolysate from adults, lead was present in both Hb A (alpha 2 beta 2) and Hb A2 (alpha 2 delta 2), whereas, in the haemolysate from new-born infants, the haemoglobin of fetal origin, Hb F (alpha 2 gamma 2) showed a much greater affinity for 203Pb than the adult haemoglobin Hb A (alpha 2 beta 2), obtained from maternal blood. Analysis of the 203 Pb-labelled haemoglobin suggested that about 82% of 203Pb was in the globin polypeptide. Further analysis with carboxylmethyl (CM) cellulose chromatography indicated that the gamma globin of fetal origin had a higher affinity for 203Pb than the beta globin, whereas alpha globin appeared to be unimportant in lead binding. The results of the different affinities for lead of different Hb types are discussed with regard to the effect of lead upon haemoglobin synthesis. PMID:6158989

  19. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  20. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  1. Desired Alteration of Protein Affinities: Competitive Selection of Protein Variants Using Yeast Signal Transduction Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Fukuda, Nobuo; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that can control protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have recently drawn attention as new drug pipeline compounds. Here, we report a technique to screen desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. We previously constructed a screening system based on a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking membrane localization ability. This ability, required for signal transmission, is restored by recruiting Gγcyto into the membrane only when the target protein interacts with an artificially membrane-anchored candidate protein, thereby allowing interacting partners (Gγ recruitment system) to be searched and identified. In the present study, the Gγ recruitment system was altered by integrating the cytosolic expression of a third protein as a competitor to set a desirable affinity threshold. This enabled the reliable selection of both affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated protein variants. The presented approach may facilitate the development of therapeutic proteins that allow the control of PPIs. PMID:25244640

  2. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26952369

  3. Purification of the proprotein convertase furin by affinity chromatography based on PC-specific inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuester, Miriam; Becker, Gero L.; Hardes, Kornelia; Lindberg, Iris; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    In eucaryotes, many secreted proteins and peptides are proteolytically excised from larger precursor proteins by a specific class of serine proteases, the proprotein/prohormone convertases (PCs). This cleavage is essential for substrate activation, making the PCs very interesting pharmacological targets in cancer and infectious disease research. Correspondingly, their structure, function and inhibition are intensely studied – studies that require the respective target proteins in large amounts and at high purity. Here we describe the development of a novel purification protocol of furin, the best-studied member of the PC family. We combined the heterologous expression of furin from CHO cells with a novel purification scheme employing an affinity step that efficiently extracts only active furin from the conditioned medium by using furin-specific inhibitor moieties as bait. Several potential affinity tags were synthesized and their binding to furin characterized. The best compound, Biotin-(Adoa)2-Arg-Pro-Arg-4-Amba coupled to streptavidin-Sepharose beads, was used in a three-step chromatographic protocol and routinely resulted in a high yield of a homogeneous furin preparation with a specific activity of ~60 units/mg protein. This purification and the general strategy can easily be adapted to the efficient purification of other PC family members. PMID:21875402

  4. DETECTION OF HETEROGENEOUS DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY FRONTAL ANALYSIS AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of frontal analysis and high-performance affinity chromatography for detecting heterogeneous binding in biomolecular interactions, using the binding of acetohexamide with human serum albumin (HSA) as a model. It was found through the use of this model system and chromatographic theory that double-reciprocal plots could be used more easily than traditional isotherms for the initial detection of binding site heterogeneity. The deviations from linearity that were seen in double-reciprocal plots as a result of heterogeneity were a function of the analyte concentration, the relative affinities of the binding sites in the system and the amount of each type of site that was present. The size of these deviations was determined and compared under various conditions. Plots were also generated to show what experimental conditions would be needed to observe these deviations for general heterogeneous systems or for cases in which some preliminary information was available on the extent of binding heterogeneity. The methods developed in this work for the detection of binding heterogeneity are not limited to drug interactions with HSA but could be applied to other types of drug-protein binding or to additional biological systems with heterogeneous binding. PMID:21612784

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester in various food products and formulations.

    PubMed

    Fox, L; Anthony, G D; Lau, E P

    1976-09-01

    A simple, rapid, and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure is described for the analysis of the chemical sweetener L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame). Using a strong cation exchange column and pressures less than 1000 psig, an analysis can be performed in less than 15 min. The technique has been applied to a wide range of food products and formulations. No interferences were found in the samples studied. Recoveries are quantitative, and the coefficients of variation for replicate analyses are less than or equal to 2.5%. PMID:965327

  6. Defining the property space for chromatographic ligands from a homologous series of mixed-mode ligands.

    PubMed

    Woo, James A; Chen, Hong; Snyder, Mark A; Chai, Yiming; Frost, Russell G; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-08-14

    A homologous ligand library based on the commercially-available Nuvia cPrime ligand was generated to systematically explore various features of a multimodal cation-exchange ligand and to identify structural variants that had significantly altered chromatographic selectivity. Substitution of the polar amide bond with more hydrophobic chemistries was found to enhance retention while remaining hydrophobically-selective for aromatic residues. In contrast, increasing the solvent exposure of the aromatic ring was observed to strengthen the ligand affinity for both types of hydrophobic residues. An optimal linker length between the charged and hydrophobic moieties was also observed to enhance retention, balancing the steric accessibility of the hydrophobic moiety with its ability to interact independently of the charged group. The weak pKa of the carboxylate charge group was found to have a notable impact on protein retention on Nuvia cPrime at lower pH, increasing hydrophobic interactions with the protein. Substituting the charged group with a sulfonic acid allowed this strong MM ligand to retain its electrostatic-dominant character in this lower pH range. pH gradient experiments were also carried out to further elucidate this pH dependent behavior. A single QSAR model was generated using this accumulated experimental data to predict protein retention across a range of multimodal and ion exchange systems. This model could correctly predict the retention of proteins on resins that were not included in the original model and could prove quite powerful as an in silico approach toward designing more effective and differentiated multimodal ligands. PMID:26162668

  7. Stereoselective Binding of Chiral Ligands to Single Nucleotide Polymorphs (SNPs) of the Human Organic Cation Transporter-1 Determined Using Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Moaddel, R.; Bighi, F.; Yamaguchi, R.; Patel, S.; Ravichandran, S.; Wainer, I.W.

    2010-01-01

    Membranes from stably transfected cell lines that expresses two point mutations of the human organic cation 1 transporter (hOCT1), R488M and G465R, have been immobilized on the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) liquid chromatographic stationary phase to form the Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography (CMAC) (hOCT1G465R) and CMAC(hOCT1R488M). Columns were created using both stationary phases and frontal displacement chromatography experiments were conducted using [3H]-methyl phenyl pyridinium, [3H]-MPP+, as the marker ligand and various displacers, including the single enantiomers of verapamil, fenoterol and isoproterenol. The chromatographic data obtained was used to refine a previously developed pharmacophore for the hOCT1 transporter. PMID:20206116

  8. Validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of ketorolac tromethamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Belal, T S; El-Kafrawy, D S; Mahrous, M S; Abdel-Khalek, M M; Abo-Gharam, A H

    2016-07-01

    This work describes five simple and reliable spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods for analysis of the binary mixture of ketorolac tromethamine (KTR) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE). Method I is based on the use of conventional Amax and derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where KTR was determined using its Amax and (1)D amplitudes at 323 and 341nm respectively, while PHE was determined by measuring the (1)D amplitudes at 248.5nm. Method II involves the application of the ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry. For KTR, 12μg/mL PHE was used as a divisor and the (1)DD amplitudes at 265nm were plotted against KTR concentrations; while - by using 4μg/mL KTR as divisor - the (1)DD amplitudes at 243.5nm were found proportional to PHE concentrations. Method III depends on ratio-difference measurement where the peak to trough amplitudes between 260 and 284nm were measured and correlated to KTR concentration. Similarly, the peak to trough amplitudes between 235 and 260nm in the PHE ratio spectra were recorded. For method IV, the two compounds were separated using Merck HPTLC sheets of silica gel 60 F254 and a mobile phase composed of chloroform/methanol/ammonia (70:30:2, by volume) followed by densitometric measurement of KTR and PHE spots at 320 and 278nm respectively. Method V depends on HPLC-DAD. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using Zorbax eclipse plus C8 column (4.6×250mm, 5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05M o-phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (50:50, by volume) at a flow rate 1mL/min and detection at 313 and 274nm for KTR and PHE respectively. Analytical performance of the developed methods was statistically validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, detection and quantification limits. The validated spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods were successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of KTR and PHE in synthetic mixtures

  9. Gas chromatographic characterization of vegetable oil deodorization distillate.

    PubMed

    Verleyen, T; Verhe, R; Garcia, L; Dewettinck, K; Huyghebaert, A; De Greyt, W

    2001-07-01

    Because of its complex nature, the analysis of deodorizer distillate is a challenging problem. Deodorizer distillate obtained from the deodorization process of vegetable oils consists of many components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. A gas chromatographic method for the analysis of deodorizer distillate without saponification of the sample is described. After a concise sample preparation including derivatization and silylation, distillate samples were injected on column at 60 degrees C followed by a gradual increase of the oven temperature towards 340 degrees C. The temperature profile of the oven was optimized in order to obtain a baseline separation of the different distillate components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. Good recoveries for delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, stigmasterol and cholesteryl palmitate of 97, 94.4, 95.6 and 92%, respectively were obtained. Repeatability of the described gas chromatographic method was evaluated by analyzing five replicates of a soybean distillate. Tocopherols and sterols had low relative standard deviations ranging between 1.67 and 2.25%. Squalene, mono- and diacylglycerides had higher relative standard deviations ranging between 3.33 and 4.12%. Several industrial deodorizer distillates obtained from chemical and physical refining of corn, canola, sunflower and soybean have been analyzed for their composition. PMID:11471811

  10. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA. PMID:23185899

  11. Chromatographic resolution of closely related species: drug metabolites and analogs.

    PubMed

    Regalado, Erik L; Helmy, Roy; Green, Mitchell D; Welch, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the separation of a variety of mixtures of drugs, metabolites, and related analogs including representatives of the carbamazepine, methylated xanthine, steroid hormone, nicotine, and morphine families using several automated chromatographic method development screening systems including ultra high performance liquid chromatography, core-shell HPLC, achiral supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), and chiral SFC. Of the 138 column and mobile phase combinations examined for each mixture, a few chromatographic conditions afford the best overall performance, with a single achiral SFC method (4.6 × 250 mm, 3.0 μm GreenSep Ethyl Pyridine, 25 mM isobutylamine in methanol/CO2) affording good separation for all samples. Four of these mixtures were also resolved by achiral SFC on the Luna HILIC and chiral SFC Chiralpak IB columns using methanol or ethanol with 25 mM isobutylamine as polar modifiers. Modifications of standard chromatography screening conditions afforded fast separation methods (from 1 to 5 min) for baseline resolution of all components of each of these challenging sets of closely related compounds. PMID:24596023

  12. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. PMID:26375205

  13. Quantitative structure-(chromatographic) retention relationship models for dissociating compounds.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Łukasz; Wiczling, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop mathematical models relating the hydrophobicity and dissociation constant of an analyte with its structure, which would be useful in predicting analyte retention times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. For that purpose a large and diverse group of 115 drugs was used to build three QSRR models combining retention-related parameters (logkw-chromatographic measure of hydrophobicity, S-slope factor from Snyder-Soczewinski equation, and pKa) with structural descriptors calculated by means of molecular modeling for both dissociated and nondissociated forms of analytes. Lasso, Stepwise and PLS regressions were used to build statistical models. Moreover a simple QSRR equations based on lipophilicity and dissociation constant parameters calculated in the ACD/Labs software were proposed and compared with quantum chemistry-based QSRR equations. The obtained relationships were further used to predict chromatographic retention times. The predictive performances of the obtained models were assessed using 10-fold cross-validation and external validation. The QSRR equations developed were simple and were characterized by satisfactory predictive performance. Application of quantum chemistry-based and ACD-based descriptors leads to similar accuracy of retention times' prediction. PMID:26960942

  14. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Block, B.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Frost, R. L.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Mauersberger, K.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.; Richards, J. E.; Way, S. H.

    2002-07-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere from 170 km altitude (˜1 hPa) to the surface (˜1500 hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major gaseous constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to investigate the composition (including isotope ratios) of several candidate surface materials. The GCMS is a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employs five ion sources sequentially feeding the mass analyzer. Three ion sources serve as detectors for the GC columns and two are dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a chemical scrubber cell for noble gas analysis and a sample enrichment cell for selective measurement of high boiling point carbon containing constituents. The mass range is 2 to 141 Dalton and the nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10- 8. The data rate available from the Probe system is 885 bit/s. The weight of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for warm up and 150 minutes of operation is 110 Watt-hours.

  15. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Block, B.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Frost, R. L.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Mauersberger, K.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.; Richards, J. E.; Way, S. H.

    2002-07-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere from 170 km altitude (~1 hPa) to the surface (~1500 hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major gaseous constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to investigate the composition (including isotope ratios) of several candidate surface materials. The GCMS is a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employs five ion sources sequentially feeding the mass analyzer. Three ion sources serve as detectors for the GC columns and two are dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a chemical scrubber cell for noble gas analysis and a sample enrichment cell for selective measurement of high boiling point carbon containing constituents. The mass range is 2 to 141 Dalton and the nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10- 8. The data rate available from the Probe system is 885 bit/s. The weight of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for warm up and 150 minutes of operation is 110 Watt-hours.

  16. Nanodiamond-Decorated Silica Spheres as a Chromatographic Material.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zuqin; Vinci, John C; Colón, Luis A

    2016-02-17

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles (∼5 nm), obtained from detonation soot, were oxidized and/or thermally hydrogenated. Both, the non-hydrogenated and hydrogenated ND particles were successfully coupled to the surface of micrometer-size organo-silica particles. A thin layer of nanodiamonds (NDs) decorating the surface of the organo-silica particles was visible on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) were used to characterize the NDs prior to coupling and to confirm attachment onto the organo-silica particles. Both, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a chemical initiator were proved to be effective radical initiators for the ND-silica coupling reaction, although for scale-up purposes the chemical initiation was more advantageous to produce the ND-silica composite. Commercially available nanodiamond primary particles were also coupled to the surface of silica particles. The ND-containing silica particles were packed into chromatographic columns to study their initial feasibility as adsorbent material for liquid chromatography. The organo-silica particles decorated with hydrogenated NDs were shown to possess reversed phase type (i.e., hydrophobic) behavior toward the probe compounds, whereas silica particles decorated with the non-hydrogenated NDs showed polar (i.e., hydrophilic) interactions, both under liquid chromatographic conditions. PMID:26790050

  17. Influence of barometric pressure on the results of chromatographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sivchenko, V.Ya.; Mal'tsev, E.K.; Voloshina, I.V.; Simonov, V.M.

    1986-07-01

    Changes in barometric pressure introduce an additional error to the results obtained with different types of gas analyzers. These errors can be reduced or eliminated by technical steps or by the application of corrections to the results obtained. In this paper, the authors present the results of their determinations of correction coefficients for gases measured by the Poisk chromatograph in the range of barometric pressures from 80 to 120 kPa (from 600 to 900 mm Hg). The authors designed their investigations to simulate increased and reduced barometric pressures with respect to the calibration pressure simultaneously at the outlet from the chromatographic columns (carrier gas discarding tube) and in the dosed volume. A head in the dosing volume and in the carrier gas outlets from the columns, simulating an increase in atmospheric pressure, was created by using compressed gas from a cylinder and a regulating valve; dilution, corresponding to a decrease in atmospheric pressure, was created by a flow rate stimulator and a regulating valve. A storage capacity eliminated fluctuations of the reduced or excess pressure.

  18. Surface affinity role in graphoepitaxy of lamellar block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claveau, G.; Quemere, P.; Argoud, M.; Hazart, J.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Sarrazin, A.; Posseme, N.; Tiron, R.; Chevalier, X.; Nicolet, C.; Navarro, C.

    2016-03-01

    Overcoming the optical limitations of 193nm immersion lithography can be achieved using Directed Self Assembly (DSA) of block-copolymers (BCPs) as a low-cost and versatile complementary technique. The goal of this paper is to investigate the potential of DSA to address line and space (L/S) high resolution patterning by performing the density multiplication of lines with the graphoepitaxy approach. As surface affinity is a key parameter in self-assembly, three variations, or "flavors", of DSA template affinity are investigated regarding several success criteria such as morphology control or defectivity. More precisely, both the methodology to register DSA defects and the impact of process parameters on defectivity are detailed. Using the 300mm pilot line available in LETI and Arkema's advanced materials, we investigate process optimization of DSA line/space patterning of a 38nm period lamellar PS-b-PMMA BCP (L38). For this study, our integration scheme, depicted in figure 2-1, is based on BCP self-assembly inside organic hard mask guiding patterns obtained using 193i nm lithography. Defect analysis coupled with the fine tuning of process parameters (annealing, brush material) provided the optimum conditions for the L38 self-assembly. Using such conditions, DSA using the three affinity flavors is investigated by means of SEM top-view and cross-section review. Lithographic performances of one selected flavor are then evaluated with the comparison of Process Windows (PWs) function of either commensurability, morphology or LWR. This work is a first step in finding the best process for an industrial graphoepitaxy approach.

  19. Determination of radium-228 in natural waters using extraction chromatographic resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, W.C.; Cable, P.H.; Moser, R.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a procedure for determination of {sup 228}Ra (t 1/2= 5.75 y) in natural waters using either the extraction chromatographic resins TRU-Spec{sup TM} or Ln-{center_dot}Spec{sup TM} to isolate the direct daughter, {sup 228}Ac, just before low-level counting. These separations are shown to be quantitative, simple, relatively fast, and free from most interferences. The recommended procedure effectively eliminates the need to perform the multiple precipitations and solvent extractions required by conventional techniques. The method uses a standard BaSO{sub 4} co-precipitation with {sup 133}Ba as an internal tracer to preconcentrate radium from a 1-2 L water sample. This is followed by a metathesizing process using K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to convert the BaSO{sub 4} to the more soluble BaCO{sub 3} form. After the {sup 133}Ba yield determination, the sample (in HN0{sub 3}) is stored for {ge}30 hours to allow ingrowth of equilibrium amounts of {sup 228}Ac (t 1/2=6.14 h) from the {sup 228}Ra in the sample. This solution is then loaded onto a chromatographic column prerinsed with HN0{sub 3} followed by a rinse with sufficient HN0{sub 3} to completely flush out barium, radium, lead, and other common elements which may be contained in the sample load. Actinium is then eluted with either HCl or more concentrated HN0{sub 3} and is ready for low-level beta-particle counting after mounting by filtration or evaporation. We estimate a detection limit of {le}1.0 pCi/L in approximately 30 minutes of counting using a proportional counter with a 1.0 cpm total beta background, a {sup 133}Ba yield of 80%, and a 2-L sample volume.

  20. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  1. Accelerated solvent extraction for gas chromatographic analysis of nicotine and cotinine in meconium samples.

    PubMed

    Sant'anna, Simone Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Dizioli Rodrigues; Diniz, Edna Maria de Albuquerque; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Adverse effects associated with smoking during pregnancy are well documented. Although self-report surveys on drug consumption during pregnancy have been improved with new interviewing techniques, underreporting is still a concern. Therefore, a series of biological markers and specimens to diagnose fetal exposure to tobacco have been studied. In the present study, an analytical method was developed to detect nicotine and cotinine (the main nicotine metabolite) in meconium samples. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) were used as sample preparation techniques. The analytes were detected by gas-chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. The limits of detection were 3.0 and 30 ng/g for cotinine and nicotine, respectively. The method showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.98) in the concentration range studied (LOQ-500 ng/g). The intraday precision, given by the RSD of the method, was less than 15% for cotinine and nicotine. The method proved to be fast, practical, and sensitive. Smaller volumes of organic solvents are necessary compared to other chromatographic methods published in the scientific literature. This is the first report in which ASE was used as sample preparation technique in methods to detect xenobiotics in meconium. PMID:22290748

  2. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  3. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  4. Polyethyleneimine-grafted boronate affinity materials for selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yun; Shi, Wenjun; Zhu, Bangjie; Gu, Xue; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chao

    2015-08-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI)-grafted and 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA)-functionalized SiO2 boronate affinity materials were synthesized for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds. Characterization results of scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, zeta potential, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated the successful fabrication of SiO2@PEI-AAPBA materials. Chromatographic separation of test mixtures reveals that SiO2@PEI-AAPBA has high selective enrichment ability for cis-diol-containing compounds. The binding pH between SiO2@PEI-AAPBA and catechol was found to be as low as pH 4.5, while that between SiO2@PEI-AAPBA and adenosine was only ~7.5. This difference might be attributed to the strong electrostatic repulsion between the solid phase and analytes at a low pH. Furthermore, a diphasic separation column was fabricated based on boronate affinity chromatography, C18-reversed-phase chromatography and applied in pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC). Results showed that four polar nucleosides could be well captured by the boronate affinity chromatography (BAC) section and separated by reversed phase pCEC. Finally, SiO2@PEI600-AAPBA-based solid-phase extraction technology was applied to the purification of ribonucleosides in real urine samples, and results of UHPLC-MS/MS revealed that the intensities of the extracted ions (a neutral mass loss of m/z 132.04 Da) of the ribonucleosides were significantly enhanced after the enrichment. PMID:26048816

  5. Analytical FcRn affinity chromatography for functional characterization of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schlothauer, Tilman; Rueger, Petra; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Hertenberger, Hubert; Fingas, Felix; Kling, Lothar; Emrich, Thomas; Drabner, Georg; Seeber, Stefan; Auer, Johannes; Koch, Stefan; Papadimitriou, Apollon

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is important for the metabolic fate of IgG antibodies in vivo. Analysis of the interaction between FcRn and IgG in vitro might provide insight into the structural and functional integrity of therapeutic IgG that may affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in vivo. We developed a standardized pH gradient FcRn affinity liquid chromatography method with conditions closely resembling the physiological mechanism of interaction between IgG and FcRn. This method allows the separation of molecular IgG isoforms, degradation products and engineered molecules based on their affinity to FcRn. Human FcRn was immobilized on the column and a linear pH gradient from pH 5.5 to 8.8 was applied. FcRn chromatography was used in comparison to surface plasmon resonance to characterize different monoclonal IgG preparations, e.g., oxidized or aggregated species. Wild-type and engineered IgGs were compared in vitro by FcRn chromatography and in vivo by PK studies in huFcRn transgenic mice. Analytical FcRn chromatography allows differentiation of IgG samples and variants by peak pattern and retention time profile. The method can distinguish: 1) IgGs with different Fabs, 2) oxidized from native IgG, 3) aggregates from monomer and 4) antibodies with mutations in the Fc part from wild-type IgGs. Changes in the FcRn chromatographic behavior of mutant IgGs relative to the wild-type IgG correlate to changes in the PK profile in the FcRn transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that FcRn affinity chromatography is a useful new method for the assessment of IgG integrity. PMID:23765230

  6. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  7. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J R

    1989-03-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  8. Smooth big bounce from affine quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Hervé; Dapor, Andrea; Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Małkiewicz, Przemysław

    2014-04-01

    We examine the possibility of dealing with gravitational singularities on a quantum level through the use of coherent state or wavelet quantization instead of canonical quantization. We consider the Robertson-Walker metric coupled to a perfect fluid. It is the simplest model of a gravitational collapse, and the results obtained here may serve as a useful starting point for more complex investigations in the future. We follow a quantization procedure based on affine coherent states or wavelets built from the unitary irreducible representation of the affine group of the real line with positive dilation. The main issue of our approach is the appearance of a quantum centrifugal potential allowing for regularization of the singularity, essential self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian, and unambiguous quantum dynamical evolution.

  9. Improved native affinity purification of RNA.

    PubMed

    Batey, Robert T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2007-08-01

    RNA biochemical or structural studies often require an RNA sample that is chemically pure, and most protocols for its in vitro production use denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to achieve this. Unfortunately, many RNAs do not quantitatively refold into an active conformation after denaturation, creating significant problems for downstream characterization or use. In addition, this traditional purification method is not amenable to studies demanding high-throughput RNA production. Recently, we presented the first general method for producing almost any RNA sequence that employs an affinity tag that is removed during the purification process. Because technical difficulties prevented application of this method to many RNAs, we have developed an improved version that utilizes a different activatable ribozyme and affinity tag that are considerably more robust, rapid, and broadly applicable. PMID:17548432

  10. Protein affinity map of chemical space.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, L M; Villar, H O; Sportsman, J R; Higgins, D L; Schmidt, D E

    1998-09-11

    Affinity fingerprinting is a quantitative method for mapping chemical space based on binding preferences of compounds for a reference panel of proteins. An effective reference panel of <20 proteins can be empirically selected which shows differential interaction with nearly all compounds. By using this map to iteratively sample the chemical space, identification of active ligands from a library of 30,000 candidate compounds has been accomplished for a wide spectrum of specific protein targets. In each case, <200 compounds were directly assayed against the target. Further, analysis of the fingerprint database suggests a strategy for effective selection of affinity chromatography ligands and scaffolds for combinatorial chemistry. With such a system, the large numbers of potential therapeutic targets emerging from genome research can be categorized according to ligand binding properties, complementing sequence based classification. PMID:9792501

  11. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  12. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  13. Use of quantitative affinity chromatography for characterizing high-affinity interactions: binding of heparin to antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Jackson, C M; Winzor, D J

    1991-02-01

    The versatility of quantitative affinity chromatography (QAC) for evaluating the binding of macromolecular ligands to macromolecular acceptors has been increased substantially as a result of the derivation of the equations which describe the partitioning of acceptor between matrix-bound and soluble forms in terms of total, rather than free, ligand concentrations. In addition to simplifying the performance of the binding experiments, this development makes possible the application of the technique to systems characterized by affinities higher than those previously amenable to investigation by QAC. Addition of an on-line data acquisition system to monitor the concentration of partitioning solute in the liquid phase as a function of time has permitted the adoption of an empirical approach for determining the liquid-phase concentration of acceptor in the system at partition equilibrium, a development which decreases significantly the time required to obtain a complete binding curve by QAC. The application of these new QAC developments is illustrated by the determination of binding constants for the interactions of high-affinity heparin (Mr 20,300) with antithrombin III at three temperatures. Association constants of 8.0 +/- 2.2 x 10(7), 3.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(7), and 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M-1 were observed at 15, 25, and 35 degrees C, respectively. The standard enthalpy change of -4.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol that is calculated from these data is in good agreement with a reported value obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements. PMID:2035830

  14. Characterization of aquatic humic substances and their metal complexes by immobilized metal-chelate affinity chromatography on iron(III)-loaded ion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Burba, P; Jakubowski, B; Kuckuk, R; Küllmer, K; Heumann, K G

    2000-12-01

    The analytical fractionation of aquatic humic substances (HS) by means of immobilized metal-chelate affinity chromatography (IMAC) on metal-loaded chelating ion exchangers is described. The cellulose HYPHAN, loaded with different trivalent ions, and the chelate exchanger Chelex 100, loaded to 90% of its capacity with Fe(III), were used. The cellulose HYPHAN, loaded with 2% Fe(III), resulted in HS distribution coefficients Kd of up to 10(3.7) mL/g at pH 4.0 continuously decreasing down to 10(1.5) at pH 12, which were appropriate for HS fractionation by a pH-depending chromatographic procedure. Similar distribution coefficients Kd were obtained for HS sorption onto Fe(III)-loaded Chelex 100. On the basis of Fe-loaded HYPHAN both, a low-pressure and high-pressure IMAC technique, were developed for the fractionation of dissolved HS applying a buffer-based pH gradient for their gradual elution between pH 4.0 and 12.0. By coupling the Chelex 100 column under high-pressure conditions with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer an on-line characterization of HS metal species could be achieved. Using these fractionation procedures a number of reference HS were characterized. Accordingly, the HA (humic acids) and FA (fulvic acids) studied could be discriminated into up to 6 fractions by applying cellulose HYPHAN, significantly differing in their Cu(II) complexation capacity but hardly in their substructures assessed by conventional FTIR. In the case of using Chelex 100 exchanger resin two major UV active HS fractions were obtained, which significantly differ in their complexation properties for Cu(II) and Pb(II), respectively. PMID:11227549

  15. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-06-20

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  16. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  17. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  18. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  19. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  20. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  1. Separation of human breast cancer cells from blood by differential dielectric affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, F F; Wang, X B; Huang, Y; Pethig, R; Vykoukal, J; Gascoyne, P R

    1995-01-01

    Electrorotation measurements were used to demonstrate that the dielectric properties of the metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA231 were significantly different from those of erythrocytes and T lymphocytes. These dielectric differences were exploited to separate the cancer cells from normal blood cells by appropriately balancing the hydrodynamic and dielectrophoretic forces acting on the cells within a dielectric affinity column containing a microelectrode array. The operational criteria for successful particle separation in such a column are analyzed and our findings indicate that the dielectric affinity technique may prove useful in a wide variety of cell separation and characterization applications. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846067

  2. Improved Chromatographic Separation of Sitagliptin Phosphate and Metformin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Moataz S.

    2015-01-01

    New UPLC method was developed for determination of sitagliptin and metformin using Symmetry C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) and isocratic elution (methanol 20%), pH (3.5) as a mobile phase. The ultraviolet detector was operated at 220 nm and the column temperature was 50°C. Linearity parameters were acceptable over the concentration ranges of 2-12 μgml-1 and 5-35 μgml-1 for sitagliptin and metformin, respectively. The variables were premeditated to adjust the chromatographic conditions using design of experiment. The proposed method was proved to be accurate for the quality control of the mentioned drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:26759536

  3. Optimization of preparative chromatographic separation of multiple rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Max-Hansen, Mark; Ojala, Frida; Kifle, Dejene; Borg, Niklas; Nilsson, Bernt

    2011-12-23

    This work presents a method to optimize multi-product chromatographic systems with multiple objective functions. The system studied is a neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium mixture separated in an ion exchange chromatography step. A homogeneous Langmuir Mobile Phase Modified model is calibrated to fit the experiments, and then used to perform the optimization task. For the optimization a multi-objective Differential Evolution algorithm was used, with weighting based on relative value of the components to find optimal operation points along the Pareto front. The objectives of the Pareto front are weighted productivity and weighted yield with purity as an equality constraint. A prioritizing scheme based on relative values is applied for determining the pooling order. A simple rule of thumb for pooling strategy selection is presented. The multi-objective optimization gives a Pareto front which shows the rule of thumb, as a gap in one of the objective functions. PMID:22079482

  4. Improved Chromatographic Separation of Sitagliptin Phosphate and Metformin Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Moataz S

    2015-12-01

    New UPLC method was developed for determination of sitagliptin and metformin using Symmetry C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) and isocratic elution (methanol 20%), pH (3.5) as a mobile phase. The ultraviolet detector was operated at 220 nm and the column temperature was 50°C. Linearity parameters were acceptable over the concentration ranges of 2-12 μgml(-1) and 5-35 μgml(-1) for sitagliptin and metformin, respectively. The variables were premeditated to adjust the chromatographic conditions using design of experiment. The proposed method was proved to be accurate for the quality control of the mentioned drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:26759536

  5. Chromatographic removal of endotoxin from protein solutions by polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Chuichi; Sakata, Masayo

    2002-12-01

    Endotoxins, constituents of cell walls of gram-negative bacteria, are potential contaminants of the protein solutions originating from biological products. Such contaminants have to be removed from solutions used for intravenous administration, because of their potent biological activities causing pyrogenic reactions. Separation methods used for decontamination of water, such as ultrafiltration, have little effect on endotoxin levels in protein solutions. To remove endotoxin from a solution of high-molecular-mass compounds, such as proteins, the adsorption method has proven to be most effective. In this review, we first introduce endotoxin-specific properties in an aqueous solution, and then provide various methods of chromatographic separation of endotoxins from cellular products using polymer adsorbents. We also provide the design of novel endotoxin-specific polymer adsorbents. PMID:12450672

  6. Gas chromatographic separation of methoxylated polychlorinated biphenyl atropisomers

    PubMed Central

    Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Vyas, Sandhya M.; Song, Yang; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Several polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their hydroxylated metabolites display axial chirality. Here we describe an enantioselective, gas chromatographic separation of methylated derivatives of hydroxylated (OH-)PCB atropisomers (MeO-PCB) using a chemically bonded β-cyclodextrin column (Chirasil-Dex). The atropisomers of several MeO-PCBs could be separated on this column with resolutions ranging from 0.42–0.87 under isothermal or temperature-programmed conditions. In addition, the enantiomeric fraction of OH-PCB 136 metabolites was determined in male and female rats treated with racemic PCB 136. The methylated derivatives of two OH-PCB 136 metabolites showed an enantiomeric enrichment in liver tissue, whereas PCB 136 itself was near racemic. PMID:18760792

  7. Allyl-silica Hybrid Monoliths For Chromatographic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjuan

    Column technology continues to be the most investigated topics in the separation world, since the column is the place where the chromatographic separation happens, making it the heart of the separation system. Allyl-silica hybrid monolithic material has been exploited as support material and potential stationary phases for liquid chromatography; the stationary phase anchored to the silica surface by Si-C bond, which is more pH stable than traditional stationary phase. First, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the sol in the synthesis of allyl-silica hybrid monoliths. Allyl-trimethoxysilane (allyl-TrMOS), dimethyldimethoxysilane (DMDMOS) and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) have been served as co-precursors in the sol-gel synthesis of organo-silica hybrid monolithic columns for liquid chromatography (LC). 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were employed to monitor reaction profiles for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and initial condensation reactions of the individual precursor and the hybrid system. 29Si-NMR has also been used to identify different silane species formed during the reactions. The overall hydrolysis rate has been found to follow the trend DMDMOS > allyl-TrMOS > TMOS, if each precursor is reacted individually (homo-polymerization). Precursors show different hydrolysis rate when reacted together in the hybrid system than they are reacted individually. Cross-condensation products of TMOS and DMDMOS (QD) arise about 10 minutes of initiation of the reaction. The allyl-silica monolithic columns for capillary liquid chromatography can only be prepared in capillaries with 50 im internal diameter with acceptable performance. One of the most prominent problems related to the synthesis of silica monolithic structures is the volume shrinkage. The synthesis of allylfunctionalized silica hybrid monolithic structures has been studied in an attempt to reduce the volume shrinkage during aging, drying and heat treatment

  8. Liquid chromatographic determination of carbadox residues in animal feed.

    PubMed

    Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W

    1985-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method for determining residues of carbadox in the 0.01-10 ppm range in swine feed is described. Carbadox is extracted from ground feed with 25% acidified methanol-CHCl3, removed from emulsion-forming coextractables via an alumina column, separated from highly colored pigments by acid-base liquid-liquid partitioning, and finally isolated from interferences on a second alumina column. Isocratic reverse phase LC at 305 nm is used for quantitation. The average overall recovery at the 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm spike levels was 83.0% with a standard deviation of 2.04% and a coefficient of variation of 2.46%. PMID:4030635

  9. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Amnesic Shellfish Poison in Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2000-10-01

    A simple, rapid, high-performance liquid chromatographic experiment suitable for undergraduate students is described for determining amnesic shellfish poison in mussels. The poison itself is an unusual naturally occurring amino acid, domoic acid, that has been found in seafood, particularly shellfish, worldwide. The symptoms of poisoning include amnesia (memory loss), loss of balance, mental confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and in extreme cases death. The domoic acid is extracted from homogenized mussel tissue by boiling in water for 5 minutes. The homogenate is cooled and centrifuged, and an aliquot of the supernatant is diluted and analyzed by isocratic HPLC using a C18 column and an acetonitrile-water mobile phase at pH 2.5 with UV detection at 242 nm.

  10. The gas chromatographic resolution of DL-isovaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Van Dort, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Isovaline is of cosmological interest because it is one of the 12 non-protein amino acids which have been isolated from the Murchison meteorite, and unlike the other chiral amino acids in this meteorite, it has no alpha-hydrogen at its asymmetric center and hence cannot racemize by the customary alpha-hydrogen-dependent mechanisms which engender racemization in ordinary amino acids. Experiments were conducted in which a .01 M solution of N-TFA-DL-isovalyl-L-leucine isopropyl ester in nitromethane was injected into the capillary column of a gas chromatograph coupled to a digital electronic integrator-recorder. Efflux times and integrated peak area percents are shown next to each diastereometer peak.

  11. Liquid chromatographic determination of tetracycline residues in animal feeds.

    PubMed

    Martinez, E E; Shimoda, W

    1988-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method for the multiresidue determination of tetracyclines (TCs) in feeds is described. The levels of quantitation were 10 ppm each for tetracycline-HCl (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC), and chlortetracycline-HCl (CTC); the detection limit was 40 ppb for each. The calibration curves were linear between 2.5 and 100 ppm. The procedure involved double extraction with pH 2.0 and pH 4.5 McIlvain buffers, cleanup on a Sephadex LH-20 column, separation on a Nova-Pak C18 column, and detection at 370 nm. Recoveries of 10 micrograms/g of each TC in multiresidue feed samples ranged from 55.8 to 75.5% for OTC, 71.6 to 100% for TC, and 22.4 to 60.6% for CTC. The identities of the TCs were confirmed by thin layer chromatography. PMID:3391942

  12. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

    2009-03-24

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

  13. Mathematical model for multicomponent separations on the continuous annular chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Bratzler, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    A model for multicomponent separations on ion exchange columns has been adapted for use in studying the performance of the continuous annular chromatograph. The model accurately predicts solute peak positions in the column effluent and qualitatively predicts trends in solute effluent resolution as a function of increasing bandwidth of the solute feed pulse. The major virtues of the model are its simplicity in terms of the calculations involved and the fact that it incorporates the nonlinear solute-resin binding isotherms common in many ion exchange separations. Because dispersion effects are not accounted for in the model, discrepancies exist between the shapes of the effluent peaks predicted by the model and those determined experimentally.

  14. Prediction of gas chromatographic retention data for hydrocarbons from naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Woloszyn, T.F.; Jurs, P.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Regression equations that model the gas chromatographic retention behavior of hydrocarbons found in complex petrochemical mixtures were developed for two different stationary phases, SE-30 and Carbowax 20M. The models had relative standard errors in the range 1--2%. This quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) study focused on a relatively heterogeneous data set and resulted in the generation of several statistical models that related Kovats' retention index with descriptors that encode molecular structure. Also investigated was the addition of boiling point as a physicochemical descriptor. These models bore a significant improvement over the models containing only structural descriptors, with R values of 0.996. 27 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. A review of chromatographic methods for the determination of water- and fat-soluble vitamins in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Karaźniewicz-Łada, Marta; Główka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vitamins are an essential element of nutrition and thus contribute to human health. Vitamins catalyze many biochemical reactions and their lack or excess can cause health problems. Therefore, monitoring vitamin concentrations in plasma or other biological fluids may be useful in the diagnosis of various disorders as well as in the treatment process. Several chromatographic methods have been developed for the determination of these compounds in biological samples, including high-performance liquid chromatography with UV and fluorescence detection. Recently, high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods have been widely used for the determination of vitamins in complex matrices because of their high sensitivity and selectivity. This method requires preconditioning of samples for analysis, including protein precipitation and/or various extraction techniques. The choice of method may depend on the desired cost, convenience, turnaround time, specificity, and accuracy of the information to be obtained. This article reviews the recently reported chromatographic methods used for determination of vitamins in biological fluids. Relevant papers published mostly during the last 5 years were identified by an extensive PubMed search using appropriate keywords. Particular attention was given to the preparation steps and extraction techniques. This report may be helpful in the selection of procedures that are appropriate for certain types of biological materials and analytes. PMID:26503668

  16. Scope of partial least-squares regression applied to the enantiomeric composition determination of ketoprofen from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Padró, Juan M; Osorio-Grisales, Jaiver; Arancibia, Juan A; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Castells, Cecilia B

    2015-07-01

    Valuable quantitative information could be obtained from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles of two enantiomers by using proper chemometric methods. Complete separation profiles where the peaks are fully resolved are difficult to achieve in chiral separation methods, and this becomes a particularly severe problem in case that the analyst needs to measure the chiral purity, i.e., when one of the enantiomers is present in the sample in very low concentrations. In this report, we explore the scope of a multivariate chemometric technique based on unfolded partial least-squares regression, as a mathematical tool to solve this quite frequent difficulty. This technique was applied to obtain quantitative results from partially overlapped chromatographic profiles of R- and S-ketoprofen, with different values of enantioresolution factors (from 0.81 down to less than 0.2 resolution units), and also at several different S:R enantiomeric ratios. Enantiomeric purity below 1% was determined with excellent precision even from almost completely overlapped signals. All these assays were tested on the most demanding condition, i.e., when the minor peak elutes immediately after the main peak. The results were validated using univariate calibration of completely resolved profiles and the method applied to the determination of enantiomeric purity of commercial pharmaceuticals. PMID:25929676

  17. Dynamical surface affinity of diphasic liquids as a probe of wettability of multimodal porous media.

    PubMed

    Korb, J-P; Freiman, G; Nicot, B; Ligneul, P

    2009-12-01

    We introduce a method for estimating the wettability of rock/oil/brine systems using noninvasive in situ nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion. This technique scans over a large range of applied magnetic fields and yields unique information about the extent to which a fluid is dynamically correlated with a solid rock surface. Unlike conventional transverse relaxation studies, this approach is a direct probe of the dynamical surface affinity of fluids. To quantify these features we introduce a microscopic dynamical surface affinity index which measures the dynamical correlation (i.e., the microscopic wettability) between the diffusive fluid and the fixed paramagnetic relaxation sources at the pore surfaces. We apply this method to carbonate reservoir rocks which are known to hold about two thirds of the world's oil reserves. Although this nondestructive method concerns here an application to rocks, it could be generalized as an in situ liquid/surface affinity indicator for any multimodal porous medium including porous biological media. PMID:20365175

  18. Liquid chromatographic method for determining the concentration of bisazir in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholefield, Ronald J.; Slaght, Karen S.; Allen, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Barrier dams, traps, and lampricides are the techniques currently used by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission to control sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes. To augment these control techniques, a sterile-male-release research program was initiated at the Lake Huron Biological Station. Male sea lampreys were sterilized by intraperitoneal injection of the chemical sterilant P,P-bis(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic amide (bisazir). An analytical method was needed to quantitate the concentration of bisazir in water and to routinely verify that bisazir (>25 μg/L) does not persist in the treated effluent discharged from the sterilization facility to Lake Huron. A rapid, accurate, and sensitive liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for determining bisazir in water. Bisazir was dissolved in Lake Huron water; extracted and concentrated on a C18 solid-phase extraction column; eluted with methanol; and quantitated by reversed-phase LC using a C18 column, a mobile phase of 70% water and 30% methanol (v/v), and UV detection (205 nm). Bisazir retention time was 7-8 min; total run time was about 20 min. Method detection limit for bisazir dissolved in Lake Huron water was about 15 μg/L. Recovery from Lake Huron water fortified with bisazir at 100 μg/L was 94% (95% confidence interval, 90.2-98.2%).

  19. Liquid chromatographic determination and liquid chromatographic-thermospray mass spectrometric confirmation of nicarbazin in chicken tissues: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Leadbetter, M G; Matusik, J E

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sponsored an interlaboratory study of a liquid chromatographic determination with ultraviolet detection of nicarbazin in chicken liver and muscle tissues. The method determined the 4,4'-dinitrocarbanilide (DNC) portion of nicarbazin. The interlaboratory study of the determinative method was successful for nicarbazin at the 4 ppm level. Results showed good reproducibility for the fortified liver and muscle samples. Mean interlaboratory recoveries and percent coefficients of variation at about 4 ppm were 87.1 and 10.9%, respectively, for muscle and 87.4 and 7.5%, respectively, for liver. The interlaboratory analyses of the dosed liver and muscle tissues produced concentration levels similar to those obtained by the sponsor. The confirmatory procedure, which identified DNC in purified tissue extracts, used liquid chromatography-thermospray/mass spectrometry. The confirmatory procedure was successfully evaluated by one FDA laboratory. PMID:8471868

  20. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018856

  1. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  2. ANALYSIS OF DISSOLVED METHANE, ETHANE, AND ETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER BY A STANDARD GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of dissolved gases such as methane, ethane, and ethylene in ground water is important in determining whether intrinsic bioremediation is occurring in a fuel- or solvent-contaminated aquifer. A simple procedure is described for the collection and subsequent analys...

  3. Determination and structural elucidation of triacylglycerols in krill oil by chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Pedro; Zhu, Han; Breivik, Joar Fjørtoft; Hjelle, Jan Idar; Zeng, Yingxu

    2014-02-01

    The content of triacylglycerols (TAG) in krill oil is generally omitted from the labels of commercial supplements and unacknowledged in studies aimed at proving its health benefits. The present study demonstrates that TAG compounds, in addition to phospholipids and lysophospholipids, are an important lipid class in pure krill oil. The fatty acid composition of TAG molecules from krill oil and their distribution on the backbone of TAG structures were determined by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric, respectively. The content of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) was similar to those reported in the literature for fish oil. It was estimated that 21 % of n-3 PUFA were at the sn-2 position of TAG structures. To our knowledge, this is the first determination and structural characterization of TAG in pure krill oil supplements. PMID:24190513

  4. Isolation of high-purity anthocyanin mixtures and monomers from blueberries using combined chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erlei; Yin, Yongguang; Xu, Caina; Liu, Jingbo

    2014-01-31

    Research on the isolation and preparation of anthocyanins has intensified in recent years because of the requirements of quantitative and bioactive analyses. However, simple and effective methods for the scale purification of pure anthocyanins from natural products are rarely reported. In this study, high-purity anthocyanin mixtures and monomers were successfully isolated from wild blueberries using a combination of column chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC. We established an effective elution system to separate high-purity anthocyanin mixtures with aqueous ethanol containing 0.01% HCl first in an Amberlite XAD-7HP column (ethanol/H2O=35:65) and then in a Sephadex LH-20 column (ethanol/H2O=25:75). Crude anthocyanin extracts were isolated using the Amberlite column, and a purity of 32% was obtained based on UV-vis analysis. Three fractions of anthocyanin mixtures were isolated from the crude extracts using the Sephadex column with purities ranging from 59% to 68%. Three pure monomeric anthocyanins of malvidin-3-O-glucoside, petunidin-3-O-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-O-glucoside were also isolated by semi-preparative HPLC and identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. The purities of these anthocyanins were determined by analytical HPLC and estimated to be 97.7%, 99.3%, and 95.4%, respectively. The results of this study may help promote the purification of anthocyanins from most blueberry varieties as well as from other plant materials. PMID:24433700

  5. Differentiation of degrees of ripeness of Catuai and Tipica green coffee by chromatographical and statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smrke, Samo; Kroslakova, Ivana; Gloess, Alexia N; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2015-05-01

    The quality of green coffee is influenced by the degree of ripeness of the fruit at harvest. The aim of this study was to identify chemical markers differentiating between degrees of ripeness. Two coffee varieties, Catuai and Tipica, from the same farm were analysed using the following parameters and methods: caffeine and chlorogenic acid content using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), sucrose content using hydrophilic interaction chromatography, high-molecular weight fraction (HMW) using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and volatile compounds using headspace solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The best method for differentiating between degrees of ripeness was found to be principal component analysis (PCA) based on HPLC data. HPSEC showed differences in the HMW fraction for different degrees of ripeness and both coffee varieties. Volatile profiles allowed separation of both varieties; yet, except for ripe Catuai, no separation was achieved for the degree of ripeness. PMID:25529730

  6. Characterization of Atypical Off-Flavor Compounds in Natural Cork Stoppers by Multidimensional Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Slabizki, Petra; Fischer, Claus; Legrum, Charlotte; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2015-09-01

    Natural cork stoppers with sensory deviations other than the typical cork taint were subgrouped according to their sensory descriptions and compared with unaffected control cork stoppers. The assessment of purge and trap extracts obtained from corresponding cork soaks was performed by heart-cut multidimensional gas chromatography-olfactometry (MDGC-O). The identification of compounds responsible for atypical cork taint detected in MDGC-O was further supported with additional multidimensional GC analysis in combination with mass spectrometric detection. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol were mainly found in cork stoppers described as moldy and cellarlike; 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine were found in cork stoppers described with green attributes. Across all cork subgroups, the impact compound for typical cork taint, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), was present and is therefore a good marker for cork taint in general. Another potent aroma compound, 3,5-dimethyl-2-methoxypyrazine (MDMP), was also detected in each subgroup, obviously playing an important role with regard to the atypical cork taint. Sensory deviations possibly affecting the wine could be generated by MDMP and its presence should thus be monitored in routine quality control. PMID:26257078

  7. Chromatographic finger print analysis of steroids in Aerva lanata L by HPTLC technique

    PubMed Central

    Yamunadevi, Mariswamy; Wesely, Edward Gnaraj; Johnson, M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the chemical profile and steroids composition of the medicinally important plant Aerva lanata (A. lanata) L. Methods Preliminary phytochemical screening was done by the method as Harborne described. HPTLC studies were carried out as Harborne and Wagner et al described. The Ethyl acetate-ethanol-water (8: 2: 1.2) was employed as mobile phase for glycosides. Results The desired aim was achieved using Chloroform-acetone (8: 2) as the mobile phase. The methanolic extract of stem, leaves, root, flower and seeds of A. lanata showed the presence of 30 different types of steroids with 30 different Rf values from 0.04 to 0.97. Maximum number (11) of steroids has been observed in leaves followed by root (10). Conclusions HPTLC profile of steroids has been chosen here to reveal the diversity existing in A. lanata. Such finger printing is useful in differentiating the species from the adulterant and act as biochemical markers for this medicinally important plant in the pharma industry and plant systematic studies. PMID:23569807

  8. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  9. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  10. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  11. An automated multidimensional preparative gas chromatographic system for isolation and enrichment of trace amounts of xenon from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Larson, Tuula; Östman, Conny; Colmsjö, Anders

    2011-04-01

    The monitoring of radioactive xenon isotopes is one of the principal methods for the detection of nuclear explosions in order to identify clandestine nuclear testing. In this work, a miniaturized, multiple-oven, six-column, preparative gas chromatograph was constructed in order to isolate trace quantities of radioactive xenon isotopes from ambient air, utilizing nitrogen as the carrier gas. The multidimensional chromatograph comprised preparative stainless steel columns packed with molecular sieves, activated carbon, and synthetic carbon adsorbents (e.g., Anasorb®-747 and Carbosphere®). A combination of purification techniques--ambient adsorption, thermal desorption, back-flushing, thermal focusing, and heart cutting--was selectively optimized to produce a well-defined xenon peak that facilitated reproducible heart cutting and accurate quantification. The chromatographic purification of a sample requires approximately 4 h and provides complete separation of xenon from potentially interfering components (such as water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, and radon) with recovery and accuracy close to 100%. The preparative enrichment process isolates and concentrates a highly purified xenon gas fraction that is suitable for subsequent ultra-low-level γ-, ß/γ-spectroscopic or high-resolution mass spectrometric measurement (e.g., to monitor the gaseous fission products of nuclear explosions at remote locations). The Xenon Processing Unit is a free-standing, relatively lightweight, and transportable system that can be interfaced to a variety of sampling and detection systems. It has a relatively inexpensive, rugged, and compact modular (19-inch rack) design that provides easy access to all parts for maintenance and has a low power requirement. PMID:21347675

  12. Aluminum monocation basicity and affinity scales.

    PubMed

    Gal, Jean-François; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2015-01-01

    The experimental aspects of the determination of thermochemical data for the attachment of the aluminum monocation Al(+) to neutral atoms and molecules are reviewed. Literature aluminum cation affinities (enthalpy scale) and basicities (Gibbs energy scale) are tabulated and discussed. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level on 43 adducts provide a consistent picture of the energetics of the adducts and their structures. The Al(+)-ligand bonding is analyzed in terms of natural bond orbital and atom-in molecule analyses. A brief comparison of the Al(+) basicity scales and other gas- phase cation basicities is presented. PMID:26307732

  13. Contractions of affine Kac-Moody algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daboul, J.; Daboul, C.; de Montigny, M.

    2008-08-01

    I review our recent work on contractions of affine Kac-Moody algebras (KMA) and present new results. We study generalized contractions of KMA with respect to their twisted and untwisted KM subalgebras. As a concrete example, we discuss contraction of D(1)4 and D(3)4, based on Z3-grading. We also describe examples of 'level-dependent' contractions, which are based on Z-gradings of KMA. Our work generalizes the Inönü-Wigner contraction of P. Majumdar in several directions. We also give an algorithm for constructing Kac-Moody-like algebras hat g for any Lie algebra g.

  14. Liquid chromatographic determination of benzocaine and N-acetylbenzocaine in the edible fillet tissue from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Stehly, G.R.; Hubert, T.D.; Bernardy, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A method was developed for determining benzocaine and N-acetylbenzocaine concentrations in fillet tissue of rainbow trout. The method involves extracting the analytes with acetonitrile, removing lipids or hydrophobic compounds from the extract with hexane, and providing additional clean-up with solid-phase extraction techniques. Analyte concentrations are determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic techniques with an isocratic mobile phase and UV detection. The accuracy (range, 92 to 121%), precision (R.S.D., <14%), and sensitivity (method quantitation limit, <24 ng/g) for each analyte indicate the usefulness of this method for studies characterizing the depletion of benzocaine residues from fish exposed to benzocaine. Copyright (C) 1999.

  15. Development of Chromatographic Fingerprints of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali) Roots Using Online Solid Phase Extraction-Liquid Chromatography (SPE-LC).

    PubMed

    Zaini, Nor Nasriah; Osman, Rozita; Juahir, Hafizan; Saim, Norashikin

    2016-01-01

    E. longifolia is attracting interest due to its pharmacological properties and pro-vitality effects. In this study, an online SPE-LC approach using polystyrene divinyl benzene (PSDVB) and C18 columns was developed in obtaining chromatographic fingerprints of E. longifolia. E. longifolia root samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) technique prior to online SPE-LC. The effects of mobile phase compositions and column switching time on the chromatographic fingerprint were optimized. Validation of the developed method was studied based on eurycomanone. Linearity was in the range of 5 to 50 µg∙mL(-1) (r² = 0.997) with 3.2% relative standard deviation of peak area. The developed method was used to analyze 14 E. longifolia root samples and 10 products (capsules). Selected chemometric techniques: cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the fingerprint datasets of 37 selected peaks to evaluate the ability of the chromatographic fingerprint in classifying quality of E. longifolia. Three groups were obtained using CA. DA yielded 100% correlation coefficient with 19 discriminant compounds. Using PCA, E. longifolia root samples were clearly discriminated from the products. This study showed that the developed online SPE-LC method was able to provide comprehensive evaluation of E. longifolia samples for quality control purposes. PMID:27144555

  16. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  17. Heparin affinity purification of extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Balaj, Leonora; Atai, Nadia A.; Chen, Weilin; Mu, Dakai; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan; Maguire, Casey A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid membrane vesicles released by cells. They carry active biomolecules including DNA, RNA, and protein which can be transferred to recipient cells. Isolation and purification of EVs from culture cell media and biofluids is still a major challenge. The most widely used isolation method is ultracentrifugation (UC) which requires expensive equipment and only partially purifies EVs. Previously we have shown that heparin blocks EV uptake in cells, supporting a direct EV-heparin interaction. Here we show that EVs can be purified from cell culture media and human plasma using ultrafiltration (UF) followed by heparin-affinity beads. UF/heparin-purified EVs from cell culture displayed the EV marker Alix, contained a diverse RNA profile, had lower levels of protein contamination, and were functional at binding to and uptake into cells. RNA yield was similar for EVs isolated by UC. We were able to detect mRNAs in plasma samples with comparable levels to UC samples. In conclusion, we have discovered a simple, scalable, and effective method to purify EVs taking advantage of their heparin affinity. PMID:25988257

  18. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  19. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  20. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  1. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  2. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  3. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  4. Multiplexed Affinity-Based Separation of Proteins and Cells Using Inertial Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aniruddh; Hou, Han Wei; Mahan, Alison. E.; Han, Jongyoon; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of low abundance proteins or rare cells from complex mixtures, such as blood, is required for many diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications. Current affinity-based protein or cell separation methods use binary ‘bind-elute’ separations and are inefficient when applied to the isolation of multiple low-abundance proteins or cell types. We present a method for rapid and multiplexed, yet inexpensive, affinity-based isolation of both proteins and cells, using a size-coded mixture of multiple affinity-capture microbeads and an inertial microfluidic particle sorter device. In a single binding step, different targets–cells or proteins–bind to beads of different sizes, which are then sorted by flowing them through a spiral microfluidic channel. This technique performs continuous-flow, high throughput affinity-separation of milligram-scale protein samples or millions of cells in minutes after binding. We demonstrate the simultaneous isolation of multiple antibodies from serum and multiple cell types from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or whole blood. We use the technique to isolate low abundance antibodies specific to different HIV antigens and rare HIV-specific cells from blood obtained from HIV+ patients. PMID:27026280

  5. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  6. Optimisation of n-Hexyl Acetate Synthesis in a Chromatographic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dipesh; Saha, Basudeb; Wakeman, Richard

    Laboratory scale batch chromatographic reactor experiments were carried for the esterification of acetic acid with n-hexanol to synthesise a value added ester, namely n-hexyl acetate in the presence of an ion exchange resin catalyst, Purolite CT-124. The effect of various parameters such as solvent flow rates in the regeneration step, amount of reactants in the reaction step and reaction step time was studied for optimisation of the reaction condition in a batch chromatographic reactor. This information would be useful for the design, operation and optimisation of n-hexyl acetate synthesis in a continuous chromatographic reactor.

  7. Chromatographic separation and concentration of quercetin and (+)-catechin using mesoporous composites based on MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S. I.; Belanova, N. A.; Korabel'nikova, E. O.; Nedosekina, I. V.; Roessner, F.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Data on chromatographic separation of quercetin and (+)-catechin-flavonoids with similar physicochemical (including sorption) properties—are presented. The highest efficiency of chromatographic process at high sorption capacity of the material with respect to quercetin and slightly lower capacity for (+)-catechin were observed when silylated composites of ordered MCM-41 type materials were used. The application of acetonitrile as a solvent increased the sorption capacity of the material and can be recommended for separation of related polyphenol substances and their determination using ordered MCM-41 modified with trimethylchlorosilane as a stationary phase in a chromatographic column.

  8. Fundamental and practical studies on high-performance liquid affinity chromatography of biopolymers with novel stationary phases

    SciTech Connect

    Bacolod, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigid microparticulate stationary phases having surface-bound metal chelating functions were developed and evaluated in high performance metal chelate affinity chromatography of proteins. Silica- and polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based metal chelate sorbents were produced in wide pore and in non-porous type of column packings. A major effort has been placed on development of non-porous highly crosslinked polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PSDVB). These PSDVB microparticles were produced by a two-step swelling polymerization, and exhibited excellent mechanical strength over a wide range of flow-rates and composition used in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Simple and reproducible hydrophilic coatings were developed for the surface modification of hydrophobic PSDVB supports. A tetradentate metal chelating ligand, ethylenediamine-N, N[prime]-diacetic acid (EDDA), was covalently bound to the surface of the various supports. Sorbents having iminodiacetic acid (IDA) metal chelating functions were also evaluated. The hydrophilic character and surface coverage of various stationary phases were assessed chromatographically. Studies concerning the effects of eluent pH as well as the nature and concentration of salts on retention and selectivity with different metal chelate stationary phases having various immobilized metal ions were carried out. Elution schemes were developed for rapid separation of proteins in metal chelate affinity chromatography. EDDA stationary phases in metal forms can be viewed as complementary to IDA stationary phases since they afforded different selectivity and retentivity toward proteins. Hydrophilic PSDVB could be functionalized with IDA or EDDA metal chelating ligands or lectins. The non-porous metal chelate stationary phases afforded rapid separation of proteins by the development of multiple gradient systems, which permitted higher column peak capacity, enabling the separation of a greater number of proteins in a single chromatographic run.

  9. Optimisation of a gas chromatographic method for trace gaseous impurities in nitrogen trifluoride by column sequence reversal.

    PubMed

    de Coning, Johannes Petrus; Swinley, John McNeil

    2008-02-01

    Highly reactive fluorinated gaseous matrices require special equipment and techniques for the gas chromatographic analysis of trace impurities in these gases. The impurities that were analysed at the low mg/L levels included dioxygen (O2), dinitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) is also present in the product at levels of 20-400mg/L and had to be analysed as well. This paper compares the use of a custom-built dual-channel gas chromatograph utilising single column back flush switching on one channel for the determination of O2, N2, CH4 and CO with column sequence reversal on a second channel for the determination of CO2, N2O, SF6 and CF4 to a similar system using a combination of dual-column back flush and heart-cut configurations. Pulsed discharge helium ionisation detectors were used on both channels in both configurations. PMID:18155712

  10. A Robust and Fully-Automated Chromatographic Method for the Quantitative Purification of Ca and Sr for Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. B.; Kim, H.; Romaniello, S. J.; Field, P.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    High throughput methods for sample purification are required to effectively exploit new opportunities in the study of non-traditional stable isotopes. Many geochemical isotopic studies would benefit from larger data sets, but these are often impractical with manual drip chromatography techniques, which can be time-consuming and demand the attention of skilled laboratory staff. Here we present a new, fully-automated single-column method suitable for the purification of both Ca and Sr for stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis. The method can accommodate a wide variety of sample types, including carbonates, bones, and teeth; silicate rocks and sediments; fresh and marine waters; and biological samples such as blood and urine. Protocols for these isotopic analyses are being developed for use on the new prepFAST-MCTM system from Elemental Scientific (ESI). The system is highly adaptable and processes up to 24-60 samples per day by reusing a single chromatographic column. Efficient column cleaning between samples and an all Teflon flow path ensures that sample carryover is maintained at the level of background laboratory blanks typical for manual drip chromatography. This method is part of a family of new fully-automated chromatographic methods being developed to address many different isotopic systems including B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb, and U. These methods are designed to be rugged and transferrable, and to allow the preparation of large, diverse sample sets via a highly repeatable process with minimal effort.

  11. High-performance liquid chromatographic strategies for the determination and confirmation of anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Hunter, K

    1985-03-15

    A comprehensive approach to the analysis of anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissues based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed. Residues of warfarin, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, diphacinone and chlorophacinone were extracted with chloroformacetone (1:1, v/v). Extracts were cleaned-up by an integrated gel permeation and adsorption chromatographic procedure which divided the rodenticides into two groups. Residues were then determined and confirmed using normal-phase, ion-pair and weak ion-exchange HPLC techniques. Ion-pair gradient separation resolved all seven rodenticides in a single chromatographic analysis. UV detection methods were employed for all seven rodenticides. Use of a diode array detection system permitted additional confirmation of residues down to 0.1 mg kg-1 by matching UV spectra and derivatives of spectra. Sensitive fluorescence detection was possible for the coumarin-based rodenticides but not for diphacinone and chlorophacinone. Post-column pH-switching fluorescence detection methods were shown to be superior to other methods of fluorescence detection of coumarin-based rodenticides. Recoveries from spiked liver tissue were around 90% at levels from 0.05 to 1 mg kg-1. Detection limits of around 0.002 mg kg-1 for most rodenticides and of 0.01 mg kg-1 for warfarin could be achieved with animal tissue extracts. PMID:3988841

  12. Chromatographic resolution of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (sartans).

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad Saqlain; Adnan, Ahmad; Syed, Quratulain

    2016-08-01

    First time a simple, sensitive and unified quantification method has been developed to analyze the complete class of angiotensin II receptor antagonists which are used in the treatment of hypertension either alone or in combination with some other drugs. The most important advantage of developed method was that the eight separate drugs can be determined on a single chromatographic system without modifications in detection wavelength and mobile phase. The drugs were separated on a Purospher Star 4.6mm×25cm, 5μm, C18 column maintained at 40°C with 1mLmin(-1) flow rate using ultra violet detection at 254nm. Good separation (Rs>2.0) was achieved in a short analysis allowing simultaneous determination of all eight sartans. The effect of variation in flow rate, detection wavelength and column oven temperature was also studied. The proposed method was statistically validated in terms of precision, accuracy, linearity, specificity and robustness. The newly developed method proved to be specific, robust and accurate for the quantification of eight sartans in commercial pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27258943

  13. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions.

    PubMed

    Andrawes, F; Holzer, G; Roedder, E; Gibson, E K; Oro, J

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These conclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusion on a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crushing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the processes involved in the history of the samples analyzed. PMID:11541990

  14. Chromatographic method for determining fouling tendency of liquid hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1988-06-21

    A method is described for determining the tendency of a liquid hydrocarbon stream to foul equipment comprising the steps of: (a) depositing a sample of liquid hydrocarbon from a liquid hydrocarbon stream onto a surface of a thin film in the presence of an asphaltene antisolvent, wherein the thin film is made up of a chromatographic separation material; (b) letting the sample of liquid hydrocarbon migrate radially outward within the film for sufficient time so that hydrocarbon compatible fractions in the sample separate from any hydrocarbon-incompatible asphaltenes in the sample, wherein the hydrocarbon compatible fractions form a matrix portion in the film and any hydrocarbon-incompatible asphaltenes form a dark ring within the matrix portion and wherein any ring formed is disposed within a central region of the matrix portion and is distinguished from the matrix portion by a dark area having a boundary with respect to a lighter area; and (c) determining the tendency of the liquid hydrocarbon stream to fuel equipment by comparing the matrix portion with any dark ring formed from any hydrocarbon-incompatible asphaltenes in the sample, wherein the area and intensity of any ring formed in relation to the matrix portion provides an indication of the tendency of the liquid hydrocarbon stream to foul equipment.

  15. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  16. Continuous stationary phase gradients for planar chromatographic media.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Balamurali; Marin, Michael A; Shrestha, Kushal; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2011-12-30

    A simple, elegant method for the formation of a continuous stationary phase gradient for use in chromatographic separations is described. Its applicability to separation science is demonstrated using thin-layer chromatography as a test case. Gradient stationary phases were formed on activated High Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography (HP-TLC) plates using a newly developed methodology termed "controlled rate infusion". Specifically, the SiOH groups on the activated HP-TLC plates were reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTEOS) in a time dependent fashion by using a programmable syringe pump to control the rate of APTEOS infusion into the deposition reservoir. The shape (profile) of the gradient was controlled by the rate of infusion and imaged by taking advantage of the concentration-dependent color formation reaction between amine groups and ninhydrin. The advantages of such gradients in optimizing the retention and separation of various components in different mixtures were illustrated using mixtures of (1) four weak acids and bases and (2) three widely used over-the-counter drugs. The separation of the individual components on the gradient stationary phase was clearly improved relative to those on either traditional normal-phase TLC plates or uniformly amine-modified TLC plates. Precise control over component retention and separation was also demonstrated by strategically modifying the steepness of the gradient. PMID:22119610

  17. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  18. Improved chromatographic fingerprints for facile differentiation of two Ganoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chun-Mei; Lu, Guang-Hua; Schmitz, Oliver J; Li, Zhang-Wan; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2009-03-01

    This paper addresses a comprehensive and comparative study of six phytochemical extraction methods for triterpenes from the fruiting body of Ganoderma spp. Quantitative analysis of extracts was performed by HPLC with photodiode array detection. In general, pressurized liquid extraction and microwave-assisted extraction under optimized conditions produce better yields, and the former also significantly reduces the total time of extraction and manipulation of a sample, as well as the amount of solvent used in comparison with conventional soxhlet, reflux, ultrasonic, and methanol-CO(2) supercritical fluid extractions. Based on the improved extraction protocol, the fingerprinting profiles for two species of Lingzhi were established using the consistent chromatographic features of 12 authentic samples. Eleven common peaks of ganoderic/ganoderenic acids were identified using LC-ESI-MS-MS. These specific triterpene groups were adopted as chemical markers for Lingzhi. Using chemometric analysis, the developed fingerprinting was successfully applied to differentiate between the two species under the Ganoderma genus and is applicable as a method for quality evaluation of this valuable medicinal fungus and its related proprietary products. PMID:18942087

  19. Authenticity analysis of pear juice employing chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Low, Nicholas H

    2014-12-01

    Pear juice is predominately composed of carbohydrates/polyols (>95% of the total soluble solids), making it susceptible to adulteration by the addition of less expensive commercial sweeteners. In this research, the major carbohydrate and polyol (fructose, glucose, sucrose, and sorbitol) content of 32 pure pear juices representing five world producing regions and three years of production was determined. Additionally, methods employing oligosaccharide profiling to detect the debasing of these samples with four commercial sweeteners (HFCS 55 and 90, TIS, and HIS) were developed using capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (CGC-FID) and high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). Detection limits for the four commercial sweeteners ranged from 0.5 to 5.0% (v/v). In addition, the developed CGC-FID method could be used to (a) detect the addition of pear to apple juice via arbutin detection and (b) determine if a pear juice was produced using enzymatic liquefaction via the presence of O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranose (cellobiose), all within a single chromatographic analysis. PMID:25384245

  20. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatographic analysis of poloxamers.

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Sanghoon; Chang, Taihyun

    2016-04-15

    Poloxamers are low molar mass triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), having number of applications as non-ionic surfactants. Comprehensive one and two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) analysis of these materials is proposed in this study. The separation of oligomers of both types (PEO and PPO) is demonstrated for several commercial poloxamers. This is accomplished at the critical conditions for one of the block while interaction for the other block. Reversed phase LC at CAP of PEO allowed for oligomeric separation of triblock copolymers with regard to PPO block whereas normal phase LC at CAP of PPO renders oligomeric separation with respect to PEO block. The oligomeric separation with regard to PEO and PPO are coupled online (comprehensive 2D-LC) to reveal two-dimensional contour plots by unconventional 2D IC×IC (interaction chromatography) coupling. The study provides chemical composition mapping of both PEO and PPO, equivalent to combined molar mass and chemical composition mapping for several commercial poloxamers. PMID:26994923

  1. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K., Jr.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  2. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  3. Characterization of a Multiple Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography Column and Identification of Endogenously Expressed Receptors in Astrocytoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kitabatake, T.; Moaddel, R.; Cole, R.; Gandhari, M.; Frazier, C.; Hartenstein, J.; Rosenberg, A.; Bernier, M.; Wainer, I. W.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes obtained from the 1321N1 and A172 astrocytoma cell lines were immobilized on a chromatographic phase to create cellular membrane affinity chromatography (CMAC) columns, CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172). The columns were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography with [3H]-epibatidine as the marker ligand and epibatidine, nicotine, and methyllycaconitine as the displacers. The results indicated that the columns contained homomeric α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (αxβy nAChRs), which was confirmed by the addition of subtype-specific inhibitors, κ-bungarotoxin (α7 nAChR) and K-bungarotoxin (αxβy nAChR) to the mobile phase. The presence of two additional ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA), was established using frontal affinity chromatography with flunitrazepam and diazepam (GABAA receptor) and MK-801 and NMDA (NMDA receptor). The presence of the four LGICs was confirmed using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172) columns contain four independently functioning LGICs, that the columns can be used to characterize binding affinities of small molecules to each of the receptors, and that the CMAC approach can be used to probe the expression of endogenous membrane receptors. PMID:18847217

  4. Characterization of a multiple ligand-gated ion channel cellular membrane affinity chromatography column and identification of endogenously expressed receptors in astrocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kitabatake, T; Moaddel, R; Cole, R; Gandhari, M; Frazier, C; Hartenstein, J; Rosenberg, A; Bernier, M; Wainer, I W

    2008-11-15

    Cellular membranes obtained from the 1321N1 and A172 astrocytoma cell lines were immobilized on a chromatographic phase to create cellular membrane affinity chromatography (CMAC) columns, CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172). The columns were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography with [(3)H]-epibatidine as the marker ligand and epibatidine, nicotine, and methyllycaconitine as the displacers. The results indicated that the columns contained homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR) and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha(x)beta(y) nAChRs), which was confirmed by the addition of subtype-specific inhibitors, alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha7 nAChR) and kappa-bungarotoxin (alpha(x)beta(y) nAChR) to the mobile phase. The presence of two additional ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), was established using frontal affinity chromatography with flunitrazepam and diazepam (GABA(A) receptor) and MK-801 and NMDA (NMDA receptor). The presence of the four LGICs was confirmed using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172) columns contain four independently functioning LGICs, that the columns can be used to characterize binding affinities of small molecules to each of the receptors, and that the CMAC approach can be used to probe the expression of endogenous membrane receptors. PMID:18847217

  5. Predicting Adsorption Affinities of Small Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Chen, Ran; Poblete, Horacio; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-12-22

    Computational techniques have the potential to accelerate the design and optimization of nanomaterials for applications such as drug delivery and contaminant removal; however, the success of such techniques requires reliable models of nanomaterial surfaces as well as accurate descriptions of their interactions with relevant solutes. In the present work, we evaluate the ability of selected models of naked and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes to predict adsorption equilibrium constants for about 30 small aromatic compounds with a variety of functional groups. The equilibrium constants determined using molecular dynamics coupled with free-energy calculation techniques are directly compared to those derived from experimental measurements. The calculations are highly predictive of the relative adsorption affinities of the compounds, with excellent correlation (r ≥ 0.9) between calculated and measured values of the logarithm of the adsorption equilibrium constant. Moreover, the agreement in absolute terms is also reasonable, with average errors of less than one decade. We also explore possible effects of surface loading, although we demonstrate that they are negligible for the experimental conditions considered. Given the degree of reliability demonstrated, we move on to employing the in silico techniques in the design of nanomaterials, using the optimization of adsorption affinity for the herbacide atrazine as an example. Our simulations suggest that, compared to other modifications of graphenic carbon, polyvinylpyrrolidone conjugation gives the highest affinity for atrazine-substantially greater than that of graphenic carbon alone-and may be useful as a nanomaterial for delivery or sequestration of atrazine. PMID:26506132

  6. A high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of major phenolic compounds in tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, C.H.; Cash, S.L. )

    1990-05-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is developed that simultaneously quantifies the dihydroxy compounds hydroquinone, resorcinol, and catechol and the monohydroxy compounds phenol, m + p-cresol and o-cresol in cigarette smoke. Particulate matter samples collected on Cambridge pads and in impingers by conventional trapping techniques are simply (no derivatization required) subjected to reversed-phase gradient liquid chromatography. Samples of both mainstream and sidestream smoke can be analyzed. Selective fluorescence detection is used to monitor the mobile phase effluent, by which these phenolic compounds are detected in the nanogram range. The detector response is linear, overall precision is good, and recoveries are greater than 95 percent. The total run time, excluding extraction, is one hour. The procedure has been applied to tobacco products whose smoke contains varying amounts of these phenols. Kentucky Reference Cigarette 1R4F was found to contain substantially more of these compounds than a new cigarette that heats but does not burn tobacco (New Cigarette). The method is compared with other procedures used to determine phenolics in cigarette smoke.

  7. Chromatographic purification of equine immunoglobulin G F(ab)2 from plasma.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Aldon; Kaundinya, John Oswald; Daftary, Gautam; Saxena, Lalit; Banerjee, Subhasis; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2008-12-01

    The antibody fragments generated from hyperimmune equine IgG is widely used as anti-snake venom, anti-scorpion venom, anti-diphtheria, anti-tetanus, anti-gangrene and anti-rabies agents. Antibody fragments, F(ab)(2), because of their specificity and absence of undesired reactivity are preferred over complete IgG. This paper discusses a novel purification technique for chromatographic purification of anti-rabies immunoglobulin G (IgG) fragment F(ab)(2) from horse serum. F(ab)(2) was purified by two successive chromatography steps using Cellufine A-200 and ProSep-vA Ultra media. The purified F(ab)(2) was characterized using biochemical and biophysical methods and shown to be pure and homogeneous. The purified F(ab)(2) was reactive to rabies antigen in immuno-electrophoresis and diffusion tests. The purified F(ab)(2) was biologically functional and was found to show a potency of 1500 IU ml(-1). Comparative analysis of the purity with commercially available F(ab)(2) by HPLC analysis and SDS-PAGE indicated that the present product is better in purity. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing evidence on purification of equine antibody fragment using controlled pore glass based protein A chromatography media. PMID:19008160

  8. Oral intake of a toluene-containing thinner. Effects and headspace gas chromatographic analytical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zahlsen, K; Rygnestad, T; Nilsen, O G

    1985-01-01

    After an accidental oral intake of a paint thinner, the constituents were identified in stomach content using headspace gas chromatography. The composition indicated ingestion of a commonly used thinner containing 60-70% toluene, 20-25% n-butylacetate and 10-15% of ethanol. A toluene concentration of 22.0 mg/kg was measured in serum in contrast to n-butylacetate which was not detected. Ethanol concentration was 1.85 g/kg, most of this was due to ethanol ingestion before the intake of thinner. The half life of toluene in serum was 8.5 h initially, which increased to 14 h after 19 h. An effect on liver function was demonstrated by increased activity of serum transaminases. Compared with the upper normal limits ASAT and ALAT were increased by 6 and 2.5 times, respectively. For both parameters the highest activity was seen 40 hours after admission and normal levels were achieved after 7 days. It is concluded that toluene is readily absorbed by ingestion of toluene-containing thinners, and that the function of the human liver is transiently affected. For screening purposes gas chromatography proved to be a useful method for the analytical diagnosis in cases of organic solvent intoxication. The use of the headspace technique further improved the speed of analysis and eliminated contamination of the gas chromatographic system. PMID:3868371

  9. Headspace gas chromatographic determination of methylene chloride in decaffeinated tea and coffee, with electrolytic conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1984-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic procedure is described for the determination of methylene chloride (MC) in decaffeinated tea and coffee. The tea or coffee sample, with added methylene bromide (MB) internal standard, is equilibrated for 1.5 h at 100 degrees C in aqueous sodium sulfate before manual headspace sampling. MC and MB are separated on a Porasil A column at 160 degrees C and detected by using a Coulson electrolytic conductivity detector. For coffee and tea samples spiked at 1.3 ppm MC, as well as commercially decaffeinated teas and coffees containing up to 8 ppm MC, coefficients of variation were 10% or less. For decaffeinated teas, problems involving sample homogeneity and loss of MC before sealing the headspace vial had to be overcome. Similar problems with decaffeinated instant and ground coffees were minimal. The headspace procedure was superior to a previously reported distillation technique. MC was readily detected at 0.05 ppm. Fourteen decaffeinated teas and 15 decaffeinated coffees were analyzed; MC was detected at levels that ranged up to 15.9 and 4.0 ppm, respectively. PMID:6469909

  10. Evaluation of two different extraction methods for chromatographic determination of bioactive amines in tomato products.

    PubMed

    Chiacchierini, E; Restuccia, D; Vinci, G

    2006-05-15

    Bioactive amines are organic bases originating from corresponding amino acid which have undergone decarboxylation by putrefactive bacteria or lactic acid bacteria. When formed by microbial enzymatic decarboxylation of amino acids, they are called " biogenic" and can produce detrimental effects on human health. Many techniques have been developed for extraction and/or clean up of bioactive amines in food, including acidic or organic extraction as well as solid phase extraction. This study deals with the comparison of two different extraction methods, homogenizing and matrix solid phase dispersion, for the chromatographic determination of eight non-volatile bioactive amines in tomato-based products (mashed tomato, biological mashed tomato, concentrated tomato pasta and ketchup) very popular in Italian alimentary habits. In both cases, perchloric acid has been used for analytes extraction and the influence of different parameters affecting amine recoveries have been evaluated. After a derivatization step with dansyl-chloride, samples were analyzed for amines quantitative determination using 1,7-diaminoheptane as internal standard on a C(18)-RP-HPLC-UV system. Method performances were tested and good results of linearity, repeatability and recovery were obtained for all the considered amines. The collected data have shown that ketchup contains the highest levels of amines followed by concentrated tomato pasta, biological mashed tomato and common mashed tomato. Moreover, it has been found that in all samples, putrescine is the most abundant amine followed by tyramine, spermidine and tryptamine. PMID:18970603

  11. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  12. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  13. Affinities of the Swartkrans early Homo mandibles.

    PubMed

    Curnoe, Darren

    2008-01-01

    The southern African early Homo assemblage continues to make important contributions to understanding the systematics, adaptations and evolutionary history of the human genus. However, the taxonomy of this sample is in a state of flux. This study examines the size and shape of the mandibular bodies of Swartkrans SK 15 and SK 45 comparing them with variation in two early Homo taxa (H. habilis sensu lato and H. sapiens erectus). The research aims to clarify their phenetic affinities and systematics through univariate statistics, inferential testing and multivariate analysis employing size (Log-transformed) and shape (Mosimann variables). Neither of them strongly resembles H. habilis sensu lato or H. sapiens erectus, rather, they probably sample a novel species of Homo not seen in East Africa. Moreover, there is considerable morphological variability within the Swartkrans sample and the possibility of more than one novel species being sampled at this site cannot be excluded. PMID:18402959

  14. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  15. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  16. Gas chromatographic determination of the interconversion energy barrier for dialkyl 2,3-pentadienedioate enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Mydlová, J; Krupcík, J; Májek, P; Skacáni, I; Jakubík, T; Sandra, P; Armstrong, D W

    2007-05-25

    The enantiomers of dialkyl 2,3-pentadienedioate undergo interconversion during gas chromatographic separation on chiral stationary phases. In this paper the on-column apparent interconversion kinetic and thermodynamic activation data were determined for dimethyl, diethyl, propylbutyl and dibutyl 2,3-pentadienedioate enantiomers by gas chromatographic separation of the racemic mixtures on a capillary column containing a polydimethylsiloxane stationary phase coupled to 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-tertbutyldimethylsilyl-beta-cyclodextrin. A deconvolution method was used to determine the individual enantiomer peak areas and retention times that are needed to calculate the interconversion rate constants and the energy barriers. The apparent rate constants and interconversion energy barriers decrease slightly with an increase in the alkyl chain length of the dialkyl 2,3-pentadienedioate esters. The optimum conformation of the dialkyl 2,3-pentadienedioate molecules, their separation selectivity factors and apparent interconversion enthalpy and entropy data changes with the alkyl chain length. The dependence of the apparent interconversion energy barrier (deltaG(app)(a-->b), deltaG(app)(b-->a)) on temperature was used to determine the apparent activation enthalpy (deltaH(app)(a-->b), deltaH(app)(b-->a)) and apparent entropy (deltaS(app)(a-->b), deltaS(app)(a-->b)) (where a denotes the first and b second eluted enantiomer). The comparison of the activation enthalpy and entropy (deltaS(app)(a-->b), deltaS(app)(a-->b)) indicated that the interconversion of dialkyl 2,3-pentadienedioate enantiomers on the HP-5+Chiraldex B-DM column series is an entropy driven process at 160 degrees C. Data obtained for dimethyl 2,3-pentadienedioate enantiomers on the HP-5+Chiraldex B-DM column series at 120 degrees C (deltaG(app)(a-->b) = 123.3 and deltaG(app)(b-->a) = 124.4 kJ mol(-1)) corresponds (at the 95% confidence interval) with the value of deltaG(#) = 128+/-1 kJ mol(-1) found at this

  17. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  18. Nylon-Based Affinity Membranes: Impacts of Surface Modification on Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Beeskow; Kroner; Anspach

    1997-12-15

    Nylon microfiltration membranes were activated with bisoxirane and formaldehyde at terminal amino groups and amide groups of the nylon polymer, respectively. Dextrans were covalently immobilized on these activated membranes to yield dextran-coated membrane matrices. Both procedures led to a significant reduction of hemoglobin adsorption; however, bisoxirane activation required additional cross-linking of dextran and a second dextran layer to yield comparable quality of dextran-coated membranes than formaldehyde activation. Formaldehyde activation was easiest and cheapest and resulted in membranes with highest dextran density and relatively lowest nonspecific hemoglobin adsorption. Dextrans of &Mmacr;w >/= 40,000 were required for bisoxirane-activated membranes, whereas dextrans of &Mmacr;w = 6000 were sufficient for formaldehyde-activated membranes. Both activation methods resulted in stable coatings at low and high pH; however, formaldehyde-activated membranes were unstable under strongly acidic conditions at pH < 3. Dextran coils were found responsible for the reduction of the hydraulic permeability but also for the high ligand densities obtained after immobilization of Cibacron Blue F3G-A (360 nmol/cm2) and iminodiacetic acid (400 nmol/cm2). The thermodynamics of protein adsorption on dye ligand affinity (DLA) membranes corresponded with chromatographic sorbents and dye ligand conjugates, with the dextran coating demonstrating similar structure than dextrans in solution. Protein adsorption took place in the extended coil structure of dextrans with binding capacities up to 730 µg/cm2 lysozyme on DLA membranes and 470 µg/cm2 concanavalin A on metal chelate affinity membranes. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. PMID:9792753

  19. Affinity capture of (Arg sup 8 )vasopressin-receptor complex using immobilized antisense peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xian Lu; Aiyar, N.; Chaiken, I. )

    1991-05-01

    Solubilized noncovalent complexes of (Arg{sup 8})-vasopressin (AVP) with receptor proteins from rat liver membranes were isolated by selective binding to silica-immobilized antisense (AS) peptide. The affinity chromatographic support was prepared with a chemically synthesized AS peptide whose sequence is encoded by the AS DNA corresponding to the 20 amino-terminal residues of the AVP bovine neurophysin II biosynthetic precursor (pro-AVP/BNPII-(20-1)), region that includes the AVP sequence at residues 1-9. The AS peptide-AVP interaction mechanism hypothesized, contact by hydropathic complementarity at multiple sites along the peptide chains, led to the prediction that AVP bound to its receptor would still have enough free surface to interact with immobilized AS peptide. To test this prediction of a three-way interaction, ({sup 3}H)AVP-receptor was obtained as a solubilized, partially purified fraction from rat liver membrane. Covalently crosslinked ({sup 3}H)AVP complex also was bound to the AS peptide column; binding was blocked by competition with unlabeled AVP in the elution buffer. Since the AVP-linked 31- and 38-kDa proteins have the same apparent molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as found previously by photoaffinity labeling, the authors conclude that the AS peptide column has affinity-captured AVP-receptor complexes. The 15-kDa protein appears to be an active AVP-receptor fragment of one or both of the larger proteins. It is generally concluded that immobilized AS peptides may be useful to isolate peptide and protein receptor complexes in other systems as well.

  20. In vitro affinity maturation of a natural human antibody overcomes a barrier to in vivo affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Fouts, Ashley E; Stengel, Katharina; Luan, Peng; Dillon, Michael; Liang, Wei-Ching; Feierbach, Becket; Kelley, Robert F; Hötzel, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies isolated from human donors are increasingly being developed for anti-infective therapeutics. These antibodies undergo affinity maturation in vivo, minimizing the need for engineering of therapeutic leads for affinity. However, the affinities required for some therapeutic applications may be higher than the affinities of the leads obtained, requiring further affinity maturation in vitro. To improve the neutralization potency of natural human antibody MSL-109 targeting human cytomegalovirus (CMV), we affinity matured the antibody against the gH/gL glycoprotein complex. A phage display library where most of the six complementary-determining regions (CDRs) were allowed to vary in only one amino acid residue at a time was used to scan for mutations that improve binding affinity. A T55R mutation and multiple mutations in position 53 of the heavy chain were identified that, when present individually or in combination, resulted in higher apparent affinities to gH/gL and improved CMV neutralization potency of Fab fragments expressed in bacterial cells. Three of these mutations in position 53 introduced glycosylation sites in heavy chain CDR 2 (CDR H2) that impaired binding of antibodies expressed in mammalian cells. One high affinity (KD < 10 pM) variant was identified that combined the D53N and T55R mutations while avoiding glycosylation of CDR H2. However, all the amino acid substitutions identified by phage display that improved binding affinity without introducing glycosylation sites required between two and four simultaneous nucleotide mutations to avoid glycosylation. These results indicate that the natural human antibody MSL-109 is close to a local affinity optimum. We show that affinity maturation by phage display can be used to identify and bypass barriers to in vivo affinity maturation of antibodies imposed by glycosylation and codon usage. These constraints may be relatively prevalent in human antibodies due to the codon usage and the amino acid

  1. Prediction of Neutral Salt Elution Profiles for Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1981-04-01

    Neutral salts exhibit very marked differences as eluants of proteins from affinity columns. We observe: (i) that the relative potencies of neutral salts as eluants are independent of the protein or the affinity ligand in the systems studied, (ii) that the absolute salt concentration necessary to elute any given protein bound to the affinity matrix is proportional to the algebraic sum of a set of elution coefficients defined herein for the separate ions present in the solution, and (iii) that the proportionality between elution potency and elution coefficient is a function of the affinity of the protein for the immobilized ligand. Given the concentration of one neutral salt required for elution of a protein of interest from an affinity column, the elution capability of any neutral salt at any temperature can be quantitatively predicted for that protein. Accordingly, application and elution protocols for affinity chromatography can be designed to optimize the yield and fold purification of proteins.

  2. Miniaturized gas chromatograph-Paul ion trap system: applications to environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph (GC) and miniature Paul ion trap (PT) mass spectrometer system has been developed for identifying and quantifying chemical species present in closed environments having a complex mixture of gases.

  3. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  4. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  5. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  6. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  9. GAS CHROMATOGRAPH-BASED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING THE METHANE FRACTION OF DIESEL ENGINE HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An instrument has been developed (termed the 'methane analytical system') enabling diesel methane emissions to be quatified separately from total unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The instrument employed gas chromatographic principles whereby a molecular sieve column operating isot...

  10. Determination of Sinomenine in Cubosome Nanoparticles by HPLC Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanfang; Guo, Chunlian; Chen, Hongying; Zhang, Yudai; Peng, Xinsheng; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We applied HPLC technique to quantitatively analyze sinomenine in cubosome nanoparticles. The chromatographic method was performed by using an isocratic system. The mobile phase was composed of methanol-PBS(pH6.8)-triethylamine (50 : 50 : 0.1%) with a flow rate of 1 mL/min; the detection wavelength was at 265 nm. Sinomenine can be successfully separated with good linearity (the regression equation is A = 10835C + 1058; R2 = 1.0) and perfect recovery (102.2%). The chromatograph technique was proper for quality control of sinomenine in cubosome nanoparticles. PMID:25734024

  11. Affine Vertex Operator Algebras and Modular Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arike, Yusuke; Kaneko, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we list all affine vertex operator algebras of positive integral levels whose dimensions of spaces of characters are at most 5 and show that a basis of the space of characters of each affine vertex operator algebra in the list gives a fundamental system of solutions of a modular linear differential equation. Further, we determine the dimensions of the spaces of characters of affine vertex operator algebras whose numbers of inequivalent simple modules are not exceeding 20.

  12. Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147

    DOEpatents

    Boll, Rose A [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-14

    A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

  13. High-resolution gas chromatographic profiles of volatile organic compounds produced by microorganisms at refrigerated temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M L; Smith, D L; Freeman, L R

    1979-01-01

    Three different strains of bacteria isolated from spoiled, uncooked chicken were grown in pure culture on Trypticase soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. The volatile organic compounds produced by each culture were concentrated on a porous polymer precolumn and analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. Twenty different compounds were identified. Both qualitative and quantitative differences in the chromatographic profiles from each culture were found. PMID:104660

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance approaches to the rationalization of chromatographic enantiorecognition processes.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Vanni, Letizia; Balzano, Federica

    2010-02-12

    NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for obtaining information about structure and dynamics at a molecular level on the diastereoisomeric complexes formed by enantiomeric substrates and chromatographic chiral selectors or modifiers. Some examples collected from the literature show the potentialities of solution NMR spectroscopy in the rationalization of chromatographic enantiorecognition processes and the different NMR approaches needed according to the chiral selector features. PMID:19926092

  15. New Method for Evaluating Irreversible Adsorption and Stationary Phase Bleed in Gas Chromatographic Capillary Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Bob W.; Wright, Cherylyn W.

    2012-10-26

    A novel method for the evaluation of gas chromatographic (GC) column inertness has been developed using a tandem GC approach. Typically column inertness is measured by analyte peak shape evaluation. In general, silica, glass, and metal surfaces are chemically reactive and can cause analyte adsorption, which typically is observed as chromatographic peak tailing. Adsorption processes produce broad, short chromatographic peaks that confound peak area determinations because a significant portion can reside in the noise. In addition, chromatographic surfaces and stationary phases can irreversibly adsorb certain analytes without obvious degradation of peak shape. The inertness measurements described in this work specifically determine the degree of irreversible adsorption behavior of specific target compounds at levels ranging from approximately 50 picograms to 1 nanogram on selected gas chromatographic columns. Chromatographic columns with 5% phenylmethylsiloxane, polyethylene glycol (wax), trifluoropropylsiloxane, and 78% cyanopropylsiloxane stationary phases were evaluated with a variety of phosphorus- and sulfur- containing compounds selected as test compounds due to their ease of adsorption and importance in trace analytical detection. In addition, the method was shown effective for characterizing column bleed.

  16. Column-switching techniques in the biomedical analysis of stereoisomeric drugs: why, how and when.

    PubMed

    Fried, K; Wainer, I W

    1997-02-01

    The application of stereoselective chromatographic techniques to bioanalytical problems has become a routine procedure. However, this approach is not always straightforward; particularly when the separation involves chromatographic chiral stationary phases. Matrix interferences and more importantly, overlapping metabolite peaks often make direct analysis impractical. One strategy to overcome these problems is to combine two or more columns with different selectivities to produce a multi-dimensional chromatographic system. This review addresses the use of coupled column chromatography in HPLC systems including different coupling methods and the application of the resulting arrangements to bioanalytical analyses. PMID:9061485

  17. Dynamic affinity chromatography in the separation of sulfated lignins binding to thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Aiye; Thakkar, Jay N.; Hindle, Michael; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs), a mixture of chemo-enzymatically prepared oligomers, have been found to be potent antagonists of coagulation. However, structures that induce anticoagulation remain unidentified. The highly polar sulfate groups on these molecules and the thousands of different structures present in these mixtures make traditional chromatographic resolution of sulfated LMWLs difficult. We performed dynamic thrombin affinity chromatography monitored using chromogenic substrate hydrolysis assay to isolate sulfated LMWL fractions that differed significantly in their biophysical and biochemical properties. Three fractions, I35, I55 and Peak II, were isolated from the starting complex mixture. Independent plasma clotting assays suggested that I35 possessed good anticoagulation potential (APTT = 4.2 μM; PT = 6.8 μM), while I55 and Peak II were approximately 10- and 100-fold less potent. The ESI-MS spectrum of this oligomeric fraction showed multiple peaks at 684.8, 610.6, 557.4, 541.4, 536.5, and 519.4 m/z, which most probably arise from variably functionalized (β-O4—β-β-linked trimers and/or a β-O4—β-O4-linked dimers. The first direct observation of these structures in sulfated LMWLs will greatly assist in the discovery of more potent sulfated LMWL-based anticoagulants. PMID:23122400

  18. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  19. A rapid chromatographic strip test for the pen-side diagnosis of rinderpest virus.

    PubMed

    Brüning, A; Bellamy, K; Talbot, D; Anderson, J

    1999-08-01

    Rinderpest is a contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed domestic and wild animals. Eradication of the virus following outbreaks depends on rapid and accurate diagnosis of infection and the implementation of control measures. Reporting and confirmatory diagnosis precede the implementation of control measures. A number of techniques have been used for diagnosis such as agar gel immunodiffusion, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), molecular biological techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and virus isolation in tissue culture. Many of these methods are both time consuming and require skilled personnel. The development of a rapid pen-side test for the detection of rinderpest virus (RPV) antigen in lachrymal fluid of cattle is described using the Clearview chromatographic strip test technology (Unipath, Bedford). Optimum conditions for binding monoclonal antibody to nitrocellulose and latex microspheres were determined and a prototype device was developed. The device detected viral antigen in lachrymal fluids from experimentally and naturally infected cattle and showed no cross-reactivity with other related viruses. A field trial was carried out at the Landhi Cattle Colony (LCC), Pakistan, to assess the performance of the rinderpest test under field conditions. Ninety-seven animals, some of which were showing various clinical signs, at LCC and neighbouring colonies were sampled and tested at the pen-side by Clearview and later by immunocapture ELISA (IC-ELISA) at IAH, Pirbright. Nineteen animals were positive by Clearview and/or IC-ELISA. Seventeen out of 19 rinderpest positive animals were positive by Clearview and 15 out of 19 were positive by IC-ELISA. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed the 19 animals to be rinderpest positive. This simple, rapid, specific test allows for the first time, accurate pen-side diagnosis of rinderpest. PMID:10488772

  20. [Preparation of an agglomerated ion chromatographic stationary phase with 2,3-ionene and its application in SO4(2-) analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Muhua; Liu, Junwei; Huang, Zhongping; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhu, Yan

    2015-07-01

    The poly-electrolyte cation functional group of 2,3-ionene was synthesized with tetramethyl ethylenediamine and 1,3-dibromopropane as the raw materials. Multiporous polystyrene-divinylbenzene microsphere particles (PS-DVB) were produced by swelling method with polystyrene as seeds and sulfonated. Then the 2,3-ionene was bonded on the sulfonated multi-porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene microsphere particles by agglomeration to get the agglomerative ion-exchange stationary phase. After optimizing the synthetic conditions, the new stationary phase was characterized by the techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis. The chromatographic column was packed by slurry method and applied in the analysis of SO4(2-) with a conductivity detector. SO4(2-) and other six common anions including F-, Cl-, NO2(-), Br-, NO3(-), PO4(3-), were separated and analyzed rapidly on the self-regulating chromatographic column within 8 min. The linear range was from 0.5 to 50 mg/L with correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9992. The LOD was 0.04 mg/L with S/N of 3. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) were 2.4% and 3.1% for the peak area and retention time, respectively. The recoveries were between 99.2% and 101.8%. The retention times of SO4(2-) did not change significantly after long time use of the self-regulating chromatographic column. The self-regulating chromatographic column is suitable for the detection of SO4(2-) in complex matrix samples. PMID:26672194