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Sample records for affinity dissociation constant

  1. Inhibition of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors by antagonists: strategy to estimate the association and the dissociation rate constant of antagonists with very strong affinity to the receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Inoue, Y; Hori, K

    1992-10-01

    Since binding of an agonist to an ionotropic neurotransmitter receptor causes not only channel opening, but also desensitization of the receptor, inhibition of the receptor by the antagonist sometimes becomes very complicated. The transient state kinetics of ligand association and dissociation, and desensitization of the receptor were considered on the basis of the minimal model proposed by Hess' group, and the following possibilities were proposed. 1) When an agonist is simultaneously applied to the receptor with an antagonist whose affinity to the receptor is extremely strong and different from that of the agonist, it is usually impossible to estimate the real inhibition constant exactly from the responses because desensitization of the receptor proceeds before the equilibrium of the ligand binding. Simultaneous addition of the antagonist with strong affinity to the receptor may apparently accelerate inactivation (desensitization) of the receptor. The association rate constant of the antagonist can be estimated by analyses of the rate of the inactivation in the presence and the absence of the antagonist. 2) A preincubated antagonist with a slow dissociation rate constant, i.e., a very effective inhibitor, may cause apparent noncompetitive inhibition of the receptor, since the receptor is desensitized by an agonist as soon as the antagonist dissociates from the receptor and the dissociation of the antagonist from the receptor becomes the rate-determining step. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNA prepared from Electrophorus electricus electroplax and used for the experiments on inhibition by an antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1337082

  2. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  3. Kinetics of calcium dissociation from its high-affinity transport sites on sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, S; Champeil, P

    1991-01-15

    We investigated the kinetics of calcium dissociation from its high-affinity transport sites on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase by combining fast filtration with stopped-flow fluorescence measurements. At pH 6 and 20 degrees C, in the absence of potassium and in the presence of 20 mM MgCl2, isotopic exchange of bound calcium exhibited biphasic kinetics, with two phases of equal amplitude, regardless of the initial extent of binding site saturation. The rapidly exchangeable site, whose occupancy by calcium controlled the rate constant of the slow phase, had an apparent affinity for calcium of about 3-6 microM. A similar high affinity was also deduced from measurements of the calcium dependence of the rate constant for ATPase fluorescence changes. This affinity was higher than the overall affinity for calcium deduced from the equilibrium binding measurements (dissociation constant of 15-20 microM); this was consistent with the occurrence of cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 1.6-1.8). The drop in intrinsic fluorescence observed upon chelation of calcium was always slightly faster than the dissociation of calcium itself, although the rates for both this drop in fluorescence and calcium dissociation varied slightly from one preparation to the other. This fluorescence drop was therefore mainly due to dissociation of the bound ions, not to slow transconformation of the ATPase. Dissociation of the two bound calcium ions in a medium containing EGTA exhibited monophasic kinetics in the presence of a calcium ionophore, with a rate constant about half that of the fast phase of isotopic exchange. This particular pattern was observed over a wide range of experimental conditions, including the presence of KCl, dimethyl sulfoxide, 4-nonylphenol, or a nucleotide analogue, at pH 6 or 7, and at various temperatures. The kinetics of calcium dissociation under the above various conditions were not correlated with the ATPase affinity for calcium deduced from equilibrium

  4. Dissociation rate constant of the biotin-streptavidin complex.

    PubMed

    Piran, U; Riordan, W J

    1990-10-01

    We measured the dissociation rate constants of the biotin/streptavidin and biotin/egg avidin complexes by following the release of radiolabeled biotin from the preformed complexes in the presence of excess unlabeled biotin. For separation of bound and free labeled biotin we employed ultrafiltration with disposable microconcentrators. The dissociation rate constant for underivatized streptavidin was 2.4 x 10(-6) s-1, or approximately 30-fold higher than that observed for egg avidin 7.5 x 10(-8) s-1). The value for streptavidin was further increased after derivatization with an acridinium ester label. Both biotin binding proteins exhibited a faster initial phase, suggesting binding site heterogeneity due to partial subunit dissociation or denaturation. The convenience of the method and the relatively fast dissociation of biotin from streptavidin render the dissociation rate constant a practical experimental criterion for monitoring the integrity of the binding site during purification and derivatization procedures. PMID:2212686

  5. MEASUREMENT OF DRUG-PROTEIN DISSOCIATION RATES BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND PEAK PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Ohnmacht, Corey M.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The rate at which a drug or other small solute interacts with a protein is important in understanding the biological and pharmacokinetic behavior of these agents. One approach that has been developed for examining these rates involves the use of high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) and estimates of band-broadening through peak profiling. Previous work with this method has been based on a comparison of the statistical moments for a retained analyte versus non-retained species at a single, high flow rate to obtain information on stationary phase mass transfer. In this study an alternative approach was created that allows a broad range of flow rates to be used for examining solute-protein dissociation rates. Chromatographic theory was employed to derive equations that could be used with this approach on a single column, as well as with multiple columns to evaluate and correct for the impact of stagnant mobile phase mass transfer. The interaction of L-tryptophan with human serum albumin was used as a model system to test this method. A dissociation rate constant of 2.7 (± 0.2) s−1 was obtained by this approach at pH 7.4 and 37°C, which was in good agreement with previous values determined by other methods. The techniques described in this report can be applied to other biomolecular systems and should be valuable for the determination of drug-protein dissociation rates. PMID:19422253

  6. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  7. Determination of Acid Dissociation Constants (pKa) of Bicyclic Thiohydantoin-Pyrrolidine Compounds in 20% Ethanol-Water Hydroorganic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Nural, Yahya; Döndaş, H. Ali; Sarı, Hayati; Atabey, Hasan; Belveren, Samet; Gemili, Müge

    2014-01-01

    The acid dissociation constants of potential bioactive fused ring thiohydantoin-pyrrolidine compounds were determined by potentiometric titration in 20% (v/v) ethanol-water mixed at 25 ± 0.1°C, at an ionic background of 0.1 mol/L of NaCl using the HYPERQUAD computer program. Proton affinities of potential donor atoms of the ligands were calculated by AM1 and PM3 semiempiric methods. We found, potentiometrically, three different acid dissociation constants for 1a–f. We suggest that these acid dissociation constants are related to the carboxyl, enol, and amino groups. PMID:24799905

  8. NON-COMPETITIVE PEAK DECAY ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN DISSOCIATION BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The peak decay method is an affinity chromatographic technique that has been used to examine the dissociation of solutes from immobilized ligands in the presence of excess displacing agent. However, it can be difficult to find a displacing agent that does not interfere with detection of the eluting analyte. In this study, a non-competitive peak decay method was developed in which no displacing agent was required for analyte elution. This method was evaluated for the study of drug-protein interactions by using it along with high-performance affinity chromatography to measure the dissociation rate constants for R- and S-warfarin from columns containing immobilized human serum albumin (HSA). Several factors were considered in the optimization of this method, including the amount of applied analyte, the column size, and the flow rate. The dissociation rate constants for R- and S-warfarin from HSA were measured at several temperatures by this approach, giving values of 0.56 (± 0.01) and 0.66 (± 0.01) s−1 at pH 7.4 and 37°C. These results were in good agreement with previous values obtained by other methods. This approach is not limited to warfarin and HSA but could be employed in studying additional drug-protein interactions or other systems with weak-to-moderate binding. PMID:19472288

  9. Diffusion coefficients and dissociation constants of enhanced green fluorescent protein binding to free standing membranes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Franziska A; Visco, Ilaria; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Heinemann, Fabian; Schwille, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new and versatile assay to determine the partitioning coefficient [Formula: see text] as a measure for the affinity of peripheral membrane proteins for lipid bilayers was presented in the research article entitled, "Introducing a fluorescence-based standard to quantify protein partitioning into membranes" [1]. Here, the well-characterized binding of hexahistidine-tag (His6) to NTA(Ni) was utilized. Complementarily, this data article reports the average diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] of His6-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP-His6) and the fluorescent lipid analog ATTO-647N-DOPE in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing different amounts of NTA(Ni) lipids. In addition, dissociation constants [Formula: see text] of the NTA(Ni)/eGFP-His6 system are reported. Further, a conversion between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] is provided. PMID:26587560

  10. Dissociation constants of phosphoric acid in dimethylformamide-water mixtures at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, L. P.; Fadeeva, Yu. A.; Pryakhin, A. A.

    2009-10-01

    The dissociation constants of phosphoric acid (p K 1 and p K 2) in water-dimethylformamide (DMFA) mixtures (0-0.65 mole fractions of DMFA) were determined at 298.15 K by potentiometric titration. The extrapolation of these data to pure DMFA and the comparative calculation method were used to estimate the dissociation constants of the acid in DMFA.

  11. Determination of proton affinities and acidity constants of sugars.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuting; Bagia, Christina; Mpourmpakis, Giannis

    2013-06-20

    Proton transfer reactions play a key role in the conversion of biomass derived sugars to chemicals. In this study, we employ high level ab initio theoretical methods, in tandem with solvation effects to calculate the proton affinities (PA) and acidity constants (pKa) of various d-glucose and d-fructose tautomers (protonation-deprotonation processes). In addition, we compare the theoretically derived pH values of sugar solutions against experimentally measured pH values in our lab. Our results demonstrate that the protonation of any of the O atoms of the sugars is thermodynamically preferred without any significant variation in the PA values. Intramolecular hydrogen transfers, dehydration reactions, and ring-opening processes were observed, resulting from the protonation of specific hydroxyl groups on the sugars. Regarding the deprotonation processes (pKa), we found that the sugars' anomeric hydroxyls exhibit the highest acidity. The theoretically calculated pH values of sugar solutions are in excellent agreement with experimental pH measurements at low sugar concentrations. At higher sugar concentrations the calculations predict less acidic solutions than the experiments. In this case, we expect the sugars to act as solvents increasing the proton solvation energy and the acidity of the solutions. We demonstrated through linear relationships that the pKa values are correlated with the relative stability of the conjugate bases. The latter is related to hydrogen bonding and polarization of the C-O(-) bond. A plausible explanation for the good performance of the direct method in calculating the pKa values of sugars can be the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds on the conjugate base. Both theory and experiments manifest that fructose is a stronger acid than glucose, which is of significant importance in self-catalyzed biomass-relevant dehydration reactions. PMID:23706015

  12. Bayesian Estimation of the Active Concentration and Affinity Constants Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Kepler, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has previously been employed to measure the active concentration of analyte in addition to the kinetic rate constants in molecular binding reactions. Those approaches, however, have a few restrictions. In this work, a Bayesian approach is developed to determine both active concentration and affinity constants using SPR technology. With the appropriate prior probabilities on the parameters and a derived likelihood function, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is applied to compute the posterior probability densities of both the active concentration and kinetic rate constants based on the collected SPR data. Compared with previous approaches, ours exploits information from the duration of the process in its entirety, including both association and dissociation phases, under partial mass transport conditions; do not depend on calibration data; multiple injections of analyte at varying flow rates are not necessary. Finally the method is validated by analyzing both simulated and experimental datasets. A software package implementing our approach is developed with a user-friendly interface and made freely available. PMID:26098764

  13. Bayesian Estimation of the Active Concentration and Affinity Constants Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Feng; Kepler, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has previously been employed to measure the active concentration of analyte in addition to the kinetic rate constants in molecular binding reactions. Those approaches, however, have a few restrictions. In this work, a Bayesian approach is developed to determine both active concentration and affinity constants using SPR technology. With the appropriate prior probabilities on the parameters and a derived likelihood function, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is applied to compute the posterior probability densities of both the active concentration and kinetic rate constants based on the collected SPR data. Compared with previous approaches, ours exploits information from the duration of the process in its entirety, including both association and dissociation phases, under partial mass transport conditions; do not depend on calibration data; multiple injections of analyte at varying flow rates are not necessary. Finally the method is validated by analyzing both simulated and experimental datasets. A software package implementing our approach is developed with a user-friendly interface and made freely available. PMID:26098764

  14. Simulations of dissociation constants in low pressure supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, S. J.; An, P.; Zhang, S.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide in water from ambient to supercritical temperatures at a fixed pressure of 250 atm. Corrosion of reaction vessels is known to be a serious problem of supercritical water, and acid/base dissociation can be a significant contributing factor to this. The SPC/e model was used in conjunction with solute models determined from density functional calculations and OPLSAA Lennard-Jones parameters. Radial distribution functions were calculated, and these show a significant increase in solute-solvent ordering upon forming the product ions at all temperatures. For both dissociations, rapidly decreasing entropy of reaction was found to be the controlling thermodynamic factor, and this is thought to arise due to the ions produced from dissociation maintaining a relatively high density and ordered solvation shell compared to the reactants. The change in entropy of reaction reaches a minimum at the critical temperature. The values of pKa and pKb were calculated and both increased with temperature, in qualitative agreement with other work, until a maximum value at 748 K, after which there was a slight decrease.

  15. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  16. Direct measurement via phage titre of the dissociation constants in solution of fusion phage-substrate complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, M R; Germaschewski, V; Murray, K

    1995-01-01

    Studies of interactions between filamentous fusion phage particles and protein or nucleic acid molecules have gained increasing importance with recent successes of screening techniques based upon random phage display libraries (biopanning). Since a number of different phage are usually obtained by biopanning, it is useful to compare quantitatively the binding affinities of individual phage for the substrate used for selection. A procedure is described for determination of relative dissociation constants (KdRel) between filamentous phage carrying peptide fusions to the coat protein gpIII and substrates in solution. This novel method is based on the measurement of phage titres. Phage selected from a random fusion phage library for binding to a monoclonal antibody or a viral structural protein exhibited KdRel values in the nanomolar and micromolar ranges for their respective substrates, thus validating the method over a wide range of binding affinities. PMID:7784206

  17. Dynamic titration: determination of dissociation constants for noncovalent complexes in multiplexed format using HPLC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Frycák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A

    2008-03-01

    With recent growth in fields such as life sciences and supramolecular chemistry, there has been an ever increasing need for high-throughput methods that would permit determination of binding affinities for noncovalent complexes of various host-guest systems. These are traditionally measured by titration experiments where concentration-dependent signals of species participating in solution-based binding equilibria are monitored by methods such as UV-vis spectrophotometry, calorimetry, or nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Here we present a new titration technique that unifies and allows chromatographic separation of guests with determination of dissociation constants by electrospray mass spectrometry in a multiplexed format. A theoretical model has been derived that describes the complex formation for the guests eluted from a chromatographic column when hosts are admixed postcolumn. The model takes possible competition equilibria into account; i.e., it can deal with unresolved peaks of guests with the possible addition of multiple hosts in one experiment. This on-line workflow makes determination of binding affinities for large libraries of compounds possible. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the determination of dissociation constants for complexes of beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs ibuprofen, naproxen, and flurbiprofen. PMID:18237190

  18. Understanding selenocysteine through conformational analysis, proton affinities, acidities and bond dissociation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Damanjit; Sharma, Punita; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Kaur, Mondeep

    Density functional methods have been employed to characterize the gas phase conformations of selenocysteine. The 33 stable conformers of selenocysteine have been located on the potential energy surface using density functional B3LYP/6-31+G* method. The conformers are analyzed in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. The proton affinity, gas phase acidities, and bond dissociation energies have also been evaluated for different reactive sites of selenocysteine for the five lowest energy conformers at B3LYP/6-311++G*//B3LYP/6-31+G* level. Evaluation of these intrinsic properties reflects the antioxidant activity of selenium in selenocysteine.0

  19. Determination of dissociation constants of cytokinins by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Barták, P; Bednár, P; Stránský, Z; Bocek, P; Vespalec, R

    2000-05-12

    A method for the pKa determination, based on mobility data measured by capillary zone electrophoresis, was applied to cytokinins and their analogs. The combination of charged mobility standards with an uncharged electroosmosis marker, injected in the uncoated capillary simultaneously with the measured substances, allows one to minimize the number of runs, reduce their duration and, in addition, to inform on the run-to-run stability of electroosmosis and on contingent side-effects. pKa values of investigated cytokinins and their analogs ranged from 2.8 to 4.0 at 25 degrees C in the phosphate and acetate buffers of ionic strength 0.015 M. Standard deviations of the constants, obtained by the non-linear fitting of equations for the pKa calculation, were 3-5-times lower than standard deviations from the linear fitting or from the point-to-point calculation utilizing the Hendersson-Haselbalch equation. The equation of Boltzman sigmoid offers two checks on reliability of effective mobilities that serve as the raw data in the pKa calculation. PMID:10866070

  20. Relative Proton Affinities from Kinetic Energy Release Distributions for Dissociation of Proton-Bound Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Hache, John J.; Laskin, Julia ); Futrell, Jean H.)

    2002-12-19

    Kinetic energy release distributions (KERDs) upon dissociation of proton-bound dimers are utilized along with Finite Heat Bath theory analysis to obtain relative proton affinities of monomeric species composing the dimer. The proposed approach allows accurate measurement of relative proton affinities based on KERD measurements for the compound with unknown thermochemical properties versus a single reference base. It also allows distinguishing the cases when dissociation of proton-bound dimers is associated with reverse activation barrier, for which both our approach and the kinetic method become inapplicable. Results are reported for the n-butanol-n-propanol dimer, for which there is no significant difference in entropy effects for two reactions and for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine dimer, which is characterized by a significant difference in entropy effects for the two competing reactions. Relative protonation affinities of -1.0?0.3 kcal/mol for the n-butanol-n-propanol pair and 0.27?0.10 kcal/mol for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine pair are in good agreement with literature values. Relative reaction entropies were extracted from the branching ratio and KERD measurements. Good correspondence was found between the relative reaction entropies for the n-butanol-n-propanol dimer (D(DS?)=-0.3?1.5 cal/mol K) and the relative protonation entropy for the two monomers (D(DSp)=0). However, the relative reaction entropy for the pyrrolidine-1,2-ethylenediamine dimer is higher than the difference in protonation entropies (D(DS?)=8.2?0.5 cal/mol K vs. D(DSp)=5 cal/mol K).

  1. The vibrational dependence of dissociative recombination: Rate constants for N{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2014-11-28

    Dissociative recombination rate constants are reported with electron temperature dependent uncertainties for the lowest 5 vibrational levels of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ground state. The rate constants are determined from ab initio calculations of potential curves, electronic widths, quantum defects, and cross sections. At 100 K electron temperature, the rate constants overlap with the exception of the third vibrational level. At and above 300 K, the rate constants for excited vibrational levels are significantly smaller than that for the ground level. It is shown that any experimentally determined total rate constant at 300 K electron temperature that is smaller than 2.0 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 3}/s is likely to be for ions that have a substantially excited vibrational population. Using the vibrational level specific rate constants, the total rate constant is in very good agreement with that for an excited vibrational distribution found in a storage ring experiment. It is also shown that a prior analysis of a laser induced fluorescence experiment is quantitatively flawed due to the need to account for reactions with unknown rate constants. Two prior calculations of the dissociative recombination rate constant are shown to be inconsistent with the cross sections upon which they are based. The rate constants calculated here contribute to the resolution of a 30 year old disagreement between modeled and observed N{sub 2}{sup +} ionospheric densities.

  2. DISSOCIATION OF ARSENITE-PEPTIDE COMPLEXES: TRIPHASIC NATURE, RATE CONSTANTS, HALF LIVES AND BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We determined the number and the dissociation rate constants of different complexes formed from arsenite and two peptides containing either one (RV AVGNDYASGYHYGV for peptide 20) or three cysteines (LE AWQGK VEGTEHLYSMK K for peptide 10) via radioactive 73As labeled arsenite and ...

  3. Energy-dependent dissociation of ATP from high affinity catalytic sites of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Penefsky, H.S.

    1985-11-05

    Incubation of (gamma-TSP)ATP with a molar excess of the membrane-bound form of mitochondrial ATPase (F1) results in binding of the bulk of the radioactive nucleotide in high affinity catalytic sites (Ka = 10(12) M-1). Subsequent initiation of respiration by addition of succinate or NADH is accompanied by a profound decrease in the affinity for ATP. About one-third of the bound radioactive ATP appears to dissociate, that is, the (gamma-TSP)ATP becomes accessible to hexokinase. The NADH-stimulated dissociation of (gamma-TSP)ATP is energy-dependent since the stimulation is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and is prevented by respiratory chain inhibitors. The rate of the energy-dependent dissociation of ATP that occurs in the presence of NADH, ADP, and Pi is commensurate with the measured initial rate of ATP synthesis in NADH-supported oxidative phosphorylation catalyzed by the same submitochondrial particles. Thus, the rate of dissociation of ATP from the high affinity catalytic site of submitochondrial particles meets the criterion of kinetic competency under the conditions of oxidative phosphorylation. These experiments provide evidence in support of the argument that energy conserved during the oxidation of substrates by the respiratory chain can be utilized to reduce the very tight binding of product ATP in high affinity catalytic sites and to promote dissociation of the nucleotide.

  4. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  5. Determination of Henry's constant, the dissociation constant, and the buffer capacity of the bicarbonate system in ruminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hille, Katharina T; Hetz, Stefan K; Rosendahl, Julia; Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Pieper, Robert; Stumpff, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical importance of ruminal acidosis, ruminal buffering continues to be poorly understood. In particular, the constants for the dissociation of H2CO3 and the solubility of CO2 (Henry's constant) have never been stringently determined for ruminal fluid. The pH was measured in parallel directly in the rumen and the reticulum in vivo, and in samples obtained via aspiration from 10 fistulated cows on hay- or concentrate-based diets. The equilibrium constants of the bicarbonate system were measured at 38°C both using the Astrup technique and a newly developed method with titration at 2 levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2; 4.75 and 94.98 kPa), yielding mean values of 0.234 ± 0.005 mmol ∙ L(-1) ∙ kPa(-1) and 6.11 ± 0.02 for Henry's constant and the dissociation constant, respectively (n/n = 31/10). Both reticular pH and the pH of samples measured after removal were more alkalic than those measured in vivo in the rumen (by ΔpH = 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.26 ± 0.04). The amount of acid or base required to shift the pH of ruminal samples to 6.4 or 5.8 (base excess) differed between the 2 feeding groups. Experimental results are compared with the mathematical predictions of an open 2-buffer Henderson-Hasselbalch equilibrium model. Because pCO2 has pronounced effects on ruminal pH and can decrease rapidly in samples removed from the rumen, introduction of a generally accepted protocol for determining the acid-base status of ruminal fluid with standard levels of pCO2 and measurement of base excess in addition to pH should be considered. PMID:26519978

  6. Hydrolysis of oxaliplatin-evaluation of the acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate complex.

    PubMed

    Jerremalm, Elin; Eksborg, Staffan; Ehrsson, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis of the platinum anticancer drug oxaliplatin gives the oxalato monodentate complex and the dihydrated oxaliplatin complex in two consecutive steps. The acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate intermediate was determined by a kinetic approach. The pK(a) value was estimated as 7.23. The monodentate intermediate is assumed to rapidly react with endogenous compounds, resulting in a continuous conversion of oxaliplatin via the monodentate form. PMID:12532393

  7. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium.

    PubMed

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

    2014-01-21

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants. PMID:25669383

  8. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

    2014-01-21

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants.

  9. Determination of the kinetic rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems by high-performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwen; Li, Haiyan; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Caifen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of the association and dissociation are fundamental kinetic processes for the host-guest interactions (such as the drug-target and drug-excipient interactions) and the in vivo performance of supramolecules. With advantages of rapid speed, high precision and ease of automation, the high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is one of the best techniques to measure the interaction kinetics of weak to moderate affinities, such as the typical host-guest interactions of drug and cyclodextrins by using a cyclodextrin-immobilized column. The measurement involves the equilibration of the cyclodextrin column, the upload and elution of the samples (non-retained substances and retained solutes) at different flow rates on the cyclodextrin and control column, and data analysis. It has been indicated that cyclodextrin-immobilized chromatography is a cost-efficient high-throughput tool for the measurement of (small molecule) drug-cyclodextrin interactions as well as the dissociation of other supramolecules with relatively weak, fast, and extensive interactions. PMID:25749964

  10. Quantifying Protein-Ligand Binding Constants using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: A Systematic Binding Affinity Study of a Series of Hydrophobically Modified Trypsin Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubrilovic, Dragana; Biela, Adam; Sielaff, Frank; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Klebe, Gerhard; Zenobi, Renato

    2012-10-01

    NanoESI-MS is used for determining binding strengths of trypsin in complex with two different series of five congeneric inhibitors, whose binding affinity in solution depends on the size of the P3 substituent. The ligands of the first series contain a 4-amidinobenzylamide as P1 residue, and form a tight complex with trypsin. The inhibitors of the second series have a 2-aminomethyl-5-chloro-benzylamide as P1 group, and represent a model system for weak binders. The five different inhibitors of each group are based on the same scaffold and differ only in the length of the hydrophobic side chain of their P3 residue, which modulates the interactions in the S3/4 binding pocket of trypsin. The dissociation constants (KD) for high affinity ligands investigated by nanoESI-MS ranges from 15 nM to 450 nM and decreases with larger hydrophobic P3 side chains. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments of five trypsin and benzamidine-based complexes show a correlation between trends in KD and gas-phase stability. For the second inhibitor series we could show that the effect of imidazole, a small stabilizing additive, can avoid the dissociation of the complex ions and as a result increases the relative abundance of weakly bound complexes. Here the KD values ranging from 2.9 to 17.6 μM, some 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than the first series. For both ligand series, the dissociation constants (KD) measured via nanoESI-MS were compared with kinetic inhibition constants (Ki) in solution.

  11. Dissociation constants of KSO4- from 10°-50°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Hostetler, P.B.

    1968-01-01

    A cell without liquid junction was used to obtain dissociation constants for the reaction: KSO4− = K+ +SO42−. At 10°, 25°, 38° and 50°C, values for Kdiss KSO4− are, respectively, 0.195, 0.142, 0.117, and 0.095. At 25°C, , and  values for the KSO4− ion are −245.96 and −274.02 kcal mole−1, and S° is +42.3 cal mole−1 deg−1.

  12. The simultaneous determination of hydrophobicity and dissociation constant by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wiczling, P; Struck-Lewicka, W; Kubik, L; Siluk, D; Markuszewski, M J; Kaliszan, R

    2014-06-01

    Convenient methods for testing drug candidates' lipophilicity and acidity are highly requested in modern pharmaceutical research and drug development strategies. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP HPLC) might be particularly useful for the determination of both dissociation constant and the (pH-dependent) partition coefficient related parameters, applicable in high-throughput analysis of multi-component mixtures. The general theory of combined pH/organic modifier gradient has recently provided equations relating gradient retention time and pH of the mobile phase. The purpose of this work was to facilitate the identification of analytes in this technique by its transfer to RP HPLC coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization source (ESI-TOF-MS). The accuracy of the proposed methodology was assessed by analyzing a set of known drugs. The ammonium formate, ammonium acetate or ammonium bicarbonate buffers were used to control pH during chromatographic analysis. In result, the pKa and hydrophobicity parameters were determined and the accuracy of the estimated values was assessed by comparing them with literature data. The gradient RP HPLC coupled with ESI-TOF-MS methods allowed for the rapid determination of dissociation constant and hydrophobicity and was shown to be especially applicable for complex mixtures. The use of ESI-TOF-MS detection allowed to achieve the medium-throughput screening rate (100 compounds/day) and provided a simple approach to assess pharmacokinetically important physicochemical properties of drugs. PMID:24598171

  13. Measuring Kinetic Dissociation/Association Constants Between Lactococcus lactis Bacteria and Mucins Using Living Cell Probes

    PubMed Central

    Le, Doan Thanh Lam; Guérardel, Yann; Loubière, Pascal; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel; Dague, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    In this work we focused on quantifying adhesion between Lactococcus lactis, the model for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and mucins. Interactions between two strains of L. lactis (IBB477 and MG1820 as control) and pig gastric mucin–based coating were measured and compared with the use of atomic force microscopy. Analysis of retraction force-distance curves shed light on the differential contributions of nonspecific and specific forces. An increased proportion of specific adhesive events was obtained for IBB477 (20% vs. 5% for the control). Blocking assays with free pig gastric mucin and its O-glycan moiety showed that oligosaccharides play a major (but not exclusive) role in L. lactis-mucins interactions. Specific interactions were analyzed in terms of kinetic constants. An increase in the loading rate of atomic force microscope tip led to a higher force between interacting biological entities, which was directly linked to the kinetic dissociation constant (Koff). Enhancing the contact time between the tip and the sample allowed an increase in the interaction probability, which can be related to the kinetic association constant (Kon). Variations in the loading rate and contact time enabled us to determine Kon (3.3 × 102 M−1·s−1) and Koff (0.46 s−1), and the latter was consistent with values given in the literature for sugar-protein interactions. PMID:22261074

  14. Determination of dissociation constants of pharmacologically active xanthones by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomu; Gong, Suxuan; Bo, Tao; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2004-12-24

    In this article, the dissociation constants (pKa) of 10 pharmacologically active xanthones isolated from herbal medicine Securidaca inappendiculata were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection. The pKa values determined by the method based on the electrophoretic mobilities (calculated from migration times) have been proved by the method based on UV absorbance calculated from the online spectra corresponding peaks. No conspicuous difference was observed between the two methods with acceptable reproducibility. Two pKa values (pKa1 and pKa2) were found for four xanthones while generally the 10 compounds possess the pKa values ranging from 6.4 to 9.2. PMID:15641365

  15. Ab initio electron affinity and hyperfine structure constants of ^231Pa:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinov, Konstantin D.; Beck, Donald R.

    1996-05-01

    We have performed valence shell Relativistic Configuration Interaction calculations(Konstantin D. Dinov and Donald R. Beck, Electron affinity and hyperfine structure constants of Pa^-: 7p attachment.) Submitted to Phys. Rev. A for the Electron Affinity (EA) of ^231Pa. Our result of 0.222 eV for the binding energy of the Pa^- 5f^2 6d 7s^2 7p J=6 state is consistent with the experimental yield(X-L. Zhao, M-J. Nadeau, M.A. Garwan, L.R. Kilius and A.E. Litherland, Nuc. Instr. Meth. B 92), 258-64 (1994). Our result for the hyperfine structure constants of Pa^-, is the first available ab initio result. No other bound states were found for the 7p attachment. We didn't find evidence to support possible 5d attachment in this system. This work extends our previous calculations for the Rare Earth negative ions(K.D. Dinov and D.R. Beck, Phys. Rev. A 52) , 2632-37 (1995); K. Dinov and D.R. Beck, Phys. Rev. A 51 (2), 1680-82 (1995); K. Dinov, D.R. Beck and D. Datta, Phys. Rev. A 50 (2), 1144-48 (1994).

  16. A new sensitive method of dissociation constants determination based on the isohydric solutions principle.

    PubMed

    Michałowski, Tadeusz; Pilarski, Bogusław; Asuero, Agustin G; Dobkowska, Agnieszka

    2010-10-15

    The paper provides a new formulation and analytical proposals based on the isohydric solutions concept. It is particularly stated that a mixture formed, according to titrimetric mode, from a weak acid (HX, C(0)mol/L) and a strong acid (HB, Cmol/L) solutions, assumes constant pH, independently on the volumes of the solutions mixed, provided that the relation C(0)=C+C(2)·10(pK(1)) is valid, where pK(1)=-log K(1), K(1) the dissociation constant for HX. The generalized formulation, referred to the isohydric solutions thus obtained, was extended also to more complex acid-base systems. Particularly in the (HX, HB) system, the titration occurs at constant ionic strength (I) value, not resulting from presence of a basal electrolyte. This very advantageous conjunction of the properties provides, among others, a new, very sensitive method for verification of pK(1) value. The new method is particularly useful for weak acids HX characterized by low pK(1) values. The method was tested experimentally on four acid-base systems (HX, HB), in aqueous and mixed-solvent media and compared with the literature data. Some useful (linear and hyperbolic) correlations were stated and applied for validation of pK(1) values. Finally, some practical applications of analytical interest of the isohydricity (pH constancy) principle as one formulated in this paper were enumerated, proving the usefulness of such a property which has its remote roots in the Arrhenius concept. PMID:20875603

  17. Enrichment and Analysis of Nonenzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2007-06-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that ETD fragmentation mode resulted in a significantly higher number of glycated peptide identifications (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing dual glycation enrichment on both the protein and peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS with ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analyses of glycated proteins and can have broad applications in studies of diabetes mellitus.

  18. The Universal Statistical Distributions of the Affinity, Equilibrium Constants, Kinetics and Specificity in Biomolecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics. PMID:25885453

  19. The universal statistical distributions of the affinity, equilibrium constants, kinetics and specificity in biomolecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-04-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics. PMID:25885453

  20. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  1. High kinetic stability of Zn(II) coordinated by the tris(histidine) unit of carbonic anhydrase towards solvolytic dissociation studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Solvolytic dissociation rate constants (kd) of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and its metallovariants (M-CAs, M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) were estimated by a ligand substitution reaction, which was monitored by affinity capillary electrophoresis to selectively detect the undissociated CAs in the reaction mixture. Using EDTA as the competing ligand for Zn-CA, the dissociation followed the unimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN1) mechanism with kd=1.0×10(-7)s(-1) (pH7.4, 25°C). The corresponding solvolysis half-life (t1/2) was 80days, showing the exceptionally high kinetic stability of t Zn-CA, in contrast to the highly labile [Zn(II)(H2O)6](2+), where the water exchange rate (kex) is high. This behavior is attributed to the tetrahedral coordination geometry supported by the tris(histidine) unit (His3) of CA. In the case of Co-CA, it showed a somewhat larger kd value (5.7×10(-7)s(-1), pH7.4, 25°C) even though it shares the same tetrahedral coordination environment with Zn-CA, suggesting that the d(7) electronic configuration of Co(II) in the transition state of the dissociation is stabilized by the ligand field. Among M-CAs, only Ni-CA showed a bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction path in its reaction with EDTA, implying that the large coordination number (6) of Ni(II) in Ni-CA allows EDTA to form an EDTA-Ni-CA intermediate. Overall, kd values roughly correlated with kex values among M-CAs, with the kd value of Zn-CA deviating strongly from the trend and highlighting the exceptionally high kinetic stabilization of Zn-CA by the His3 unit. PMID:27235274

  2. Dissociation of bimolecular αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex under a constant tensile force.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Barsegov, Valeri; Schissler, Andrew J; Fisher, Andrew R; Bennett, Joel S; Weisel, John W; Shuman, Henry

    2011-01-01

    The regulated ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to bind fibrinogen plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation, adhesion, and hemostasis. Employing an optical-trap-based electronic force clamp, we studied the thermodynamics and kinetics of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen bond formation and dissociation under constant unbinding forces, mimicking the forces of physiologic blood shear on a thrombus. The distribution of bond lifetimes was bimodal, indicating that the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex exists in two bound states with different mechanical stability. The αIIbβ3 antagonist, abciximab, inhibited binding without affecting the unbinding kinetics, whereas Mn²(+) biased the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex to the strong bound state with reduced off-rate. The average bond lifetimes decreased exponentially with increasing pulling force from ∼5 pN to 50 pN, suggesting that in this force range the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions are classical slip bonds. We found no evidence for catch bonds, which is consistent with the known lack of shear-enhanced platelet adhesion on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. Taken together, these data provide important quantitative and qualitative characteristics of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen binding and unbinding that underlie the dynamics of platelet adhesion and aggregation in blood flow. PMID:21190668

  3. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  4. Determination of dissociation constant of the NFκB p50/p65 heterodimer using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy in the living cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Manisha; Mikuni, Shintaro; Muto, Hideki; Kinjo, Masataka

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We used two-laser-beam FCCS to determine the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of IPT domain of p50/p65 heterodimer in living cell. •Interaction of p50 and p65 was analyzed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of single living cell. •Binding affinity of p50/p65 heterodimer is higher in cytoplasm than that of nucleus. -- Abstract: Two-laser-beam fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) is promising technique that provides quantitative information about the interactions of biomolecules. The p50/p65 heterodimer is the most abundant and well understood of the NFκB dimers in most cells. However, the quantitative value of affinity, namely the K{sub d}, for the heterodimer in living cells is not known yet. To quantify the heterodimerization of the IPT domain of p50/p65 in the living cell, we used two-laser-beam FCCS. The K{sub d} values of mCherry{sub 2}- and EGFP-fused p50 and p65 were determined to be 0.46 μM in the cytoplasm and 1.06 μM in the nucleus of the living cell. These results suggest the different binding affinities of the p50/p65 heterodimer in the cytoplasm and nucleus of the living cell and different complex formation in each region.

  5. MR Imaging-derived Oxygen-Hemoglobin Dissociation Curves and Fetal-Placental Oxygen-Hemoglobin Affinities.

    PubMed

    Avni, Reut; Golani, Ofra; Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Cohen, Yonni; Biton, Inbal; Garbow, Joel R; Neeman, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To generate magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived, oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curves and to map fetal-placental oxygen-hemoglobin affinity in pregnant mice noninvasively by combining blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) T2* and oxygen-weighted T1 contrast mechanisms under different respiration challenges. Materials and Methods All procedures were approved by the Weizmann Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Pregnant mice were analyzed with MR imaging at 9.4 T on embryonic days 14.5 (eight dams and 58 fetuses; imprinting control region ICR strain) and 17.5 (21 dams and 158 fetuses) under respiration challenges ranging from hyperoxia to hypoxia (10 levels of oxygenation, 100%-10%; total imaging time, 100 minutes). A shorter protocol with normoxia to hyperoxia was also performed (five levels of oxygenation, 20%-100%; total imaging time, 60 minutes). Fast spin-echo anatomic images were obtained, followed by sequential acquisition of three-dimensional gradient-echo T2*- and T1-weighted images. Automated registration was applied to align regions of interest of the entire placenta, fetal liver, and maternal liver. Results were compared by using a two-tailed unpaired Student t test. R1 and R2* values were derived for each tissue. MR imaging-based oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curves were constructed by nonlinear least square fitting of 1 minus the change in R2*divided by R2*at baseline as a function of R1 to a sigmoid-shaped curve. The apparent P50 (oxygen tension at which hemoglobin is 50% saturated) value was derived from the curves, calculated as the R1 scaled value (x) at which the change in R2* divided by R2*at baseline scaled (y) equals 0.5. Results The apparent P50 values were significantly lower in fetal liver than in maternal liver for both gestation stages (day 14.5: 21% ± 5 [P = .04] and day 17.5: 41% ± 7 [P < .0001]). The placenta showed a reduction of 18% ± 4 in mean apparent P50 values from day 14.5 to day 17.5 (P = .003

  6. Predicting both passive intestinal absorption and the dissociation constant toward albumin using the PAMPA technique.

    PubMed

    Bujard, Alban; Sol, Marine; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Martel, Sophie

    2014-10-15

    The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is a high-throughput screening (HTS) method that is widely used to predict in vivo passive permeability through biological barriers, such as the skin, the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The PAMPA technique has also been used to predict the dissociation constant (Kd) between a compound and human serum albumin (HSA) while disregarding passive permeability. Furthermore, the assay is based on the use of two separate 5-point kinetic experiments, which increases the analysis time. In the present study, we adapted the hexadecane membrane (HDM)-PAMPA assay to both predict passive gastrointestinal absorption via the permeability coefficient logPe value and determine the Kd. Two assays were performed: one in the presence and one in the absence of HSA in the acceptor compartment. In the absence of HSA, logPe values were determined after a 4-h incubation time, as originally described, but the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) percentage and pH were altered to be compatible with the protein. In parallel, a second PAMPA assay was performed in the presence of HSA during a 16-h incubation period. By adding HSA, a variation in the amount of compound crossing the membrane was observed compared to the permeability measured in the absence of HSA. The concentration of compound reaching the acceptor compartment in each case was used to determine both parameters (logPe and logKd) using numerical simulations, which highlighted the originality of this method because these calculations required only two endpoint measurements instead of a complete kinetic study. It should be noted that the amount of compound that reaches the acceptor compartment in the presence of HSA is modulated by complex dissociation in the receptor compartment. Only compounds that are moderately bound to albumin (-3

  7. (/sup 3/H)dihydroergotamine as a high-affinity, slowly dissociating radioligand for 5-HT1B binding sites in rat brain membranes: evidence for guanine nucleotide regulation of agonist affinity states

    SciTech Connect

    Hamblin, M.W.; Ariani, K.; Adriaenssens, P.I.; Ciaranello, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    (/sup 3/H)Dihydroergotamine (DE) labels a population of binding sites in rat brain membranes with an affinity of approximately 70 pM in both hippocampus (maximal binding at saturation (Bmax) = 340 fmol/mg of protein) and cerebral cortex (Bmax = 250 fmol/mg of protein). Specific binding typically comprises about 97% of total binding at the Kd of the radioligand when nonspecific binding is determined in the presence of 100 nM unlabeled DE. Association kinetics at 37 degrees C are consistent with a uniform association rate constant for all sites labeled. Specific binding is completely reversible with addition of excess unlabeled DE, but dissociation does not proceed with simple first-order kinetics, suggesting the presence of more than one discrete binding site. Competition studies with selective drugs reveal alpha adrenergic, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B components of (/sup 3/H)DE specific binding. When phentolamine (500 nM) is included to block alpha receptors and DPAT (100 nM) or spiroxatrine (500 nM) is included to block 5-HT1A receptors, specific binding is exclusively to sites with drug affinities characteristic of 5-HT1B receptors. Under these 5-HT1B-selective conditions, (/sup 3/H)DE binding is about 90% specific, with a Kd of about 50 to 60 pM and a Bmax of 96 fmol/mg of protein in hippocampus and 77 fmol/mg of protein in cortex. (/sup 3/H)DE binding to 5-HT1B sites is very slowly dissociable, with a T1/2 of greater than 2 h at 37 degrees C. 5-HT1B antagonists and DE itself yield competition curves at (/sup 3/H)DE-labeled 5-HT1B sites that are adequately fit assuming a single site in nonlinear regression analysis. Addition of 100 microM guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate appears to convert nearly all 5-HT1B sites to those having low affinity for agonists while having a much smaller effect on the binding of (/sup 3/H)DE.

  8. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  9. Wild-type and mutant D-xylose isomerase from Actinoplanes missouriensis: metal-ion dissociation constants, kinetic parameters of deuterated and non-deuterated substrates and solvent-isotope effects.

    PubMed Central

    van Bastelaere, P B; Kersters-Hilderson, H L; Lambeir, A M

    1995-01-01

    The metal-ion dissociation constants (Mg2+, Mn2+) of wild-type and mutant D-xylose isomerases from Actinoplanes missouriensis have been determined by titrating the metal-ion-free enzymes with Mg2+ and Mn2+ respectively. Substitution of amino acids co-ordinated to metal-ion 1 (E181D, D245N) dramatically affects the dissociation constants, pH-activity profiles and apparent substrate binding. Mutagenesis of groups ligated to metal-ion 2 is less drastic except for that of Asp-255: a decrease in metal-ion affinity, a change in metal-ion preference and an improved apparent substrate binding (at pH values above the optimum), especially in the presence of Mn2+, are observed for the D255N enzyme. Similar effects, except for a slightly increased metal-ion affinity, are obtained by mutagenesis of the adjacent Glu-186 to Gln and the unconserved Ala-25 to Lys. Moreover, the striking acidic-pH shifts observed for the D255N and E186Q enzymes support the crucial role of the water molecule, Wa-690, Asp-255 and the adjacent Glu-186 in proton transfer from 2-OH to O-1 of the open and extended aldose substrate. Mutations of other important groups scarcely affect the metal-ion dissociation constants and pH-activity profiles, although pronounced effects on the kinetic parameters may be observed. PMID:7717967

  10. Potentiometric determination of the dissociation constants of an asymmetric sorbent containing l-proline, and the stability constants of its Cu(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, Y A; Kurganov, A A; Davankov, V A

    1978-09-01

    The dissociation constants of the carboxyl groups (pK(a1) = 2.2, n = 1.8) and amino groups (pK(a2) = 9.5, n(2) = 1.6) of a sorbent prepared by reacting l-proline with a cross-linked chloromethylated styrene polymer have been determined by potentiometric titration. The potentiometrically measured stability constants of the Cu(II) complexes of the resin (logbeta(1) = 6.9 and log beta(2) = 12.4) were found to be close to the values for the Cu(II) complexes of N-benzyl-l-proline. For complexed resins of alpha-amino-acid type the pH-values of decomplexation do not appear to be directly correlated with the stability constants. PMID:18962307

  11. Determination of the dissociation constants of the cephalosporins cefepime and cefpirome using UV spectrometry and pH potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Evagelou, Vassilis; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Koupparis, Michael

    2003-04-10

    UV spectrometry and pH potentiometry were used for the determination and direct characterization of the dissociation constants of cefepime (Cef) and cefpirome. The absorbance/pH profiles at two analytical wavelengths and different conditions were assessed and found to conform to those of diprotic acids. The titration curves indicated a triprotic acid profile with two overlapping dissociation constants. The comparison of the results of both techniques permitted the direct attribution of the three dissociation constants to the carboxylic group at position 4 of the Delta-3 cephem nucleus, the aminothiazole group and the amide group at position 7 of the Delta-3 cephem nucleus. Stability studies of Cef in alkaline solutions were also performed in order to evaluate the accuracy of the measurements carried out for the determination of the third pK(a) value. The experimental pK(a) values were compared to the corresponding predicted values derived by PALLAS/PKALC and Advanced Chemical Development (ACD) software packages. PMID:12667928

  12. Evaluation of Taylor dispersion injections: determining kinetic/affinity interaction constants and diffusion coefficients in label-free biosensing.

    PubMed

    Quinn, John G

    2012-02-15

    In label-free biomolecular interaction analysis, a standard injection provides an injection of uniform analyte concentration. An alternative approach exploiting Taylor dispersion produces a continuous analyte titration allowing a full analyte dose response to be recorded in a single injection. The enhanced biophysical characterization that is possible with this new technique is demonstrated using a commercially available surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor. A kinetic interaction model was fitted locally to Taylor dispersion curves for estimation of the analyte diffusion coefficient in addition to affinity/kinetic constants. Statistical confidence in the measured parameters from a single Taylor dispersion injection was comparable to that obtained for global analysis of multiple standard injections. The affinity constants for multisite interactions were resolved with acceptable confidence limits. Importantly, a single analyte injection could be treated as a high-resolution real-time affinity isotherm and was demonstrated using the complex two-site interaction of warfarin with human serum albumin. In all three model interactions tested, the kinetic/affinity constants compared favorably with those obtained from standard kinetic analysis and the estimates of analyte diffusion coefficients were in good agreement with the expected values. PMID:22197422

  13. High-performance affinity monolith chromatography for chiral separation and determination of enzyme kinetic constants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunhe; Qi, Li; Qiao, Juan; Zhang, Haizhi; Wang, Fuyi; Chen, Yi; Yang, Gengliang

    2010-09-15

    A new kind of immobilized human serum albumin (HSA) column was developed by using the sub-micron skeletal polymer monolith based on poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [poly(GMA-EDMA)] as the support of high-performance affinity chromatography. Using the epoxide functional groups presented in GMA, the HSA immobilization procedure was performed by two different means. The affinity columns were successfully adopted for the chiral separation of D,L-amino acids (AAs). Then this method was shown to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of D-tryptophan, with a linear range between 12.0 microM and 979.0 microM, and a correlation coefficient above 0.99. Furthermore, it was used for the analysis of urine sample. This assay is demonstrated to be facile and relatively rapid. So it allows us to measure the enzyme catalytic activity in the incubation of D,L-AAs with D-AA oxidase and to study the kinetics of the enzyme reaction. It implied that the affinity monolithic columns can be a useful tool for studying DAAO enzyme reaction and investigating the potential enzyme mechanism requirement among chiral conversion. PMID:20801337

  14. Effect of pressure on the dissociation constant of boric acid in water and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.; Ward, Gary K.; Surdo, Antonio Lo; Huang, Fen

    2012-01-01

    The sound speeds of boric acid and sodium borate in water and 0.725 m NaCl have been measured from 0 to 50 °C and to near 1 molal. These results have been used to determine the partial molal adiabatic compressibilities of B(OH) 3 and NaB(OH) 4. The partial molal volumes, v¯(i), and compressibilities, κ¯(i), have been used to estimate the changes in the volume (Δ V) and compressibility (Δ κ) for the dissociation of boric acid in water and average seawater (0.725 m NaCl, SA ˜ 35 g/kg) B(OH)3+H2O=H++B(OH)4- where

  15. Distribution of proton dissociation constants for model humic and fulvic acid molecules.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Yasemin B; Carbonaro, Richard F; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2009-05-15

    The intrinsic proton binding constants of 10 model humic acid and six model fulvic acid molecules are calculated using SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry (SPARC). The accuracy of the SPARC calculations is examined using estimated microscopic binding constants of various small organic acids. An equimolar mixture of the appropriate hypothetical molecules is used as a representation of soil and aqueous humic acid and fulvic acid. The probability distributions of the mixture microscopic proton binding constants and the intrinsic proton binding constants in the metal speciation models WHAM V and WHAM VI (Windermere humic aqueous models) are compared. The idea is to assess the predictive value of the molecular mixture models as representations of heterogeneous natural organic matter. For aqueous humic and fulvic acids, the results are comparable to the WHAM distribution. For soil humic acid, the WHAM probability distribution is less acidic for the carboxylic sites but similar to that of the phenolic sites. Computations made using the WHAM molecular distributions and WHAM VI are comparable to titration data for Suwannee River fulvic acid. These results suggest that mixture molecular models can be used to investigate and predict the binding of metal cations to humic and fulvic acids. PMID:19544864

  16. Dissociation and rate constants of some human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Pietruszko, R; de Zalenski, C; Theorell, H

    1976-01-01

    ADH from human liver forms binary complexes with NADH, associated with a blue shift of the peak of the fluorescence emission of NADH. The wavelength shift is the same for all isoenzymes but the accompanying intensification of the fluorescence is different. The fluorescence is further increased by the formation of the very tight ternary enzyme-NADH-isobutyramide complexes. These properties are similar to those for the horse liver ADH, as well as the molecular weight of E=40 000 per active site of the dimer molecule (EE). "Stopped-flow" determined velocity constants (ER in equilibrium E+R) were found to be in good agreement with ethanol activity constants previously determined by activity measurement, confirming the validity of the ordered ternary complex mechanism also for the human ADH. No single isoenzyme activity as high as that reported by Mourad and Woronick or Drum has been found. PMID:184631

  17. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase ( PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  18. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27225419

  19. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  20. SNAP-Tag Technology: A Useful Tool To Determine Affinity Constants and Other Functional Parameters of Novel Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Niesen, Judith; Sack, Markus; Seidel, Melanie; Fendel, Rolf; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Antibody derivatives, such as the single chain fragment variable (scFv), can be developed as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer research, especially in the form of fusion proteins. Such derivatives are easier to produce and modify than monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and achieve better tissue/tumor penetration. The genetic modification of scFvs is also much more straightforward than the challenging chemical modification of mAbs. Therefore, we constructed two scFvs derived from the approved monoclonal antibodies cetuximab (scFv2112) and panitumumab (scFv1711), both of which are specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a well-characterized solid tumor antigen. Both scFvs were genetically fused to the SNAP-tag, an engineered version of the human DNA repair enzyme O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase that allows the covalent coupling of benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates such as fluorescent dyes. The SNAP-tag achieves controllable and irreversible protein modification and is an important tool for experimental studies in vitro and in vivo. The affinity constant of a scFv is a key functional parameter, especially in the context of a fusion protein. Therefore, we developed a method to define the affinity constants of scFv-SNAP fusion proteins by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. We could confirm that both scFvs retained their functionality after fusion to the SNAP-tag in a variety of procedures and assays, including ELISA, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. The experimental procedures described herein, and the new protocol for affinity determination by SPR spectroscopy, are suitable for the preclinical evaluation of diverse antibody formats and derivatives. PMID:27391930

  1. The autoxidation and proton dissociation constants of tertiary diphosphines: relevance to biological activity.

    PubMed

    Berners-Price, S J; Norman, R E; Sadler, P J

    1987-11-01

    The pKas and autoxidation properties of a number of diphosphines which exhibit varying degrees of antitumor and cytotoxic activity were investigated. Titration by HClO4 in CH3NO2 was used to determine pKas of the following diphosphines: R2P(CH2)nPR'2, where for R = R' = Ph, n = 1, 2, and 3 (dppm, dppe, and dppp respectively); for R = R' = Et, n = 2 (depe); for R = Ph, R' = Et, n = 2 (eppe); and for cis and trans Ph2PCH = CHPPh2 (dppey). The difference between the first and second protonation constants decreases as the length of the carbon chain between the two phosphorus centers increases. Unsaturation in the carbon chain lowers pKas. -PEt2 centers are apparently more basic than -PPh2 centers. Apart from electrostatic effects, the protonation of a given phosphine center appears to be independent of the substituents at the second phosphine center. The autoxidation reactions of dppm, dppe, dppp, depe, and cis-dppey were studied in a variety of solvents by 31P NMR spectroscopy. The ethyl-substituted diphosphines were much more rapidly oxidized than the phenyl-substituted, and the pathways of autoxidation differed. Generally, the phenyl-substituted diphosphines gave only mono- and dioxides, while the ethyl-substituted diphosphines additionally gave phosphinites and other oxidation products. The relevance of the autoxidation reactivity and the pKas to the contrasting antitumor activity of these diphosphines is discussed. PMID:2828542

  2. Calculation of rate constants for dissociative attachment of low-energy electrons to hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI and their deuterated analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Houfek, Karel; Cizek, Martin; Horacek, Jiri

    2002-12-01

    Calculations of rate constants for the process of dissociative attachment of low-energy electrons to hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI and for the reverse process of associative detachment based on the nonlocal resonance model are reported. The calculated data are of importance for the modeling of plasma processes, environmental chemistry, etc. The calculated dissociative attachment rate constants are found to be in good agreement with existing experimental data. It is shown that at low temperatures the rate constants are very sensitive to small changes of the parameters of the nonlocal resonance model used for the calculation of the rate constants and represent a severe test of the theory. The isotopic effect and its dependence on the temperature is also discussed. The calculations of rate constants for the reverse process of associative detachment are also reported and discussed.

  3. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan ; Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Wang, Wei-Ting; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Tsai, Jing-Shin; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Wu, Chien-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  4. Detection analysis of surface hydroxyl active sites and simulation calculation of the surface dissociation constants of aqueous diatomite suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of the diatomite were investigated using nitrogen adsorption/deadsorption isotherms, TG-DSC, FTIR, and XPS, and surface protonation-deprotonation behavior was determined by continuous acid-base potentiometric titration technique. The diatomite sample with porous honeycomb structure has a BET specific surface area of 10.21 m2/g and large numbers of surface hydroxyl functional groups (i.e. tbnd Si-OH, tbnd Fe-OH, and tbnd Al-OH). These surface hydroxyls can be protonated or deprotonated depending on the pH of the suspension. The experimental potentiometric data in two different ionic strength solutions (0.1 and 0.05 mol/L NaCl) were fitted using ProtoFit GUI V2.1 program by applying diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites and minimizing the sum of squares between a dataset derivative function and a model derivative function. The optimized surface parameters (i.e. surface dissociation constants (log K1, log K2) and surface site concentrations (log C)) of the sample were obtained. Based on the optimized surface parameters, the surface species distribution was calculated using Program-free PHREEQC 3.1.2. Thus, this work reveals considerable new information about surface protonation-deprotonation processes and surface adsorptive behaviors of the diatomite, which helps us to effectively use the cheap and cheerful diatomite clay adsorbent.

  5. Determination of acid dissociation constant of 20 coumarin derivatives by capillary electrophoresis using the amine capillary and two different methodologies.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł Mateusz; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Piwowarska, Monika; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2016-05-13

    In this work capillary electrophoresis has been used to determine acid dissociation constant of 20 structurally diverse coumarin derivatives. For a majority of compounds pKa value has been determined for the first time. The obtained values vary between 4.16-9.10pH unit, pointing to the interesting structure-acidity relationships. The amine permanently coated capillary has been applied for that purpose, because it has turned out to be more effective in pKa determination than the bare silica and other coated capillaries, ensuring good precision and shorter migration times. A traditional methodology relying on measurements in a broad pH range and fitting of a sigmoidal function has been compared to an alternative simplified approach, reported for the first time, where only two electrophoretic mobility values suffice for pKa estimation. The first value corresponds to the partially ionized form and it is measured experimentally, while the second one to the totally ionized form - it is measured experimentally (two-values method) or estimated directly from molecular mass (one-value method). We show that despite a limited measurements number, the alternative approach may be consistent with the traditional methodology, yielding the relatively low pKa deviation. Its reliability has also been confirmed by the analytical predictions, comprising resolution, migration order, migration times and peaks overlapping. Therefore, combination of the amine capillary with the simplified calculation method is an attractive tool for fast and reliable pKa estimation. PMID:27083264

  6. From the affinity constant to the half-saturation index: understanding conventional modeling concepts in novel wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Arnaldos, Marina; Amerlinck, Youri; Rehman, Usman; Maere, Thomas; Van Hoey, Stijn; Naessens, Wouter; Nopens, Ingmar

    2015-03-01

    The "affinity constant" (KS) concept is applied in wastewater treatment models to incorporate the effect of substrate limitation on process performance. As an increasing number of wastewater treatment processes rely on low substrate concentrations, a proper understanding of these so-called constants is critical in order to soundly model and evaluate emerging treatment systems. In this paper, an in-depth analysis of the KS concept has been carried out, focusing on the different physical and biological phenomena that affect its observed value. By structuring the factors influencing half-saturation indices (newly proposed nomenclature) into advectional, diffusional and biological, light has been shed onto some of the apparent inconsistencies present in the literature. Particularly, the importance of non-ideal mixing as a source of variability between observed KS values in different systems has been illustrated. Additionally, discussion on the differences existent between substrates that affect half-saturation indices has been carried out; it has been shown that the observed KS for some substrates will reflect transport or biological limitations more than others. Finally, potential modeling strategies that could alleviate the shortcomings of the KS concept have been provided. These could be of special importance when considering the evaluation and design of emerging wastewater treatment processes. PMID:25576693

  7. Apparent Ca2+ dissociation constant of Ca2+ chelators incorporated non-disruptively into intact human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, T; Lew, V L

    1997-01-01

    1. A recently developed method of measuring cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering in intact red cells was applied to re-evaluate the intracellular Ca2+ binding properties of the Ca2+ chelators benz2 and BAPTA. Incorporation of the free chelators was accomplished by incubating the cells with the acetoxymethyl ester forms (benz2 AM or BAPTA AM). The divalent cation ionophore A23187 was used to induce equilibrium distribution of Ca2+ between cells and medium. 45Ca2+ was added stepwise to cell suspensions in the presence and absence of external BAPTA. To induce full Ca2+ equilibration, the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump was inhibited either by depleting the cells of ATP or by adding vanadate to the cell suspension. 2. The properties of the incorporated chelators were assessed from the difference in cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering between chelator-free and chelator-loaded cells, over a wide range of intracellular ionized calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i), from nanomolar to millimolar. 3. Under the experimental conditions applied, incorporation of benz2 and BAPTA into the red cells increased their Ca2+ buffering capacity by 300-600 mumol (340 g Hb)-1. The intracellular apparent Ca2+ dissociation constants (KDi) were about 500 nM for benz2 and 800 nM for BAPTA, values much higher than those reported for standard salt solutions (KD) of about 40 and 130 nM, respectively. These results suggest that, contrary to earlier observations, the intracellular red cell environment may cause large shifts in the apparent Ca2+ binding behaviour of incorporated chelators. 4. The possibility that the observed KD shifts are due to reversible binding of the chelators to haemoglobin is considered, and the implications of the present results for early estimates of physiological [Ca2+]i levels is discussed. PMID:9423182

  8. Intrinsic affinities of alkali cations for 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6: Bond dissociation energies of gas-phase M{sup +}-crown ether complexes

    SciTech Connect

    More, M.B.; Ray, D.; Armentrout, P.B.

    1999-01-20

    Bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of M{sup +}[c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 5}] and M{sup +}[c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 6}] for M = Na, K, Rb, and Cs are reported. The BDEs are determined experimentally by analysis of the thresholds for collision-induced dissociation of the cation-crown ether complexes by xenon measured by using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. In all cases, the primary and lowest energy dissociation channel observed experimentally in endothermic loss of the ligand molecule. The cross section thresholds are interpreted to yield 0 and 298 K BDEs after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-molecule collisions, internal energy of the complexes, and unimolecular decay rates. For both 18-crown-6 and 15-crown-5, the BDEs decrease monotonically with increasing cation size. These results indicate that the intrinsic affinity of c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 5} and c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 6} for M{sup +} is determined principally by the charge density of the cation not by the ratio of the ionic radius to the cavity size. The BDEs reported here are in fair agreement with recent ab initio calculations at the MP2 level with 6-31+G* basis sets. The experimental values are systematically smaller than the computed values by 8 {+-} 2 kJ/mol per metal-oxygen interaction. The existence of less strongly bound isomers in the experimental apparatus for Rb{sup +}(15-crown-5) and Cs{sup +}(15-crown-5) appears likely, but their absence for Na{sup +} and K{sup +} complexes indicates interesting metal-dependent dynamics to the formation of such isomers.

  9. The proton dissociation constant of additive effect on self-assembly of poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Lee, Hsu-Feng; Huang, Yi-Chiang; Jung, Yi-Jiun; Gong, Fang-Lin; Huang, Wen-Yao

    2014-07-01

    In the decision on the pros and cons of the optical and electrical properties of organic solar cells, the morphology has proven to be very important. Easy to change the morphology via adding a small amount of additive, because proton dissociation constant is the main reason for their application. In this study, the use of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl C 61-butyric acid methyl ester as the donor and acceptor materials, and were subsequently doped with different quantity of 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol, 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenyl, biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol. When the proton dissociation constant is higher and lower respectively, the morphology reveals earthworms-like and fiber-like. For the reason that when the additive is biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol, it can improve the power conversion efficiency of about 27% and the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of about 12%.

  10. The dissociation constants of the cytostatic bosutinib by nonlinear least-squares regression of multiwavelength spectrophotometric and potentiometric pH-titration data.

    PubMed

    Meloun, Milan; Nečasová, Veronika; Javůrek, Milan; Pekárek, Tomáš

    2016-02-20

    Potentiometric and spectrophotometric pH-titration of the multiprotic cytostatics bosutinib for dissociation constants determination were compared. Bosutinib treats patients with positive chronic myeloid leukemia. Bosutinib exhibits four protonatable sites in a pH range from 2 to 11, where two pK are well separated (ΔpK>3), while the other two are near dissociation constants. In the neutral medium, bosutinib occurs in the slightly water soluble form LH that can be protonated to the soluble cation LH4(3+). The molecule LH can be dissociated to still difficultly soluble anion L(-). The set of spectra upon pH from 2 to 11 in the 239.3-375.0nm was divided into two absorption bands: the first one from 239.3 to 290.5nm and the second from 312.3 to 375.0nm, which differ in sensitivity of chromophores to a pH change. Estimates of pK of the entire set of spectra were compared with those of both absorption bands. Due to limited solubility of bosutinib the protonation in a mixed aqueous-methanolic medium was studied. In low methanol content of 3-6% three dissociation constants can be reliably determined with SPECFIT/32 and SQUAD(84) and after extrapolation to zero content of methanol they lead to pKc1=3.43(12), pKc2=4.54(10), pKc3=7.56(07) and pKc4=11.04(05) at 25°C and pKc1=3.44(06), pKc2=5.03(08) pKc3=7.33(05) and pKc4=10.92(06) at 37°C. With an increasing content of methanol in solvent the dissociation of bosutinib is suppressed and the percentage of LH3(2+) decreases and LH prevails. From the potentiometric pH-titration at 25°C the concentration dissociation constants were estimated with ESAB pKc1=3.51(02), pKc2=4.37(02), pKc3=7.97(02) and pKc4=11.05(03) and with HYPERQUAD: pKc1=3.29(12), pKc2=4.24(10), pKc3=7.95(07) and pKc4=11.29(05). PMID:26730513

  11. Mapping the binding pocket of a novel, high-affinity, slow dissociating tachykinin NK3 receptor antagonist: biochemical and electrophysiological characterization.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Pari; Knoflach, Frédéric; Marcuz, Anne; Bohnert, Claudia; Weber, Michael; Knust, Henner; Ratni, Hasane; Spooren, Will; Ballard, Theresa M; Bissantz, Caterina

    2014-11-01

    The NK3 receptor is a GPCR that is prominently expressed in limbic areas of the brain, many of which have been implicated in schizophrenia. Phase II clinical trials in schizophrenia with two selective NK3 antagonists (osanetant and talnetant) have demonstrated significant improvement in positive symptoms. The objective of this study was to characterize the properties of a novel dual NK2/NK3 antagonist, RO5328673. [(3)H]RO5328673 bound to a single saturable site on hNK2, hNK3 and gpNK3 with high-affinity. RO5328673 acted as an insurmountable antagonist at both human and guinea-pig NK3 receptors in the [(3)H]IP accumulation assay. In binding kinetic analyses, [(3)H]RO5328673 had fast association and dissociation rates at hNK2 while it had a fast association rate and a remarkably slow dissociation rate at gp and hNK3. In electrophysiological recordings of gp SNpc, RO5328673 inhibited the senktide-induced potentiation of spontaneous activity of dopaminergic neurons with an insurmountable mechanism of action. RO5328673 exhibited in-vivo activity in gerbils, robustly reversing the senktide-induced locomotor activity. The TM2 residue gpNK3-A114(2.58) (threonine in all other species) was identified as the critical residue for the RO5328673's slower dissociation kinetics and stronger insurmountable mode of antagonism in the guinea-pig as compared to hNK3-T139(2.58). Using site-directed mutagenesis, [(3)H]RO5328673 binding and rhodopsin-based modeling, the important molecular determinants of the RO5328673-binding pocket of hNK3 were determined. A comparison of the RO5328673-binding pocket with that of osanetant showed that two antagonists have similar contact sides on hNK3 binding crevice except for three mutations V95L(1.42), Y247W(5.38), V255I(5.46), which behaved differently between interacting modes of two antagonists in hNK3. PMID:25107588

  12. The thermodynamic dissociation constants of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by the least-squares nonlinear regression of multiwavelength spectrophotometric pH-titration data.

    PubMed

    Meloun, Milan; Bordovská, Sylva; Galla, Lubomír

    2007-11-30

    The mixed dissociation constants of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, flurbiprofen and ketoprofen at various ionic strengths I of range 0.003-0.155, and at temperatures of 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, were determined with the use of two different multiwavelength and multivariate treatments of spectral data, SPECFIT/32 and SQUAD(84) nonlinear regression analyses and INDICES factor analysis. The factor analysis in the INDICES program predicts the correct number of components, and even the presence of minor ones, when the data quality is high and the instrumental error is known. The thermodynamic dissociation constant pK(a)(T) was estimated by nonlinear regression of (pK(a), I) data at 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Goodness-of-fit tests for various regression diagnostics enabled the reliability of the parameter estimates found to be proven. PALLAS, MARVIN, SPARC, ACD/pK(a) and Pharma Algorithms predict pK(a) being based on the structural formulae of drug compounds in agreement with the experimental value. The best agreement seems to be between the ACD/pK(a) program and experimentally found values and with SPARC. PALLAS and MARVIN predicted pK(a,pred) values with larger bias errors in comparison with the experimental value for all four drugs. PMID:17825517

  13. Simultaneous determination of hydrophobicity and dissociation constant for a large set of compounds by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Łukasz; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Kaliszan, Roman; Wiczling, Paweł

    2015-10-16

    Fast and reliable methods for the determination of hydrophobicity and acidity are desired in pre-clinical drug development phases to eliminate compounds with poor pharmacokinetic properties. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP HPLC) coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RP HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS) is a convenient technique for that purpose. In this work we determined the chromatographic measure of hydrophobicity (logkw) and dissociation constant (pKa) simultaneously for a large and diverse group of 161 drugs. Retention times were determined by means of RP HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS for a series of pH and organic modifier gradients. We were able to measure retention times for 140 out of 161 (87%) compounds. For those analytes logkw and pKa parameters were calculated and compared with literature and ACD Labs-calculated data. The determined chromatographic measure of hydrophobicity and dissociation constant was closely related to literature and theoretically calculated values. Applied methodology achieved the medium-throughput screening rate of 100 compounds per day and proved to be a simple, fast and reliable approach of assessing important physicochemical properties of drugs. This technique has certain limitations as it is not applicable for very hydrophilic analytes (logP<0.5) and compounds with identical molar masses. PMID:26365909

  14. Determination of binding constants by affinity capillary electrophoresis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and phase-distribution methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Weber, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    Many methods for determining intermolecular interactions have been described in the literature in the past several decades. Chief among them are methods based on spectroscopic changes, particularly those based on absorption or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [especially proton NMR (1H NMR)]. Recently, there have been put forward several new methods that are particularly adaptable, use very small quantities of material, and do not place severe requirements on the spectroscopic properties of the binding partners. This review covers new developments in affinity capillary electrophoresis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and phasetransfer methods. PMID:19802330

  15. Evaluation of three neutral capillary coatings for the determination of analyte-cyclodextrin binding constants by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Application to N,N'-disubstituted piperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Danel, Cécile; Melnyk, Patricia; Azaroual, Nathalie; Larchanché, Paul-Emmanuel; Goossens, Jean-François; Vaccher, Claude

    2016-07-15

    The performances of three neutral static coatings (hydroxypropyl cellulose, polyethylene oxide and poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) have been evaluated in order to determine the binding constants of the complexes formed between four polycationic compounds (piperazine derivatives) and four cyclodextrins of pharmaceutical interest (β-CD, HP-β-CD, Me-β-CD and sulfobutyl ether-β-CD) by affinity capillary electrophoresis. The physically-adsorbed poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) coating proves to be the more efficient to mask the silanol groups of the capillary wall since the lowest electroosmotic flow was measured for this coating. Moreover, it drastically reduces the adsorption of the compounds since it allows a correct repeatability of their migration time, higher efficiencies of the peaks and no baseline shift. Then, it was verified for four complexes that this coating allows a correct determination of the binding constants avoiding the CD adsorption which is responsible of an undervaluation of binding constants. The highest binding constants are obtained using the anionic sulfobutyl ether-β-CD (SBE-β-CD). The structure of the complex formed between the tacrine derivative and the SBE-β-CD was further investigated through 2D ROESY NMR experiments and structure-binding constant relationships. Results suggest that the inclusion in the SBE-β-CD cavity occurs through the aliphatic ring portion of the tacrine moiety. PMID:27286645

  16. Strong ion difference excess and corrected strong ion difference model incorporating the variations in apparent dissociation constant for human blood plasma electro-neutrality equilibria.

    PubMed

    Rana, Amar P S; Rana, Sam Pal; Rana, Jay Pal; Singh, Sumarjeet

    2006-01-01

    We introduce computed value of the corrected Strong Ion Difference (SID) by including the large variability of the apparent dissociation constant pK' in non-logarithmic form on SID in Henderson-Hasselbach bicarbonate ion aqueous equilibria thereby resulting in a significant correction of up to 27% in SID. We further introduce a new concept of Strong Ion Difference Excess (SIDE) as the change in SID from the reference value at pH = 7.4, pCO2 = 5.33 Kpa (or 40 torr). The SIDE is a particularly useful quick measure when one can rule out the effects of hemoglobin, weak proteins and unidentified components for human blood plasma. PMID:17051730

  17. Potential misevaluation of the ground-state dissociation constant from fluorimetric titrations: application to the ion indicators SBFI, PBFI, and fura-2.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, A; Boens, N; Meuwis, K; Ameloot, M

    1997-02-01

    A test based on time-resolved fluorescence experiments is proposed to assess the interference of an excited-state reaction with the fluorimetric determination of the ground-state dissociation constant Kd of ion [symbol: see text] fluorescent indicator complexes. If an inflection point occurs in the plot of the fluorescence signal vs -log [ion] in the concentration range of the ion where both decay times are invariant, this inflection point can be associated with the correct Kd. In contrast, the inflection point(s) in the concentration range where the decay times vary cannot be attributed to Kd. The test is applied to the fluorescent ion indicators SBFI (for Na+), PBFI (for K+), and Fura-2 (for Ca2+). In all three cases the decay times are invariant in the physiological concentration ranges of the respective ions, indicating that the fluorimetrically determined Kd values are actually the true Kd values. PMID:9025965

  18. Fractionation of oil sands-process affected water using pH-dependent extractions: a study of dissociation constants for naphthenic acids species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongfu; Sun, Nian; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; McPhedran, Kerry N; Changalov, Mohamed; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    The fractionation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) via pH-dependent extractions was performed to quantitatively investigate naphthenic acids (NAs, CnH2n+ZO2) and oxidized NAs (Ox-NAs) species (CnH2n+ZO3 and CnH2n+ZO4) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS). A mathematical model was also developed to estimate the dissociation constant pKa for NAs species, considering the liquid-liquid extraction process and the aqueous layer acid-base equilibrium. This model provides estimated dissociation constants for compounds in water samples based on fractionation extraction and relative quantification. Overall, the sum of O2-, O3-, and O4-NAs species accounted for 33.6% of total extracted organic matter. Accumulative extracted masses at different pHs revealed that every oxygen atom added to NAs increases the pKa (i.e., O2-NAs

  19. Modeling Taylor dispersion injections: determination of kinetic/affinity interaction constants and diffusion coefficients in label-free biosensing.

    PubMed

    Quinn, John G

    2012-02-15

    A new method based on Taylor dispersion has been developed that enables an analyte gradient to be titrated over a ligand-coated surface for kinetic/affinity analysis of interactions from a minimal number of injections. Taylor dispersion injections generate concentration ranges in excess of four orders of magnitude and enable the analyte diffusion coefficient to be reliably estimated as a fitted parameter when fitting binding interaction models. A numerical model based on finite element analysis, Monte Carlo simulations, and statistical profiling were used to compare the Taylor dispersion method with standard fixed concentration injections in terms of parameter correlation, linearity of parameter error space, and global versus local model fitting. A dramatic decrease in parameter correlations was observed for TDi curves relative to curves from standard fixed concentration injections when surface saturation was achieved. In FCI the binding progress is recorded with respect to injection time, whereas in TDi the second time dependency encoded in the analyte gradient increases resolving power. This greatly lowers the dependence of all parameters on each other and on experimental interferences. When model parameters were fitted locally, the performance of TDis remained comparable to global model fitting, whereas fixed concentration binding response curves yielded unreliable parameter estimates. PMID:22197421

  20. Quantification of chemical states, dissociation constants and contents of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of biochars produced at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zaiming; Xiao, Xin; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Surface functional groups such as carboxyl play a vital role in the environmental applications of biochar as a soil amendment. However, the quantification of oxygen-containing groups on a biochar surface still lacks systematical investigation. In this paper, we report an integrated method combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques that were established to quantitatively identify the chemical states, dissociation constants (pK(a)), and contents of oxygen-containing groups on dairy manure-derived biochars prepared at 100-700 °C. Unexpectedly, the dissociation pH of carboxyl groups on the biochar surface covered a wide range of pH values (pH 2-11), due to the varied structural microenvironments and chemical states. For low temperature biochars (≤ 350 °C), carboxyl existed not only as hydrogen-bonded carboxyl and unbonded carboxyl groups but also formed esters at the surface of biochars. The esters consumed OH(-) via saponification in the alkaline pH region and enhanced the dissolution of organic matter from biochars. For high temperature biochars (≥ 500 °C), esters came from carboxyl were almost eliminated via carbonization (ester pyrolysis), while lactones were developed. The surface density of carboxyl groups on biochars decreased sharply with the increase of the biochar-producing temperature, but the total contents of the surface carboxyls for different biochars were comparable (with a difference <3-fold) as a result of the expanded surface area at high pyrolytic temperatures. Understanding the wide pKa ranges and the abundant contents of carboxyl groups on biochars is a prerequisite to recognition of the multifunctional applications and biogeochemical cycling of biochars. PMID:25453912

  1. Asymmetry in inward- and outward-affinity constant of transport explain unidirectional lysine flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Frans; Klooster, Joury S van 't; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Luck, Katja; Pols, Tjeerd; Urbatsch, Ina L; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The import of basic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be unidirectional, which is not typical of how secondary transporters work. Since studies of energy coupling and transport kinetics are complicated in vivo, we purified the major lysine transporter (Lyp1) of yeast and reconstituted the protein into lipid vesicles. We show that the Michaelis constant (KM) of transport from out-to-in is well in the millimolar range and at least 3 to 4-orders of magnitude higher than that of transport in the opposite direction, disfavoring the efflux of solute via Lyp1. We also find that at low values of the proton motive force, the transport by Lyp1 is comparatively slow. We benchmarked the properties of eukaryotic Lyp1 to that of the prokaryotic homologue LysP and find that LysP has a similar KM for transport from in-to-out and out-to-in, consistent with rapid influx and efflux. We thus explain the previously described unidirectional nature of lysine transport in S. cerevisiae by the extraordinary kinetics of Lyp1 and provide a mechanism and rationale for previous observations. The high asymmetry in transport together with secondary storage in the vacuole allow the cell to accumulate basic amino acids to very high levels. PMID:27550794

  2. Asymmetry in inward- and outward-affinity constant of transport explain unidirectional lysine flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Frans; Klooster, Joury S. van ‘t; Ruiz, Stephanie J.; Luck, Katja; Pols, Tjeerd; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The import of basic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be unidirectional, which is not typical of how secondary transporters work. Since studies of energy coupling and transport kinetics are complicated in vivo, we purified the major lysine transporter (Lyp1) of yeast and reconstituted the protein into lipid vesicles. We show that the Michaelis constant (KM) of transport from out-to-in is well in the millimolar range and at least 3 to 4-orders of magnitude higher than that of transport in the opposite direction, disfavoring the efflux of solute via Lyp1. We also find that at low values of the proton motive force, the transport by Lyp1 is comparatively slow. We benchmarked the properties of eukaryotic Lyp1 to that of the prokaryotic homologue LysP and find that LysP has a similar KM for transport from in-to-out and out-to-in, consistent with rapid influx and efflux. We thus explain the previously described unidirectional nature of lysine transport in S. cerevisiae by the extraordinary kinetics of Lyp1 and provide a mechanism and rationale for previous observations. The high asymmetry in transport together with secondary storage in the vacuole allow the cell to accumulate basic amino acids to very high levels. PMID:27550794

  3. Statistical theory of chromatography: new outlooks for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Denizot, F C; Delaage, M A

    1975-01-01

    We have developed further the statistical approach to chromatography initiated by Giddings and Eyring, and applied it to affinity chromatography. By means of a convenient expression of moments the convergence towards the Laplace-Gauss distribution has been established. The Gaussian character is not preserved if other causes of dispersion are taken into account, but expressions of moments can be obtained in a generalized form. A simple procedure is deduced for expressing the fundamental constants of the model in terms of purely experimental quantities. Thus, affinity chromatography can be used to determine rate constants of association and dissociation in a range considered as the domain of the stopped-flow methods. PMID:1061072

  4. Preferential solvation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by methanol in methanol-water mixtures: A potential overestimation of the dissociation constant of PFOA using a Yasuda-Shedlovsky plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsuna, Shuzo; Hori, Hisao; Sonoda, Takaaki; Iwakami, Toru; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2012-03-01

    Solvation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in methanol-water mixed solvents was investigated by means of the mass spectrometric analyses of clusters in the solutions. The observed clusters were composed of PFOA, methanol, and water molecules. The molecular composition of the clusters showed that PFOA was preferentially solvated by methanol in the methanol-water mixed solvents, and that the ratio of methanol molecules in the PFOA solvation sphere was beyond 0.6 at the bulk methanol mole fraction (xMeOH) = 0.045. The microscopic environment of PFOA was almost occupied by the methanol from such lower xMeOH (xMeOH ≥ 0.045), and hence the ratio of methanol in the PFOA solvation sphere did not change at xMeOH ≥ 0.045 as much as the bulk xMeOH. This preferential solvation of PFOA by methanol suggested a potential overestimation on the dissociation constant (pKa) of PFOA extrapolated from a Yasuda-Shedlovsky plot.

  5. Application of chemometrics in determination of the acid dissociation constants (pKa) of several benzodiazepine derivatives as poorly soluble drugs in the presence of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Tavakol Heidary; Radmehr, Moojan; Khajavi, Farzad; Mahjub, Reza

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the acid dissociation constants (pKa) of some benzodiazepine derivatives including chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, lorazepam, and oxazepam in aqueous micellar solution were determined spectrophotometrically at an ionic strength of 0.1M at 25°C. The effect of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic and sodium n-dodecyl sulfate(SDS) as an anionic surfactant on the absorption spectra of benzodiazepine drugs at different pH values were studied. The acidity constants of all related species are estimated by considering the surfactant concept and the application of chemometric methods using the whole spectral fitting of the collected data to an established factor analysis model. DATAN® software (Ver. 5.0, Multid Analyses AB, and Goteborg, Sweden) was applied to determine the acidity constants. In this study, a simple and fast method to determine the ionization constant (pKa) of poorly soluble drugs was developed using surfactants. The acidity constant (i.e. pKa) for chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, lorazepam, and oxazepam were reported as 4.62, pKa1 value of 1.52 and pKa2 value of 10.51, pKa1 value of 1.53 and pKa2 value of 10.92 and pKa1 value 1.63 and pKa2 value of 11.21 respectively. The results showed that the peak values in the spectrophotometric absorption spectra of drugs are influenced by the presence of anionic and cationic surfactants. According to the results, by changing the SDS concentration from 0 to 0.05M, the pKa of chlordiazepoxide was increased to 5.9, the pKa1 of lorazepam was decreased to 0.1 while the pKa2 was increased to 11.5. Increase in SDS concentration has not shown significant alteration in pKa of clonazepam and oxazepam. Results indicate that by Changing the CTAB concentration from 0 to 0.05M, the pKa of chlordiazepoxide was reduced to 4.4, the pKa1 of clonazepam was decreased to 0.1 and the pKa2 was decreased to 9.1, the pKa1 of lorazepam was decreased to 0.4 and the pKa2 was decreased to 9.4, the pKa1 of oxazepam was

  6. Structure-based model profiles affinity constant of drugs with hPEPT1 for rapid virtual screening of hPEPT1's substrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Meng, S

    2016-08-01

    The human proton-coupled peptide transporter (hPEPT1) with broad substrates is an important route for improving the pharmacokinetic performance of drugs. Thus, it is essential to predict the affinity constant between drug molecule and hPEPT1 for rapid virtual screening of hPEPT1's substrate during lead optimization, candidate selection and hPEPT1 prodrug design. Here, a structure-based in silico model for 114 compounds was constructed based on eight structural parameters. This model was built by the multiple linear regression method and satisfied all the prerequisites of the regression models. For the entire data set, the r(2) and adjusted r(2) values were 0.74 and 0.72, respectively. Then, this model was used to perform substrate/non-substrate classification. For 29 drugs from DrugBank database, all were correctly classified as substrates of hPEPT1. This model was also used to perform substrate/non-substrate classification for 18 drugs and their prodrugs; this QSAR model also can distinguish between the substrate and non-substrate. In conclusion, the QSAR model in this paper was validated by a large external data set, and all results indicated that the developed model was robust, stable, and can be used for rapid virtual screening of hPEPT1's substrate in the early stage of drug discovery. PMID:27586363

  7. Ab initio characterization of the HCO{sup x} (x = {minus}1, 0, +1) species: Structures, vibrational frequencies, CH bond dissociation energies, and HCO ionization potential and electron affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Mourik, T. van; Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Peterson, K.A.

    2000-03-23

    The potential energy surfaces of the HCO{sup x} (x = +1, 0, -1) species near their equilibrium geometries have been calculated employing coupled cluster methods with augmented correlation consistent basis sets. The equilibrium structures, vibrational frequencies, zero point energies, and dissociation energies were computed for all three species. Valence-electron CCSD(T) calculations with the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set predict CH bond dissociation energies, D{sub 0}, of 140.3 kcal/mol for HCO{sup +}, 14.0 kcal/mol for HCO, and 4.5 kcal/mol for HCO{sup {minus}}, in good agreement with experiment (140.1 {+-} 1, 13.9--14.3, and 5.2 {+-} 0.2 kcal/mol, respectively). The same calculations predict the electron affinity, EA{sub 0}, and ionization potential, IP{sub 0}, of HCO to be 7.7 and 187.3 kcal/mol; these values are within 0.5 kcal/mol of the measured values. Inclusion of core-valence correlation corrections has only a minor effect on the calculated energetics.

  8. Ultrasensitive characterization of site-specific glycosylation of affinity-purified haptoglobin from lung cancer patient plasma using 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular liquid chromatography-linear ion trap collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L

    2011-03-15

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography-collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of the glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization, 200-500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrixes. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultranarrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap (LTQ) collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometer to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low picomole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patient plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol of Hpt digest (13 ng of protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS system allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ∼100 amol level. The PLOT LC-MS system is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace

  9. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  10. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing Peptides Using Non-Activated Immobilized Metal Affinity Cchromatography Resin Enrichment and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Yang, Feng; Qian, Weijun; Brown, Roslyn N.; Wang, Yuexi; Merkley, Eric D.; Park, Jea H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-10-01

    c-type cytochromes play essential roles in many biological activities of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including electron transfer, enzyme catalysis and induction of apoptosis. We report a novel enrichment strategy for identifying c-type heme-containing peptides that uses non-activated IMAC resin. The strategy demonstrated at least seven-fold enrichment for heme-containing peptides digested from a cytochrome c protein standard, and quantitative linear performance was also assessed for heme-containing peptide enrichment. Heme-containing peptides extracted from the periplasmic fraction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were further identified using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated the applicability of this enrichment strategy to identify c-type heme-containing peptides from a highly complex biological sample, and at the same time, confirmed the periplasmic localization of heme-containing proteins during suboxic respiration activities of S. oneidensis MR-1.

  11. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  12. A Small, Dilute-Cytoplasm, High-Affinity, Novel Bacterium Isolated by Extinction Culture and Having Kinetic Constants Compatible with Growth at Ambient Concentrations of Dissolved Nutrients in Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Button, D. K.; Robertson, Betsy R.; Lepp, Paul W.; Schmidt, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    Dilutions of raw seawater produced a bacterial isolate capable of extended growth in unamended seawater. Its 2.9-Mb genome size and 40-fg dry mass were similar to values for many naturally occurring aquatic organotrophs, but water and DNA comprised a large portion of this small chemoheterotroph, as compared to Escherichia coli. The isolate used only a few aromatic hydrocarbons and acetate, and glucose and amino acid incorporation were entirely absent, although many membrane and cytoplasmic proteins were inducible; it was named Cycloclasticus oligotrophus. A general rate equation that incorporates saturation phenomena into specific affinity theory is derived. It is used to relate the kinetic constants for substrate uptake by the isolate to its cellular proteins. The affinity constant KA for toluene was low at 1.3 μg/liter under optimal conditions, similar to those measured in seawater, and the low value was ascribed to an unknown slow step such as limitation by a cytoplasmic enzyme; KA increased with increasing specific affinities. Specific affinities, a°s, were protocol sensitive, but under optimal conditions were 47.4 liters/mg of cells/h, the highest reported in the literature and a value sufficient for growth in seawater at concentrations sometimes found. Few rRNA operons, few cytoplasmic proteins, a small genome size, and a small cell size, coupled with a high a°s and a low solids content and the ability to grow without intentionally added substrate, are consistent with the isolation of a marine bacterium with properties typical of the bulk of those present. PMID:9797308

  13. Predicting pressure-dependent unimolecular rate constants using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling combined with system-specific quantum RRK theory: a definitive test for fluoroform dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the falloff in rate constants of gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate constants as the pressure is lowered is a fundamental problem in chemical kinetics, with practical importance for combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and essentially all gas-phase reaction mechanisms. In the present work, we use our recently developed system-specific quantum RRK theory, calibrated by canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling, combined with the Lindemann-Hinshelwood mechanism, to model the dissociation reaction of fluoroform (CHF3), which provides a definitive test for falloff modeling. Our predicted pressure-dependent thermal rate constants are in excellent agreement with experimental values over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The present validation of our methodology, which is able to include variational transition state effects, multidimensional tunneling based on the directly calculated potential energy surface along the tunneling path, and torsional and other vibrational anharmonicity, together with state-of-the-art reaction-path-based direct dynamics calculations, is important because the method is less empirical than models routinely used for generating full mechanisms, while also being simpler in key respects than full master equation treatments and the full reduced falloff curve and modified strong collision methods of Troe. PMID:27273734

  14. The high-spin cytochrome o' component of the cytochrome bo-type quinol oxidase in membranes from Escherichia coli: formation of the primary oxygenated species at low temperatures is characterized by a slow 'on' rate and low dissociation constant.

    PubMed

    Poole, R K; Salmon, I; Chance, B

    1994-05-01

    Cytochromes b and o in membrane vesicles from aerobically grown Escherichia coli were readily reduced by succinate; one cytochrome, which we propose should be called cytochrome o', reacted with CO in the Fe(II) state to give a photodissociable CO adduct. The photodissociation spectrum (photolysed minus pre-photolysis) at sub-zero temperatures had a relatively high gamma/alpha absorbance ratio, indicating a high-spin haem, which, in the reduced state, probably contributes little to the sharp alpha absorbance of the oxidase complex in membranes. Reaction with oxygen of the unliganded high-spin haem between -132 degrees C and -95 degrees C following photolytic activation gave a product that is identified as the oxygenated form, being spectrally similar to, but not identical with, the CO adduct. In membranes, the forward velocity constant at -95 degrees C was 61 M-1s-1, and the dissociation constant was 1.6 x 10(-5) M O2, as it is in intact cells. These data clearly distinguish the oxygen-trapping strategy of the cytochrome o' in this oxidase from that of cytochrome a3 and also suggest that the presence of the soluble flavohaemoglobin (Hmp) in intact cells is without effect on such measurements of the primary oxygen reaction. In view of recent findings that this oxidase complex contains predominantly one mole of haem O and one of haem B, a revised nomenclature for the oxidase complex is proposed, namely, cytochrome bo'. PMID:8025668

  15. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  16. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Sperm in poor quality semen from bulls during heat stress have a lower affinity for binding hydrogen-3 heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Ax, R.L.; Gilbert, G.R.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Binding assays with (/sup 3/H) heparin were performed using spermatozoa collected prior to, during, and following summer heat stress to dairy bulls. Ejaculates collected in August 1983 after a period of ambient temperatures exceeding 29.4/sup 0/C exhibited a high frequency of abnormal sperm, and motility was reduced in some samples. Sperm in samples collected during heat stress possessed dissociation constants for binding (/sup 3/H) heparin ranging from 134.5 to 163.2 nmol. In contrast, sperm in semen collected prior to and after heat stress had significantly lower dissociation constants (higher affinity) for (/sup 3/H)heparin, 12.9 to 56.4 nmol. The number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H) heparin on sperm did not change among collection periods. It was concluded that the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H) heparin may reflect membrane integrity of bull sperm.

  18. Spondylopelvic dissociation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew P; Smith, Harvey E; Schuster, James M; Donegan, Derek; Mehta, Samir; Ahn, Jaimo

    2014-01-01

    Spondylopelvic dissociation is a complex injury pattern resulting in multiplanar instability of the lumbopelvis. These injuries have traditionally been known as "suicide jumper's fractures" and have recently increased in prevalence as a result of under-vehicle explosions seen in the past decade of military conflicts in the Middle East. The hallmarks of spondylopelvic dissociation are bilateral vertical sacral fractures with a horizontal component, resulting in lumbosacral instability in the sagittal and axial planes. Surgical treatment has evolved greatly and both percutaneous and open options are available, with triangular osteosynthesis being the most relied on method of fixation. PMID:24267208

  19. Km as an Apparent Dissociation Constant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohlberg, Jeffrey A.

    1979-01-01

    An approach to enzyme kinetics which emphasizes similarities between equilibrium binding and steady state kinetics is outlined. It is intended for use in teaching biochemistry to beginning students. (Author/SA)

  20. Affinity chromatography based on a combinatorial strategy for rerythropoietin purification.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ceron, María C; Marani, Mariela M; Taulés, Marta; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Albericio, Fernando; Cascone, Osvaldo; Camperi, Silvia A

    2011-05-01

    Small peptides containing fewer than 10 amino acids are promising ligand candidates with which to build affinity chromatographic systems for industrial protein purification. The application of combinatorial peptide synthesis strategies greatly facilitates the discovery of suitable ligands for any given protein of interest. Here we sought to identify peptide ligands with affinity for recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), which is used for the treatment of anemia. A combinatorial library containing the octapeptides X-X-X-Phe-X-X-Ala-Gly, where X = Ala, Asp, Glu, Phe, His, Leu, Asn, Pro, Ser, or Thr, was synthesized on HMBA-ChemMatrix resin by the divide-couple-recombine method. For the library screening, rhEPO was coupled to either Texas Red or biotin. Fluorescent beads or beads showing a positive reaction with streptavidin-peroxidase were isolated. After cleavage, peptides were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Fifty-seven beads showed a positive reaction. Peptides showing more consensuses were synthesized, and their affinity to rhEPO was assessed using a plasma resonance biosensor. Dissociation constant values in the range of 1-18 μM were obtained. The best two peptides were immobilized on Sepharose, and the resultant chromatographic matrixes showed affinity for rhEPO with dissociation constant values between 1.8 and 2.7 μM. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was spiked with rhEPO, and the artificial mixture was loaded on Peptide-Sepharose columns. The rhEPO was recovered in the elution fraction with a yield of 90% and a purity of 95% and 97% for P1-Sepharose and P2-Sepharose, respectively. PMID:21495625

  1. Streptavidin aptamers: affinity tags for the study of RNAs and ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Srisawat, C; Engelke, D R

    2001-01-01

    RNA affinity tags would be very useful for the study of RNAs and ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) as a means for rapid detection, immobilization, and purification. To develop a new affinity tag, streptavidin-binding RNA ligands, termed "aptamers," were identified from a random RNA library using in vitro selection. Individual aptamers were classified into two groups based on common sequences, and representative members of the groups had sufficiently low dissociation constants to suggest they would be useful affinity tools. Binding of the aptamers to streptavidin was blocked by presaturation of the streptavidin with biotin, and biotin could be used to dissociate RNA/streptavidin complexes. To investigate the practicality of using the aptamer as an affinity tag, one of the higher affinity aptamers was inserted into RPR1 RNA, the large RNA subunit of RNase P. The aptamer-tagged RNase P could be specifically isolated using commercially available streptavidin-agarose and recovered in a catalytically active form when biotin was used as an eluting agent under mild conditions. The aptamer tag was also used to demonstrate that RNase P exists in a monomeric form, and is not tightly associated with RNase MRP, a closely related ribonucleoprotein enzyme. These results show that the streptavidin aptamers are potentially powerful tools for the study of RNAs or RNPs. PMID:11345441

  2. Mechanism of electrocatalytic hydrogen production by a di-iron model of iron-iron hydrogenase: a density functional theory study of proton dissociation constants and electrode reduction potentials.

    PubMed

    Surawatanawong, Panida; Tye, Jesse W; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Hall, Michael B

    2010-03-28

    Simple dinuclear iron dithiolates such as (mu-SCH2CH2CH2S)[Fe(CO)3]2, (1) and (mu-SCH2CH2S)[Fe(CO)3]2 (2) are functional models for diiron-hydrogenases, [FeFe]-H2ases, that catalyze the reduction of protons to H2. The mechanism of H2 production with 2 as the catalyst and with both toluenesulfonic (HOTs) and acetic (HOAc) acids as the H+ source in CH3CN solvent has been examined by density functional theory (DFT). Proton dissociation constants (pKa) and electrode reduction potentials (E(o)) are directly computed and compared to the measured pKa of HOTs and HOAc acids and the experimental reduction potentials. Computations show that when the strong acid, HOTs, is used as a proton source the one-electron reduced species 2- can be protonated to form a bridging hydride complex as the most stable structure. Then, this species can be reduced and protonated to form dihydrogen and regenerate 2. This cycle produces H2 via an ECEC process at an applied potential of -1.8 V vs. Fc/Fc+. A second faster process opens for this system when the species produced at the ECEC step above is further reduced and H2 release returns the system to 2- rather than 2, an E[CECE] process. On the other hand, when the weak acid, HOAc, is the proton source a more negative applied reduction potential (-2.2 V vs. Fc/Fc+) is necessary. At this potential two one-electron reductions yield the dianion 2(2-) before the first protonation, which in this case occurs on the thiolate. Subsequent reduction and protonation form dihydrogen and regenerate 2- through an E[ECEC] process. PMID:20221544

  3. Microcantilever-Based Label-Free Characterization of Temperature-Dependent Biomolecular Affinity Binding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Fengliang; Nguyen, ThaiHuu; Xu, Yong; Lin, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents label-free characterization of temperature-dependent biomolecular affinity binding on solid surfaces using a microcantilever-based device. The device consists of a Parylene cantilever one side of which is coated with a gold film and functionalized with molecules as an affinity receptor to a target analyte. The cantilever is located in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chamber that is integrated with a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) resistive temperature sensor on the underlying substrate. The ITO sensor allows for real-time measurements of the chamber temperature, as well as unobstructed optical access for reflection-based optical detection of the cantilever deflection. To test the temperature-dependent binding between the target and receptor, the temperature of the chamber is maintained at a constant setpoint, while a solution of unlabeled analyte molecules is continuously infused through the chamber. The measured cantilever deflection is used to determine the target-receptor binding characteristics. We demonstrate label-free characterization of temperature-dependent binding kinetics of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) protein with an aptamer receptor. Affinity binding properties including the association and dissociation rate constants as well as equilibrium dissociation constant are obtained, and shown to exhibit significant dependencies on temperature. PMID:24723743

  4. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  5. Affine hypersurfaces with parallel difference tensor relative to affine α-connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cece

    2014-12-01

    Li and Zhang (2014) studied affine hypersurfaces of R n + 1 with parallel difference tensor relative to the affine α-connection ∇ (α), and characterized the generalized Cayley hypersurfaces by K n - 1 ≠ 0 and ∇ (α) K = 0 for some nonzero constant α, where the affine α-connection ∇ (α) of information geometry was introduced on affine hypersurface. In this paper, by a slightly different method we continue to study affine hypersurfaces with ∇ (α) K = 0, if α = 0 we further assume that the Pick invariant vanishes and affine metric is of constant sectional curvature. It is proved that they are either hyperquadrics or improper affine hypersphere with flat indefinite affine metric, the latter can be locally given as a graph of a polynomial of at most degree n + 1 with constant Hessian determinant. In particular, if the affine metric is definite, Lorentzian, or its negative index is 2, we complete the classification of such hypersurfaces.

  6. Recurrent Episodes of Dissociative Fugue

    PubMed Central

    Angothu, Hareesh; Pabbathi, Lokeswar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative fugue is rare entity to encounter with possible differentials of epilepsy and malingering. It is one of the dissociative disorders rarely seen in clinical practice more often because of the short lasting nature of this condition. This might also be because of organized travel of the individuals during the episodes and return to their families after the recovery from episodes. This is a case description of a patient who has experienced total three episodes of dissociative fugue. The patient has presented during the third episode and two prior episodes were diagnosed as fugue episodes retrospectively based on the history. Planned travel in this case by the patient to a distant location was prevented because of early diagnosis and constant vigilance till the recovery. As in this case, it may be more likely that persons with Dissociative fugue may develop similar episodes if they encounter exceptional perceived stress. However, such conclusions may require follow-up studies. PMID:27114633

  7. A comparison of affinity constants for muscarine-sensitive acetylcholine receptors in guinea-pig atrial pacemaker cells at 29 degrees C and in ileum at 29 degrees C and 37 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, R B; Berry, K J; Glenton, P A; Nilolaou, N M; Soh, K S

    1976-01-01

    1 The affinity of 17 compounds for muscarine-sensitive acetylcholine receptors in atrial pacemaker cells and ileum of the guinea-pig has been measured at 29 degrees C in Ringer-Locke solution. Measurements were also made at 37 degrees C with 7 of them. 2 Some of the compounds had much higher affinity for the receptors in the ileum than for those in the atria. For the most selective compound, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide, the difference was approximately 20-fold. The receptors in the atria are therefore different the structure from those in the ileum. 3 The effect of temperature on affinity are not the same for all the compounds, tested indicating different enthalpies and entropies of adsorption and accounting for some of the difficulty experienced in predicting the affinity of new compounds. PMID:1000135

  8. Purification of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; De Backer, J P; Guillet, J C; Vanderheyden, P; Vauquelin, G; Strosberg, A D

    1983-01-01

    Calf forebrain homogenates contain 2.8 pM muscarinic acetylcholine receptors per mg of protein. [3H]Antagonist saturation binding experiments under equilibrium conditions revealed a single class of sites with equilibrium dissociation constants of 0.82 nM for [3H]dexetimide and 0.095 nM for [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. Displacement binding studies with agonists revealed the presence of low and high affinity sites. Here we describe the solubilization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with digitonin and their purification by affinity chromatography using an affinity gel which consisted of dexetimide coupled to Affi-Gel 10 (i.e., carboxy N-hydroxysuccinimide esters linked via a 1 nm spacer arm to agarose beads). Purified proteins were obtained by specific elution with muscarinic drugs, i.e., the antagonist atropine and the irreversible ligand propylbenzilylcholine mustard. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the radioiodinated purified preparations revealed a major 70-K protein. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6605245

  9. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  10. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  11. Analysis of free drug fractions in human serum by ultrafast affinity extraction and two-dimensional affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast affinity extraction and a two-dimensional high performance affinity chromatographic system were used to measure the free fractions for various drugs in serum and at typical therapeutic concentrations. Pooled samples of normal serum or serum from diabetic patients were utilized in this work. Several drug models (i.e., quinidine, diazepam, gliclazide, tolbutamide, and acetohexamide) were examined that represented a relatively wide range of therapeutic concentrations and affinities for human serum albumin (HSA). The two-dimensional system consisted of an HSA microcolumn for the extraction of a free drug fraction, followed by a larger HSA analytical column for the further separation and measurement of this fraction. Factors that were optimized in this method included the flow rates, column sizes, and column switching times that were employed. The final extraction times used for isolating the free drug fractions were 333-665 ms or less. The dissociation rate constants for several of the drugs with soluble HSA were measured during system optimization, giving results that agreed with reference values. In the final system, free drug fractions in the range of 0.7-9.5% were measured and gave good agreement with values that were determined by ultrafiltration. Association equilibrium constants or global affinities were also estimated by this approach for the drugs with soluble HSA. The results for the two-dimensional system were obtained in 5-10 min or less and required only 1-5 μL of serum per injection. The same approach could be adapted for work with other drugs and proteins in clinical samples or for biomedical research. PMID:26462924

  12. Comparative Study of Three Methods for Affinity Measurements: Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled with UV Detection and Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Gleb G.; Logie, Jennifer; Okhonin, Victor; Renaud, Justin B.; Mayer, Paul M.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2012-07-01

    We present affinity capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ACE-MS) as a comprehensive separation technique for label-free solution-based affinity analysis. The application of ACE-MS for measuring affinity constants between eight small molecule drugs [ibuprofen, s-flurbiprofen, diclofenac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, folic acid, resveratrol, and 4,4'-(propane-1,3-diyl) dibenzoic acid] and β-cyclodextrin is described. We couple on-line ACE with MS to combine the separation and kinetic capability of ACE together with the molecular weight and structural elucidation of MS in one system. To understand the full potential of ACE-MS, we compare it with two other methods: Direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and ACE with UV detection (ACE-UV). After the evaluation, DIMS provides less reliable equilibrium dissociation constants than separation-based ACE-UV and ACE-MS, and cannot be used solely for the study of noncovalent interactions. ACE-MS determines apparent dissociation constants for all reacting small molecules in a mixture, even in cases when drugs overlap with each other during separation. The ability of ACE-MS to interact, separate, and rapidly scan through m/z can facilitate the simultaneous affinity analysis of multiple interacting pairs, potentially leading to the high-throughput screening of drug candidates.

  13. Ab initio molecular orbital study of substituent effects in vaska type complexes (trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X): Electron affinities, ionization potentials, carbonyl stretch frequencies, and the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} dissociative addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Hasanayn, F.; Goldman, A.S.; Krogh-Jespersen, K.

    1994-10-26

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations are used to study substituent effects in Vaska-type complexes, trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (1-X) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, CN, H, CH{sub 3}, SiH{sub 3}, OH, and SH; L = PH{sub 3}). Both the electron affinity and the ionization potential of 1-X are computed to increase upon descending the halogen series of complexes, which indicates, surprisingly, that the complexes with more electronegative halogens are more difficult to reduce and easier to oxidize. The computed electron affinity trend is consistent with the half-wave reduction potential trend known for 1-X (L = PPh{sub 3}; X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Computed carbonyl stretch frequencies for 1-X are greater than experimental values (L = PPh{sub 3}), but observed trends are well reproduced. The redox and spectroscopic trends are discussed in terms of the substituent effects on the electronic structure of 1-X, particularly as revealed in the molecular orbital energy level diagrams of these complexes. The reaction energy for H{sub 2} addition to 1-X, leading to the cis,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (2-X) product, has been computed. After electron correlation effects are included (MP4(SDTQ)), the reaction enthalpy computed for 1-CI is {minus}18.4 kcal/mol (L = PH{sub 3}) as compared to a reported experimental value of {minus}14 kcal/mol (L = PPh{sub 3}). Compared with available experimental data, the electronic effects of L(L = PH{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, or AsH{sub 3}) and X on the thermodynamics of the H{sub 2} addition reaction are accurately reproduced by the model calculations at all levels of theory (HF and MPn). Formation of the hypothetical products cis,trans- and trans,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X(2-X and 3-X) (X = BH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, and PH{sub 2}) is used to demonstrate that {pi}-acceptor substituents promote the H{sub 2} addition reaction to 1-X while {pi}-donor substituents disfavor addition.

  14. Effect of Copper and Zinc on the Single Molecule Self-Affinity of Alzheimer’s Amyloid-β Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hane, Francis T.; Hayes, Reid; Lee, Brenda Y.; Leonenko, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    The presence of trace concentrations of metallic ions, such as copper and zinc, has previously been shown to drastically increase the aggregation rate and neurotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), the peptide implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The mechanism of why copper and zinc accelerate Aβ aggregation is poorly understood. In this work, we use single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to probe the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters (dissociation constant, Kd, kinetic dissociation rate, koff, and free energy, ΔG) of the dissociation of an Aβ dimer, the amyloid species which initiates the amyloid cascade. Our results show that nanomolar concentrations of copper do not change the single molecule affinity of Aβ to another Aβ peptide in a statistically significant way, while nanomolar concentrations of zinc decrease the affinity of Aβ-Aβ by an order of magnitude. This suggests that the binding of zinc ion to Aβ may interfere with the binding of Aβ-Aβ, leading to a lower self-affinity. PMID:26808970

  15. Screening of high-affinity scFvs from a ribosome displayed library using BIAcore biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Wang, Zhongkang; Nian, Siji; Yin, Youping; Chen, Gang; Xia, Yuxian

    2009-02-01

    An experimental protocol was developed to screen high-affinity single-chain Fv antibody fragments (scFvs) from a Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) immunized ribosome display library using BIAcore biosensor. The screening methods involved immobilizing antigen [lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Xac] on sensor chip HPA and then unpurified expression products of scFvs flowing over the immobilized sensor chip. The affinity-improved scFvs were selected based on dissociation rate constants (k (d)). Thirty-five enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-positive scFvs were analyzed by BIAcore, and three of those (scFv A1, B2, and C5) with lower k (d) were screened. To demonstrate the accuracy of the screening method, the three scFvs were expressed in Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified. The purified scFvs were subsequently further identified according to association rate and affinity constants. The results showed that the three scFvs (A1, B2, and C5) had high affinity for LPS of Xac (3.51 x 10(-11), 1.13 x 10(-10), 5.06 x 10(-10) M, respectively). Furthermore, the scFv B2 was highly specific for LPS of Xac and had no any cross-reactions with bovine serum albumin and LPS from Xac-related bacteria. This provided evidence that the information from the BIAcore screening assay could be accurate. PMID:18574567

  16. Affinity Maturation to Improve Human Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Potency and Breadth against Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Keck, Zhen-yong; Saha, Anasuya; Xia, Jinming; Conrad, Fraser; Lou, Jianlong; Eckart, Michael; Marks, James D.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2011-01-01

    A potent neutralizing antibody to a conserved hepatitis C virus (HCV) epitope might overcome its extreme variability, allowing immunotherapy. The human monoclonal antibody HC-1 recognizes a conformational epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein. Previous studies showed that HC-1 neutralizes most HCV genotypes but has modest potency. To improve neutralization, we affinity-matured HC-1 by constructing a library of yeast-displayed HC-1 single chain Fv (scFv) mutants, using for selection an E2 antigen from one of the poorly neutralized HCVpp. We developed an approach by parallel mutagenesis of the heavy chain variable (VH) and κ-chain variable (Vk) genes separately, then combining the optimized VH and Vk mutants. This resulted in the generation of HC-1-related scFv variants exhibiting improved affinities. The best scFv variant had a 92-fold improved affinity. After conversion to IgG1, some of the antibodies exhibited a 30-fold improvement in neutralization activity. Both surface plasmon resonance and solution kinetic exclusion analysis showed that the increase in affinity was largely due to a lowering of the dissociation rate constant, Koff. Neutralization against a panel of HCV pseudoparticles and infectious 2a HCV virus improved with the affinity-matured IgG1 antibodies. Interestingly, some of these antibodies neutralized a viral isolate that was not neutralized by wild-type HC-1. Moreover, propagating 2a HCVcc under the selective pressure of WT HC-1 or affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies yielded no viral escape mutants and, with the affinity-matured IgG1, needed 100-fold less antibody to achieve complete virus elimination. Taken together, these findings suggest that affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies are excellent candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:22002064

  17. Substituted pentacyclic carbazolones as novel muscarinic allosteric agents: synthesis and structure-affinity and cooperativity relationships.

    PubMed

    Gharagozloo, Parviz; Lazareno, Sebastian; Miyauchi, Masao; Popham, Angela; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2002-03-14

    Two series of pentacyclic carbazolones, 22 and 23, have been synthesized utilizing a facile intramolecular Dielsminus signAlder reaction and are allosteric modulators at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Their affinities and cooperativities with acetylcholine and the antagonist N-methylscopolamine (NMS) at M(1)minus signM(4) receptors have been analyzed and compared. All of the synthesized compounds are negatively cooperative with acetylcholine. In contrast, the majority of the compounds exhibit positive cooperativity with NMS, particularly at M(2) and M(4) receptors. The subtype selectivity, in terms of affinity, was in general M(2) > M(1) > M(4) > M(3). The largest increases in affinity produced by a single substitution of the core structure were given by the 1-OMe (22b) and 1-Cl (22d) derivatives. The position of the N in the ring did not appear to be important for binding affinity or cooperativity. Two compounds 22y and 23i, both trisubstituted analogues, were the most potent compounds synthesized, with dissociation constants of 30minus sign100 nM for the M(2) NMS-liganded and unliganded receptor, respectively. The results indicate that the allosteric site, like the primary binding site, is capable of high-affinity interactions with molecules of relatively low molecular weight. PMID:11881995

  18. Modulating the affinity and the selectivity of engineered calmodulin EF-Hand peptides for lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Clainche, Loïc Le; Figuet, Mélanie; Montjardet-Bas, Véronique; Blanchard, Sébastien; Vita, Claudio

    2006-09-01

    A set of engineered peptides (33 amino acids long) corresponding to the helix-turn-helix (EF-Hand) motif of the metal-binding site I of the protein calmodulin from paramecium tetraurelia have been synthesized. A disulfide bridge has been introduced in the native sequence in order to stabilize a native-like conformation. The calcium-binding carboxylate residues in positions 20, 22, 24, and 31 were mutated into other amino acids and the influence of such mutations on the binding affinity of the peptides for calcium and lanthanides have been studied. It was shown that the binding affinity for terbium ions can be modulated with dissociation constants ranging from 40 nmolar to 40 mmolar. The study of the influence of the mutations on the terbium affinity showed that the residue in position 24 played a key role on the capability of the peptides to bind lanthanides and that the affinity could be enhanced by mutations on non-coordinating positions. Such peptides with high affinity for lanthanides may facilitate the development of new highly sensitive biosensors to monitor the metal pollution in the environment. PMID:16637059

  19. Affinity improvement by fine tuning of single-chain variable fragment against aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Na, Kang-In; Yoon, Jung-Hyun; Heo, Yoon-Jee; Lee, Daesang; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-10-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) produced in Aspergillus flavus is a major hepatocarcinogen found in foods and feed. For effective immunological detection of AFB1 at low concentrations, the development of high affinity antibody for AFB1 is required. Previously, an affinity-maturated single-chain variable fragment containing 6 mutations (scFv-M37) was isolated from an artificial mutagenic library, which showed a 9-fold higher affinity than its wild type scFv. In this study, the effect of the 6 mutated residues on the affinity improvement was characterized using surface plasmon resonance analysis, which identified a deleterious mutation (VH-A110T) located on a framework region of the scFv-M37. The back mutation of VH-A110T resulted in a 3.2-fold affinity improvement, which was attributed to decrease of dissociation rate constant (kd) in interaction between AFB1 and the back mutant scFv. The biophysical analyses using circular dichroism and gel filtration revealed that the back mutation of VH-A110T caused a subtle conformational change of the scFv toward tighter binding to AFB1. PMID:27173568

  20. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  1. Relationship of nonreturn rates of dairy bulls to binding affinity of heparin to sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.L.; Ax, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The binding of the glycosaminoglycan (3H) heparin to bull spermatozoa was compared with nonreturn rates of dairy bulls. Semen samples from five bulls above and five below an average 71% nonreturn rate were used. Samples consisted of first and second ejaculates on a single day collected 1 d/wk for up to 5 consecutive wk. Saturation binding assays using (TH) heparin were performed to quantitate the binding characteristics of each sample. Scatchard plot analyses indicated a significant difference in the binding affinity for (TH) heparin between bulls of high and low fertility. Dissociation constants were 69.0 and 119.3 pmol for bulls of high and low fertility, respectively. In contrast, the number of binding sites for (TH) heparin did not differ significantly among bulls. Differences in binding affinity of (TH) heparin to bull sperm might be used to predict relative fertility of dairy bulls.

  2. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  3. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (K D) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  4. High-Affinity Binding of Remyelinating Natural Autoantibodies to Myelin-Mimicking Lipid Bilayers Revealed by Nanohole Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Im, Hyungsoon; Xu, Xiaohua; Wootla, Bharath; Watzlawik, Jens; Warrington, Arthur E.; Rodriguez, Moses; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive neurological disorder that results in the degradation of myelin sheaths that insulate axons in the central nervous system. Therefore promotion of myelin repair is a major thrust of multiple sclerosis treatment research. Two mouse monoclonal natural autoantibodies, O1 and O4, promote myelin repair in several mouse models of multiple sclerosis. Natural autoantibodies are generally polyreactive and predominantly of the IgM isotype. The prevailing paradigm is that because they are polyreactive, these antibodies bind antigens with low affinities. Despite their wide use in neuroscience and glial cell research, however, the affinities and kinetic constants of O1 and O4 antibodies have not been measured to date. In this work, we developed a membrane biosensing platform based on surface plasmon resonance in gold nanohole arrays with a series of surface modification techniques to form myelin-mimicking lipid bilayer membranes to measure both the association and dissociation rate constants for O1 and O4 antibodies binding to their myelin lipid antigens. The ratio of rate constants shows that O1 and O4 bind to galactocerebroside and sulfated galactocerebroside, respectively, with unusually small apparent dissociation constants (KD ~0.9 nM) for natural autoantibodies. This is approximately one to two orders of magnitude lower than typically observed for the highest affinity natural autoantibodies. We propose that the unusually high affinity of O1 and O4 to their targets in myelin contributes to the mechanism by which they signal oligodendrocytes and induce central nervous system repair. PMID:22762372

  5. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  6. A sol-gel-integrated protein array system for affinity analysis of aptamer-target protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Jeehye; Kim, Soyoun

    2011-06-01

    A sol-gel microarray system was developed for a protein interaction assay with high activity. Comparing to 2-dimensional microarray surfaces, sol-gel can offer a more dynamic and broad range for proteins. In the present study, this sol-gel-integrated protein array was used in binding affinity analysis for aptamers. Six RNA aptamers and their target protein, yeast TBP (TATA-binding protein), were used to evaluate this method. A TBP-containing sol-gel mixture was spotted using a dispensing workstation under high-humidity conditions and each Cy-3-labeled aptamer was incubated. The dissociation constants (K(d)) were calculated by plotting the fluorescent intensity of the bound aptamers as a function of the TBP concentrations. The K(d) value of the control aptamer was found to be 8 nM, which agrees well with the values obtained using the conventional method, electric mobility shift assay. The sol-gel-based binding affinity measurements fit well with conventional binding affinity measurements, suggesting their possible use as an alternative to the conventional method. In addition, aptamer affinity measurements by the sol-gel-integrated protein chip make it possible to develop a simple high-throughput affinity method for screening high-affinity aptamers. PMID:21749295

  7. Analytical high-performance affinity chromatography: evaluation by studies of neurophysin self-association and neurophysin-peptide hormone interaction using glass matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Swaisgood, H.E.; Chaiken, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    Bovine neurophysin II (BNP II) was covalently immobilized on both nonporous and porous (200-nm pore diameter) glass beads and incorporated in a high-performance liquid chromatograph to evaluate analytical high-performance affinity chromatography as a microscale method for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The self-association of neurophysin and its binding of the peptide hormone vasopressin were characterized by using a single chromatograhic column containing immobilized neurophysin predominantly in the monomer form. Both (/sup 3/H)(Arg/sup 8/)vasopressin (AVP) and /sup 125/I-BNP II were rapidly eluted (<25 min). The relatively symmetrical elution peaks obtained allowed calculation of both equilibrium dissociation constants and kinetic dissociation rate constants. In contrast to the agreement of chromatographic equilibrium binding constants with those measured in solution, the dissociation rate, k..sqrt../sub 3/, determined from the variance of the affinity chromatographic elution profile with nonporous beads, was several orders of magnitude smaller than the solution counterpart. This latter difference may reflect the probability of rebinding to contiguous sites immobilized on a surface, a feature which would be related to that for contiguous sites on a membrane.

  8. Force and Stress along Simulated Dissociation Pathways of Cucurbituril-Guest Systems

    PubMed Central

    Velez-Vega, Camilo; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The field of host-guest chemistry provides computationally tractable yet informative model systems for biomolecular recognition. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to study the forces and mechanical stresses associated with forced dissociation of aqueous cucurbituril-guest complexes with high binding affinities. First, the unbinding transitions were modeled with constant velocity pulling (steered dynamics) and a soft spring constant, to model atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. The computed length-force profiles yield rupture forces in good agreement with available measurements. We also used steered dynamics with high spring constants to generate paths characterized by a tight control over the specified pulling distance; these paths were then equilibrated via umbrella sampling simulations and used to compute time-averaged mechanical stresses along the dissociation pathways. The stress calculations proved to be informative regarding the key interactions determining the length-force profiles and rupture forces. In particular, the unbinding transition of one complex is found to be a stepwise process, which is initially dominated by electrostatic interactions between the guest’s ammoniums and the host’s carbonyl groups, and subsequently limited by the extraction of the guest’s bulky bicyclooctane moiety; the latter step requires some bond stretching at the cucurbituril’s extraction portal. Conversely, the dissociation of a second complex with a more slender guest is mainly driven by successive electrostatic interactions between the different guest’s ammoniums and the host’s carbonyl groups. The calculations also provide information on the origins of thermodynamic irreversibilities in these forced dissociation processes. PMID:22754402

  9. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  10. Diminazene or berenil, a classic duplex minor groove binder, binds to G-quadruplexes with low nanomolar dissociation constants and the amidine groups are also critical for G-quadruplex binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Le, Vu; Kalia, Dimpy; Nakayama, Shizuka; Mikek, Clinton; Lewis, Edwin A; Sintim, Herman O

    2014-10-01

    G-quadruplexes have shown great promise as chemotherapeutic targets, probably by inhibiting telomere elongation or downregulating oncogene expression. There have been many G-quadruplex ligands developed over the years but only a few have drug-like properties. Consequently only a few G-quadruplex ligands have entered clinical trials as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The DNA minor groove ligand, berenil (diminazene aceturate or DMZ), is used to treat animal trypanosomiasis and hence its toxicological profile is already known, making it an ideal platform to engineer into new therapeutics. Herein, using a plethora of biophysical methods including UV, NMR, MS and ITC, we show that DMZ binds to several G-quadruplexes with a Kd of ∼1 nM. This is one of the strongest G-quadruplex binding affinities reported to date and is 10(3) tighter than the berenil affinity for an AT-rich duplex DNA. Structure-activity-relationship studies demonstrate that the two amidine groups on DMZ are important for binding to both G-quadruplex and duplex DNA. This work reveals that DMZ or berenil is not as selective for AT-rich duplexes as originally thought and that some of its biological effects could be manifested through G-quadruplex binding. The DMZ scaffold represents a good starting point to develop new G-quadruplex ligands for cancer cell targeting. PMID:25096593

  11. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  12. Dissociative recombination of molecular ions in the He-Ne plasma. Partial rate constants of atoms formation in the 2 p 53d and 2 p 54d configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.; Petrovskaya, A. S.; Skoblo, Yu. E.

    2016-02-01

    A spectroscopic study of population processes was carried out for states of the neon atom of the 2 p 53 d configuration in the discharge afterglow in helium with a small admixture of neon ([Ne]/[He] ≈ 10-5) at a pressure of 38 Torr. Based on the comparative analysis of time dependences of the spectral line intensities of the Ne I 2 p 53 d → 2 p 53 d and 2 p 54 d → 2 p 53 d transitions and ratio of ion densities [Ne 2 + ]/[HeNe+], it has been found that the formation of excited Ne(2 p 53 d) atoms in the afterglow caused by two dissociative recombination processes: HeNe+ + e → Ne(2 p 53 d) + Ne and Ne 2 + + e → Ne(2 p 53 d) + Ne. Distributions of population fluxes of the 2 p 53 d levels Γ _{3{d_t}}^{HeN{e^ + }} and Γ _{3{d_t}}^{Ne_2^ + }—were obtained for each of these processes.

  13. Estimating Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity using High-Throughput Screening by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Hage, David S.; Harbison, Gerard S.; Powers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Many of today’s drug discovery programs utilize high-throughput screening methods that rely on quick evaluations of protein activity to rank potential chemical leads. By monitoring biologically relevant protein-ligand interactions, NMR can provide a means to validate these discovery leads and to optimize the drug discovery process. NMR-based screens typically use a change in chemical shift or linewidth to detect a protein-ligand interaction. However, the relatively low throughput of current NMR screens and their high demand on sample requirements generally makes it impractical to collect complete binding curves to measure the affinity for each compound in a large and diverse chemical library. As a result, NMR ligand screens are typically limited to identifying candidates that bind to a protein and do not give any estimate of the binding affinity. To address this issue, a methodology has been developed to rank binding affinities for ligands based on NMR-based screens that use 1D 1H NMR line-broadening experiments. This method was demonstrated by using it to estimate the dissociation equilibrium constants for twelve ligands with the protein human serum albumin (HSA). The results were found to give good agreement with previous affinities that have been reported for these same ligands with HSA. PMID:18831571

  14. Rationally Designing Aptamer Sequences with Reduced Affinity for Controlled Sensor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Schoukroun-Barnes, Lauren R.; White, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The relative ease of predicting the secondary structure of nucleic acid sequences lends itself to the design of sequences to perform desired functions. Here, we combine the utility of nucleic acid aptamers with predictable control over the secondary structure to rationally design sequences with controlled affinity towards a target analyte when employed as the recognition element in an electrochemical sensor. Specifically, we present a method to modify an existing high-gain aptamer sequence to create sequences that, when employed in an electrochemical, aptamer-based sensor, exhibit reduced affinity towards a small molecule analyte tobramycin. Sensors fabricated with the high-gain parent sequence saturate at concentrations much below the therapeutic window for tobramycin (7–18 µM). Accordingly, the rationale behind modifying this high-gain sequence to reduce binding affinity was to tune sensor performance for optimal sensitivity in the therapeutic window. Using secondary structure predictions and analysis of the NMR structure of an aminoglycoside RNA aptamer bound to tobramycin, we are able to successfully modify the aptamer sequence to tune the dissociation constants of electrochemical aptamer-based sensors between 0.17 and 3 µM. The guidelines we present represent a general strategy to lessening binding affinity of sensors employing aptamer-modified electrodes. PMID:25835184

  15. Coupling Isotachophoresis with Affinity Chromatography for Rapid and Selective Purification with High Column Utilization, Part 1: Theory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel technique that couples isotachophoresis (ITP) with affinity chromatography (AC) to achieve rapid, selective purification with high column utilization. ITP simultaneously preconcentrates an analyte and purifies it, based on differences in mobility of sample components, excluding species that may foul or compete with the target at the affinity substrate. ITP preconcentration accelerates the affinity reaction, reducing assay time, improving column utilization, and allowing for capture of targets with higher dissociation constants. Furthermore, ITP-AC separates the target and contaminants into nondiffusing zones, thus achieving high resolution in a short distance and time. We present an analytical model for spatiotemporal dynamics of ITP-AC. We identify and explore the effect of key process parameters, including target distribution width and height, ITP zone velocity, forward and reverse reaction constants, and probe concentration on necessary affinity region length, assay time, and capture efficiency. Our analytical approach shows collapse of these variables to three nondimensional parameters. The analysis yields simple analytical relations for capture length and capture time in relevant ITP-AC regimes, and it demonstrates how ITP greatly reduces assay time and improves column utilization. In the second part of this two-part series, we will present experimental validation of our model and demonstrate ITP-AC separation of the target from 10,000-fold more-abundant contaminants. PMID:24937679

  16. Dissociation of gadolinium chelates in mice: relationship to chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wedeking, P; Kumar, K; Tweedle, M F

    1992-01-01

    Tissue distributions of seven 153Gd-labeled Gd chelates were determined at five residence intervals (5 min to 14 days) following intravenous administration of 0.4 mmol/kg to mice. Relationships were sought among physicochemical parameters: thermodynamic and conditional (pH 7.4) equilibrium stability constants (log K and log K'), acid dissociation rate constants (k(obs)), lipophilicity (log P), overall charge, and size (molecular weight). Size and lipophilicity did not correlate with tissue distributions. There were possible correlations between anionic charge and rapid, early renal excretion and between stability constants and long-term residual Gd deposition. Strong correlations (r greater than 0.99) were found between acid dissociation rates and long-term deposition of Gd in the whole body, liver, and femur. This is attributed to dissociation of Gd from the chelates in vivo. Acid dissociation rates may be useful in predicting dissociation of Gd from chelates in vivo. PMID:1501535

  17. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  18. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems. PMID:21117653

  19. Binding affinities of CRBPI and CRBPII for 9-cis-retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Bright, Frank V.; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular retinol binding-protein I (CRBPI) and cellular retinol binding-protein II (CRBPII) serve as intracellular retinoid chaperones that bind retinol and retinal with high affinity and facilitate substrate delivery to select enzymes that catalyze retinoic acid (RA) and retinyl ester biosynthesis. Recently, 9-cis-RA has been identified in vivo in the pancreas, where it contributes to regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In vitro, 9-cis-RA activates RXR (retinoid×receptors), which serve as therapeutic targets for treating cancer and metabolic diseases. Binding affinities and structure–function relationships have been well characterized for CRBPI and CRBPII with all-trans-retinoids, but not for 9-cis-retinoids. This study extended current knowledge by establishing binding affinities for CRBPI and CRBPII with 9-cis-retinoids. Methods We have determined apparent dissociation constants, Kd′, through monitoring binding of 9-cis-retinol, 9-cis-retinal, and 9-cis-RA with CRBPI and CRBPII by fluorescence spectroscopy, and analyzing the data with non-linear regression. We compared these data to the data we obtained for all-trans- and 13-cis-retinoids under identical conditions. Results CRBPI and CRBPII, respectively, bind 9-cis-retinol ( Kd′, 11 nM and 68 nM) and 9-cis-retinal ( Kd′, 8 nM and 5 nM) with high affinity. No significant 9-cis-RA binding was observed with CRBPI or CRBPII. Conclusions CRBPI and CRBPII bind 9-cis-retinol and 9-cis-retinal with high affinities, albeit with affinities somewhat lower than for all-trans-retinol and all-trans-retinal. General significance These data provide further insight into structure–binding relationships of cellular retinol binding-proteins and are consistent with a model of 9-cis-RA biosynthesis that involves chaperoned delivery of 9-cis-retinoids to enzymes that recognize retinoid binding-proteins. PMID:21382444

  20. Structure-Affinity Properties of a High-Affinity Ligand of FKBP12 Studied by Molecular Simulations of a Binding Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Lilian; Gardebien, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    With a view to explaining the structure-affinity properties of the ligands of the protein FKBP12, we characterized a binding intermediate state between this protein and a high-affinity ligand. Indeed, the nature and extent of the intermolecular contacts developed in such a species may play a role on its stability and, hence, on the overall association rate. To find the binding intermediate, a molecular simulation protocol was used to unbind the ligand by gradually decreasing the biasing forces introduced. The intermediate was subsequently refined with 17 independent stochastic boundary molecular dynamics simulations that provide a consistent picture of the intermediate state. In this state, the core region of the ligand remains stable, notably because of the two anchoring oxygen atoms that correspond to recurrent motifs found in all FKBP12 ligand core structures. Besides, the non-core regions participate in numerous transient intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The dynamic aspect of most of the contacts seems important both for the ligand to retain at least a part of its configurational entropy and for avoiding a trapped state along the binding pathway. Since the transient and anchoring contacts contribute to increasing the stability of the intermediate, as a corollary, the dissociation rate constant of this intermediate should be decreased, resulting in an increase of the affinity constant . The present results support our previous conclusions and provide a coherent rationale for explaining the prevalence in high-affinity ligands of (i) the two oxygen atoms found in carbonyl or sulfonyl groups of dissimilar core structures and of (ii) symmetric or pseudo-symmetric mobile groups of atoms found as non-core moieties. Another interesting aspect of the intermediate is the distortion of the flexible 80 s loop of the protein, mainly in its tip region, that promotes the accessibility to the bound state. PMID:25502559

  1. A rapid assay for affinity and kinetics of molecular interactions with nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Gregory P; Roelofs, Kevin G; Luo, Yiling; Sintim, Herman O; Lee, Vincent T

    2012-04-01

    The Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA) allows detection of protein interactions with low-molecular weight ligands based on separation of the protein-ligand complex by differential capillary action. Here, we present an application of DRaCALA to the study of nucleic acid-protein interactions using the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). CRP bound in DRaCALA specifically to (32)P-labeled oligonucleotides containing the consensus CRP binding site, but not to oligonucleotides with point mutations known to abrogate binding. Affinity and kinetic studies using DRaCALA yielded a dissociation constant and dissociation rate similar to previously reported values. Because DRaCALA is not subject to ligand size restrictions, whole plasmids with a single CRP-binding site were used as probes, yielding similar results. DNA can also function as an easily labeled carrier molecule for a conjugated ligand. Sequestration of biotinylated nucleic acids by streptavidin allowed nucleic acids to take the place of the protein as the immobile binding partner. Therefore, any molecular interactions involving nucleic acids can be tested. We demonstrate this principle utilizing a bacterial riboswitch that binds cyclic-di-guanosine monophosphate. DRaCALA is a flexible and complementary approach to other biochemical methods for rapid and accurate measurements of affinity and kinetics at near-equilibrium conditions. PMID:22210888

  2. BIOINTERACTION ANALYSIS BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: KINETIC STUDIES OF IMMOBILIZED ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Anne; Moser, Annette; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    A system based on high-performance affinity chromatography was developed for characterizing the binding, elution and regeneration kinetics of immobilized antibodies and immunoaffinity supports. This information was provided by using a combination of frontal analysis, split-peak analysis and peak decay analysis to determine the rate constants for antibody-antigen interactions under typical sample application and elution conditions. This technique was tested using immunoaffinity supports that contained monoclonal antibodies for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Association equilibrium constants measured by frontal analysis for 2,4-D and related compounds with the immobilized antibodies were 1.7–12 × 106 M−1 at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Split-peak analysis gave association rate constants of 1.4–12 × 105 M−1s−1 and calculated dissociation rate constants of 0.01–0.4 s−1 under the application conditions. Elution at pH 2.5 for the analytes from the antibodies was examined by peak decay analysis and gave dissociation rate constants of 0.056–0.17 s−1. A comparison of frontal analysis results after various periods of column regeneration allowed the rate of antibody regeneration to be examined, with the results giving a first-order regeneration rate constant of 2.4 × 10−4 s−1. This combined approach and the information it provides should be useful in the design and optimization of immunoaffinity chromatography and other analytical methods that employ immobilized antibodies. The methods described are not limited to the particular analytes and antibodies employed in this study but should be useful in characterizing other targets, ligands and supports. PMID:19394281

  3. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binds independently to both sites of the IgG homodimer with identical affinity

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Yeung, Yik Andy; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier; Barman, Ishita; Strop, Pavel; Chin, Sherman Michael; Pham, Amber; Bolton, Gary; McDonough, Dan; Lindquist, Kevin; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is expressed by cells of epithelial, endothelial and myeloid lineages and performs multiple roles in adaptive immunity. Characterizing the FcRn/IgG interaction is fundamental to designing therapeutic antibodies because IgGs with moderately increased binding affinities for FcRn exhibit superior serum half-lives and efficacy. It has been hypothesized that 2 FcRn molecules bind an IgG homodimer with disparate affinities, yet their affinity constants are inconsistent across the literature. Using surface plasmon resonance biosensor assays that eliminated confounding experimental artifacts, we present data supporting an alternate hypothesis: 2 FcRn molecules saturate an IgG homodimer with identical affinities at independent sites, consistent with the symmetrical arrangement of the FcRn/Fc complex observed in the crystal structure published by Burmeister et al. in 1994. We find that human FcRn binds human IgG1 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 760 ± 60 nM (N = 14) at 25°C and pH 5.8, and shows less than 25% variation across the other human subtypes. Human IgG1 binds cynomolgus monkey FcRn with a 2-fold higher affinity than human FcRn, and binds both mouse and rat FcRn with a 10-fold higher affinity than human FcRn. FcRn/IgG interactions from multiple species show less than a 2-fold weaker affinity at 37°C than at 25°C and appear independent of an IgG's variable region. Our in vivo data in mouse and rat models demonstrate that both affinity and avidity influence an IgG's serum half-life, which should be considered when choosing animals, especially transgenic systems, as surrogates. PMID:25658443

  4. Zero-Point Energy Constraint for Unimolecular Dissociation Reactions. Giving Trajectories Multiple Chances To Dissociate Correctly.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit K; Hase, William L

    2016-01-28

    A zero-point energy (ZPE) constraint model is proposed for classical trajectory simulations of unimolecular decomposition and applied to CH4* → H + CH3 decomposition. With this model trajectories are not allowed to dissociate unless they have ZPE in the CH3 product. If not, they are returned to the CH4* region of phase space and, if necessary, given additional opportunities to dissociate with ZPE. The lifetime for dissociation of an individual trajectory is the time it takes to dissociate with ZPE in CH3, including multiple possible returns to CH4*. With this ZPE constraint the dissociation of CH4* is exponential in time as expected for intrinsic RRKM dynamics and the resulting rate constant is in good agreement with the harmonic quantum value of RRKM theory. In contrast, a model that discards trajectories without ZPE in the reaction products gives a CH4* → H + CH3 rate constant that agrees with the classical and not quantum RRKM value. The rate constant for the purely classical simulation indicates that anharmonicity may be important and the rate constant from the ZPE constrained classical trajectory simulation may not represent the complete anharmonicity of the RRKM quantum dynamics. The ZPE constraint model proposed here is compared with previous models for restricting ZPE flow in intramolecular dynamics, and connecting product and reactant/product quantum energy levels in chemical dynamics simulations. PMID:26738691

  5. Estimation of the rate constants associated with the inhibitory effect of okadaic acid on type 2A protein phosphatase by time-course analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, A; Ohno, Y; Yasumoto, T; Mieskes, G

    1992-01-01

    As is often the case with tightly binding inhibitors, okadaic acid produces its inhibitory effect on type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) in a time-dependent manner. We measured the rate constants associated with the binding of okadaic acid to PP2A by analysing the time-course of the reduction of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) phosphatase activity of the enzyme after application of okadaic acid. The rate constants for dissociation of okadaic acid from PP2A were also estimated from the time-course of the recovery of the activity from inhibition by okadaic acid after addition of a mouse IgG1 monoclonal antibody raised against the inhibitor. Our results show that the rate constants for the binding of okadaic acid and PP2A are of the order of 10(7) M-1.s-1, a typical value for reactions involving relatively large molecules, whereas those for their dissociation are in the range 10(-4)-10(-3) s-1. The very low values of the latter seems to be the determining factor for the exceedingly high affinity of okadaic acid for PP2A. The dissociation constants for the interaction of okadaic acid with the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex, estimated as the ratio of the rate constants, are both in the range 30-40 pM, in agreement with the results of previous dose-inhibition analyses. PMID:1329723

  6. Identification and characterization of high affinity antisense PNAs for the human unr (upstream of N-ras) mRNA which is uniquely overexpressed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huafeng; Yue, Xuan; Li, Xiaoxu; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that an MCF-7 tumor can be imaged in a mouse by PET with 64Cu-labeled Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) tethered to the permeation peptide Lys4 that recognize the uniquely overexpressed and very abundant upstream of N-ras or N-ras related gene (unr mRNA) expressed in these cells. Herein we describe how the high affinity antisense PNAs to the unr mRNA were identified and characterized. First, antisense binding sites on the unr mRNA were mapped by an reverse transcriptase random oligonucleotide library (RT-ROL) method that we have improved, and by a serial analysis of antisense binding sites (SAABS) method that we have developed which is similar to another recently described method. The relative binding affinities of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the antisense binding sites were then qualitatively ranked by a new Dynabead-based dot blot assay. Dissociation constants for a subset of the ODNs were determined by a new Dynabead-based solution assay and were found to be 300 pM for the best binders in 1 M salt. PNAs corresponding to the ODNs with the highest affinities were synthesized with an N-terminal CysTyr and C-terminal Lys4 sequence. Dissociation constants of these hybrid PNAs were determined by the Dynabead-based solution assay to be about 10 pM for the highest affinity binders. PMID:16314303

  7. Computational and ESR studies of electron attachment to decafluorocyclopentane, octafluorocyclobutane, and hexafluorocyclopropane: electron affinities of the molecules and the structures of their stable negative ions as determined from 13C and 19F hyperfine coupling constants.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Adel M; Tschumper, Gregory S; Crocombe, Richard A; Wang, Jih Tzong; Williams, Ffrancon

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution ESR spectra of the ground-state negative ions of hexafluorocyclopropane (c-C3F6*-), octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8*-), and decafluorocyclopentane (c-C5F10*-) are reported and their isotropic 19F hyperfine coupling constants (hfcc) of 198.6 +/- 0.4 G, 147.6 +/- 0.4 G, and 117.9 +/- 0.4 G, respectively, are in inverse ratio to the total number of fluorine atoms per anion. Together with the small value of 5.2 +/- 0.4 G determined for the isotropic 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*-, these results indicate that in each case the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is delocalized over the equivalent fluorines and possesses a nodal plane through the carbon atoms of a time-averaged D(nh) structure. A series of quantum chemical computations were carried out to further characterize these anions and their neutral counterparts. Both the B3LYP density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) indicate that c-C3F6*- adopts a D(3h) geometry and a (2)A2'' ground electronic state, that c-C4F8*- adopts a D(4h) geometry and a (2)A2u ground electronic state, and that c-C5F10*- adopts a C(s) structure and a (2)A' electronic state. Moreover, the 19F hyperfine coupling constants computed with the MP2 method and a high quality triple-zeta basis set are within 1% of the experimental values. Also, the values computed for the 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*- are consistent with the experimental value of 5.2 G. Therefore, in keeping with the ESR results, these negative ions derived from first-row elements can be characterized as pi* species. In addition, the hypervalency of these perfluorocycloalkane radical anions has been clarified. PMID:16045345

  8. Swirling flow of a dissociated gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfram, W. R., Jr.; Walker, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    Most physical applications of the swirling flow, defined as a vortex superimposed on an axial flow in the nozzle, involve high temperatures and the possibility of real gas effects. The generalized one-dimensional swirling flow in a converging-diverging nozzle is analyzed for equilibrium and frozen dissociation using the ideal dissociating gas model. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the major effects and to compare with results obtained for a perfect gas with constant ratio of specific heats. It is found that, even in the case of real gases, perfect gas calculations can give a good estimate of the reduction in mass flow due to swirl.

  9. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  10. Biotinylated Cyclophane: Synthesis, Cyclophane-Avidin Conjugates, and Their Enhanced Guest-Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Osamu; Kojima, Miwa; Kusano, Shuhei

    2015-10-01

    Cationic and anionic cyclophanes bearing a biotin moiety were synthesized as a water-soluble host (1a and 1b, respectively). Both hosts 1a and 1b were found to strongly bind avidin with binding constants of 1.3 × 10(8) M(-1), as confirmed by surface plasmon resonance measurements. The present conjugate of 1a with avidin (1a-avidin) showed an enhanced guest binding affinity toward fluorescence guests such as TNS and 2,6-ANS. The K values of 1a-avidin conjugate with TNS and 2,6-ANS were ~19-fold larger than those of monocyclic cyclophane 1a with the identical guests. Favorable hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between 1a-avidin and TNS were suggested by computer-aided molecular modeling calculations. Moreover, addition of excess biotin to the complexes of 1a-avidin with the guests resulted in dissociation of 1a-avidin to avidin and 1a having less guest-binding affinity. Conversely, such enhancements in the guest-binding affinity were not obviously observed for the conjugate of anionic 1b with avidin (1b-avidin) due to electrostatic repulsion between anionic 1b and anionic guests. PMID:26360807

  11. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor-compatible silicon nanowire biofield-effect transistors as affinity biosensors.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xuexin; Rajan, Nitin K; Izadi, Mohammad Hadi; Reed, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Affinity biosensors use biorecognition elements and transducers to convert a biochemical event into a recordable signal. They provides the molecule binding information, which includes the dynamics of biomolecular association and dissociation, and the equilibrium association constant. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor-compatible silicon (Si) nanowires configured as a field-effect transistor (NW FET) have shown significant advantages for real-time, label-free and highly sensitive detection of a wide range of biomolecules. Most research has focused on reducing the detection limit of Si-NW FETs but has provided less information about the real binding parameters of the biomolecular interactions. Recently, Si-NW FETs have been demonstrated as affinity biosensors to quantify biomolecular binding affinities and kinetics. They open new applications for NW FETs in the nanomedicine field and will bring such sensor technology a step closer to commercial point-of-care applications. This article summarizes the recent advances in bioaffinity measurement using Si-NW FETs, with an emphasis on the different approaches used to address the issues of sensor calibration, regeneration, binding kinetic measurements, limit of detection, sensor surface modification, biomolecule charge screening, reference electrode integration and nonspecific molecular binding. PMID:24156488

  12. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  13. Probing high-affinity 11-mer DNA aptamer against Lup an 1 (β-conglutin).

    PubMed

    Nadal, P; Svobodova, M; Mairal, T; O'Sullivan, C K

    2013-11-01

    Aptamers are synthetic nucleic acids with great potential as analytical tools. However, the length of selected aptamers (typically 60-100 bases) can affect affinity, due to the presence of bases not required for interaction with the target, and therefore, the truncation of these selected sequences and identification of binding domains is a critical step to produce potent aptamers with higher affinities and specificities and lowered production costs. In this paper we report the truncation of an aptamer that specifically binds to β-conglutin (Lup an 1), an anaphylactic allergen. Through comparing the predicted secondary structures of the aptamers, a hairpin structure with a G-rich loop was determined to be the binding motif. The highest affinity was observed with a truncation resulting in an 11-mer sequence that had an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K D) of 1.7 × 10(-9) M. This 11-mer sequence was demonstrated to have high specificity for β-conglutin and showed no cross-reactivity to other lupin conglutins (α-, δ-, γ-conglutins) and closely related proteins such as gliadin. Finally, the structure of the truncated 11-mer aptamer was preliminarily elucidated, and the GQRS Mapper strongly predicted the presence of a G-quadruplex, which was subsequently corroborated using one-dimensional NMR, thus highlighting the stability of the truncated structure. PMID:24126837

  14. Weak affinity chromatography as a new approach for fragment screening in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Meiby, Elinor; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2011-07-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is currently being implemented in drug discovery, creating a demand for developing efficient techniques for fragment screening. Due to the intrinsic weak or transient binding of fragments (mM-μM in dissociation constant (K(D))) to targets, methods must be sensitive enough to accurately detect and quantify an interaction. This study presents weak affinity chromatography (WAC) as an alternative tool for screening of small fragments. The technology was demonstrated by screening of a selected 23-compound fragment collection of documented binders, mostly amidines, using trypsin and thrombin as model target protease proteins. WAC was proven to be a sensitive, robust, and reproducible technique that also provides information about affinity of a fragment in the range of 1 mM-10 μM. Furthermore, it has potential for high throughput as was evidenced by analyzing mixtures in the range of 10 substances by WAC-MS. The accessibility and flexibility of the technology were shown as fragment screening can be performed on standard HPLC equipment. The technology can further be miniaturized and adapted to the requirements of affinity ranges of the fragment library. All these features of WAC make it a potential method in drug discovery for fragment screening. PMID:21352794

  15. Characteristics of the interaction of calcium with casein submicelles as determined by analytical affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, H.D.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Interaction of calcium with casein submicelles was investigated in CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers and with synthetic milk salt solutions using the technique of analytical affinity chromatography. Micelles that had been prepared by size exclusion chromatography with glycerolpropyl controlled-pore glass from fresh raw skim milk that had never been cooled, were dialyzed at room temperature against calcium-free imidazole buffer, pH 6.7. Resulting submicelles were covalently immobilized on succinamidopropyl controlled-pore glass (300-nm pore size). Using 45Ca to monitor the elution retardation, the affinity of free Ca2+ and calcium salt species was determined at temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees C and pH 6.0 to 7.5. Increasing the pH in this range or increasing the temperature strengthened the binding of calcium to submicelles, similar to previous observations with individual caseins. However, the enthalpy change obtained from the temperature dependence was considerably greater than that reported for alpha s1- and beta-caseins. Furthermore, the elution profiles for 45Ca in milk salt solutions were decidedly different from those in CaCl2 or calcium phosphate buffers and the affinities were also greater. For example, at pH 6.7 and 30 degrees C the average dissociation constant for the submicelle-calcium complex is 0.074 mM for CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers, vs 0.016 mM for the milk salt solution. The asymmetric frontal boundaries and higher average affinities observed with milk salts may be due to binding of calcium salts with greater affinity in addition to the binding of free Ca2+ in these solutions.

  16. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  17. Theoretical and experimental studies on zone-interference chromatography as a new method for determining macromolecular kinetic constants.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Wada, A

    1983-11-01

    Zone-interference chromatography is a new method for studying macromolecular interactions (S. Endo and A. Wada, Anal. Biochem. 124 (1982) 372). This method is a new style of affinity chromatography which requires no preparation of affinity-column materials but utilizes the velocity difference in a column between interacting molecular species. Using the stochastic theory on the behavior of solute molecules, both the association and the dissociation rate constants can be analytically obtained from the degree of deformation of elution patterns, i.e., the change of the first and second moments. In order to verify the present theory, computer simulation of elution profiles by the extended plate theory and a binding experiment between glutamate dehydrogenase and ADP have been carried out. PMID:6661497

  18. A comparison of binding surfaces for SPR biosensing using an antibody-antigen system and affinity distribution analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Gorshkova, Inna I.; Fu, Gregory L.; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The application of optical biosensors in the study of macromolecular interactions requires immobilization of one binding partner to the surface. It is often highly desirable that the immobilization is uniform and does not affect the thermodynamic and kinetic binding parameters to soluble ligands. To achieve this goal, a variety of sensor surfaces, coupling strategies and surface chemistries are available. Previously, we have introduced a technique for increasing the level of detail on the immobilized sites beyond an average affinity by determining the distribution of affinities and kinetic rate constants from families of binding and dissociation traces acquired at different concentrations of soluble ligand. In the present work, we explore how this affinity distribution analysis can be useful in the assessment and optimization of surface immobilization. With this goal, using an antibody-antigen interaction as a model system, we study the activity, thermodynamic and kinetic binding parameters, and heterogeneity of surface sites produced with different commonly used sensor surfaces, at different total surface densities and with direct immobilization or affinity capture. PMID:23270815

  19. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening. PMID:27454185

  20. A versatile polypeptide platform for integrated recognition and reporting: affinity arrays for protein-ligand interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Enander, Karin; Dolphin, Gunnar T; Liedberg, Bo; Lundström, Ingemar; Baltzer, Lars

    2004-05-17

    A molecular platform for protein detection and quantification is reported in which recognition has been integrated with direct monitoring of target-protein binding. The platform is based on a versatile 42-residue helix-loop-helix polypeptide that dimerizes to form four-helix bundles and allows site-selective modification with recognition and reporter elements on the side chains of individually addressable lysine residues. The well-characterized interaction between the model target-protein carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor benzenesulfonamide was used for a proof-of-concept demonstration. An affinity array was designed where benzenesulfonamide derivatives with aliphatic or oligoglycine spacers and a fluorescent dansyl reporter group were introduced into the scaffold. The affinities of the array members for human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) were determined by titration with the target protein and were found to be highly affected by the properties of the spacers (dissociation constant Kd=0.02-3 microM). The affinity of HCAII for acetazolamide (Kd=4 nM) was determined in a competition experiment with one of the benzenesulfonamide array members to address the possibility of screening substance libraries for new target-protein binders. Also, successful affinity discrimination between different carbonic anhydrase isozymes highlighted the possibility of performing future isoform-expression profiling. Our platform is predicted to become a flexible tool for a variety of biosensor and protein-microarray applications within biochemistry, diagnostics and pharmaceutical chemistry. PMID:15146511

  1. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  2. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  3. Dissociation of diatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections has been applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of rotational and vibrational states. Although the preexponential factor of the Arrhenius rate expression is shown to be a complex function of the dimensionless activation energy, the average over all states in the ladder is well represented by a single factor that varies about as T exp (-n), where the coefficient n is the order of unity. This relation agrees very well with experimental data for dissociation of O2 and N2, for example. The results validate previous empirical assignment of a single preexponential factor in the Arrhenius expression and justify the extrapolation of the expression well beyond the range of data. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators the results are about the same as for harmonic oscillators, and the dissociation from a ladder of equilibrium rotational and nonequilibrium vibrational states is close to an analytic approximation provided by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare for harmonic oscillators all dissociating from the ground rotational state.

  4. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation from the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Pan, Albert C; Dror, Ron O; Mocking, Tamara; Liu, Rongfang; Heitman, Laura H; Shaw, David E; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-01

    How drugs dissociate from their targets is largely unknown. We investigated the molecular basis of this process in the adenosine A2Areceptor (A2AR), a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Through kinetic radioligand binding experiments, we characterized mutant receptors selected based on molecular dynamic simulations of the antagonist ZM241385 dissociating from the A2AR. We discovered mutations that dramatically altered the ligand's dissociation rate despite only marginally influencing its binding affinity, demonstrating that even receptor features with little contribution to affinity may prove critical to the dissociation process. Our results also suggest that ZM241385 follows a multistep dissociation pathway, consecutively interacting with distinct receptor regions, a mechanism that may also be common to many other GPCRs. PMID:26873858

  5. Modulating uranium binding affinity in engineered calmodulin EF-hand peptides: effect of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T(9)TKE(12) sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from K(d) = 25±6 nM to K(d) = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (K(d) = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the ν(as)(P-O) and ν(s)(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in ν(as)(UO(2))(2+) vibration (from 923 cm(-1) to 908 cm(-1)) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  6. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  7. II. Dissociation free energies in drug-receptor systems via nonequilibrium alchemical simulations: application to the FK506-related immunophilin ligands.

    PubMed

    Nerattini, Francesca; Chelli, Riccardo; Procacci, Piero

    2016-06-01

    The recently proposed fast switching double annihilation (FS-DAM) [Cardelli et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2015, 11, 423] is aimed at computing the absolute standard dissociation free energies for the chemical equilibrium RL ⇌ R + L occurring in solution through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the atomistic level. The technique is based on the production of fast nonequilibrium annihilation trajectories of one of the species (the ligand) in the solvated RL complex and in the bulk solvent. As detailed in the companion theoretical paper, the free energies of these two nonequilibrium annihilation processes are recovered by using an unbiased unidirectional estimate derived from the Crooks theorem exploiting the inherent Gaussian nature of the annihilation work. The FS-DAM technique was successfully applied to the evaluation of the dissociation free energy of the complexes of Zn(ii) cations with an inhibitor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor α converting enzyme. Here we apply the technique to a real drug-receptor system, by satisfactorily reproducing the experimental dissociation free energies of FK506-related bulky ligands towards the native FKBP12 enzyme and by predicting the dissociation constants for the same ligands towards the mutant I56D. The effect of such mutations on the binding affinity of FK506-related ligands is relevant for assessing the thermodynamic forces regulating molecular recognition in FKBP12 inhibition. PMID:27193181

  8. Mathematical model accurately predicts protein release from an affinity-based delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vulic, Katarina; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Sonthalia, Rohit; Ramachandran, Arun; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-01-10

    Affinity-based controlled release modulates the delivery of protein or small molecule therapeutics through transient dissociation/association. To understand which parameters can be used to tune release, we used a mathematical model based on simple binding kinetics. A comprehensive asymptotic analysis revealed three characteristic regimes for therapeutic release from affinity-based systems. These regimes can be controlled by diffusion or unbinding kinetics, and can exhibit release over either a single stage or two stages. This analysis fundamentally changes the way we think of controlling release from affinity-based systems and thereby explains some of the discrepancies in the literature on which parameters influence affinity-based release. The rate of protein release from affinity-based systems is determined by the balance of diffusion of the therapeutic agent through the hydrogel and the dissociation kinetics of the affinity pair. Equations for tuning protein release rate by altering the strength (KD) of the affinity interaction, the concentration of binding ligand in the system, the rate of dissociation (koff) of the complex, and the hydrogel size and geometry, are provided. We validated our model by collapsing the model simulations and the experimental data from a recently described affinity release system, to a single master curve. Importantly, this mathematical analysis can be applied to any single species affinity-based system to determine the parameters required for a desired release profile. PMID:25449806

  9. Binding of L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine to a single class of high affinity sites in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lippiello, P.M.; Fernandes, K.G.

    1986-05-01

    The binding of optically pure L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine to rat brain membrane preparations was studied using a rapid filtration method. The binding properties observed depended on the method used for tissue isolation. The most consistent results were obtained with membranes prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors, without divalent cations. Binding was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of high affinity sites with an average KD of 2 nM and a Bmax of approximately 200 fmol/mg of protein. The Hill coefficient was near unity. The KD calculated from the kinetic rate constants for association (k1 = 0.012 min-1 nM-1) and dissociation (k-1 = 0.04 min-1) was around 3 nM, in good agreement with the dissociation constant determined from equilibrium binding. In competition studies, cholinergic agonists were generally the most effective in inhibiting L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine binding, whereas antagonists were relatively ineffective. The D-isomer of nicotine was about 60-fold less potent than the L-isomer in inhibiting binding. The results were unaffected by temperature, with the exception that Bmax was somewhat lower at 37 degrees. The equilibrium binding properties of these sites were essentially identical in adult male and female brain. However, Bmax was lower in fetal brain tissue. The present findings are consistent with the idea that there is a single class of high affinity nicotinic binding sites in rat brain with cholinoceptive properties.

  10. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  11. Affinity purification of recombinant proteins using a novel silica-binding peptide as a fusion tag.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed A A; Motomura, Kei; Ikeda, Takeshi; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio

    2014-06-01

    We recently reported that silica is deposited on the coat of Bacillus cereus spores as a layer of nanometer-sized particles (Hirota et al. 2010 J Bacteriol 192: 111-116). Gene disruption analysis revealed that the spore coat protein CotB1 mediates the accumulation of silica (our unpublished results). Here, we report that B. cereus CotB1 (171 amino acids [aa]) and its C-terminal 14-aa region (corresponding to residues 158-171, designated CotB1p) show strong affinity for silica particles, with dissociation constants at pH 8.0 of 2.09 and 1.24 nM, respectively. Using CotB1 and CotB1p as silica-binding tags, we developed a silica-based affinity purification method in which silica particles are used as an adsorbent for CotB1/CotB1p fusion proteins. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) technology was employed to release the target proteins from the adsorbed fusion proteins. SUMO-protease-mediated site-specific cleavage at the C-terminus of the fused SUMO sequence released the tagless target proteins into the liquid phase while leaving the tag region still bound to the solid phase. Using the fluorescent protein mCherry as a model, our purification method achieved 85 % recovery, with a purity of 95 % and yields of 0.60 ± 0.06 and 1.13 ± 0.13 mg per 10-mL bacterial culture for the CotB1-SUMO-mCherry and CotB1p-SUMO-mCherry fusions, respectively. CotB1p, a short 14-aa peptide, which demonstrates high affinity for silica, could be a promising fusion tag for both affinity purification and enzyme immobilization on silica supports. PMID:24756322

  12. Performance of dye-affinity beads for aluminium removal in magnetically stabilized fluidized bed

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Handan; Say, Ridvan; Andaç, Müge; Bayraktar, Necmi; Denizli, Adil

    2004-01-01

    Background Aluminum has recently been recognized as a causative agent in dialysis encephalopathy, osteodystrophy, and microcytic anemia occurring in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo long-term hemodialysis. Only a small amount of Al(III) in dialysis solutions may give rise to these disorders. Methods Magnetic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (mPHEMA) beads in the size range of 80–120 μm were produced by free radical co-polymerization of HEMA and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in the presence of magnetite particles (Fe3O4). Then, metal complexing ligand alizarin yellow was covalently attached onto mPHEMA beads. Alizarin yellow loading was 208 μmol/g. These beads were used for the removal of Al(III) ions from tap and dialysis water in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. Results Al(III) adsorption capacity of the beads decreased with an increase in the flow-rate. The maximum Al(III) adsorption was observed at pH 5.0. Comparison of batch and magnetically stabilized fluidized bed (MSFB) maximum capacities determined using Langmuir isotherms showed that dynamic capacity (17.5 mg/g) was somewhat higher than the batch capacity (11.8 mg/g). The dissociation constants for Al(III) were determined using the Langmuir isotherm equation to be 27.3 mM (MSFB) and 6.7 mM (batch system), indicating medium affinity, which was typical for pseudospecific affinity ligands. Al(III) ions could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed with these beads without noticeable loss in their Al(III) adsorption capacity. Conclusions Adsorption of Al(III) demonstrate the affinity of magnetic dye-affinity beads. The MSFB experiments allowed us to conclude that this inexpensive sorbent system may be an important alternative to the existing adsorbents in the removal of aluminium. PMID:15329149

  13. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  14. Dissociative Reactions to Incest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, J. Mark

    In contrast to Freud's later and revised view of the etiology of hysterical, or dissociative, symptoms, it is now known that real, and not fantasized, sexual experiences in childhood are experienced in disociative symptomatology. It is useful to understand that incest involves both traumatic events, that is, incidents of sexual violation per se,…

  15. Dissociative Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Few psychological disorders in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual have generated as much controversy as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). For the past 35 years diagnoses of DID, previously referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), have increased exponentially, causing various psychological researchers and clinicians to question the…

  16. Dissociation and psychosis in dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Laddis, Andreas; Dell, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms, first-rank symptoms of schizophrenia, and delusions were assessed in 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients with the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). Schizophrenia patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; DID patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised. DID patients obtained significantly (a) higher dissociation scores; (b) higher passive-influence scores (first-rank symptoms); and (c) higher scores on scales that measure child voices, angry voices, persecutory voices, voices arguing, and voices commenting. Schizophrenia patients obtained significantly higher delusion scores than did DID patients. What is odd is that the dissociation scores of schizophrenia patients were unrelated to their reports of childhood maltreatment. Multiple regression analyses indicated that 81% of the variance in DID patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Ego-Alien Experiences Scale, whereas 92% of the variance in schizophrenia patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Voices Scale. We propose that schizophrenia patients' responses to the MID do not index the same pathology as do the responses of DID patients. We argue that neither phenomenological definitions of dissociation nor the current generation of dissociation instruments (which are uniformly phenomenological in nature) can distinguish between the dissociative phenomena of DID and what we suspect are just the dissociation-like phenomena of schizophrenia. PMID:22651674

  17. Pathological Dissociation as Measured by the Child Dissociative Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; Neil, Debra A.; Taylor, Tamara N.

    2009-01-01

    The component structure of the Child Dissociative Checklist was examined among abused children. A factor described as pathological dissociation emerged that was predicted by participants being male. There also were differences in pathological dissociation between groups of sexually abused and physically abused children. Replication of this factor…

  18. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  19. Concanavalin A - Polysaccharides Binding Affinity Analysis Using A Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    PubMed Central

    COULIBALY, FOHONA SOUMAHILA; YOUAN, BI-BOTTI C.

    2014-01-01

    There is no comparative data available on the binding constants of Concanavalin A (Con A) and glycogen and Con A-mannan using Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM), cost and time efficient system for biosensor analysis. It is hypothesized that a QCM can be used in its flow injection mode to monitor the binding affinity of polysaccharides to an immobilized lectin, Con A. The biosensor is prepared by immobilizing Con A on a 5 MHz gold crystal by carbodiimide crosslinking chemistry. The attachment efficiency was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Equilibrium association and dissociation constants describing Con A-polysaccharides interaction are determined in a saturation binding experiment, where increasing concentrations of polysaccharides are run on a Con A-immobilized gold crystal surface, and the frequency shifts recorded on the frequency counter. The molecular weights (MW) of glycogen from Oyster and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were determined by size exclusion chromatography. The MW for glycogen and mannan are 604±0.002 kDa and 54±0.002 kDa, respectively. The equilibrium association and dissociation constants for ConA-glycogen and Con A-mannan interactions are KA = 3.93 ± 0.7 × 106 M−1 / KD = 0.25 ± 0.06 μM and KA = 3.46 ± 0.22 × 105 M−1 / KD = 2.89 μM ± 0.20 (n = 3), respectively. Their respective frequency and motional resistance shifts relationship (ΔF/ΔR) are 37.29±1.55 and 34.86±0.85 Hz.Ω−1 (n=3), which support the validity of Sauerbrey’s rigidity approximation. This work suggests that Con A-mannan complex could be potentially utilized delivery and the targeting of glucose-rich substances and glycoproteins when fast drug release is desired. PMID:24768820

  20. [Determination of the interaction kinetics between meloxicam and β-cyclodextrin using the quantitative high-performance affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-fen; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Xiao-bo; Li, Hai-yan; Zhang, Ji-wen; Sun, Li-xin

    2015-09-01

    The association rate constant and dissociation rate constant are important parameters of the drug-cyclodextrin supermolecule systems, which determine the dissociation of drugs from the complex and the further in vivo absorption of drugs. However, the current studies of drug-cyclodextrin interactions mostly focus on the thermodynamic parameter of equilibrium constants (K). In this paper, a method based on quantitative high performance affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was developed to determine the apparent dissociation rate constant (k(off,app)) of drug-cyclodextrin supermolecule systems. This method was employed to measure the k(off,app) of meloxicam and acetaminophen. Firstly, chromatographic peaks of drugs and non-retained solute (uracil) on β-cyclodextrin column at different flow rates were acquired, and the retention time and variance values were obtained via the fitting the peaks. Then, the plate heights of drugs (H(R)) and uracil (H(M,C)) were calculated. The plate height of theoretical non-retained solute (H(M,T)) was calculated based on the differences of diffusion coefficient and the stagnant mobile phase mass transfer between drugs and uracil. Finally, the k(off,app) was calculated from the slope of the regression equation between (H(R)-H(M,T)) and uk/(1+k)2, (0.13 ± 0.00) s(-1) and (4.83 ± 0.10) s(-1) for meloxicam and acetaminophen (control drug), respectively. In addition, the apparent association rate constant (k(on,app)) was also calculated through the product of K (12.53 L x mol(-1)) and k(off,app). In summary, it has been proved that the method established in our study was simple, efficiently fast and reproducible for investigation on the kinetics of drug-cyclodextrin interactions. PMID:26757555

  1. Kinetic ion thermometers for electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Tureček, František

    2015-02-19

    Peptide fragment ions of the z-type were used as kinetic ion thermometers to gauge the internal energy of peptide cation-radicals produced by electron transfer in the gas-phase. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced z2 ions containing the leucine residue, z2(Leu-Lys) and z2(Leu-Arg), were found to undergo spontaneous dissociation by loss of C3H7 that was monitored by time-resolved kinetic measurements on the time scale of the linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Kinetic modeling of the dissociations, including collisional cooling and product loss by neutralization, provided unimolecular rate constants for dissociation that were converted to the z ion internal energies using RRKM theory. The internal energy of z2(Leu-Lys) and z2(Leu-Arg) fragment ions was found to decrease with the increasing size of the precursor peptide ion, indicating vibrational energy partitioning between the ion and neutral fragments and ergodic behavior. The experimentally determined excitation in the peptide cation-radicals upon electron transfer (285-327 kJ mol(-1)) was found to be lower than that theoretically calculated from the reaction exothermicity. The reasons for this missing energy are discussed. PMID:25594857

  2. Three dimensions of dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation extracted 3 factors from the 42 memory and amnesia items of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) database (N = 2,569): Discovering Dissociated Actions, Lapses of Recent Memory and Skills, and Gaps in Remote Memory. The 3 factors' shared variance ranged from 36% to 64%. Construed as scales, the 3 factor scales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .96, .94, and .93, respectively. The scales correlated strongly with mean Dissociative Experiences Scale scores, mean MID scores, and total scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R). What is interesting is that the 3 amnesia factors exhibited a range of correlations with SCID-D-R Amnesia scores (.52, .63, and .70, respectively), suggesting that the SCID-D-R Amnesia score emphasizes gaps in remote memory over amnesias related to dissociative identity disorder. The 3 amnesia factor scales exhibited a clinically meaningful pattern of significant differences among dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified-1, dissociative amnesia, depersonalization disorder, and nonclinical participants. The 3 amnesia factors may have greater clinical utility for frontline clinicians than (a) amnesia as discussed in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nosology of the dissociative disorders or (b) P. Janet's (1893/1977 ) 4-fold classification of dissociative amnesia. The author recommends systematic study of the phenomenological differences within specific dissociative symptoms and their differential relationship to specific dissociative disorders. PMID:23282045

  3. Failure of the three compartment model to describe the pharmacokinetics in brain of a high affinity substituted benzamide.

    PubMed

    Votaw, J R; Kessler, R M; de Paulis, T

    1993-11-01

    The applicability of using the standard 3-compartment model to describe the neuropharmacokinetics of a high affinity substituted benzamide was investigated. We performed the following experiments using the [18F]-5-(3-fluoropropyl) analog of epidepride ([18F]5-FPrEpid), a potent dopamine D2 receptor antagonist: constant left ventricular infusion, first-pass clearance, varying ligand specific activity, and displacing bound ligand with varying amounts of unlabelled ligand. Taken together, the information from these experiments rigorously tests the standard 3-compartment model. The obtained data and predictions from the model of the kinetic behavior of the ligand are inconsistent. The measured and model predicted dissociation rate (measured koff = 0.065 min-1, model prediction koff = 0.007 min-1) and the equilibrium dissociation constant (measured KD = 0.14 nM, model prediction KD = 2.2 nM) differ by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the model cannot be used to accurately estimate the receptor density. We postulate that the synapse geometry and physical relationship between receptors are necessary components of a model that describes the pharmacokinetics of [18F]5-FPrEpid. PMID:8278896

  4. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  5. Crystal structure and ligand affinity of avidin in the complex with 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Avidin is a protein found in egg white that binds numerous organic compounds with high affinity, especially biotin and its derivatives. Due to its extraordinary affinity for its ligands, avidin is extensively used in biotechnology. X-ray crystallography and fluorescence-based biophysical techniques were used to show that avidin binds the dye 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA) with a lower affinity than biotin. The apparent dissociation constant determined for the avidin complex with HABA by microscale thermophoresis (MST) is 4.12 μM. The crystal structure of avidin-HABA complex was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å (PDB entry 5chk). The crystals belong to a hexagonal system, in the space group P6422. In that structure, the hydrazone tautomer of HABA is bound at the bottom part of the central calyx near the polar residues. We show interactions of the dye with avidin and compare them with the previously reported avidin-biotin complex.

  6. Crystal structure and ligand affinity of avidin in the complex with 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Avidin is a protein found in egg white that binds numerous organic compounds with high affinity, especially biotin and its derivatives. Due to its extraordinary affinity for its ligands, avidin is extensively used in biotechnology. X-ray crystallography and fluorescence-based biophysical techniques were used to show that avidin binds the dye 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA) with a lower affinity than biotin. The apparent dissociation constant determined for the avidin complex with HABA by microscale thermophoresis (MST) is 4.12 μM. The crystal structure of avidin-HABA complex was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å (PDB entry 5chk). The crystals belong to a hexagonal system, in the space group P6422. In that structure, the hydrazone tautomer of HABA is bound at the bottom part of the central calyx near the polar residues. We show interactions of the dye with avidin and compare them with the previously reported avidin-biotin complex.

  7. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1990-11-15

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB-{sup 125}I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein.

  8. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  9. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  10. Dissociation and psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Steingard, S; Frankel, F H

    1985-08-01

    The literature on hysterical or brief reactive psychosis reflects great diversity both in clinical description and theoretical formulation. The authors describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with a diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder, rapid cycling type, but who, in fact, was experiencing dissociative episodes manifested as psychotic states. The patient's successful treatment with hypnosis is described, along with the clinical and theoretical implications of the case. PMID:4025593

  11. Eosinophil cationic protein high-affinity binding to bacteria-wall lipopolysaccharides and peptidoglycans.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Marc; Navarro, Susanna; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2008-03-18

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil-secreted RNase involved in the immune host defense, with a cytotoxic activity against a wide range of pathogens. The protein displays antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The protein can destabilize lipid bilayers, although the action at the membrane level can only partially account for its bactericidal activity. We have now shown that ECP can bind with high affinity to the bacteria-wall components. We have analyzed its specific association to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), its lipid A component, and peptidoglycans (PGNs). ECP high-affinity binding capacity to LPSs and lipid A has been analyzed by a fluorescent displacement assay, and the corresponding dissociation constants were calculated using the protein labeled with a fluorophor. The protein also binds in vivo to bacteria cells. Ultrastructural analysis of cell bacteria wall and morphology have been visualized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein damages the bacteria surface and induces the cell population aggregation on E. coli cultures. Although both bacteria strain cells retain their shape and no cell lysis is patent, the protein can induce in E. coli the outer membrane detachment. ECP also activates the cytoplasmic membrane depolarization in both strains. Moreover, the depolarization activity on E. coli does not require any pretreatment to overcome the outer membrane barrier. The protein binding to the bacteria-wall surface would represent a first encounter step key in its antimicrobial mechanism of action. PMID:18293932

  12. A theoretical study on ascorbic acid dissociation in water clusters.

    PubMed

    Demianenko, Eugeniy; Ilchenko, Mykola; Grebenyuk, Anatoliy; Lobanov, Victor; Tsendra, Oksana

    2014-03-01

    Dissociation of ascorbic acid in water has been studied by using a cluster model. It was examined by density functional theory (DFT) with the В3LYP, M06, and wB97XD functionals and a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of proton transfer from ascorbic acid molecule to water clusters were calculated as well as the equilibrium constants (pK a ) for the related processes. The used functionals in the DFT method together with continuum solvent models provided results close to the experimental data for the dissociation constant of ascorbic acid in aqueous solution. PMID:24567154

  13. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF INTERACTION KINETICS BETWEEN CHIRAL SOLUTES AND HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN BY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND PEAK PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak profiling and high-performance columns containing immobilized human serum albumin (HSA) were used to study the interaction kinetics of chiral solutes with this protein. This approach was tested using the phenytoin metabolites 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin (m-HPPH) and 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin (p-HPPH) as model analytes. HSA columns provided some resolution of the enantiomers for each phenytoin metabolite, which made it possible to simultaneously conduct kinetic studies on each chiral form. The dissociation rate constants for these interactions were determined by using both the single flow rate and multiple flow rate peak profiling methods. Corrections for non-specific interactions with the support were also considered. The final estimates obtained at pH 7.4 and 37°C for the dissociation rate constants of these interactions were 8.2–9.6 s−1 for the two enantiomers of m-HPPH and 3.2–4.1 s−1 for the enantiomers of p-HPPH. These rate constants agreed with previous values that have been reported for other drugs and solutes that have similar affinities and binding regions on HSA. The approach used in this report was not limited to phenytoin metabolites or HSA but could be applied to a variety of other chiral solutes and proteins. This method could also be adopted for use in the rapid screening of drug-protein interactions. PMID:21872871

  15. a Measurement of the Homogeneous Rate of Thermal Dissociation of Uranium Hexafluoride by Shock Tube Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoles, Stephen Wesley

    1990-01-01

    A determination of the rate of homogeneous thermal dissociation of UF_6 is reported. The high temperature region of a shock tube generated flow was used to dissociate UF_6. Laser -schlieren diagnostic techniques were used to measure post -shock density gradient and shock wave velocity, from which the dissociation rate constant and post-shock conditions were determined. The unimolecular dissociation theory of Rice, Ramsparger, and Kassel was used to model the temperature - and density-dependent rate constants. When extrapolated to the high density limit the dissociation rate constant obtained is:rm k_infty = 3.51times 10^{13}{bf e}^{{-64.6+/-6.3 {kcal over mole}over R_{U}T }}{1over sec}.This result agrees with a reliable theoretical calculation by another investigator, but differs by two orders of magnitude from the only other experimental measurements in the open literature.

  16. Recurrent dissociative fugue.

    PubMed

    Mamarde, Abhishek; Navkhare, Praveen; Singam, Amrita; Kanoje, Akash

    2013-10-01

    Dissociative fugue is a rarely reported diagnostic entity. It is one of the least understood and yet clinically one of the most fascinating disorders in mental health. Here, we describe a case of fugue in a 32-year-old man who was brought to mental hospital with complete loss of memory for events pertaining to identity of self. This case illustrates the nature of presentation in hospital setting like mental hospital and effort taken to reintegrate his identity and reunite with his family. PMID:24379504

  17. Energetics from Slow Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Jockusch, Rebecca A.; Paech, Kolja

    2005-01-01

    Photodissociation kinetics of the protonated pentapeptide leucine enkephalin measured using a cw CO2 laser and a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer are reported. A short induction period, corresponding to the time required to raise the internal energy of the ion population to a (dissociating) steady state, is observed. After this induction period, the dissociation data are accurately fit by first-order kinetics. A plot of the log of the unimolecular dissociation rate constant, kuni, as a function of the log of laser power is linear at low laser powers (<9 W, kuni <0.05 s−1), but tapers off at high laser power (9–33 W, kuni = 0.05–7 s−1). The entire measured dissociation curve can be accurately fit by an exponential function plus a constant. The experiment is simulated using a master equation formalism. In the model, the laser radiation is described as an energetically flat-topped distribution which is spatially uniform. This description is consistent with experimental results which indicate that ion motion within the cell averages out spatial inhomogeneities in the laser light. The model has several adjustable parameters. The effect of varying these parameters on the calculated kinetics and power dependence curves is discussed. A procedure for determining a limited range of threshold dissociation energy, Eo, which fits both the measured induction period and power dependence curves, is presented. Using this procedure, Eo of leucine enkephalin is determined to be 1.12–1.46 eV. This result is consistent with, although less precise than, values measured previously using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation. Although the blackbody dissociation results were used as a starting point to search for fits of the master equation model to experiment, these results demonstrate that it is, in principle, possible to determine a limited range of Eo from slow infrared multiphoton dissociation data alone. PMID:16467893

  18. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets. PMID:25715324

  19. THE DISSOCIATIVE TURN IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Itzkowitz, Sheldon

    2015-06-01

    In his response to the Roundtable Discussions on what is effective in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the author focuses on the renewed interest in the concept of dissociation that began to emerge toward the end of the 20th century. A contemporary psychoanalytic position informed by the impact of developmental trauma has led to an understanding of and interest in the dissociative mind. The actuality of trauma during infancy and early childhood is recognized as a key factor leading to the emergence of dissociative processes, the potential dissociative structuring of the mind, and mind being characterized by multiple, discontinuous, centers of consciousness. The therapeutic goal in the psychoanalytic work with fragmented patients is to establish communication and understanding between the dissociated self-states. The author offers two brief clinical examples of working with dissociated self-states. PMID:26177756

  20. [Analysis of the impact of heparin on the affinity of high mobility group box-1 protein and the receptor of advanced glycation end products by surface plasmon resonance technology].

    PubMed

    Ling, Yan; Wang, Chun-You; Yang, Zhi-Yong

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the affinity constants of heparin with high mobility group protein 1(HMGB1) and HMGB1 with the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and to analyze the impact of heparin on the affinity of HMGB1 and RAGE, the standard BIAcore amine coupling chemistry protocol using EDC and NHS was employed for immobilizing. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology was used to detect the affinity constants of heparin/HMGB1, HMGB1/RAGE and heparin/ RAGE. Binding analysis was used to investigate the impact of heparin on the affinity of HMGB1 and RAGE. After the immobilization, 9 000 and 5 000 RU rise of HMGB1 and RAGE respectively were obtained. These meant that the immobilized values of HMGB1 and RAGE were about 9 and 5 ng x mm(-2) respectively. The kinetic constants were k(a) = 1.78 x 10(5) L x mol(-1) x s(-1), kd = 8.02 x 10(-4) s(-1), and the affinity constants were KA = 2.22 x 10(8) L x mol(-1), the equilibrium dissociation constant K(D) = 4.5 x 10(-9) mol x L(-1) for heparin and HMGB1; while the kinetic constants were k(a) = 1.85 x 10(3) L x mol(-1) x s(-1), k(d) = 1.81 x 10(-4) s(-1), K(A) = 1.02 x 10(7) L x mol(-1), K(D) = 9.77 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1) for HMGB1 and RAGE; there was very low affinity of heparin with RAGE. The highest concentration of 10 000 u x L(-1) of heparin in this experiment did not reach the saturation with HMGB1. After 50 mg x L(-1) of HMGB1 was mixed with heparin of 50, 100, 1 000, 10 000 u x L(-1), the combining amount of HMGB1 and RAGE declined from 100 to 50 RU. But there were no significant differences between different concentrations of heparin. It was concluded that heparin can combine with HMGB1 and affect the affinity of HMGB1/RAGE. In addition, this impact was not in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:20101991

  1. Determination of protein binding affinities within hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs).

    PubMed

    EL-Sharif, Hazim F; Hawkins, Daniel M; Stevenson, Derek; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs) were prepared for several proteins (haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase) using a family of acrylamide-based monomers. Protein affinity towards the HydroMIPs was investigated under equilibrium conditions and over a range of concentrations using specific binding with Hill slope saturation profiles. We report HydroMIP binding affinities, in terms of equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) within the micro-molar range (25 ± 4 μM, 44 ± 3 μM, 17 ± 2 μM for haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase respectively within a polyacrylamide-based MIP). The extent of non-specific binding or cross-selectivity for non-target proteins has also been assessed. It is concluded that both selectivity and affinity for both cognate and non-cognate proteins towards the MIPs were dependent on the concentration and the complementarity of their structures and size. This is tentatively attributed to the formation of protein complexes during both the polymerisation and rebinding stages at high protein concentrations. We have used atomic force spectroscopy to characterize molecular interactions in the MIP cavities using protein-modified AFM tips. Attractive and repulsive force curves were obtained for the MIP and NIP (non-imprinted polymer) surfaces (under protein loaded or unloaded states). Our force data suggest that we have produced selective cavities for the template protein in the MIPs and we have been able to quantify the extent of non-specific protein binding on, for example, a non-imprinted polymer (NIP) control surface. PMID:24950144

  2. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca(2+) Probe D4ER.

    PubMed

    Greotti, Elisa; Wong, Andrea; Pozzan, Tullio; Pendin, Diana; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents the major intracellular Ca(2+) store and the free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within its lumen ([Ca(2+)]ER) can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca(2+) sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca(2+) probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd) for Ca(2+), low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca(2+)] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca(2+) affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca(2+)] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca(2+)]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer's Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2). The lower Ca(2+) affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca(2+) content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls. PMID:27598166

  3. Isolation, identification and characterisation of starch-interacting proteins by 2-D affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Irwin, Jennifer A; Higgins, Jody; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew K

    2006-05-01

    A 2-D affinity electrophoretic technique (2-DAE) has been used to isolate proteins that interact with various starch components from total barley endosperm extracts. In the first dimension, proteins are separated by native PAGE. The second-dimensional gel contains polysaccharides such as amylopectin and glycogen. The migration of starch-interacting proteins in this dimension is determined by their affinity towards a particular polysaccharide and these proteins are therefore spatially separated from the bulk of proteins in the crude extract. Four distinct proteins demonstrate significant affinity for amylopectin and have been identified as starch branching enzyme I (SBEI), starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa), SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase using polyclonal antibodies and zymogram activity analysis. In the case of starch phosphorylase, a protein spot was excised from a 2-DAE polyacrylamide gel and analysed using Q-TOF MS/MS, resulting in the alignment of three internal peptide sequences with the known sequence of the wheat plastidic starch phosphorylase isoform. This assignment was confirmed by the determination of the enzyme's function using zymogram analysis. Dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated for the three enzymes at 4 degrees C and values of 0.20, 0.21 and 1.3 g/L were determined for SBEI, SBEIIa and starch phosphorylase, respectively. Starch synthase I could also be resolved from the other proteins in the presence of glycogen and its identity was confirmed using a polyclonal antibody and by activity analysis. The 2-DAE method described here is simple, though powerful, enabling protein separation from crude extracts on the basis of function. PMID:16645949

  4. Fragment screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meiby, Elinor; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M; Ohlson, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a new strategy for drug discovery where lead compounds are evolved from small molecules. These fragments form low affinity interactions (dissociation constant (K(D)) = mM - μM) with protein targets, which require fragment screening methods of sufficient sensitivity. Weak affinity chromatography (WAC) is a promising new technology for fragment screening based on selective retention of fragments by a drug target. Kinases are a major pharmaceutical target, and FBDD has been successfully applied to several of these targets. In this work, we have demonstrated the potential to use WAC in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for fragment screening of a kinase target-cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK). One hundred seventy fragments were selected for WAC screening by virtual screening of a commercial fragment library against the ATP-binding site of five different proteins. GAK protein was immobilized on a capillary HPLC column, and compound binding was characterized by frontal affinity chromatography. Compounds were screened in sets of 13 or 14, in combination with MS detection for enhanced throughput. Seventy-eight fragments (46 %) with K(D) < 200 μM were detected, including a few highly efficient GAK binders (K(D) of 2 μM; ligand efficiency = 0.51). Of special interest is that chiral screening by WAC may be possible, as two stereoisomeric fragments, which both contained one chiral center, demonstrated twin peaks. This ability, in combination with the robustness, sensitivity, and simplicity of WAC makes it a new method for fragment screening of considerable potential. PMID:22918538

  5. Dissociative Electron Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola, Esmeralda; Esmeralda Arreola Collaboration; Leigh Hargreaves Collaboration

    Since the pioneering work of Boudiaffa et al., it has been understood that electrons, even with energies near or below the ionization threshold, are capable of initiating strand-breaks in human DNA. This discovery raised important questions for cancer treatments, since sub-ionizing electrons are known to be the most copiously produced secondary product of radiation therapy. But even to date these factors are largely excluded from dosimetry calculations. This lack of inclusion is, at least in part, certainly due to the dearth of fundamental data describing low-energy electron interactions with nucleotide molecules that form the basis of DNA. Understanding of how such slow electrons are able to damage DNA remains incomplete, but the strongly peaked nature of Boudiaffa et al.'s data gives strong hints at resonantly driven collision processes. DNA damage is therefore most likely driven by ``dissociative electron attachment'' (DEA). DEA is a rather complicated process to model due to the coupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in the molecule. At the California State University Fullerton, we are currently commissioning a new spectrometer to study dissociation channels, reaction rates and orientation effects in DEA collisions between slow electrons and nucleotide molecules. At the meeting we will present design parameters and commissioning data for this new apparatus.

  6. Selective induction of high-ouabain-affinity isoform of Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase by thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, R.S.; Loeb, J.N. )

    1988-12-01

    The administration of thyroid hormone is known to result in an induction of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-adenosinetriphosphatase (Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase) in rat skeletal muscle and other thyroid hormone-responsive tissues. Since the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase in a variety of mammalian tissues has recently been reported to exist in at least two forms distinguishable by differing affinities for the inhibitory cardiac glycoside ouabain. The authors have studied the effects of 3,3{prime},5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T{sub 3}) treatment on these two forms of the enzyme in rat diaphragm. The inhibition of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in a crude membrane fraction by varying concentrations of ouabain conformed to a biphasic pattern consistent with the presence of two distinct isoforms with inhibition constants (K{sub I}s) for ouabain of {approximately}10{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}4} M, respectively. Measurement of the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)ouabain to these membranes confirmed the presence of a class of high-affinity ouabain binding sites with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of slightly less than 10{sup {minus}7}M, whose maximal binding capacity was increased by T{sub 3} treatment by 185%. Binding studies in unfractionated homogenates of diaphragm similarly demonstrated the presence of high-affinity sites whose maximal binding capacity was increased by T{sub 3} treatment. Quantitation of both the high- and low-ouabain-affinity forms of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase by ouabain-dependent phosphorylation from ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate confirmed that T{sub 3} treatment markedly increased the number of high-affinity sites while having little effect on the number of low-affinity sites. These observations provide, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that these two forms of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase are subject to selective hormonal induction.

  7. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  8. Comparison of biosensor platforms in the evaluation of high affinity antibody-antigen binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    The acquisition of reliable kinetic parameters for the characterization of biomolecular interactions is an important component of the drug discovery and development process. While several benchmark studies have explored the variability of kinetic rate constants obtained from multiple laboratories and biosensors, a direct comparison of these instruments' performance has not been undertaken, and systematic factors contributing to data variability from these systems have not been discussed. To address these questions, a panel of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies was simultaneously evaluated for their binding kinetics against the same antigen on four biosensor platforms: GE Healthcare's Biacore T100, Bio-Rad's ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio's Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics's IBIS MX96. We compared the strengths and weaknesses of these systems and found that despite certain inherent systematic limitations in instrumentation, the rank orders of both the association and dissociation rate constants were highly correlated between these instruments. Our results also revealed a trade-off between data reliability and sample throughput. Biacore T100, followed by ProteOn XPR36, exhibited excellent data quality and consistency, whereas Octet RED384 and IBIS MX96 demonstrated high flexibility and throughput with compromises in data accuracy and reproducibility. Our results support the need for a "fit-for-purpose" approach in instrument selection for biosensor studies. PMID:27365220

  9. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides.

    PubMed

    Kessler, R M; Ansari, M S; de Paulis, T; Schmidt, D E; Clanton, J A; Smith, H E; Manning, R G; Gillespie, D; Ebert, M H

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. "Iodopride" (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with [125I]iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, "iclopride" (KD 0.23 nM) and "itopride" (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, "epidepride" (KD 0.057 nM) and "ioxipride" (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8. PMID:1831229

  10. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Ansari, M.S.; de Paulis, T.; Schmidt, D.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Manning, R.G.; Gillespie, D.; Ebert, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. Iodopride (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with (125I)iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, iclopride (KD 0.23 nM) and itopride (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, epidepride (KD 0.057 nM) and ioxipride (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8.

  11. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed. PMID:26286620

  12. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  13. Evaluation of adhesion force and binding affinity of phytohemagglutinin erythroagglutinating to EGF receptor on human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, W-T; Dong, G-C; Yao, C-H; Huang, J-Y; Lin, F-H

    2013-01-01

    PHA-E is a natural product extracted from red kidney beans, and it has been reported to induce cell apoptosis by blocking EGFR in lung cancer cells. Because EGF is the major in vivo competitor to PHA-E in clinical application, PHA-E must be proved that has better affinity to EGFR than EGF. This study would focus on how PHA-E tightly bind to EGFR and the results would compare with EGF. The adhesion force, measured by AFM, between EGFR and PHA-E was 207.14±74.42 pN that was higher than EGF (183.65±86.93 pN). The equilibrium dissociation constant of PHA-E and EGF to EGFR was 2.4 10(-9)±1.4 10(-9) and 7.3 10(-8)±2.7 10(-8), respectively, that could evaluate binding affinity. The result showed that binding affinity of PHA-E to EGFR was one order higher than EGF to EGFR. In the results of flow cytometer and confocal microscope, we found binding efficiency of EGF to EGFR was decrease as the concentration of PHA-E increased. In the analysis of Western blot, treatment of A-549 cells with PHA-E resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in EGFR phosphorylation. In conclusion, we found that PHA-E had better adhesion force and binding affinity to EGFR than that of the EGF. The interaction between PHA-E and EGFR could block EGF binding and then inhibit EGFR phosphorylation. PHA-E could be developed into a new target molecule for lung cancer treatment that could be immobilized on the drug carrier to guide therapeutic particles to the tumor site. PMID:23394551

  14. Binding affinity and specificity of neuromyelitis optica autoantibodies to aquaporin-4 M1/M23 isoforms and orthogonal arrays.

    PubMed

    Crane, Jonathan M; Lam, Chiwah; Rossi, Andrea; Gupta, Tripta; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Verkman, A S

    2011-05-01

    Autoantibodies against astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are highly specific for the neuroinflammatory disease neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We measured the binding of NMO autoantibodies to AQP4 in human astrocyte-derived U87MG cells expressing M1 and/or M23 AQP4, or M23 mutants that do not form orthogonal array of particles (OAPs). Binding affinity was quantified by two-color fluorescence ratio imaging of cells stained with NMO serum or a recombinant monoclonal NMO autoantibody (NMO-rAb), together with a C terminus anti-AQP4 antibody. NMO-rAb titrations showed binding with dissociation constants down to 44 ± 7 nm. Different NMO-rAbs and NMO patient sera showed a wide variation in NMO-IgG binding to M1 versus M23 AQP4. Differences in binding affinity rather than stoichiometry accounted for M1 versus M23 binding specificity, with consistently greater affinity of NMO-IgG binding to M23 than M1 AQP4. Binding and OAP measurements in cells expressing different M1:M23 ratios or AQP4 mutants indicated that the differential binding of NMO-IgG to M1 versus M23 was due to OAP assembly rather than to differences in the M1 versus M23 N termini. Purified Fab fragments of NMO-IgG showed similar patterns of AQP4 isoform binding, indicating that structural changes in the AQP4 epitope upon array assembly, and not bivalent cross-linking of whole IgG, result in the greater binding affinity to OAPs. Our study establishes a quantitative assay of NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 and indicates remarkable, OAP-dependent heterogeneity in NMO autoantibody binding specificity. PMID:21454592

  15. Evidence for monomeric and oligomeric hormone-binding domains in affinity-purified gonadotropin receptor from rat ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Y.; Menon, K.M.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Rat ovarian lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor was purified from a Triton X-100-solubilized membrane preparation by affinity chromatography with Affi-Gel 10 coupled to purified human choriogonadotropin. The affinity-purified receptor preparations contained a single class of high-affinity binding sites for {sup 125}I-labeled human choriogonadotropin, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M, which is comparable to the K{sub d} values for membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. The purified receptor appeared as two dominant bands with molecular weights of 135,000 and 92,000 after sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. When the individual affinity-purified receptor bands were electroeluted from the gel and analyzed again by SDS/PAGE under nonreducing conditions, both the M{sub r} 92,000 and the 135,000 proteins retained their original molecular form even when 8 M urea was included in the gel. However, when the electrophoretically purified M{sub r} 92,000 and 135,000 bands were subjected to SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, the M{sub r} 135,000 species was almost completely converted to a M{sub r} 92,000 band, but the M{sub r} 92,000 species did not undergo any alteration in molecular weight. The results suggest that the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor from rat ovary exists in two molecular forms, and the higher molecular weight form appears to be composed of disulfide-linked M{sup r} 92,000 subunit, which comprises the hormone-binding domain.

  16. Dissociative States and Neural Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bob, Petr; Svetlak, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that neural mechanisms of consciousness are related to integration of distributed neural assemblies. This neural integration is particularly vulnerable to past stressful experiences that can lead to disintegration and dissociation of consciousness. These findings suggest that dissociation could be described as a level of…

  17. /sup 125/I-BW-A844U, an antagonist radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for adenosine A1 receptors, and /sup 125/I-azido-BW-A844U, a photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Craig, R.H.; Daluge, S.M.; Linden, J.

    1988-06-01

    3-(4-Amino)phenethyl-1-propyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (BW-A844U) has been synthesized and shown to bind with high affinity to adenosine A1 receptors of bovine brain membranes (KD = 0.23 nM). This compound is highly selective for A1 receptors; the KI for binding to A2 receptors of human platelet membranes is 2.0 microM (A2/A1 ratio = 8700). Radioiodination of the 3-aminophenethyl group resulted in 125I-BW-A844U, a radioligand that retains high affinity for A1 receptors in bovine brain membranes (KD = 0.14 nM) and to 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate-solubilized receptors (KD = 0.34 nM). Specific binding of 125I-BW-A844U represented greater than 90% of the total binding at the KD. From the association constant (K1 = 5.0 X 10(8) M-1min-1) and the dissociation constant (K-1 = 0.064 min-1), the kinetic KD (K-1/K1) in membranes was calculated to be 0.13 nM. NaCl (1 M) had little effect on the binding affinity of 125I-BW-A844U, in contrast to the large effect of salt on the binding affinity of acidic antagonist radioligands. 8-Sulfophenyltheophylline inhibited radioligand binding with a Hill coefficient of 1.0, indicative of a single affinity binding state for the antagonist. By comparison, two distinct agonist affinity states of A1 receptors for the agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine could be resolved, a high affinity state (62%, KH = 74 pM) and a low affinity state (KL = 3.83 nM). The addition of 0.1 mM guanylylimidodiphosphate converted all receptors to the low affinity state. Addition of NaCl (0.5 M) decreased the fraction of receptors in the high affinity state and increased both KH and KL, suggesting that NaCl alters coupling of receptors to G proteins and influences the conformation of the receptor polypeptide, whether or not the receptor is coupled to a G protein.

  18. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  19. Competition between solution and cell surface receptors for ligand. Dissociation of hapten bound to surface antibody in the presence of solution antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B; Posner, R G; Torney, D C; Erickson, J; Holowka, D; Baird, B

    1989-01-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study on the effects of competition for ligand between receptors in solution and receptors on cell surfaces. We focus on the following experiment. After ligand and cell surface receptors equilibrate, solution receptors are introduced, and the dissociation of surface bound ligand is monitored. We derive theoretical expressions for the dissociation rate and compare with experiment. In a standard dissociation experiment (no solution receptors present) dissociation may be slowed by rebinding, i.e., at high receptor densities a ligand that dissociates from one receptor may rebind to other receptors before separating from the cell. Our theory predicts that rebinding will be prevented when S much greater than N2Kon/(16 pi 2D a4), where S is the free receptor site concentration in solution, N the number of free surface receptor sites per cell, Kon the forward rate constant for ligand-receptor binding in solution, D the diffusion coefficient of the ligand, and a the cell radius. The predicted concentration of solution receptors needed to prevent rebinding is proportional to the square of the cell surface receptor density. The experimental system used in these studies consists of a monovalent ligand, 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP)-aminocaproyl-L-tyrosine (DCT), that reversibly binds to a monoclonal anti-DNP immunoglobulin E (IgE). This IgE is both a solution receptor and, when anchored to its high affinity Fc epsilon receptor on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells, a surface receptor. For RBL cells with 6 x 10(5) binding sites per cell, our theory predicts that to prevent DCT rebinding to cell surface IgE during dissociation requires S much greater than 2,400 nM. We show that for S = 200-1,700 nM, the dissociation rate of DCT from surface IgE is substantially slower than from solution IgE where no rebinding occurs. Other predictions are also tested and shown to be consistent with experiment. PMID:2532552

  20. Emergent properties of nanosensor arrays: applications for monitoring IgG affinity distributions, weakly affined hypermannosylation, and colony selection for biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Reuel, Nigel F; Grassbaugh, Brittany; Kruss, Sebastian; Mundy, J Zachary; Opel, Cary; Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Egodage, Kamal; Wahl, Ramon; Helk, Bernhard; Zhang, Jingqing; Kalcioglu, Z Ilke; Tvrdy, Kevin; Bellisario, Darin O; Mu, Bin; Blake, Steven S; Van Vliet, Krystyn J; Love, J Christopher; Wittrup, Karl Dane; Strano, Michael S

    2013-09-24

    It is widely recognized that an array of addressable sensors can be multiplexed for the label-free detection of a library of analytes. However, such arrays have useful properties that emerge from the ensemble, even when monofunctionalized. As examples, we show that an array of nanosensors can estimate the mean and variance of the observed dissociation constant (KD), using three different examples of binding IgG with Protein A as the recognition site, including polyclonal human IgG (KD μ = 19 μM, σ(2) = 1000 mM(2)), murine IgG (KD μ = 4.3 nM, σ(2) = 3 μM(2)), and human IgG from CHO cells (KD μ = 2.5 nM, σ(2) = 0.01 μM(2)). Second, we show that an array of nanosensors can uniquely monitor weakly affined analyte interactions via the increased number of observed interactions. One application involves monitoring the metabolically induced hypermannosylation of human IgG from CHO using PSA-lectin conjugated sensor arrays where temporal glycosylation patterns are measured and compared. Finally, the array of sensors can also spatially map the local production of an analyte from cellular biosynthesis. As an example, we rank productivity of IgG-producing HEK colonies cultured directly on the array of nanosensors itself. PMID:23909808

  1. Morphometric affinities of gigantopithecus.

    PubMed

    Gelvin, B R

    1980-11-01

    Multivariate analyses, supplemented by univariate statistical methods, of measurements from mandibular tooth crown dimensions and the mandible of Gigantopithecus blacki, G. bilaspurensis, Plio-Plelstocene hominids, Homo erectus, and seven Neogene ape species from the genera Proconsul, Sivapithecus, Ouranopithecus, and Dryopithecus were used to assess the morphometric affinities of Gigantopithecus. The results show that Gigantopithecus displays affinities to Ouranopithecus and to the hominids, particularly the Plio-Plelstocene hominids, rather than to the apes. Ouranopithecus demonstrated dental resemblances to G. bilaspurensis and the Plio-Pleistocene hominids but mandibular similarities to the apes. Results of analyses of tooth and mandibular shape indices, combined with multivariate distance and temporal relationships, suggest that Ouranopithecus is a more likely candidate for Gigantopithecus ancestry than is Silvapithecus indicus. Shape and allometric differences between G. bilaspurensis and the robust australopithecines weaken the argument for an ancestral-descendant relationship between these groups. The results support the hypothesis that Gigantopithecus is an extinct side branch of the Hominidae. PMID:7468790

  2. Magneto-nanosensor platform for probing low-affinity protein-protein interactions and identification of a low-affinity PD-L1/PD-L2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Bechstein, Daniel J B; Ooi, Chin Chun; Patel, Ashka; Gaster, Richard S; Ng, Elaine; Gonzalez, Lino C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to understand the interactions between immune checkpoint receptors and their ligands targeted in immunotherapies against cancer. To carefully characterize the complete network of interactions involved and the binding affinities between their extracellular domains, an improved kinetic assay is needed to overcome limitations with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Here, we present a magneto-nanosensor platform integrated with a microfluidic chip that allows measurement of dissociation constants in the micromolar-range. High-density conjugation of magnetic nanoparticles with prey proteins allows multivalent receptor interactions with sensor-immobilized bait proteins, more closely mimicking natural-receptor clustering on cells. The platform has advantages over traditional SPR in terms of insensitivity of signal responses to pH and salinity, less consumption of proteins and better sensitivities. Using this platform, we characterized the binding affinities of the PD-1-PD-L1/PD-L2 co-inhibitory receptor system, and discovered an unexpected interaction between the two known PD-1 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PMID:27447090

  3. Magneto-nanosensor platform for probing low-affinity protein–protein interactions and identification of a low-affinity PD-L1/PD-L2 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Bechstein, Daniel J. B.; Ooi, Chin Chun; Patel, Ashka; Gaster, Richard S.; Ng, Elaine; Gonzalez, Lino C.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to understand the interactions between immune checkpoint receptors and their ligands targeted in immunotherapies against cancer. To carefully characterize the complete network of interactions involved and the binding affinities between their extracellular domains, an improved kinetic assay is needed to overcome limitations with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Here, we present a magneto-nanosensor platform integrated with a microfluidic chip that allows measurement of dissociation constants in the micromolar-range. High-density conjugation of magnetic nanoparticles with prey proteins allows multivalent receptor interactions with sensor-immobilized bait proteins, more closely mimicking natural-receptor clustering on cells. The platform has advantages over traditional SPR in terms of insensitivity of signal responses to pH and salinity, less consumption of proteins and better sensitivities. Using this platform, we characterized the binding affinities of the PD-1—PD-L1/PD-L2 co-inhibitory receptor system, and discovered an unexpected interaction between the two known PD-1 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PMID:27447090

  4. Distinction between high-affinity (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine binding sites and muscarinic receptors in guinea-pig ileum muscle

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fakahany, E.E.; Triggle, D.J.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1984-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Phencyclidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP) binding was studied in guinea-pig ileum muscle membranes. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PCP was time dependent, reversible and saturable, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 154 nM and maximum binding of 12.9 pmol/mg of protein at pH 9. Its pH dependency suggests that the un-ionized PCP is the pharmacologically active form. The binding site was on a protein which was sensitive to heat, proteolytic enzymes and the carboxylic group reagent dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, but insensitive to phospholipase A and C, concanavalin A, dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide. Specific (/sup 3/H)PCP binding was displaced effectively by several PCP analogs and Ca/sup + +/ channel antagonists including verapamil, to which these sites had a high affinity. These high-affinity PCP-binding sites were found at a much higher concentration in the same membrane preparation than muscarinic receptor sites identified by their specific binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. PCP bound to both sites, but with a lower affinity to the muscarinic receptor sites. The PCP and muscarinic receptor sites differed in their sensitivities to pH and drug specifities.

  5. Structure of the phylloquinone-binding (Q phi) site in green plant photosystem I reaction centers: the affinity of quinones and quinonoid compounds for the Q phi site.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, M; Itoh, S

    1991-06-01

    The dissociation constants (Kd) between the phylloquinone-binding site (designated as the Q phi site) and 23 quinones and 2 quinonoid compounds were measured in spinach photosystem I reaction centers. Kd values were calculated from the dependency of the recovery of the flash-induced stable oxidation of the primary donor chlorophyll P700 in the phylloquinone-extracted reaction center on the concentration of added compounds. The binding free energy, calculated from the Kd value of quinones with nonpolar substituted groups, linearly depended on their partition coefficients between water and cyclohexane, but only if their molecular sizes are smaller than anthraquinone. The quinones with larger molecular sizes showed a lower affinity than expected from their hydrophobicities. This suggests that the quinone-binding domain is hydrophobic and that its size is similar to that of anthraquinone. The interaction other than the hydrophobic one was also estimated to stabilize the binding by -5.7 kcal/mol for alkylated quinones. Deletion of one of the carbonyls of p-quinones significantly decreased the binding affinity. This suggests a hydrogen bond or a pi-pi electronic interaction between quinone and the Q phi site. Effects of halogens and amino substitutions on the binding affinity were also studied. The structure of the quinone-binding site in the photosystem I reaction center is deduced from these results. PMID:2036403

  6. FYWHCLDE-based affinity chromatography of IgG: effect of ligand density and purifications of human IgG and monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-08-15

    This work reports the development of an octapeptide-based affinity adsorbent for the purification of human IgG (hIgG) and monoclonal antibody (mAb). The octapeptide was FYWHCLDE selected earlier by the biomimetic design of affinity peptide ligands for hIgG. The ligand was coupled to Sepharose gel at four densities from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL, and the effect of peptide density on the adsorption of hIgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was first investigated. The binding capacity of hIgG increased from 104.2 to 176.4mg/mL within the ligand density range, and the binding affinity (dissociation constant) kept at 2.4-3.7μM. Batch adsorption revealed that the selectivity of FYWHCLDE-Sepharose for IgG was 30-40 times over BSA. The effective pore diffusivity of IgG decreased somewhat with increasing ligand density, but the dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough, measured by using 10-fold diluted human serum as feedstock, doubled with increasing ligand density from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL due to the remarkable increase of static binding capacity. By using the affinity column with a ligand density of 23.9μmol/mL, hIgG and humanized mAb purifications from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the robustness of the peptide gel was demonstrated by recycled use of the affinity column in 20 breakthrough cycles. PMID:24947889

  7. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Zaczek, R.; Pearsall, D.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1989-12-01

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of (125I)Tyro-ovine CRF ((125I)oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for (125I) oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, (125I)oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex.

  8. Fast and high-affinity binding of B-lymphotropic papovavirus to human B-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M; Oppenländer, M; Pawlita, M

    1995-01-01

    Binding of B-lymphotropic papovavirus (LPV) to host cells differing in susceptibility to viral infection was determined by a newly established, direct, nonradioactive virus binding assay, which allows quantitative description of the binding characteristics by receptor saturation and Scatchard analysis. LPV binding to the highly susceptible human B-lymphoma cell line BJA-B K88 is specific, saturable, and noncooperative. Binding occurs very fast, with an association rate constant (k1) of 6.7 x 10(7) M-1s-1, and is of high affinity, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.9 x 10(-12) M; and the virus-receptor complex is stable, with a half life of 70 min. The binding affinities of receptors on four other highly, moderately, or weakly susceptible human B-lymphoma cell lines were similar, with up to twofold variation around a mean Kd value of 3 x 10(-12) M, suggesting the presence of the same LPV receptor on all of these cell lines. This view is further supported by the finding that in all cases a terminal sialic acid is necessary for LPV binding. Tunicamycin has been shown to drastically induce LPV susceptibility and LPV binding in weakly and moderately susceptible B-lymphoma cell lines (O.T. Keppler, M. Herrmann, M. Oppenländer, W. Meschede, and M. Pawlita, J. Virol. 68:6933-6939, 1994). The hypothesis that the constitutively expressed and tunicamycin-induced LPV receptors are identical is strengthened by our finding that both receptor types displayed the same high affinity. LPV susceptibility of different B-lymphoma cell lines was correlated with receptor number but not with receptor affinity. The numbers of receptors per cell on highly and moderately susceptible cell lines ranged from 2,000 to 400 and were directly proportional to LPV susceptibility. This indicates that the number of high-affinity receptors per cell is a key regulating factor for the LPV host range. PMID:7474091

  9. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms. PMID:26241024

  10. Affinity interactions of human immunoglobulin G with short peptides: role of ligand spacer on binding, kinetics, and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Rojas, Orlando J; Genzer, Jan; Gurgel, Patrick V; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2016-03-01

    The interaction affinity between human IgG and a short peptide ligand (hexameric HWRGWV) was investigated by following the shifts in frequency and energy dissipation in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). HWRGWV was immobilized by means of poly(ethylene glycol) tethered on QCM sensors coated with silicon oxide, which enhanced the accessibility of the peptide to hIgG and also passivated the surface. Ellipsometry and ToF-SIMS were employed for surface characterization. The peptide ligand density was optimized to 0.88 chains nm(-2), which enabled the interaction of each hIgG molecule with at least one ligand. The maximum binding capacity was found to be 4.6 mg m(-2), corresponding to a monolayer of hIgG, similar to the values for chromatographic resins. Dissociation constants were lower than those obtained from resins, possibly due to overestimation of bound mass by QCM. Equilibrium thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were determined, shedding light on interfacial effects important for detection and bioseparation. Graphical Abstract The interaction affinity between human IgG and a short peptide ligand was investigated by using quartz crystal microgravimetry, ellipsometry and ToF-SIMS. Equilibrium thermodynamic and kinetics parameters were determined, shedding light on interfacial effects important for detection and bioseparation. PMID:26549116

  11. The association-dissociation behavior of the ApoE proteins: kinetic and equilibrium studies

    PubMed Central

    Garai, Kanchan; Frieden, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E family consists of three major protein isoforms: apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), ApoE3 and ApoE2. The isoforms, which contain 299 residues, differ only by single amino acid changes but of the three only ApoE4 is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s Disease. At μM concentrations lipid-free ApoE exists predominantly as tetramers. In more dilute solutions, lower molecular weight species predominate. Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), intermolecular Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and sedimentation methods we find that the association-dissociation reaction of ApoE can be modeled with a monomer-dimer-tetramer process. Equilibrium constants have been determined from the sedimentation data while the individual rate constants for association and dissociation are determined by measuring the kinetics of dissociation of ApoE and are in agreement with the equilibrium constants. Dissociation kinetics as measured by intermolecular FRET show two phases reflecting the dissociation of tetramer to dimer and of dimer to monomer with dissociation from tetramer to dimer being more rapid than the dimer to monomer dissociation. The rate constants differ for the different ApoE isoforms showing that the association-dissociation process is isoforms specific. Strikingly, the association rate constants are almost two orders of magnitude slower than expected for a diffusion controlled process. Dissociation kinetics were also monitored by tryptophan fluorescence in presence of acrylamide and the data found to be consistent with the monomer-dimer-tetramer model. The approach combining multiple methods establishes the reaction scheme of ApoE self-association. PMID:20923231

  12. PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: RECENT TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe A.; Bi, Cong; Li, Rong; Matsuda, Ryan; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Vargas, John; Zheng, Xiwei

    2012-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a separation technique that has become increasingly important in work with biological samples and pharmaceutical agents. This method is based on the use of a biologically-related agent as a stationary phase to selectively retain analytes or to study biological interactions. This review discusses the basic principles behind affinity chromatography and examines recent developments that have occurred in the use of this method for biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis. Techniques based on traditional affinity supports are discussed, but an emphasis is placed on methods in which affinity columns are used as part of HPLC systems or in combination with other analytical methods. General formats for affinity chromatography that are considered include step elution schemes, weak affinity chromatography, affinity extraction and affinity depletion. Specific separation techniques that are examined include lectin affinity chromatography, boronate affinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography, and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Approaches for the study of biological interactions by affinity chromatography are also presented, such as the measurement of equilibrium constants, rate constants, or competition and displacement effects. In addition, related developments in the use of immobilized enzyme reactors, molecularly imprinted polymers, dye ligands and aptamers are briefly considered. PMID:22305083

  13. Somatostatin binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, B.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E. )

    1990-11-01

    A method has been developed for the study of somatostatin (SS) binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex. Binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS to cells obtained by mechanical dissociation of rat cerebral cortex was dependent on time and temperature, saturable, reversible and highly specific. Under conditions of equilibrium, i.e., 60 min at 25 degrees C, native SS inhibited tracer binding in a dose-dependent manner. The Scatchard analysis of binding data was linear and yielded a dissociation constant of 0.60 +/- 0.08 nM with a maximal binding capacity of 160 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein. The binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS was specific as shown in experiments on tracer displacement by the native peptides, SS analogues, and unrelated peptides.

  14. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  15. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Lanius, Ruth; Vermetten, Eric; Simeon, Daphne; Friedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The rationale, research literature, and proposed changes to the dissociative disorders and conversion disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. Dissociative identity disorder will include reference to possession as well as identity fragmentation, to make the disorder more applicable to culturally diverse situations. Dissociative amnesia will include dissociative fugue as a subtype, since fugue is a rare disorder that always involves amnesia but does not always include confused wandering or loss of personality identity. Depersonalization disorder will include derealization as well, since the two often co-occur. A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defined by the presence of depersonalization or derealization in addition to other PTSD symptoms, is being recommended, based upon new epidemiological and neuroimaging evidence linking it to an early life history of adversity and a combination of frontal activation and limbic inhibition. Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity. PMID:23394228

  16. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Method for Palytoxin Detection Based on Na+,K+-ATPase Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Amparo; Pazos, María-José; Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Tobio, Araceli; Alfonso, Carmen; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Palytoxin (PLTX), produced by dinoflagellates from the genus Ostreopsis was first discovered, isolated, and purified from zoanthids belonging to the genus Palythoa. The detection of this toxin in contaminated shellfish is essential for human health preservation. A broad range of studies indicate that mammalian Na+,K+-ATPase is a high affinity cellular receptor for PLTX. The toxin converts the pump into an open channel that stimulates sodium influx and potassium efflux. In this work we develop a detection method for PLTX based on its binding to the Na+,K+-ATPase. The method was developed by using the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to monitor biomolecular reactions. This technique does not require any labeling of components. The interaction of PLTX over immobilized Na+,K+-ATPase is quantified by injecting different concentrations of toxin in the biosensor and checking the binding rate constant (kobs). From the representation of kobs versus PLTX concentration, the kinetic equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association can be calculated. The value of this constant is KD = 6.38 × 10−7 ± 6.67 × 10−8 M PLTX. In this way the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association was used as a suitable method for determination of the toxin concentration in a sample. This method represents a new and useful approach to easily detect the presence of PLTX-like compounds in marine products using the mechanism of action of these toxins and in this way reduce the use of other more expensive and animal based methods. PMID:24379088

  17. Structural Basis of Low-Affinity Nickel Binding to the Nickel-Responsive Transcription Factor NikR from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.; Schreiter, E; Stultz, C; Drennan, C

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli NikR regulates cellular nickel uptake by binding to the nik operon in the presence of nickel and blocking transcription of genes encoding the nickel uptake transporter. NikR has two binding affinities for the nik operon: a nanomolar dissociation constant with stoichiometric nickel and a picomolar dissociation constant with excess nickel [Bloom, S. L., and Zamble, D. B. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 10029-10038; Chivers, P. T., and Sauer, R. T. (2002) Chem. Biol. 9, 1141-1148]. While it is known that the stoichiometric nickel ions bind at the NikR tetrameric interface [Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 794-799; Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 13676-13681], the binding sites for excess nickel ions have not been fully described. Here we have determined the crystal structure of NikR in the presence of excess nickel to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution and have obtained nickel anomalous data (1.4845 {angstrom}) in the presence of excess nickel for both NikR alone and NikR cocrystallized with a 30-nucleotide piece of double-stranded DNA containing the nik operon. These anomalous data show that excess nickel ions do not bind to a single location on NikR but instead reveal a total of 22 possible low-affinity nickel sites on the NikR tetramer. These sites, for which there are six different types, are all on the surface of NikR, and most are found in both the NikR alone and NikR-DNA structures. Using a combination of crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations, the nickel sites can be described as preferring octahedral geometry, utilizing one to three protein ligands (typically histidine) and at least two water molecules.

  18. Global functioning and disability in dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Rufibach, Kaspar; Perron, Noelle; Wyss, Daniela; Kuenzler, Cornelia; Prezewowsky, Cornelia; Pitman, Roger K; Rufer, Michael

    2012-12-30

    Dissociative disorders are frequent comorbid conditions of other mental disorders. Yet, there is controversy about their clinical relevance, and little systematic research has been done on how they influence global functioning. Outpatients and day care patients (N=160) of several psychiatric units in Switzerland were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV Axis I Disorders, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-II. The association between subjects with a dissociative disorder (N=30) and functional impairment after accounting for non-dissociative axis I disorders was evaluated by linear regression models. We found a proportion of 18.8% dissociative disorders (dissociative amnesia=0%, dissociative fugue=0.6%, depersonalization disorder=4.4%, dissociative identity disorder=7.5%, dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified=6.3%) across treatment settings. Adjusted for other axis I disorders, subjects with a comorbid dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified had a median global assessment of functioning score that was 0.86 and 0.88 times, respectively, the score of subjects without a comorbid dissociative disorder. These findings support the hypothesis that complex dissociative disorders, i.e., dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified, contribute to functional impairment above and beyond the impact of co-existing non-dissociative axis I disorders, and that they qualify as "serious mental illness". PMID:22578820

  19. Electrochemical and theoretical analysis of the reactivity of shikonin derivatives: dissociative electron transfer in esterified compounds.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Vidales, Georgina; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical and theoretical analysis of a series of shikonin derivatives in aprotic media is presented. Results showed that the first electrochemical reduction signal is a reversible monoelectronic transfer, generating a stable semiquinone intermediate; the corresponding E(I)⁰ values were correlated with calculated values of electroaccepting power (ω(+)) and adiabatic electron affinities (A(Ad)), obtained with BH and HLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) and considering the solvent effect, revealing the influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and the substituting group at position C-2 in the experimental reduction potential. For the second reduction step, esterified compounds isobutyryl and isovalerylshikonin presented a coupled chemical reaction following dianion formation. Analysis of the variation of the dimensionless cathodic peak potential values (ξ(p)) as a function of the scan rate (v) functions and complementary experiments in benzonitrile suggested that this process follows a dissociative electron transfer, in which the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer is slow (~0.2 cm s(-1)), and the rate constant of the chemical process is at least 10(5) larger. PMID:25007856

  20. KINETIC STUDIES OF DRUG-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS BY USING PEAK PROFILING AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: EXAMINATION OF MULTI-SITE INTERACTIONS OF DRUGS WITH HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN COLUMNS

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Schiel, John E.; Papastavros, Efthimia; Ohnmacht, Corey M.; Smith, Quentin R.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Carbamazepine and imipramine are drugs that have significant binding to human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant serum protein in blood and a common transport protein for many drugs in the body. Information on the kinetics of these drug interactions with HSA would be valuable in understanding the pharmacokinetic behavior of these drugs and could provide data that might lead to the creation of improved assays for these analytes in biological samples. In this report, an approach based on peak profiling was used with high-performance affinity chromatography to measure the dissociation rate constants for carbamazepine and imipramine with HSA. This approach compared the elution profiles for each drug and a non-retained species on an HSA column and control column over a board range of flow rates. Various approaches for the corrections of non-specific binding between these drugs and the support were considered and compared in this process. Dissociation rate constants of 1.7 (± 0.2) s-1 and 0.67 (± 0.04) s-1 at pH 7.4 and 37 °C were estimated by this approach for HSA in its interactions with carbamazepine and imipramine, respectively. These results gave good agreement with rate constants that have determined by other methods or for similar solute interactions with HSA. The approach described in this report for kinetic studies is not limited to these particular drugs or HSA but can also be extended to other drugs and proteins. PMID:21067755

  1. Dissociative experiences and dissociative minds: Exploring a nomological network of dissociative functioning.

    PubMed

    Schimmenti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the psychometric properties of the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II) were tested in a sample of Italian adults, and a nomological network of dissociative functioning based on current psychodynamic research was examined. A total of 794 participants (55% females) ranging in age from 18 to 64 completed the DES-II and other measures of theory of mind, alexithymia, attachment style, and empathy. The Italian translation of the DES-II showed high internal consistency, adequate item-to-scale homogeneity, and good split-half reliability. A single-factor solution including the 8 items of pathological dissociation (DES-T) adequately fit the data. Participants who reported higher levels of dissociative experiences showed significantly lower scores on theory of mind and empathy than other participants. They also showed significantly higher scores on alexithymia, preoccupied attachment, and fearful attachment. Results of the study support the view that people who suffer from severe dissociative experiences may also have difficulties mentalizing and regulating affects and that they may feel uncomfortable in close relationships because they have a negative view of the self. This can inform clinical work with dissociative individuals, who could benefit from therapies that consider their potential problems with mentalization, empathy, affect regulation, and attachment. PMID:26507547

  2. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-06-20

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  3. Identification of a Soluble, High-Affinity Salicylic Acid-Binding Protein in Tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H.; Klessig, D. F.

    1997-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key component in the signal transduction pathway(s), leading to the activation of certain defense responses in plants after pathogen attack. Previous studies have identified several proteins, including catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, through which the SA signal might act. Here we describe a new SA-binding protein. This soluble protein is present in low abundance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and has an apparent molecular weight of approximately 25,000. It reversibly binds SA with an apparent dissociation constant of 90 nM, an affinity that is 150-fold higher than that between SA and catalase. The ability of most analogs of SA to compete with labeled SA for binding to this protein correlated with their ability to induce defense gene expression and enhanced resistance. Strikingly, benzothiadiazole, a recently described chemical activator that induces plant defenses and disease resistance at very low rates of application, was the strongest competitor, being much more effective than unlabeled SA. The possible role of this SA-binding protein in defense signal transduction is discussed. PMID:12223676

  4. Dual aptamer-immobilized surfaces for improved affinity through multiple target binding in potentiometric thrombin biosensing.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Higashi, Daiki; Matsumoto, Akira; Hoshi, Toru; Sawaguchi, Takashi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2015-11-15

    We developed a label-free and reagent-less potentiometric biosensor with improved affinity for thrombin. Two different oligomeric DNA aptamers that can recognize different epitopes in thrombin were introduced in parallel or serial manners on the sensing surface to capture the target via multiple contacts as found in many biological systems. The spacer and linker in the aptamer probes were optimized for exerting the best performance in molecular recognition. To gain the specificity of the sensor to the target, an antifouling molecule, sulfobeaine-3-undecanethiol (SB), was introduced on the sensor to form a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Surface characterization revealed that the aptamer probe density was comparable to the distance of the two epitopes in thrombin, while the backfilling SB SAM was tightly aligned on the surface to resist nonspecific adsorption. The apparent binding parameters were obtained by thrombin sensing in potentiometry using the 1:1 Langmuir adsorption model, showing the improved dissociation constants (Kd) with the limit of detection of 5.5 nM on the dual aptamer-immobilized surfaces compared with single aptamer-immobilized ones. A fine control of spacer and linker length in the aptamer ligand was essential to realize the multivalent binding of thrombin on the sensor surface. The findings reported herein are effective for improving the sensitivity of potentiometric biosensor in an affordable way towards detection of tiny amount of biomolecules. PMID:26067329

  5. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G.; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [3H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element. PMID:26657626

  6. Rapid screening of textile dyes employed as affinity ligands to purify enzymes from yeast.

    PubMed

    Raya-Tonetti, G; Perotti, N

    1999-04-01

    A rapid method for screening potential dye ligands for use in affinity chromatography is described. Textile dyes were non-covalently coupled to a cross-linked polysaccharide Sepharose(R) matrix. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was used as the model protein for evaluating the screening system. A homogenate from baker's yeast was used as the crude source of enzyme. Batchwise adsorption and elution were used to evaluate the individual dyes. The influence of pH and ionic strength in the binding and elution steps was evaluated. Batch isotherms were used to evaluate parameter characteristics. Experimental data obtained were fitted to Langmuir isotherms to determine the maximum binding capacity and the dissociation constant for each dye evaluated in this study. A dynamic binding capacity of 107.6 units of ADH/g of resin was determined for Procion Turquoise MXG dye by frontal analysis. Specific elution with NAD+ and non-specific elution with 50 mM Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5, were tested when Procion Turquoise MXG was used, giving purification factors of 53.5 and 4.4 respectively. This screening technique is inexpensive and can be performed in a few hours. It was possible to predict the performance of different reactive dyes in this way, and the influence of pH and salt on the binding behaviour was demonstrated. PMID:10075911

  7. Discovery of a hepatitis C target and its pharmacological inhibitors by microfluidic affinity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Shirit; Gerber, Doron; Bryson, Paul D; Sklan, Ella H; Elazar, Menashe; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    More effective therapies are urgently needed against hepatitis C virus (HCV), a major cause of viral hepatitis. We used in vitro protein expression and microfluidic affinity analysis to study RNA binding by the HCV transmembrane protein NS4B, which plays an essential role in HCV RNA replication. We show that HCV NS4B binds RNA and that this binding is specific for the 3′ terminus of the negative strand of the viral genome with a dissociation constant (Kd) of ~3.4 nM. A high-throughput microfluidic screen of a compound library identified 18 compounds that substantially inhibited binding of RNA by NS4B. One of these compounds, clemizole hydrochloride, was found to inhibit HCV RNA replication in cell culture that was mediated by its suppression of NS4B’s RNA binding, with little toxicity for the host cell. These results yield new insight into the HCV life cycle and provide a candidate compound for pharmaceutical development. PMID:18758449

  8. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  9. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH SERUM PROTEINS BY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Barnaby, Omar; Jackson, Abby; Yoo, Michelle J.; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Sobansky, Matt; Tong, Zenghan

    2011-01-01

    The binding of drugs with serum proteins can affect the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of pharmaceutical agents in the body. One tool that can be used to quickly analyze and characterize these interactions is high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). This review shows how HPAC can be used to study drug-protein binding and describes the various applications of this approach when examining drug interactions with serum proteins. Methods for determining binding constants, characterizing binding sites, examining drug-drug interactions, and studying drug-protein dissociation rates will be discussed. Applications that illustrate the use of HPAC with serum binding agents such as human serum albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, and lipoproteins will be presented. Recent developments will also be examined, such as new methods for immobilizing serum proteins in HPAC columns, the utilization of HPAC as a tool in personalized medicine, and HPAC methods for the high-throughput screening and characterization of drug-protein binding. PMID:21395530

  11. The Lectin Frontier Database (LfDB), and data generation based on frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Tateno, Hiroaki; Shikanai, Toshihide; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are a large group of carbohydrate-binding proteins, having been shown to comprise at least 48 protein scaffolds or protein family entries. They occur ubiquitously in living organisms-from humans to microorganisms, including viruses-and while their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, their main underlying actions are thought to mediate cell-cell and cell-glycoconjugate interactions, which play important roles in an extensive range of biological processes. The basic feature of each lectin's function resides in its specific sugar-binding properties. In this regard, it is beneficial for researchers to have access to fundamental information about the detailed oligosaccharide specificities of diverse lectins. In this review, the authors describe a publicly available lectin database named "Lectin frontier DataBase (LfDB)", which undertakes the continuous publication and updating of comprehensive data for lectin-standard oligosaccharide interactions in terms of dissociation constants (Kd's). For Kd determination, an advanced system of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is used, with which quantitative datasets of interactions between immobilized lectins and >100 fluorescently labeled standard glycans have been generated. The FAC system is unique in its clear principle, simple procedure and high sensitivity, with an increasing number (>67) of associated publications that attest to its reliability. Thus, LfDB, is expected to play an essential role in lectin research, not only in basic but also in applied fields of glycoscience. PMID:25580689

  12. Kinetic exclusion assay of monoclonal antibody affinity to the membrane protein Roundabout 1 displayed on baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Fukuda, Rie; Kamiya, Wakana; Iwanari, Hiroko; Hamakubo, Takao

    2016-07-01

    The reliable assessment of monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity against membrane proteins in vivo is a major issue in the development of cancer therapeutics. We describe here a simple and highly sensitive method for the evaluation of mAbs against membrane proteins by means of a kinetic exclusion assay (KinExA) in combination with our previously developed membrane protein display system using budded baculovirus (BV). In our BV display system, the membrane proteins are displayed on the viral surface in their native form. The BVs on which the liver cancer antigen Roundabout 1 (Robo1) was displayed were adsorbed onto magnetic beads without fixative (BV beads). The dissociation constant (Kd, ∼10(-11) M) that was measured on the Robo1 expressed BV beads correlated well with the value from a whole cell assay (the coefficient of determination, R(2) = 0.998) but not with the value for the soluble extracellular domains of Robo1 (R(2) = 0.834). These results suggest that the BV-KinExA method described here provides a suitably accurate Kd evaluation of mAbs against proteins on the cell surface. PMID:27095060

  13. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  14. The affinity and activity of compounds related to nicotine on the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog (Rana pipiens)

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, R. B.; Thompson, G. M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Series of pyridylalkyl- and substituted phenylalkyl-trimethylammonium salts, triethylammonium salts, diethylamines and di-n-propylamines have been made. The substituents in the benzene ring were nitro, chloro, bromo, methoxy, hydroxy and amino groups and the alkyl residues had one, two, or three methylene groups separating the aromatic nucleus from the cationic head. 2. Most of the trimethylammonium compounds caused a contracture of the frog rectus muscle, but some were partial agonists and a few were antagonists. The di-n-propylamines were all antagonists, as were most of the diethylamines and triethylammonium compounds, though some of these were partial agonists and a few triethylammonium compounds were agonists. The affinities of the antagonists and partial agonists for the receptors stimulated by β-pyridylmethyltrimethylammonium (and by nicotine) were measured. The equipotent molar ratios of all the agonists were measured relative to β-pyridylmethyltrimethylammonium. 3. The dissociation constants of the pyridylmethyldiethylamines and substituted benzyldiethylamines were measured. The effects of substituents on the pKa of benzyldiethylamine were similar to their effects on the pKa of aniline, though there were differences with some of the o-substituted compounds, which could be attributed to internal hydrogen-bond formation. 4. There is no obvious correlation between the effects of a substituent on the pKa of benzyldiethylamine and its effects on affinity. Although increasing the size of the cationic group usually increased affinity, it did not always do so. The compounds with the highest affinity, p-hydroxybenzyldiethylamine (log K, 5·90) had about half the affinity of (+)-tubocurarine (log K, 6·11), but the triethylammonium analogue (log K, 4·17) had only about one-fiftieth of the affinity of the tertiary base. The binding of the drug to the receptor appears to involve many factors which include the size of the groups as well as their electron

  15. Visuomotor Dissociation in Cerebral Scaling of Size.

    PubMed

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; de Jong, Bauke M

    2016-01-01

    Estimating size and distance is crucial in effective visuomotor control. The concept of an internal coordinate system implies that visual and motor size parameters are scaled onto a common template. To dissociate perceptual and motor components in such scaling, we performed an fMRI experiment in which 16 right-handed subjects copied geometric figures while the result of drawing remained out of sight. Either the size of the example figure varied while maintaining a constant size of drawing (visual incongruity) or the size of the examples remained constant while subjects were instructed to make changes in size (motor incongruity). These incongruent were compared to congruent conditions. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) revealed brain activations related to size incongruity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, pre-SMA / anterior cingulate and anterior insula, dominant in the right hemisphere. This pattern represented simultaneous use of a 'resized' virtual template and actual picture information requiring spatial working memory, early-stage attention shifting and inhibitory control. Activations were strongest in motor incongruity while right pre-dorsal premotor activation specifically occurred in this condition. Visual incongruity additionally relied on a ventral visual pathway. Left ventral premotor activation occurred in all variably sized drawing while constant visuomotor size, compared to congruent size variation, uniquely activated the lateral occipital cortex additional to superior parietal regions. These results highlight size as a fundamental parameter in both general hand movement and movement guided by objects perceived in the context of surrounding 3D space. PMID:26963705

  16. Visuomotor Dissociation in Cerebral Scaling of Size

    PubMed Central

    Potgieser, Adriaan R. E.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2016-01-01

    Estimating size and distance is crucial in effective visuomotor control. The concept of an internal coordinate system implies that visual and motor size parameters are scaled onto a common template. To dissociate perceptual and motor components in such scaling, we performed an fMRI experiment in which 16 right-handed subjects copied geometric figures while the result of drawing remained out of sight. Either the size of the example figure varied while maintaining a constant size of drawing (visual incongruity) or the size of the examples remained constant while subjects were instructed to make changes in size (motor incongruity). These incongruent were compared to congruent conditions. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) revealed brain activations related to size incongruity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, pre-SMA / anterior cingulate and anterior insula, dominant in the right hemisphere. This pattern represented simultaneous use of a ‘resized’ virtual template and actual picture information requiring spatial working memory, early-stage attention shifting and inhibitory control. Activations were strongest in motor incongruity while right pre-dorsal premotor activation specifically occurred in this condition. Visual incongruity additionally relied on a ventral visual pathway. Left ventral premotor activation occurred in all variably sized drawing while constant visuomotor size, compared to congruent size variation, uniquely activated the lateral occipital cortex additional to superior parietal regions. These results highlight size as a fundamental parameter in both general hand movement and movement guided by objects perceived in the context of surrounding 3D space. PMID:26963705

  17. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic

  18. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  19. Kinetic analysis of drug-protein interactions by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-10-01

    Information on the kinetics of drug-protein interactions is of crucial importance in drug discovery and development. Several methods based on affinity chromatography have been developed in recent years to examine the association and dissociation rates of these processes. These techniques include band-broadening measurements, the peak decay method, peak fitting methods, the split-peak method, and free fraction analysis. This review will examine the general principles and applications of these approaches and discuss their use in the characterization, screening and analysis of drug-protein interactions in the body. PMID:26724332

  20. Affinity maturation of T-cell receptor-like antibodies for Wilms tumor 1 peptide greatly enhances therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Hasan, Aisha; Kuo, Tzu-Yun; Guo, Hong-fen; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    WT1126 (RMFPNAPYL) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) restricted peptide derived from Wilms tumor protein (WT1), which is widely expressed in a broad spectrum of leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. A novel T-cell-receptor (TCR)-like single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody specific for the T cell epitope consisting of the WT1/HLA-A2 complex was isolated from a human scFv phage library. This scFv was affinity-matured by mutagenesis combined with yeast display, and structurally analyzed using a homology model. This monovalent scFv showed a 100-fold affinity improvement (dissociation constant [KD]= 3nM) and exquisite specificity towards its targeted epitope or HLA-A2+/WT1+ tumor cells. Bivalent scFv-huIgG1-Fc fusion protein demonstrated an even higher avidity (KD = 2pM) binding to the T cell epitope and to tumor targets, and was capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or tumor lysis by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing human T or NK-92-MI transfected cells. This antibody demonstrated specific and potent cytotoxicity in vivo towards WT1-positive leukemia xenograft that was HLA-A2 restricted. In summary, T cell epitopes can provide novel targets for antibody-based therapeutics. By combining phage and yeast displays and scFv-Fc fusion platforms, a strategy for developing high affinity TCR-like antibodies could be rapidly explored for potential clinical development. PMID:25987253

  1. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  2. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ligand dissociation from liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Mu, Yuguang; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized "portal region" could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques. PMID:19564911

  4. Some remarks on the selection of exit channels in the theoretical description of dissociative recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The need for the careful selection of dissociative routes for inclusion in the theoretical calculation of accurate dissociative recombination (DR) cross sections and rate constants is discussed. For total energies corresponding to the sum of the "free" electron energy plus the ion vibrational energy, all neutral diabatic curves that fall between or near the turning points of the highest Rydberg vibrational levels with the same electronic symmetry need to be included in the calculation. This is especially the case if there are several dissociative routes of the same electronic symmetry that satisfy this criterion. Also, care must be exercised in the exclusion of dissociative routes having relatively small electron capture widths. Examples from theoretical studies of the dissociative recombination (DR) of N2+ are used as illustrations.

  5. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  6. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  7. Dissociation of pleasure in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L

    1981-01-01

    This paper analyzes the development of the concept of dissociation from 19th century psychological theory through 20th century neurophysiological thought. Recent research is discussed, indicating that normal individuals show an "association" between emitted pleasurable behavior and self-perception of pleasurable activity, whereas depressives and schizophrenics show a lack of association, or "dissociation," between these measures. concomitantly, depressives show an abnormal degree of association between the experience and expression of negative affect. Such a discrepancy in systems of affect is considered as both an important pathological element in mental disorder and also as a valuable new research tool for studying etiology, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic efficacy in psychobiological illness. PMID:7005394

  8. Competitive Inhibition of High-Affinity Oryzalin Binding to Plant Tubulin by the Phosphoric Amide Herbicide Amiprophos-Methyl.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, J. V.; Kim, H. H.; Hanesworth, V. R.; Hugdahl, J. D.; Morejohn, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Amiprophos-methyl (APM), a phosphoric amide herbicide, was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro polymerization of isolated plant tubulin (L.C. Morejohn, D.E. Fosket [1984] Science 224: 874-876), yet little other biochemical information exists concerning this compound. To characterize further the mechanism of action of APM, its interactions with tubulin and microtubules purified from cultured cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) were investigated. Low micromolar concentrations of APM depolymerized preformed, taxol-stabilized tobacco microtubules. Remarkably, at the lowest APM concentration examined, many short microtubules were redistributed into fewer but 2.7-fold longer microtubules without a substantial decrease in total polymer mass, a result consistent with an end-to-end annealing of microtubules with enhanced kinetic properties. Quasi-equilibrium binding measurements showed that tobacco tubulin binds [14C]oryzalin with high affinity to produce a tubulin-oryzalin complex having a dissociation constant (Kd) = 117 nM (pH 6.9; 23[deg]C). Also, an estimated maximum molar binding stoichiometry of 0.32 indicates pharamacological heterogeneity of tobacco dimers and may be related to structural heterogeneity of tobacco tubulin subunits. APM inhibits competitively the binding of [14C]oryzalin to tubulin with an inhibition constant (Ki) = 5 [mu]M, indicating the formation of a moderate affinity tubulin-APM complex that may interact with the ends of microtubules. APM concentrations inhibiting tobacco cell growth were within the threshold range of APM concentrations that depolymerized cellular microtubules, indicating that growth inhibition is caused by microtubules depolymerization. APM had no apparent effect on microtubules in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Because cellular microtubules were depolymerized at APM and oryzalin concentrations below their respective Ki and Kd values, both herbicides are proposed to depolymerize microtubules by a

  9. Affinity and Avidity in Antibody-Based Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, Stephen I.

    2009-01-01

    Summation Many factors contribute to successful tumor targeting by antibodies. Besides properties of the tumor tissue and general antibody pharmacology, a relationship exists between an antibody and its antigen that can shape penetration, catabolism, specificity, and efficacy. The affinity and avidity of the binding interactions play critical roles in these dynamics. In this work, we review the principles that guide models predicting tumor penetration and cellular internalization while providing a critical overview of studies aimed at experimentally determining the specific role of affinity and avidity in these processes. One should gain the perspective that binding affinity can, in part, dictate the localization of antibodies in tumors, leading to high concentrations in the perivascular space or low concentrations diffused throughout the tumor. These patterns can be simply due to the diminution of available dose by binding antigen and are complicated by internalization and degradation stemming from slow rates of dissociation. As opposed to the trend of simply increasing affinity to increase efficacy, novel strategies that increase avidity and broaden specificity have made significant progress in tumor targeting. PMID:19409036

  10. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  11. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off PMID:2853303

  12. Theoretical dissociation energies for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters are accurately determined for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides by means of ab initio self-consistent field and correlated wave function calculations. Numerical Hartree-Fock calculations are performed on selected systems to ensure that the extended Slater basis sets employed are near the Hartree-Fock limit. Since the bonding is predominantly electrostatic in origin, a strong correlation exists between the dissociation energy (to ions) and the spectroscopic parameter r(e). By dissociating to the ionic limits, most of the differential correlation effects can be embedded in the accurate experimental electron affinities and ionization potentials.

  13. [Gender differences in dissociative disorders].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Freyberger, H J

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between mental illness, on the one hand, and sex and gender, on the other hand, has received interest since the beginning of medicine in antique times. A prototypical example of a seemingly woman-specific disease is hysteria. The term itself, which is derived from the Greek word for womb, denotes a psychosexual dimension comprising the current attitude towards sexuality and the dominating gender relationship. In addition, the colourful history of hysteria indicates that illness is not exclusively determined by biological factors, but also significantly by socio-cultural influences, for example in the treatment of hysterical women. Even nowadays, there is a wide-spread belief that dissociative symptoms and disorders, which have succeeded hysteria in current classification systems, are predominantly seen in women. However, empirical studies in the general population and in different clinical samples using sound instruments have indicated that dissociative symptoms do not differ between the genders. The seemingly dominance of dissociative disorders in women may also depend on the socio-cultural context, because men with dissociative disorders usually do not enter the general health system, but rather the legal system, i.e. they can be found in jail or forensic institutions. PMID:18185968

  14. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with strong acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Nigel G.; Smith, David; Viggiano, A. A.; Paulson, John F.; Henchman, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    Using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, we have determined (at variously 300 and 570 K) the dissociative attachment coefficients β for the reactions of electrons with the common acids HNO3 (producing NO-2) and H2SO4 (HSO-4), the superacids FSO3H (FSO-3), CF3SO3H (CF3SO-3), ClSO3H (ClSO-3,Cl-), the acid anhydride (CF3SO2)2O (CF3SO-3), and the halogen halides HBr (Br-) and HI (I-). The anions formed in the reactions are those given in the parentheses. The reactions with HF and HCl were investigated, but did not occur at a measurable rate since they are very endothermic. Dissociative attachment is rapid for the common acids, the superacids, and the anhydride, the measured β being appreciable fractions of the theoretical maximum β for such reactions, βmax. The HI reaction is very fast ( β˜βmax) but the HBr reaction occurs much more slowly because it is significantly endothermic. The data indicate that the extreme acidity of the (Bronsted-type) superacids has its equivalence in the very efficient gas-phase dissociative attachment which these species undergo when reacting with free electrons. The anions of the superacids generated in these reactions, notably FSO-3 and CF3SO-3, are very stable (unreactive) implying exceptionally large electron affinities for the FSO3 and CF3SO3 radicals.

  15. Affine generalization of the Komar complex of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2001-02-01

    On the basis of the ``on shell'' Noether identities of the metric-affine gauge approach of gravity, an affine superpotential is derived which comprises the energy- and angular-momentum content of exact solutions. In the special case of general relativity (GR) or its teleparallel equivalent, the Komar or Freud complex, respectively, are recovered. Applying this to the spontaneously broken anti-de Sitter gauge model of McDowell and Mansouri with an induced Euler term automatically yields the correct mass and spin of the Kerr-AdS solution of GR with a (induced) cosmological constant without the factor two discrepancy of the Komar formula.

  16. Two-temperature models for nitrogen dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. Lino; Guerra, V.; Loureiro, J.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate sets of nitrogen state-resolved dissociation rates have been reduced to two-temperature (translational T and vibrational Tv) dissociation rates. The analysis of such two-temperature dissociation rates shows evidence of two different dissociation behaviors. For Tv < 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly from the lower-lying vibrational levels, whereas for Tv > 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly form the near-dissociative vibrational levels, with an abrupt change of behavior at Tv = 0.3 T. These two-temperature sets have then been utilized as a benchmark for the comparison against popular multitemperature dissociation models (Park, Hansen, Marrone-Treanor, Hammerling, Losev-Shatalov, Gordiets, Kuznetsov, and Macheret-Fridman). This has allowed verifying the accuracy of each theoretical model, and additionally proposing adequate values for any semi-empirical parameters present in the different theories. The Macheret-Fridman model, who acknowledges the existence of the two aforementioned dissociation regimes, has been found to provide significantly more accurate results than the other models. Although these different theoretical approaches have been tested and validated solely for nitrogen dissociation processes, it is reasonable to expect that the general conclusions of this work, regarding the adequacy of the different dissociation models, could be extended to the description of arbitrary diatomic dissociation processes.

  17. Study of the dissociation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Dissociators used to obtain an RF plasma discharge for hydrogen masers and the test system used for operation and evaluation of the dissociators are described. A compact sorption cartridge using a graphite matrix is tested as part of a hydrogen scavenging system. Testing of a vacuum enclosed hydrogen dissociator suitable for long term operation in space is described.

  18. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    sensors for the immobilization of peptide ligands with low nonspecific binding. The silica surface was first modified by the formation of self-assembling monolayer (SAM) of 3-amino-propyl triethoxy silane as an anchor layer. Short chains of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with Fmoc-protected amino groups at one end and carboxyl groups at the other end were then coupled through the carboxyl terminal to the amino groups on the silane. The short PEG chains served as spacer arms to reduce nonspecific binding to the substrate. The gold surface was modified by a two-component SAM using mixtures of HS(CH 2)11(CH2CH2O)6NH2 and HS(CH2)11(CH2CH2O)3OH. The advantage of using a modified silica surface is its relatively higher stability than the SAM on gold during the peptide functionalization step, however the SPR sensors do not work on silica surfaces. In addition, the modification process of the gold surface is relatively simple compared with that of the silica surface. The peptide immobilization process was optimized with silica surfaces and the best conditions were applied for the immobilization on gold surfaces. The results of surface modifications and peptide immobilizations were characterized by various surface analysis techniques including, ellipsometry, contact angle goniometer, chemical force microscopy (CFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). QCM and SPR results indicated that this peptide ligand HWRGWV immobilized on modified silica or gold surfaces has high affinity and specificity to hIgG binding even in a complex medium such as cMEM. Both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of affinity interaction were obtained by the analysis of QCM and SPR data. Compared with QCM, SPR is more suitable for quantitative analysis of the protein binding, which is essential for the investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics parameters. The maximum binding capacity (4.15 mg m-2 ) and the dissociation constant (1.83 mu

  19. Mutations in TFIIIA that increase stability of the TFIIIA-5 S rRNA gene complex: unusual effects on the kinetics of complex assembly and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Brady, Kristina L; Ponnampalam, Stephen N; Bumbulis, Michael J; Setzer, David R

    2005-07-22

    We have identified four mutations in Xenopus TFIIIA that increase the stability of TFIIIA-5 S rRNA gene complexes. In each case, the mutation has a relatively modest effect on equilibrium binding affinity. In three cases, these equilibrium binding effects can be ascribed primarily to decreases in the rate constant for protein-DNA complex dissociation. In the fourth case, however, a substitution of phenylalanine for the wild-type leucine at position 148 in TFIIIA results in much larger compensating changes in the kinetics of complex assembly and dissociation. The data support a model in which a relatively unstable population of complexes with multi-component dissociation kinetics forms rapidly; complexes then undergo a slow conformational change that results in very stable, kinetically homogeneous TFIIIA-DNA complexes. The L148F mutant protein acts as a particularly potent transcriptional activator when it is fused to the VP16 activation domain and expressed in yeast cells. Substitution of L148 to tyrosine or tryptophan produces an equally strong transcriptional activator. Substitution to histidine results in genetic and biochemical effects that are more modest than, but similar to, those observed with the L148F mutation. We propose that an amino acid with a planar side chain at position 148 can intercalate between adjacent base pairs in the intermediate element of the 5 S rRNA gene. Intercalation occurs slowly but results in a very stable DNA-protein complex. These results suggest that transcriptional activation by a cis-acting sequence element is largely dependent on the kinetic, rather than the thermodynamic, stability of the complex formed with an activator protein. Thus, transcriptional activation is dependent in large part on the lifetime of the activator-DNA complex rather than on binding site occupancy at steady state. Introduction of intercalating amino acids into zinc finger proteins may be a useful tool for producing artificial transcription factors with

  20. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  1. Solar constant secular changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    1990-01-01

    A recent model for solar constant secular changes is used to calculate a 'proxy' solar constant for: (1) the past four centuries, based upon the sunspot record, (2) the past nine centuries, based upon C-14 observations and their relation to solar activity, and (3) the next decade, based upon a dynamo theory model for the solar cycle. The proxy solar constant data is tabulated as it may be useful for climate modelers studying global climate changes.

  2. Quantitative structure-(chromatographic) retention relationship models for dissociating compounds.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Łukasz; Wiczling, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop mathematical models relating the hydrophobicity and dissociation constant of an analyte with its structure, which would be useful in predicting analyte retention times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. For that purpose a large and diverse group of 115 drugs was used to build three QSRR models combining retention-related parameters (logkw-chromatographic measure of hydrophobicity, S-slope factor from Snyder-Soczewinski equation, and pKa) with structural descriptors calculated by means of molecular modeling for both dissociated and nondissociated forms of analytes. Lasso, Stepwise and PLS regressions were used to build statistical models. Moreover a simple QSRR equations based on lipophilicity and dissociation constant parameters calculated in the ACD/Labs software were proposed and compared with quantum chemistry-based QSRR equations. The obtained relationships were further used to predict chromatographic retention times. The predictive performances of the obtained models were assessed using 10-fold cross-validation and external validation. The QSRR equations developed were simple and were characterized by satisfactory predictive performance. Application of quantum chemistry-based and ACD-based descriptors leads to similar accuracy of retention times' prediction. PMID:26960942

  3. Using in vitro selection to direct the covalent attachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein to high-affinity RNA ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, K B; Atkinson, B L; Willis, M C; Koch, T H; Gold, L

    1995-01-01

    We have used an in vitro selection procedure called crosslinking SELEX (SELEX = systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) to identify RNA sequences that bind with high affinity and crosslink to the Rev protein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A randomized RNA library substituted with the photoreactive chromophore 5-iodouracil was irradiated with monochromatic UV light in the presence of Rev. Those sequences with the ability to photocrosslink to Rev were partitioned from the rest of the RNA pool, amplified, and used for the next round of selection. Rounds of photocrosslinking selection were alternated with rounds of selection for RNA sequences with high affinity to Rev. This iterative, dual-selection method yielded RNA molecules with subnanomolar dissociation constants and high efficiency photocrosslinking to Rev. Some of the RNA molecules isolated by this procedure form a stable complex with Rev that is resistant to denaturing gel electrophoresis in the absence of UV irradiation. In vitro selection of nucleic acids by using modified nucleotides allows the isolation of nucleic acid molecules with potentially limitless chemical capacities to covalently attack a target molecule. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8618873

  4. Tityus gamma toxin, a high affinity effector of the Na+ channel in muscle, with a selectivity for channels in the surface membrane.

    PubMed

    Barhanin, J; Ildefonse, M; Rougier, O; Sampaio, S V; Giglio, J R; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Toxin gamma from the venom of Tityus serrulatus scorpion produces a partial block of the surface Na+ channel in frog muscle. This block occurs with no change in the voltage-dependence or in the kinetics of the remaining surface Na+ current. The partial blockade of Na+ channel activity occurs with no change in tubular Na+ currents nor in twitch tension. The maximum effect of the toxin is attained at concentrations as low as 3 X 10(-10) M. Hyperpolarization to potentials more negative than the resting potential (E = -90 mV) reduces or abolishes the effect of the toxin. Radioiodinated toxin gamma binds to frog muscle membranes with a very high affinity corresponding to a dissociation constant of about 1 X 10(-11) M. Data obtained with both rabbit and frog muscle indicate that toxin gamma is specific for Na+ channels in surface membranes. Toxin gamma does not seem to bind to Na+ channels in T-tubule membranes. The biochemical data are in good agreement with electrophysiological studies and data on contraction. There is one Tityus gamma toxin binding site per tetrodotoxin binding site in surface membranes. Competition experiments have confirmed that Tityus gamma toxin binds to a new toxin receptor site on the Na+ channel structure. This site is the same that the toxin II from Centruroides suffusus binding site, but this toxin has 100 times less affinity for the Na+ channel than Tityus gamma toxin. PMID:6324066

  5. Gonadotropin stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and testosterone production without detectable high-affinity binding sites in purified Leydig cells from rat testis

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, E.S.; Bhalla, V.K. )

    1991-02-01

    Rat testicular interstitial cells were separated by three different gradient-density procedures and, with each, two biochemically and morphologically distinct cell fractions were isolated. The lighter density cells in fraction-I bound iodine 125-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with high-affinity (apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, approximately 10{sup {minus} 10} M) without producing either cyclic adenosine monophosphate or testosterone in response to hormone action. The heavier-density cells displayed morphologic features typical of Leydig cells and produced cyclic adenosine monophosphate and testosterone in the presence of hCG without detectable {sup 125}I-labeled hCG high-affinity binding. These cell fractions were further characterized by studies using deglycosylated hCG, a known antagonist to hCG action. Cell concentration-dependent studies with purified Leydig cells revealed that maximal testosterone production was achieved when lower cell concentrations (0.5 x 10(6) cells/250 microliters) were used for in vitro hCG stimulation assays. Under these conditions, the {sup 125}I-labeled hCG binding was barely detectable (2.24 fmol; 2,698 sites/cell). Furthermore, these studies revealed that the hCG-specific binding in Leydig cells is overestimated by the classic method for nonspecific binding correction using excess unlabeled hormone. An alternate method is presented.

  6. The single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain of the GAGA protein flanked by basic residues is sufficient for high-affinity specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Pedone, P V; Ghirlando, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Felsenfeld, G; Omichinski, J G

    1996-04-01

    Specific DNA binding to the core consensus site GAGAGAG has been shown with an 82-residue peptide (residues 310-391) taken from the Drosophila transcription factor GAGA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was demonstrated that the minimal domain required for specific binding (residues 310-372) includes a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family and a stretch of basic amino acids located on the N-terminal end of the zinc finger. In gel retardation assays, the specific binding seen with either the peptide or the whole protein is zinc dependent and corresponds to a dissociation constant of approximately 5 x 10(-9) M for the purified peptide. It has previously been thought that a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family is incapable of specific, high-affinity binding to DNA. The combination of an N-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger in the GAGA protein can thus be viewed as a novel DNA binding domain. This raises the possibility that other proteins carrying only one Cys2-His2 finger are also capable of high-affinity specific binding to DNA. PMID:8610125

  7. Development of a specific affinity-matured exosite inhibitor to MT1-MMP that efficiently inhibits tumor cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A.; Kwok, Hang Fai; Terp, Mikkel G.; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; Santamaria, Salvatore; McCafferty, John; Andreasen, Peter A.; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Ditzel, Henrik J.; Murphy, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase-14, MT1-MMP, has been implicated in pericellular proteolysis with an important role in cellular invasion of collagenous tissues. It is substantially upregulated in various cancers and rheumatoid arthritis, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we report the identification of antibody fragments to MT1-MMP that potently and specifically inhibit its cell surface functions. Lead antibody clones displayed inhibitory activity towards pro-MMP-2 activation, collagen-film degradation and gelatin-film degradation, and were shown to bind to the MT1-MMP catalytic domain outside the active site cleft, inhibiting binding to triple helical collagen. Affinity maturation using CDR3 randomization created a second generation of antibody fragments with dissociation constants down to 0.11 nM, corresponding to an improved affinity of 332-fold with the ability to interfere with cell-surface MT1-MMP functions, displaying IC50 values down to 5 nM. Importantly, the new inhibitors were able to inhibit collagen invasion by tumor-cells in vitro and in vivo primary tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells in a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. Herein is the first demonstration that an inhibitory antibody targeting sites outside the catalytic cleft of MT1-MMP can effectively abrogate its in vivo activity during tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:26934448

  8. Dopamine inhibition of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase is mediated through the high-affinity state of the D/sub 2/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Borgundvaag, B.; George, S.R.

    1985-07-29

    The diterpinoid forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity (measured by conversion of (/sup 3/H)-ATP to (/sup 3/H)-cAMP) in anterior pituitary from male and female rats. Inhibition of stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by potent dopaminergic agonists was demonstrable only in female anterior pituitary. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity displayed a typically dopaminergic rank order of agonist potencies and could be completely reversed by a specific dopamine receptor antagonist. The IC/sub 50/ values of dopamine agonist inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity correlated with equal molarity with the dissociation constant of the high-affinity dopamine agonist-detected receptor binding site and with the IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition of prolactin secretion. These findings support the hypothesis that it is the high-affinity form of the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor in anterior pituitary which is responsible for mediating the dopaminergic function of attenuating adenylate cyclase activity. 12 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  9. Coulomb dissociation of N,2120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Marko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aksyutina, Yulia; Alcantara, Juan; Altstadt, Sebastian; Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ashwood, Nicholas; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Avdeichikov, Vladimir; Barr, M.; Beceiro, Saul; Bemmerer, Daniel; Benlliure, Jose; Bertulani, Carlos; Boretzky, Konstanze; Borge, Maria J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamaño, Manuel; Caesar, Christoph; Casarejos, Enrique; Catford, Wilton; Cederkäll, Joakim; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, Marielle; Chulkov, Leonid; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Crespo, Raquel; Datta Pramanik, Ushasi; Diaz-Fernandez, Paloma; Dillmann, Iris; Elekes, Zoltan; Enders, Joachim; Ershova, Olga; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, Luis M.; Freer, Martin; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, Hans; Galaviz, Daniel; Geissel, Hans; Gernhäuser, Roman; Göbel, Kathrin; Golubev, Pavel; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, Julius; Heftrich, Tanja; Heil, Michael; Heine, Marcel; Heinz, Andreas; Henriques, Ana; Holl, Matthias; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, Alexander; Jakobsson, Bo; Johansson, Hâkan; Jonson, Björn; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kanungo, Rituparna; Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Knöbel, Ronja; Kröll, Thorsten; Krücken, Reiner; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, Nikolaus; Labiche, Marc; Langer, Christoph; Le Bleis, Tudi; Lemmon, Roy; Lepyoshkina, Olga; Lindberg, Simon; Machado, Jorge; Marganiec, Justyna; Mostazo Caro, Magdalena; Movsesyan, Alina; Najafi, Mohammad Ali; Nilsson, Thomas; Nociforo, Chiara; Panin, Valerii; Paschalis, Stefanos; Perea, Angel; Petri, Marina; Pietri, S.; Plag, Ralf; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, Md. Anisur; Rastrepina, Ganna; Reifarth, Rene; Ribeiro, Guillermo; Ricciardi, M. Valentina; Rigollet, Catherine; Riisager, Karsten; Rossi, Dominic; Sanchez del Rio Saez, Jose; Savran, Deniz; Scheit, Heiko; Simon, Haik; Sorlin, Olivier; Stoica, V.; Streicher, Branislav; Taylor, Jon; Tengblad, Olof; Terashima, Satoru; Thies, Ronja; Togano, Yasuhiro; Uberseder, Ethan; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, Paulo; Volkov, Vasily; Wagner, Andreas; Wamers, Felix; Weick, Helmut; Weigand, Mario; Wheldon, Carl; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, Christine; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, Philip; Yakorev, Dmitry; Zhukov, Mikhail; Zilges, Andreas; Zuber, Kai; R3B Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutron-rich light nuclei and their reactions play an important role in the creation of chemical elements. Here, data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment on N,2120 are reported. Relativistic N,2120 ions impinged on a lead target and the Coulomb dissociation cross section was determined in a kinematically complete experiment. Using the detailed balance theorem, the 19N (n ,γ )20N and 20N (n ,γ ) 21N excitation functions and thermonuclear reaction rates have been determined. The 19 (n ,γ )20N rate is up to a factor of 5 higher at T <1 GK with respect to previous theoretical calculations, leading to a 10% decrease in the predicted fluorine abundance.

  10. [Prison psychosis and dissociative disorders].

    PubMed

    al Chaabani, S; Bataille, M

    2002-12-01

    Through a few clinical case histories stemming from their daily activities at the psychiatric section of the Lantin Prison, the authors propose to revisit the classic concept of Prison psychosis. They broaden its limits to include other psychotic and dissociative phenomena common to the jail population. This requires a strict differential diagnosis, allowing to eliminate some similar pathologies; nevertheless, some difficulties and imperfections persist. The development of the psychosis, the input from the jail architecture and milieu, the predisposing as well as facilitating factors linked to the personality of the inmate, and triggering phenomena are discussed. Finally, the comorbidity between these psychotic/dissociative phenomena and the borderline & histrionic personality disorders is envisaged. PMID:12632838

  11. [Dis-social personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, E; Herpertz, S C

    2006-05-01

    Deviant behavior is gaining in clinical importance if it is founded on stable, characteristic, and enduring patterns of psychopathologically relevant personality traits which have their onset in childhood or adolescence. The classification of these traits shows variations, so that a distinction between the ICD-10 diagnosis of dis-social personality disorder, DSM-IV diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and the concept "psychopathy" is necessary. Our knowledge about the biological basis of antisocial behavior includes neurophysiologic, psychophysiologic, and genetic findings. Also relevant are results of neurotransmitter studies and structural resp. functional neuroimaging findings. Psychosocial risk factors include parental deficits, rejection, disregard, unstable relations, and abuse. Efficient psychotherapeutic treatment is cognitive-behavioral. Pharmacologic treatment is largely "off-label". The diagnosis of antisocial and dis-social personality disorders allows no conclusions on criminal responsibility. In addition to psychiatric diagnostics, considerations on the severity of the disorder and its effects on the ability to inhibit actions are necessary. PMID:16609871

  12. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018856

  13. Coupling of disulfide bond and distal histidine dissociation in human ferrous cytoglobin regulates ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Beckerson, Penny; Reeder, Brandon J; Wilson, Michael T

    2015-02-13

    Earlier kinetics studies on cytoglobin did not assign functional properties to specific structural forms. Here, we used defined monomeric and dimeric forms and cysteine mutants to show that an intramolecular disulfide bond (C38-C83) alters the dissociation rate constant of the intrinsic histidine (H81) (∼1000 fold), thus controlling binding of extrinsic ligands. Through time-resolved spectra we have unequivocally assigned CO binding to hexa- and penta-coordinate forms and have made direct measurement of histidine rebinding following photolysis. We present a model that describes how the cysteine redox state of the monomer controls histidine dissociation rate constants and hence extrinsic ligand binding. PMID:25601563

  14. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  15. [Clinical Handling of Patients with Dissociative Disorders].

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the way informed psychiatrists are expected to handle dissociative patients in clinical situations, with a specific focus on dissociative identity disorders and dissociative fugue. On the initial interview with dissociative patients, information on their history of trauma and any nascent dissociative symptoms in their childhood should be carefully obtained. Their level of stress in their current life should also be assessed in order to understand their symptomatology, as well as to predict their future clinical course. A psychoeducational approach is crucial; it might be helpful to give information on dissociative disorder to these patients as well as their family members in order to promote their adherence to treatment. Regarding the symptomatology of dissociative disorders, detailed symptoms and the general clinical course are presented. It was stressed that dissociative identity disorder and dissociative fugue, the most high-profile dissociative disorders, are essentially different in their etiology and clinical presentation. Dissociative disorders are often confused with and misdiagnosed as psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Other conditions considered in terms of the differential diagnosis include borderline personality disorder as well as temporal lobe epilepsy. Lastly, the therapeutic approach to dissociative identity disorder is discussed. Each dissociative identity should be understood as potentially representing some traumatically stressful event in the past. The therapist should be careful not to excessively promote the creation or elaboration of any dissociative identities. Three stages are proposed in the individual psychotherapeutic process. In the initial stage, a secure environment and stabilization of symptoms should be sought. The second stage consists of aiding the "host" personality to make use of other more adaptive coping skills in their life. The third stage involves coaching as well as continuous awareness of

  16. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  17. STABILITY OF A SPHERICAL ACCRETION SHOCK WITH NUCLEAR DISSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Thompson, Christopher

    2009-06-01

    We examine the stability of a standing shock wave within a spherical accretion flow onto a gravitating star, in the context of core-collapse supernova explosions. Our focus is on the effect of nuclear dissociation below the shock on the linear growth, and nonlinear saturation, of nonradial oscillations of the shocked fluid. We combine two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations using FLASH2.5 with a solution to the linear eigenvalue problem, and demonstrate the consistency of the two approaches. Previous studies of this 'standing accretion shock instability' (SASI) have focused either on zero-energy accretion flows without nuclear dissociation, or made use of a detailed finite-temperature nuclear equation of state and included strong neutrino heating. Our main goal in this and subsequent papers is to introduce equations of state of increasing complexity, in order to isolate the various competing effects. In this work, we employ an ideal gas equation of state with a constant rate of nuclear dissociation below the shock, and do not include neutrino heating. We find that a negative Bernoulli parameter below the shock significantly lowers the real frequency, growth rate, and saturation amplitude of the SASI. A decrease in the adiabatic index has similar effects. The nonlinear development of the instability is characterized by an expansion of the shock driven by turbulent kinetic energy at nearly constant internal energy. Our results also provide further insight into the instability mechanism: the rate of growth of a particular mode is fastest when the radial advection time from the shock to the accretor overlaps with the period of a standing lateral sound wave. The fastest-growing mode can therefore be modified by nuclear dissociation.

  18. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  19. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  20. Robust Affinity Standards for Cu(I) Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Pritha; Morgan, M. Thomas; Bacsa, John; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of reliable Cu(I) protein binding affinities requires competing reference ligands with similar binding strengths; however, the literature on such reference ligands is not only sparse but often conflicting. To address this deficiency, we have created and characterized a series of water-soluble monovalent copper ligands, MCL-1, MCL-2, and MCL-3, that form well-defined, air-stable, and colorless complexes with Cu(I) in aqueous solution. Concluding from X-ray structural data, electrochemical measurements, and an extensive network of equilibrium titrations, all three ligands form discrete Cu(I) complexes with 1:1 stoichiometry and are capable of buffering Cu(I) concentrations between 10−10 and 10−17 M. As most Cu(I) protein affinities have been obtained from competition experiments with bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) or 2,2′-bicinchoninic acid (BCA), we further calibrated their Cu(I) stability constants against the MCL-series. To demonstrate the application of these reagents, we determined the Cu(I) binding affinity of CusF (logK = 14.3±0.1), a periplasmic metalloprotein required for the detoxification of elevated copper levels in E. coli. Altogether, this interconnected set of affinity standards establishes a reliable foundation that will facilitate the precise determination of Cu(I) binding affinities of proteins and small molecule ligands. PMID:24298878

  1. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  2. The influence of porosity and structural parameters on different kinds of gas hydrate dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures was studied experimentally for different artificial and natural samples, differing by macro- and micro-structural parameters. Four characteristic dissociation types are discussed in the paper. The internal kinetics of artificial granule gas hydrates and clathrate hydrates in coal is dependent on the porosity, defectiveness and gas filtration rate. The density of pores distribution in the crust of formed ice decreases by the several orders of magnitude and this change significantly the rate of decay. Existing models for describing dissociation at negative temperatures do not take into account the structural parameters of samples. The dissociation is regulated by internal physical processes that must be considered in the simulation. Non-isothermal dissociation with constant external heat flux was simulated numerically. The dissociation is simulated with consideration of heat and mass transfer, kinetics of phase transformation and gas filtering through a porous medium of granules for the negative temperatures. It is shown that the gas hydrate dissociation in the presence of mainly microporous structures is fundamentally different from the disintegration of gas hydrates containing meso and macropores. PMID:27445113

  3. The influence of porosity and structural parameters on different kinds of gas hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures was studied experimentally for different artificial and natural samples, differing by macro- and micro-structural parameters. Four characteristic dissociation types are discussed in the paper. The internal kinetics of artificial granule gas hydrates and clathrate hydrates in coal is dependent on the porosity, defectiveness and gas filtration rate. The density of pores distribution in the crust of formed ice decreases by the several orders of magnitude and this change significantly the rate of decay. Existing models for describing dissociation at negative temperatures do not take into account the structural parameters of samples. The dissociation is regulated by internal physical processes that must be considered in the simulation. Non-isothermal dissociation with constant external heat flux was simulated numerically. The dissociation is simulated with consideration of heat and mass transfer, kinetics of phase transformation and gas filtering through a porous medium of granules for the negative temperatures. It is shown that the gas hydrate dissociation in the presence of mainly microporous structures is fundamentally different from the disintegration of gas hydrates containing meso and macropores.

  4. The influence of porosity and structural parameters on different kinds of gas hydrate dissociation.

    PubMed

    Misyura, S Y

    2016-01-01

    Methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures was studied experimentally for different artificial and natural samples, differing by macro- and micro-structural parameters. Four characteristic dissociation types are discussed in the paper. The internal kinetics of artificial granule gas hydrates and clathrate hydrates in coal is dependent on the porosity, defectiveness and gas filtration rate. The density of pores distribution in the crust of formed ice decreases by the several orders of magnitude and this change significantly the rate of decay. Existing models for describing dissociation at negative temperatures do not take into account the structural parameters of samples. The dissociation is regulated by internal physical processes that must be considered in the simulation. Non-isothermal dissociation with constant external heat flux was simulated numerically. The dissociation is simulated with consideration of heat and mass transfer, kinetics of phase transformation and gas filtering through a porous medium of granules for the negative temperatures. It is shown that the gas hydrate dissociation in the presence of mainly microporous structures is fundamentally different from the disintegration of gas hydrates containing meso and macropores. PMID:27445113

  5. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  6. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  7. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, K d) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in K d (range 2.0-7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The K d values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5-5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the K d in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists. PMID:27293705

  8. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J.; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in Kd (range 2.0–7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The Kd values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5–5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the Kd in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists. PMID:27293705

  9. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  10. Space Shuttle astrodynamical constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, B. F.; Williamson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Basic space shuttle astrodynamic constants are reported for use in mission planning and construction of ground and onboard software input loads. The data included here are provided to facilitate the use of consistent numerical values throughout the project.

  11. Toward a Universal Method for Preparing Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles with Antibody-like Affinity for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Ambrosini, Serena; Tamahkar, Emel; Rossi, Claire; Haupt, Karsten; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette

    2016-01-11

    We describe a potentially universal, simple and cheap method to prepare water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP-NPs) as synthetic antibodies against proteins. The strategy is based on a solid phase synthesis approach where glass beads (GBs) are functionalized with a metal chelate, acting as a general affinity ligand to attract surface-bound histidines present on proteins. This configuration enables an oriented immobilization of the proteins, upon which thermoresponsive MIP-NPs are synthesized. The GBs play the role of both a reactor and a separation column since, after synthesis, the MIP-NPs are released from the support by a simple temperature change, resulting in protein-free polymers. The resulting MIP-NPs are endowed with improved binding site homogeneity, since the binding sites have the same orientation. Moreover, they are stable (no aggregation) in a buffer solution for prolonged storage time and exhibit apparent dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, with little or no cross-reactivity toward other proteins. PMID:26644006

  12. Constant potential pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of constant potential pulse polarography, In which all pulses are to be the same potential, is presented theoretically and evaluated experimentally. The response obtained is in the form of a faradaic current wave superimposed on a constant capacitative component. Results obtained with a computer-controlled system exhibit a capillary response current similar to that observed In normal pulse polarography. Calibration curves for Pb obtained using a modified commercial pulse polarographic instrument are in good accord with theoretical predictions.

  13. Religious Dissociation and Economic Appraisal in Brazil.

    PubMed

    François Dengah, H J

    2016-04-01

    Research on the association between religion and health often neglects to provide an explicit theoretical mechanism of influence between faith and well-being. This research posits that dissociative behaviors, such as glossolalia, may provide a biological pathway that influences both physiological and psychological health. This paper argues that religious dissociation acts as a moderator between economic stressors and psychobiological appraisal. Brazil, with its economic inequality and preponderance of religious dissociative rituals, provides an ideal context to examine religious dissociation as a moderator of stress. Utilizing data from a cross section of Brazilian faiths, this paper examines: (1) Whether individuals with low socioeconomic status preferentially participate and experience religious dissociative states and (2) whether dissociative states are correlated with greater psychological appraisal of status. PMID:25687180

  14. Dissociative Tendencies and Facilitated Emotional Processing

    PubMed Central

    Oathes, Desmond J.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Dissociation is a process linked to lapses of attention, history of abuse or trauma, compromised emotional memory, and a disintegrated sense of self. It is theorized that dissociation stems from avoiding emotional information, especially negative emotion, to protect a fragile psyche. The present study tested whether or not dissociaters do actually avoid processing emotion by asking groups scoring high or low on the Dissociative Experiences Scale to judge the affective valence of several types of emotional stimuli. Manipulations of valence, modality (pictures or words), task complexity, and personal relevance lead to results suggesting that dissociation is linked to facilitated rather than deficient emotional processing. Our results are consistent with a theory that sensitivity to emotional material may be a contributing factor in subsequent dissociation to avoid further elaboration of upsetting emotion in these individuals. The findings for dissociation further exemplify the influence of individual differences in the link between cognition and emotion. PMID:18837615

  15. Coulomb Dissociation of 27P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro Novo, S.; Sümmerer, K.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Wimmer, C.; Plag, R.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Behr, K.; Boretzky, K.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Datta-Pramanik, U.; Elekes, Z.; Fulop, Z.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Giron, S.; Greife, U.; Hammache, F.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Johansson, H.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O.; Kurz, N.; Larsson, K.; Le Bleis, T.; Litvinov, Y.; Mahata, K.; Muentz, C.; Nociforo, C.; Ott, W.; Paschalis, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroth, J.; Typel, S.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.

    2012-09-01

    In this work the astrophysical 26Si(p,γ)27P reaction is studied using the Coulomb dissociation technique. We performed a 27P Coulomb Dissociation experiment at GSI, Darmstadt (28 May-5 June 2007) using the ALADIN-LAND setup which allows complete-kinematic studies. A secondary 27P beam at 498 AMeV impinging a 515mg/cm2 Pb target was used. The relative energy of the outgoing system (26Si+p) is measured obtaining the resonant states of the 27P. Preliminary results show four resonant states measured at 0.36±0.07, 0.88±0.09, 1.5±0.2, 2.3±0.3 MeV and evidence of a higher state at around 3.1 MeV. The preliminary total cross section obtained for relative energies between 0 and 3 MeV has been measured and yields 55±7 mb.

  16. Dissociative recombination in planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionization in planetary atmospheres can be produced by solar photoionization, photoelectron impact ionization, and, in auroral regions, by impact of precipitating particles. This ionization is lost mainly in dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions. Although atomic ions cannot undergo DR, they can be transformed locally through ion-molecule reactions into molecular ions, or they may be transported vertically or horizontally to regions of the atmosphere where such transformations are possible. Because DR reactions tend to be very exothermic, they can be an important source of kinetically or internally excited fragments. In interplanetary thermospheres, the neutral densities decrease exponentially with altitude. Below the homopause (or turbopause), the atmosphere is assumed to be throughly mixed by convection and/or turbulence. Above the homopause, diffusion is the major transport mechanism, and each species is distributed according to its mass, with the logarithmic derivative of the density with repect to altitude given approximately by -1/H, where H = kT/mg is the scale height. In this expression, T is the neutral temperature, g is the local acceleratiion of gravity, and m is the mass of the species. Thus lighter species become relatively more abundant, and heavier species less abundant, as the altitude increases. This variation of the neutral composition can lead to changes in the ion composition; furthermore, as the neutral densities decrease, dissociative recombination becomes more important relative to ion-neutral reactions as a loss mechanism for molecular ions.

  17. Dissociation rate of bromine diatomics in an argon heat bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razner, R.; Hopkins, D.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of a collection of 300 K bromine diatomics embedded in a heat bath of argon atoms at 1800 K was studied by computer, and a dissociation-rate constant for the reaction Br2 + BR + Ar yields Br + Ar was determined. Previously published probability distributions for energy and angular momentum transfers in classical three-dimensional Br2-Ar collisions were used in conjunction with a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme for this purpose. Results are compared with experimental shock-tube data and the predictions of several other theoretical models. A departure from equilibrium is obtained which is significantly greater than that predicted by any of these other theories.

  18. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  19. Degree of somatoform and psychological dissociation in dissociative disorder is correlated with reported trauma.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, E R; Spinhoven, P; van Dyck, R; van der Hart, O; Vanderlinden, J

    1998-10-01

    In this study, the prevalence and severity of traumatic experiences as reported by patients with dissociative disorders and with other DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses were compared. Furthermore, the predictive value of emotional, physical, and sexual trauma with respect to somatoform and psychological dissociation was analyzed. In contrast with comparison patients, dissociative disorder patients reported severe and multifaceted traumatization. Physical and sexual trauma predicted somatoform dissociation, sexual trauma predicted psychological dissociation as well. According to the memories of the dissociative disorder patients, this abuse occurred in an emotionally neglectful and abusive social context. Pathological dissociation was best predicted by early onset of reported intense, chronic and multiple traumatization. Methodological limitations restricting causal inferences between reported trauma and dissociation are discussed. PMID:9870223

  20. Calcium ion gradients modulate the zinc affinity and antibacterial activity of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Hayden, Joshua A; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-31

    Calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein produced and released by neutrophils that inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering essential metal nutrients in the extracellular space. In this work, spectroscopic and thermodynamic metal-binding studies are presented to delineate the zinc-binding properties of CP. Unique optical absorption and EPR spectroscopic signatures for the interfacial His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of human calprotectin are identified by using Co(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Zinc competition titrations employing chromophoric Zn(II) indicators provide a 2:1 Zn(II):CP stoichiometry, confirm that the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of CP coordinate Zn(II), and reveal that the Zn(II) affinity of both sites is calcium-dependent. The calcium-insensitive Zn(II) competitor ZP4 affords dissociation constants of K(d1) = 133 ± 58 pM and K(d2) = 185 ± 219 nM for CP in the absence of Ca(II). These values decrease to K(d1) ≤ 10 pM and K(d2) ≤ 240 pM in the presence of excess Ca(II). The K(d1) and K(d2) values are assigned to the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites, respectively. In vitro antibacterial activity assays indicate that the metal-binding sites and Ca(II)-replete conditions are required for CP to inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Taken together, these data provide a working model whereby calprotectin responds to physiological Ca(II) gradients to become a potent Zn(II) chelator in the extracellular space. PMID:23082970

  1. Heterogenetiy of glucocorticoid binders: a high affinity triamcinolone acetonide binder in bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Do, Y; Feldman, D

    1980-11-01

    While investigating glucocorticoid-binding proteins in bovine tissues, a new binder was found in fresh bovine serum which exhibited high affinity for certain synthetic glucocorticoids. This serum binder was characterized using [3H]triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as the ligand. On sucrose gradients, the [3H]TA peak sedimented at 8S, which was easily distinguishable from the [3H]cortisol-transcortin peak at 4S. Unlike the tissue receptor, which showed ionically dependent transformation from 8S in equilibrium or formed from 4S, the serum binder sedimented at 8S in both hypo- and hypertonic gradients. Binding properties were evaluated employing sephadex G-50 chromatography to separate bound from free steroid. Scatchard analysis of specific [3H]TA binding data revealed a straight line. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was 7.8 +/- 0.7 X 10(-8) M, and the binding capacity was 772 +/- 70 fmol/mg serum protein. Hormonal specificity was determined by a competitive binding assay and revealed the following sequence: TA (100%) > betamethasone (47%) > triamcinolone (33%) > dexamethasone (2%) = cortisol = progesterone; aldosterone, estradiol, and testosterone exhibited negligible competitive activity. The serum binder was very stable, withstanding heating to 37 C for 60 min and long term storage in the frozen state. However, binding was significantly destroyed by trypsin. The binder was absent from fresh samples of chicken, mouse, rat, rabbit, dog, monkey, and human sera and frozen horse and porcine sera, but was clearly present in commercially available frozen calf, fetal calf, and lamb sera. At this time, we are unable to define the function of this binder, although its existence in both ovine and bovine sera suggests a possible role in ruminants. However, since bovine serum is routinely employed in tissue culture studies, the presence of this glucocorticoid binder might significantly influence many experiments. PMID:6775927

  2. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  3. Synthetic glucocorticoids that dissociate transactivation and AP-1 transrepression exhibit antiinflammatory activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vayssière, B M; Dupont, S; Choquart, A; Petit, F; Garcia, T; Marchandeau, C; Gronemeyer, H; Resche-Rigon, M

    1997-08-01

    Some of the most potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive agents are synthetic glucocorticoids. However, major side effects severely limit their therapeutic use. The development of improved glucocorticoid-based drugs will require the separation of beneficial from deleterious effects. One possibility toward this goal is to try to dissociate two main activities of glucocorticoids, i.e. transactivation and transrepression. Screening of a library of compounds using transactivation and AP-1 transrepression models in transiently transfected cells identified dissociated glucocorticoids, which exert strong AP-1 inhibition but little or no transactivation. Importantly, despite high ligand binding affinity, the prototypic dissociated compound, RU24858, acted as a weak agonist and did not efficiently antagonize dexamethasone-induced transcription in transfected cells. Similar results were obtained in hepatic HTC cells for the transactivation of the endogenous tyrosine amino transferase gene (TAT), which encodes one of the enzymes involved in the glucocorticoid-dependent stimulation of neoglucogenesis. To investigate whether dissociated glucocorticoids retained the antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive potential of classic glucocorticoids, several in vitro and in vivo models were used. Indeed, secretion of the proinflammatory lymphokine interleukin-1beta was severely inhibited by dissociated glucocorticoids in human monocytic THP 1 cells. Moreover, in two in vivo models, these compounds exerted an antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive activity as potent as that of the classic glucocorticoid prednisolone. These results may lead to an improvement of antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies and provide a novel concept for drug discovery. PMID:9259316

  4. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Vardar, Melek Kanarya; Yesılyurt, Sema; Oncu, Fatıh

    2012-10-01

    The present study attempted to assess the dissociative symptoms and overall dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In addition, we examined the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dissociative symptoms. All patients admitted for the first time to the psychiatric outpatient unit were included in the study. Seventy-eight patients had been diagnosed as having OCD during the 2-year study period. Patients had to meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for OCD. Most (76.9%; n = 60) of the patients were female, and 23.1% (n = 18) of the patients were male. Dissociation Questionnaire was used to measure dissociative symptoms. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Dissociative Disorders interviews and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Checklist and Severity Scale were used. Eleven (14%) of the patients with OCD had comorbid dissociative disorder. The most prevalent disorder in our study was dissociative depersonalization disorder. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder were common as well. The mean Yale-Brown score was 23.37 ± 7.27 points. Dissociation Questionnaire scores were between 0.40 and 3.87 points, and the mean was 2.23 ± 0.76 points. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Yale-Brown points and Dissociation Questionnaire points. We conclude that dissociative symptoms among patients with OCD should alert clinicians for the presence of a chronic and complex dissociative disorder. Clinicians may overlook an underlying dissociative process in patients who have severe symptoms of OCD. However, a lack of adequate response to cognitive-behavioral and drug therapy may be a consequence of dissociative process. PMID:22425531

  5. Thiochrome enhances acetylcholine affinity at muscarinic M4 receptors: receptor subtype selectivity via cooperativity rather than affinity.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Dolezal, V; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2004-01-01

    Thiochrome (2,7-dimethyl-5H-thiachromine-8-ethanol), an oxidation product and metabolite of thiamine, has little effect on the equilibrium binding of l-[3H]N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]NMS) to the five human muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1-M5) at concentrations up to 0.3 mM. In contrast, it inhibits [3H]NMS dissociation from M1 to M4 receptors at submillimolar concentrations and from M5 receptors at 1 mM. These results suggest that thiochrome binds allosterically to muscarinic receptors and has approximately neutral cooperativity with [3H]NMS at M1 to M4 and possibly M5 receptors. Thiochrome increases the affinity of acetylcholine (ACh) 3- to 5-fold for inhibiting [3H]NMS binding to M4 receptors but has no effect on ACh affinity at M1 to M3 or M5 receptors. Thiochrome (0.1 mM) also increases the direct binding of [3H]ACh to M4 receptors but decreases it slightly at M2 receptors. In agreement with the binding data, thiochrome does not affect the potency of ACh for stimulating the binding of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) to membranes containing M1 to M3 receptors, but it increases ACh potency 3.5-fold at M4 receptors. It also selectively reduces the release of [3H]ACh from potassium-stimulated slices of rat striatum, which contain autoinhibitory presynaptic M4 receptors, but not from hippocampal slices, which contain presynaptic M2 receptors. We conclude that thiochrome is a selective M4 muscarinic receptor enhancer of ACh affinity and has neutral cooperativity with ACh at M1 to M3 receptors; it therefore demonstrates a powerful new form of selectivity, "absolute subtype selectivity", which is derived from cooperativity rather than from affinity. PMID:14722259

  6. Modeling heating curve for gas hydrate dissociation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Dicharry, Christophe; Gayet, Pascal; Marion, Gérard; Graciaa, Alain; Nesterov, Anatoliy N

    2005-09-15

    A method for modeling the heating curve for gas hydrate dissociation in porous media at isochoric conditions (constant cell volume) is presented. This method consists of using an equation of state of the gas, the cumulative volume distribution (CVD) of the porous medium, and a van der Waals-Platteeuw-type thermodynamic model that includes a capillary term. The proposed method was tested to predict the heating curves for methane hydrate dissociation in a mesoporous silica glass for saturated conditions (liquid volume = pore volume) and for a fractional conversion of water to hydrate of 1 (100% of the available water was converted to hydrate). The shape factor (F) of the hydrate-water interface was found equal to 1, supporting a cylindrical shape for the hydrate particles during hydrate dissociation. Using F = 1, it has been possible to predict the heating curve for different ranges of pressure and temperature. The excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental heating curves supports the validity of our approach. PMID:16853195

  7. Photoinduced ionization and dissociation of aniline-(methanol)n clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Sun; Nam, Sang Hwan; Song, Jae Kyu; Park, Seung Min

    2007-04-01

    A linear tandem-type time-of-flight mass spectrometer was employed to study unimolecular dissociation of metastable aniline+-(methanol)n (An+-(CH3OH)n, n = 2-9) cluster cations formed by two-photon ionization of neutral clusters. The dominant dissociation channel was to liberate a single methanol molecule, namely, An+-(CH3OH)n --> An+-(CH3OH)n-1 + CH3OH. The decay time constant of the ions ranged from 65 to 460 [mu]s and turned out to be highly dependent on the cluster size. Also, hydrogen transfer mechanism in the formation of An+-(CH3OH)nH was examined by analyzing experimental results from isotopomers, such as deuterated An-d7+-(CH3OD) and An-d7+-(CD3OD) cluster ions. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to obtain optimized structures for neutral and ionic clusters and to support mechanisms related to the hydrogen transfer and unimolecular dissociation reaction.

  8. A Redetermination of the Dissociation Energy of MgO(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1994-01-01

    In 1986, we reported a dissociation energy (D(sub 0) of 2.31 eV for the X(sup 2)Pi ground state of MgO(+). This value was determined by computing the dissociation energy to the Mg(2+) + O(-) limit and adjusting the value to the Mg(+) + O limit using the experimental Ionization Potential (IP) of Mg(+) and the Electron Affinity (EA) of O. The success of this method relies on the assumption that there is little covalent contribution to the bonding. The very small (0.04 eV) correlation contribution to the binding energy was taken as corroboration for the validity of this approach. Our earlier theoretical value was estimated to be accurate to at least 0.2 eV. It is in excellent agreement with the subsequent value of 2.30 +/- 0.13 eV determined by Freiser and co-workers from photodissociation experiments. It is also consistent with the upper (less than 3.1 eV) and lower (greater than 1.1 eV) bounds determined by Rowe obtained by studying the reactions of Mg(+) with 03 and NO2. However, it is inconsistent with an upper bound of 1.7 eV reported by Kappes and Staley based on their failure to observe MgO(+) in the reaction of Mg(+) with N2O. The picture became somewhat clouded, however, by the recent guided-ion beam mass spectrometric studies of Dalleska and Armentrout. Their initial analysis of the reaction data for Mg(+) + O2 lead to a bond dissociation energy of 2.92 +/- 0.25 eV, which is considerably larger than the value of 2.47 +/- 0.06 eV deduced from their studies of the Mg(+)+NO2 reaction.

  9. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  10. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  11. Molecular Basis for the Dissociation Dynamics of Protein A-Immunoglobulin G1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex. PMID:23776704

  12. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  13. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  14. Increasing functional avidity of TCR-redirected T cells by removing defined N-glycosylation sites in the TCR constant domain

    PubMed Central

    Hauptrock, Beate; Malina, Victoria; Antunes, Edite; Voss, Ralf-Holger; Wolfl, Matthias; Strong, Roland; Theobald, Matthias; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes transduced with a T cell receptor (TCR) to impart tumor reactivity has been reported as a potential strategy to redirect immune responses to target cancer cells (Schumacher, T.N. 2002. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 2:512–519). However, the affinity of most TCRs specific for shared tumor antigens that can be isolated is usually low. Thus, strategies to increase the affinity of TCRs or the functional avidity of TCR-transduced T cells might be therapeutically beneficial. Because glycosylation affects the flexibility, movement, and interactions of surface molecules, we tested if selectively removing conserved N-glycoslyation sites in the constant regions of TCR α or β chains could increase the functional avidity of T cells transduced with such modified TCRs. We observed enhanced functional avidity and improved recognition of tumor cells by T cells harboring TCR chains with reduced N-glycosylation (ΔTCR) as compared with T cells with wild-type (WT) TCR chains. T cells transduced with WT or ΔTCR chains bound tetramer equivalently at 4°C, but tetramer binding was enhanced at 37°C, predominantly as a result of reduced tetramer dissociation. This suggested a temperature-dependent mechanism such as TCR movement in the cell surface or structural changes of the TCR allowing improved multimerization. This strategy was effective with mouse and human TCRs specific for different antigens and, thus, should be readily translated to TCRs with any specificity. PMID:19171765

  15. Molecular dissociation in dilute gas

    SciTech Connect

    Renfrow, S.N.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D. |

    1999-06-01

    The charge state distributions (CSD) produced during molecular dissociation are important to both Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) and the ion implantation industry. The CSD of 1.3{endash}1.7 MeV SiN{sup +}, SiMg{sup +}, SiMn{sup +}, and SiZn{sup +} molecules have been measured for elements that do not form atomic negative ions (N, Mg, Mn, and Zn) using a NEC Tandem Pelletron accelerator. The molecules were produced in a Cs sputter negative ion source, accelerated, magnetically analyzed, and then passed through an N{sub 2} gas cell. The neutral and charged breakups where analyzed using an electrostatic deflector and measured with particle detectors. Equilibrium CSD were determined and comparisons made between molecular and atomic ion data. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  17. XrayOpticsConstants

    2005-06-20

    This application (XrayOpticsConstants) is a tool for displaying X-ray and Optical properties for a given material, x-ray photon energy, and in the case of a gas, pressure. The display includes fields such as the photo-electric absorption attenuation length, density, material composition, index of refraction, and emission properties (for scintillator materials).

  18. Multiple GPCR conformations and signalling pathways: implications for antagonist affinity estimates

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Antagonist affinity measurements have traditionally been considered important in characterizing the cell-surface receptors present in a particular cell or tissue. A central assumption has been that antagonist affinity is constant for a given receptor–antagonist interaction, regardless of the agonist used to stimulate that receptor or the downstream response that is measured. As a consequence, changes in antagonist affinity values have been taken as initial evidence for the presence of novel receptor subtypes. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that receptors can possess multiple binding sites and the same receptor can show different antagonist affinity measurements under distinct experimental conditions. Here, we discuss several mechanisms by which antagonists have different affinities for the same receptor as a consequence of allosterism, coupling to different G proteins, multiple (but non-interacting) receptor sites, and signal-pathway-dependent pharmacology (where the pharmacology observed varies depending on the signalling pathway measured). PMID:17629959

  19. Dissociative recombination of highly symmetric polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann E; Greene, Chris H; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2012-01-13

    A general first-principles theory of dissociative recombination is developed for highly symmetric molecular ions and applied to H(3)O(+) and CH(3)(+), which play an important role in astrophysical, combustion, and laboratory plasma environments. The theoretical cross sections obtained for the dissociative recombination of the two ions are in good agreement with existing experimental data from storage ring experiments. PMID:22324682

  20. A Hierarchical Process-Dissociation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Jun; Morey, Richard D.; Sun, Dongchu; Speckman, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    In fitting the process-dissociation model (L. L. Jacoby, 1991) to observed data, researchers aggregate outcomes across participant, items, or both. T. Curran and D. L. Hintzman (1995) demonstrated how biases from aggregation may lead to artifactual support for the model. The authors develop a hierarchical process-dissociation model that does not…

  1. Dissociation and the Development of Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Frank W.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    This paper reviews the research on dissociation and the development of psychopathology in children and adolescents. Definitions and dimensions of dissociation are addressed, noting its range from normative daydreaming to the extremes found in individuals with multiple personality disorder. Memory dysfunctions, disturbances of identity, passive…

  2. Dissociative depression among women in the community.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Akyüz, Gamze; Oztürk, Erdinç; Alioğlu, Firdevs

    2013-01-01

    This study screened the prevalence and correlates of dissociative disorders among depressive women in the general population. The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to 628 women in 500 homes. The prevalence of current major depressive episode was 10.0%. Of the women, 26 (40.6%) had the lifetime diagnosis of a DSM-IV, dissociative disorder, yielding a prevalence of 4.1% for dissociative depression. This group was younger (mean age = 30.7 years) than the nondissociative depression women (mean age = 39.6 years). There was no difference between the 2 groups on comorbid somatization disorder, PTSD, or borderline personality disorder. Besides suicide attempts, the dissociative group was characterized by secondary features of dissociative identity disorder; Schneiderian symptoms; borderline personality disorder criteria; and extrasensory perceptions, including possession experiences. They reported suicidality, thoughts of guilt and worthlessness, diminished concentration and indecisiveness, and appetite and weight changes more frequently than the nondissociative group. Early cessation of school education and childhood sexual abuse were frequently reported by the dissociative depression group. With its distinct features, the concept of dissociative depression may facilitate understanding of treatment resistance in, development of better psychotherapy strategies for, and new thinking on the neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of depressive disorders. PMID:23796173

  3. Recent developments in the theory of dissociation

    PubMed Central

    SPITZER, CARSTEN; BARNOW, SVEN; FREYBERGER, HARALD J; GRABE, HANS JOERGEN

    2006-01-01

    Although the construct of dissociation was introduced into psychiatry at the end of the 19th century by Pierre Janet, the term still lacks a coherent conceptualization, which is partially reflected by differences in the classification of dissociative and conversion disorders in ICD-10 and DSM-IV. Given the clinical significance of dissociative psychopathology in numerous clinical conditions, it is very valuable that various efforts have been made to refine and to specify current conceptualizations in recent years. The most promising and convincing approaches converge in subdividing dissociation into qualitatively different types, i.e. pathological versus non-pathological dissociation, and "detachment" versus "compartmentalization". We review these concepts and discuss their scientific and clinical potential as well as their limitations. PMID:16946940

  4. Native Elution of Yeast Protein Complexes Obtained by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes two options for the native (nondenaturing) elution of protein complexes obtained by affinity capture. The first approach involves the elution of complexes purified through a tag that includes a human rhinovirus 3C protease (PreScission protease) cleavage site sequence between the protein of interest and the tag. Incubation with the protease cleaves immobilized complexes from the affinity medium. The second approach involves the release of protein A-tagged protein complexes using a competitive elution reagent called PEGylOx. The degree of purity of the native assemblies eluted is sample dependent and strongly influenced by the affinity capture. It should be noted that the efficiency of native elution is commonly lower than that of elution by a denaturing agent (e.g., SDS) and the release of the complex will be limited by the activity of the protease or the inhibition constant (Ki) of the competitive release agent. However, an advantage of native release is that some nonspecifically bound materials tend to stay adsorbed to the affinity medium, providing an eluted fraction of higher purity. Finally, keep in mind that the presence of the protease or elution peptide could potentially affect downstream applications; thus, their removal should be considered. PMID:27371597

  5. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D)

    PubMed Central

    Schalinski, Inga; Schauer, Maggie; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010) provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D) was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity). A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups) from healthy controls. The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding. PMID:25976478

  6. A classical trajectory study of the dissociation and isomerization of C2H5.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Albert F; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Bachellerie, Damien; Perry, Jamin W; Thompson, Donald L

    2013-11-21

    Motivated by photodissociation experiments in which non-RRKM nanosecond lifetimes of the ethyl radical were reported, we have performed a classical trajectory study of the dissociation and isomerization of C2H5 over the energy range 100-150 kcal/mol. We used a customized version of the AIREBO semiempirical potential (Stuart, S. J.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 6472-6486) to more accurately describe the gas-phase decomposition of C2H5. This study constitutes one of the first gas-phase applications of this potential form. At each energy, 10,000 trajectories were run and all underwent dissociation in less than 100 ps. The calculated dissociation rate constants are consistent with RRKM models; no evidence was found for nanosecond lifetimes. An analytic kinetics model of isomerization/dissociation competition was developed that incorporated incomplete mode mixing through a postulated divided phase space. The fits of the model to the trajectory data are good and represent the trajectory results in detail through repeated isomerizations at all energies. The model correctly displays single exponential decay at lower energies, but at higher energies, multiexponential decay due to incomplete mode mixing becomes more apparent. At both ends of the energy range, we carried out similar trajectory studies on CD2CH3 to examine isotopic scrambling. The results largely support the assumption that a H or a D atom is equally likely to dissociate from the mixed-isotope methyl end of the molecule. The calculated fraction of products that have the D atom dissociation is ∼20%, twice the experimental value available at one energy within our range. The calculated degree of isotopic scrambling is non-monotonic with respect to energy due to a non-monotonic ratio of the isomerization to dissociation rate constants. PMID:23448205

  7. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  8. Dissociation and Memory Fragmentation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Evaluation of the Dissociative Encoding Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Several prominent theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) posit that peritraumatic dissociation results in insufficient encoding of the trauma memory and that persistent dissociation prevents memory elaboration, resulting in memory fragmentation and PTSD. In this review, we summarize the empirical literature on peritraumatic and trait dissociation and trauma narrative fragmentation as measured by meta-memory and rater/objective coding. Across 16 studies to date, the association between dissociation and fragmentation was most prominent when examining peritraumatic dissociation and patient's own ratings of memory fragmentation. This relationship did not hold when examining trait dissociation or rater-coded or computer-generated measures of fragmentation. Thus, initial evidence points more toward a strong self-reported association between constructs that is not supported on more objective fragmentation coding. Measurement overlap, construct ambiguity, and exclusion of potential confounds may underlie lack of a strong association between dissociation and objective-rated fragmentation. PMID:22348400

  9. High fidelity modeling of thermal relaxation and dissociation of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-11-01

    A master equation study of vibrational relaxation and dissociation of oxygen is conducted using state-specific O2-O transition rates, generated by extensive trajectory simulations. Both O2-O and O2-O2 collisions are concurrently simulated in the evolving nonequilibrium gas system under constant heat bath conditions. The forced harmonic oscillator model is incorporated to simulate the state-to-state relaxation of oxygen in O2-O2 collisions. The system of master equations is solved to simulate heating and cooling flows. The present study demonstrates the importance of atom-diatom collisions due to the extremely efficient energy randomization in the intermediate O3 complex. It is shown that the presence of atomic oxygen has a significant impact on vibrational relaxation time at temperatures observed in hypersonic flow. The population of highly-excited O2 vibrational states is affected by the amount of atomic oxygen when modeling the relaxation under constant heat bath conditions. A model of coupled state-to-state vibrational relaxation and dissociation of oxygen is also discussed.

  10. High fidelity modeling of thermal relaxation and dissociation of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Andrienko, Daniil A. Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-11-15

    A master equation study of vibrational relaxation and dissociation of oxygen is conducted using state-specific O{sub 2}–O transition rates, generated by extensive trajectory simulations. Both O{sub 2}–O and O{sub 2}–O{sub 2} collisions are concurrently simulated in the evolving nonequilibrium gas system under constant heat bath conditions. The forced harmonic oscillator model is incorporated to simulate the state-to-state relaxation of oxygen in O{sub 2}–O{sub 2} collisions. The system of master equations is solved to simulate heating and cooling flows. The present study demonstrates the importance of atom-diatom collisions due to the extremely efficient energy randomization in the intermediate O{sub 3} complex. It is shown that the presence of atomic oxygen has a significant impact on vibrational relaxation time at temperatures observed in hypersonic flow. The population of highly-excited O{sub 2} vibrational states is affected by the amount of atomic oxygen when modeling the relaxation under constant heat bath conditions. A model of coupled state-to-state vibrational relaxation and dissociation of oxygen is also discussed.

  11. Capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments by a high-affinity profilin-actin complex.

    PubMed

    DiNubile, M J; Huang, S

    1997-01-01

    Profilin, a ubiquitous 12 to 15-kDa protein, serves many functions, including sequestering monomeric actin, accelerating nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, decreasing the critical concentration of the barbed end of actin filaments, and promoting actin polymerization when barbed ends are free. Most previous studies have focused on profilin itself rather than its complex with actin. A high-affinity profilin-actin complex (here called profilactin) can be isolated from a poly-(L)-proline (PLP) column by sequential elution with 3 M and 7 M urea. Profilactin inhibited the elongation rate of pyrenyl-G-actin from filament seeds in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Much greater inhibition of elongation was observed with spectrin-F-actin than gelsolin-F-actin seeds, suggesting that the major effect of profilactin was due to capping the barbed ends of actin filaments. Its dissociation constant for binding to filament ends was 0.3 microM; the on- and off-rate constants were estimated to be 1.7 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 and 4.5 x 10(-4) s-1, respectively. Purified profilin (obtained by repetitive applications to a PLP column and assessed by silver-stained polyacylamide gels) did not slow the elongation rate of pyrenyl-G-actin from filament seeds. Capping protein could not be detected by Western blotting in the profilactin preparation, but low concentrations of gelsolin did contaminate our preparation. However, prolonged incubation with either calcium or EGTA did not affect capping activity, implying that contaminating gelsolin-actin complexes were not primarily responsible for the observed capping activity. Reapplication of the profilactin preparation to PLP-coupled Sepharose removed both profilin and actin and concurrently eliminated its capping activity. Profilactin that was reapplied to uncoupled Sepharose retained its capping activity. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) was the most potent phosphoinositol in reducing the capping activity of profilactin

  12. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  13. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  14. Renormalization of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The problem of obtaining a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant is addressed. By a specific parametrization of metric fluctuations a gauge independent functional integral is constructed for the semiclassical theory around an arbitrary Einstein space. The effective action then has the property that only physical polarizations of the graviton contribute, while all other modes cancel with the functional measure. We are then able to compute a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant in d dimensions to one-loop order. No Landau pole is present provided Ng<18 , where Ng=d (d -3 )/2 is the number of polarizations of the graviton. While adding a large number of matter fields can change this picture, the absence of a pole persists for the particle content of the standard model in four spacetime dimensions.

  15. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  16. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: abalcerz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2015-02-01

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including Λ-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ansätze for the variability of constants: c(a) = c{sub 0} a{sup n} and G(a)=G{sub 0} a{sup q}. We find that most of the varying c and G minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe ''from nothing'' (a=0) to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor a{sub t} is large for growing c models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing c models. As for G varying, the probability of tunneling is large for G diminishing, while it is small for G increasing. In general, both varying c and G change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  17. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-05-29

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a {pi}{radical}(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment.

  18. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-09-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72-74 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with typical errors of 2-3 km s^-1 Mpc^-1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s^-1 Mpc^-1 and typical errors of 1-2 km s^-1 Mpc^-1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  19. Exciton dissociation at organic small molecule donor-acceptor interfaces (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Steven W.

    2015-08-01

    Exciton dissociation at organic semiconductor donor-acceptor (D-A) heterojunctions is critical for the performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) structures. Interfacial charge separation and recombination processes control device efficiency. We have investigated these fundamental interfacial issues using time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE), coupled with the formation of well-controlled D-A structures by organic molecular beam epitaxy. The interfacial electronic and molecular structure of these model interfaces was well-characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy and ultraviolet photoemission. Exciton dissociation dynamics were investigated by using a sub-picosecond pump pulse to create Pc π-->π* transitions, producing a population of singlet (S1) Pc excitons. The subsequent decay dynamics of this population was monitored via photoemission with a time-delayed UV pulse. For CuPcC60 interfaces, S1 exciton population decay in the interfacial CuPc layer was much faster than decay in the bulk due to interfacial charge separation. The rate constant for exciton dissociation was found to be ≍ 7 x 10 12 sec-1 (≍ 140 fs). Excitons that lose energy via intersystem crossing (ISC) to triplet levels dissociate approximately 500 to 1000 times slower. The dependence of exciton dissociation on separation was also studied. Exciton dissociation falls of rapidly with distance from the interface. Dissociation from the 2nd, and subsequent, layers of H2Pc is reduced by at least a factor of 10 from that in the interfacial layer. Finally, investigations of the relative efficiency for interfacial exciton dissociation by alternative acceptors based on perylene cores, (perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride, or PTCDA) compared to fullerene-based acceptors such as C60 will also be discussed.

  20. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media. PMID:27524303

  1. Fractal binding and dissociation kinetics of heart-related compounds on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Doke, Atul M; Mathur, Sunil K; Sadana, Ajit

    2006-01-01

    A fractal analysis is presented for the binding and dissociation of different heart-related compounds in solution to receptors immobilized on biosensor surfaces. The data analyzed include LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) concentrations in solution to egg white apoA-I rHDL immobilized on a biosensor chip surface (1), native, mildly oxidized, and strongly oxidized LDL in solution to a heparin-modified Au-surface of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor (2), and TRITC-labeled HDL in solution to a bare optical fiber surface (3). Single-and dual-fractal models were used to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s), affinity values, and the fractal dimensions were obtained from the regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (4). The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. Predictive equations are developed for the binding rate coefficient as a function of the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface and on the LCAT concentration in solution and for the affinity as a function of the ratio of fractal dimensions present in the binding and the dissociation phases. The analysis presented provided physical insights into these analyte-receptor reactions occurring on different biosensor surfaces. PMID:16818380

  2. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  3. From state dissociation to status dissociatus.

    PubMed

    Antelmi, Elena; Ferri, Raffaele; Iranzo, Alex; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves; Bhatia, Kailash P; Liguori, Rocco; Schenck, Carlos H; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The states of being are conventionally defined by the simultaneous occurrence of behavioral, neurophysiological and autonomic descriptors. State dissociation disorders are due to the intrusion of features typical of a different state into an ongoing state. Disorders related to these conditions are classified according to the ongoing main state and comprise: 1) Dissociation from prevailing wakefulness as seen in hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, automatic behaviors, sleep drunkenness, cataplexy and sleep paralysis 2) Dissociation from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as seen in REM sleep behavior disorder and lucid dreaming and 3) Dissociation from NREM sleep as seen in the disorders of arousal. The extreme expression of states dissociation is characterized by the asynchronous occurrence of the various components of the different states that prevents the recognition of any state of being. This condition has been named status dissociatus. According to the underlying disorders/diseases and to their severity, among status dissociatus we may recognize disorders in which such an extreme dissociation occurs only at night time or intermittently (i.e., autoimmune encephalopathies, narcolepsy type 1 and IgLON5 parasomnia), and others in which it occurs nearly continuously with complete loss of any conventionally defined state of being, and of the circadian pattern (agrypnia excitata). Here, we render a comprehensive review of all diseases/disorders associated with state dissociation and status dissociatus and propose a critical classification of this complex scenario. PMID:26431902

  4. Banach frames in the affine synthesis problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, Pavel A.

    2009-10-01

    We consider the problem of representing functions f\\in L^p(\\mathbb R^d) by a series in elements of the affine system \\displaystyle \\psi_{j,k}(x)=\\lvert\\det a_j\\rvert^{1/2}\\psi(a_jx-bk), \\qquad j\\in\\mathbb N, \\quad k\\in\\mathbb Z^d. The corresponding representation theorems are established on the basis of the frame inequalities \\displaystyle A\\Vert g\\Vert _q\\le\\Vert\\{(g,\\psi_{j,k})\\}\\Vert _Y\\le B\\Vert g\\Vert _q for the Fourier coefficients \\displaystyle(g,\\psi_{j,k})=\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}g(x)\\psi_{j,k}(x)\\,dx of functions g\\in L^q(\\mathbb R^d), 1/p+1/q=1, where {\\Vert\\cdot\\Vert}_Y is the norm in some Banach space of number families \\{y_{j,k}\\} and 0 are constants. In particular, it is proved that if the integral of a function \\psi\\in L^1\\cap L^p(\\mathbb R^d), 1, is nonzero, so \\displaystyle\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}\\psi(x)\\,dx\

  5. Indian craniometric variability and affinities.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with "Caucasoid" populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  6. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  7. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  8. Dissociative Ionization of Pyridine by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the damage of biomolecules by electrons, a process important in radiation damage, we undertake a study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of pyridine (C5H5N) from the low-lying ionization channels. The methodology used is the same as in the benzene study. While no experimental DI data are available, we compare the dissociation products from our calculations with the dissociative photoionization measurements of Tixier et al. using dipole (e, e(+) ion) coincidence spectroscopy. Comparisons with the DI of benzene is also made so as to understand the difference in DI between a heterocyclic and an aromatic molecule.

  9. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  10. Products of Dissociative Recombination in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Philip

    1996-01-01

    SRI International undertook a novel experimental measurement of the product states formed by dissociative ro-combination (DR) of C2(+), NO(+), and N2(+) as a function of both electron energy and reactant ion vibrational level. For these measurements we used a recently developed experimental technique for measuring dissociation product distributions that allows both the branching ratios to be accurately determined and the electronic and ro-vibrational state composition of the reactant ions to be specified. DR is the dominant electron loss mechanism in all regions of the ionosphere. In this process, electron attachment to the molecular ion produces an unstable neutral molecule that rapidly dissociates.

  11. Wavepacket theory of collisional dissociation in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.

    1980-01-01

    An explicit integration scheme is used to solve the time dependent Schroedinger equation for wavepackets which model collisions in the collinear H + H/sub 2/ system. A realistic LEPS-type potential energy surface is used. Collision energies considered are above the dissociation threshold and probabilities for collision induced dissociation are reported. Also quantum mechanical state-to-state transition probabilities are generated. These results are compared to extensive classical trajectory calculations performed on this same system. The time evolution of the wavepacket densities is studied to understand the dynamics of the collinear collisional dissociation process.

  12. Electrosteric Stabilization of Al(2)O(3), ZrO(2), and 3Y-ZrO(2) Suspensions: Effect of Dissociation and Type of Polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Pettersson; Marino; Pursiheimo; Rosenholm

    2000-08-01

    The mechanisms of eight anionic polyelectrolytes stabilizing colloidal sized alpha-Al(2)O(3), pure ZrO(2), and Y(2)O(3)-doped ZrO(2) particles in aqueous solution are discussed. The polyelectrolytes studied were the Na(+) and NH(4)(+) salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid having different molecular weights. The particle-dispersant interactions were studied by measuring adsorption isotherms, particle size, thickness of adsorbed layer, and zeta potentials by elektrokinetic sonic analysis at different powder volume fractions (straight phi=0.01-0.3), pH, and electrolyte (KCl) content. The dissociation of the polyelectrolytes was studied by potentiometric titrations. The dissociation constant of the polymethacrylates was found to be 0.6 pH unit higher than that for the polyacrylates. High-affinity adsorption isotherms were observed over the pH range when the polyelectrolytes were fully ionized. The results show good correlation between adsorption isotherms and zeta potential data in systems of dispersed, dilute alumina particles. When particles and polymers were of equal charge (the same sign of charge) the polymer shell was thicker. At higher volume fractions (straight phi=0.3), and when alumina particles/added ammonium polyelectrolyte were of equal charge, a maximum in the absolute value of zeta potential resulted. Due to adsorption all the anionic polyelectrolytes studied provided electrosteric stabilization of the alpha-Al(2)O(3), and Y(2)O(3)-doped ZrO(2) suspensions by enhancing the zeta potential to 40 mV or over and by shifting the isoelectric point to lower pH, the low-molecular-weight polyelectrolytes decreasing the isoelectric point more than the polyelectrolytes having higher molecular weight. The polyelectrolytes studied failed to stabilize pure monoclinic ZrO(2) particles. Due to the shortness of the chain of polyelectrolytes studied, no bridging was observed between oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/alumina particles. Copyright 2000 Academic

  13. A theoretical analysis of photoactivated unimolecular dissociation: The overtone dissociation of t-butyl hydroperoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David W.; Miller, James A.

    1984-07-01

    We have used the master equation formalism to analyze the photoactivated unimolecular dissociation of a large polyatomic molecule, t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH). Our results are compared to the experimental results of Chandler, Farneth, and Zare and of Chuang et al. We find that the curvature in their Stern-Volmer plots cannot be explained by a collisional energy transfer mechanism. At high pressure, the theoretical Stern-Volmer plots are linear, independent of the collisional energy transfer properties. This linearity is related to the existence of a limiting high pressure ``reactive distribution.'' We identify three different pressure regimes that exist in photoactivated unimolecular reaction experiments, and we relate these regimes to the properties of the reactive distribution. In particular, we find that, when a Stern-Volmer analysis is used, curvature at very low pressure can result in systematic errors in determining the unimolecular rate constants. In addition, we have successfully analyzed the real time experiments of Rizzo and Crim using the same molecular model and parameters necessary to predict the experiments of Chandler et al.

  14. Theoretical analysis of photoactivated unimolecular dissociation: The overtone dissociation of t-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.; Miller, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    We have used the master equation formalism to analyze the photoactivated unimolecular dissociation of a large polyatomic molecule, t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH). Our results are compared to the experimental results of Chandler, Farneth, and Zare and of Chuang et al. We find that the curvature in their Stern-Volmer plots cannot be explained by a collisional energy transfer mechanism. At high pressure, the theoretical Stern--Volmer plots are linear, independent of the collisional energy transfer properties. This linearity is related to the existence of a limiting high pressure ''reactive distribution.'' We identify three different pressure regimes that exist in photoactivated unimolecular reaction experiments, and we relate these regimes to the properties of the reactive distribution. In particular, we find that, when a Stern-Volmer analysis is used, curvature at very low pressure can result in systematic errors in determining the unimolecular rate constants. In addition, we have successfully analyzed the real time experiments of Rizzo and Crim using the same molecular model and parameters necessary to predict the experiments of Chandler et al.

  15. Shock wave study of the thermal dissociations of C3F6 and c-C3F6. II. dissociation of hexafluorocyclopropane and dimerization of CF2.

    PubMed

    Cobos, C J; Sölter, L; Tellbach, E; Troe, J

    2014-07-10

    The thermal dissociation of c-C3F6 has been studied in shock waves over the range 620-1030 K monitoring the UV absorption of CF2. The reaction was studied close to its high-pressure limit, but some high-temperature falloff was accounted for. Quantum-chemical and kinetic modeling rationalized the experimental data. The reaction is suggested to involve the 1,3 biradical CF2CF2CF2 intermediate. CF2 formed by the dissociation of c-C3F6 dimerizes to C2F4. The measured rate of this reaction is also found to correspond to the falloff range. Rate constants for 2CF2 → C2F4 as a function of temperature and bath gas concentration [Ar] are given and shown to be consistent with literature values for the high-pressure rate constants from experiments at lower temperatures and dissociation rate constants obtained in the falloff range at higher temperatures. The onset of falloff at intermediate temperatures is analyzed. PMID:24905207

  16. Electron Affinities, Fluoride Affinities, and Heats of Formation of the Second Row Transition Metal Hexafluorides: MF6 (M = Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag)

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, Raluca; Long, Rebecca T.; Dixon, David A.; Christe, Karl O.

    2010-07-22

    High-level electronic structure calculations were used to evaluate reliable, self-consistent thermochemical data sets for the second row transition metal hexafluorides. The electron affinities, heats of formation, first (MF{sub 6} {yields} MF{sub 5} + F) and average M-F bond dissociation energies, and fluoride affinities of MF{sub 6} (MF{sub 6} + F{sup -} {yields} MF{sub 7}{sup -}) and MF{sub 5} (MF{sub 5} + F{sup -} {yields} MF{sub 6}{sup -}) were calculated. The electron affinities are higher than those of the corresponding third row hexafluorides, making them stronger one-electron oxidizers. The calculated electron affinities, in good agreement with the available experimental values, are 4.23 eV for MoF{sub 6}, 5.89 eV for TcF{sub 6}, 7.01 eV for RuF{sub 6}, 6.80 eV for RhF{sub 6}, 7.95 eV for PdF{sub 6}, and 8.89 eV for AgF{sub 6}. The corresponding pentafluorides are also very strong Lewis acids, although their acidities on the pF{sup -} scale are about one unit lower than those of the third row pentafluorides. The performance of a wide range of DFT exchange-correlation functionals was benchmarked by comparing them to our more accurate CCSD(T) results.

  17. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  18. Dissociative identity disorder presenting as dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Aydemir, Ertugrul H; Oguz, Oya

    2006-06-01

    Dermatitis artefacta is a rare psychiatric condition characterized by rubbing of skin blisters and denial of self-infliction. Dissociation may be comorbid with self-injurious behavior. A background of emotional disturbances during formative years and in later life often results in feelings of isolation and insecurity, which can lead to dissociation as a primary defense mechanism used to overcome traumatic events. In this case report, we describe a female patient with dermatitis artefacta associated with dissociative identity disorder. The patient was a 14-year-old girl. Multiple large, deep ulcerations with unnatural shapes were seen on her left forearm. The ulcerations were thought to be self-inflicted. Psychiatric examination revealed that she had a different identity, and inflicted the lesions when this was assumed. This case leads us to suggest that patients with dermatitis artefacta might have comorbid dissociative experiences, which cannot be identified easily. PMID:16796649

  19. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  20. Research Reports: Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in bizarre or dangerous behavior. Hallucinogens such as LSD, psilocybin, peyote, DMT, and ayahuasca cause emotions to ... Take Hallucinogenic or Dissociative Drugs? How Do Hallucinogens (LSD, Psilocybin, Peyote, DMT, and Ayahuasca) Affect the Brain ...

  1. A comparison of the equilibrium constants for the dissociation of carbonic acid in seawater media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, A. G.; Millero, F. J.

    1987-10-01

    The published experimental data of Hansson and of Mehrbach et al. have been critically compared after adjustment to a common pH scale based upon total hydrogen ion concentration. No significant systematic differences are found within the overall experimental error of the data. The results have been pooled to yield reliable equations that can be used to estimate pK 1∗and pK 2∗ for seawater media a salinities from 0 to 40 and at temperatures from 2 to 35°C.

  2. Determination of the inhibitor dissociation constant of an individual unmodified enzyme molecule in free solution.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeremie J; Hollett, Joshua W; Craig, Douglas B

    2016-08-01

    Single enzyme molecule assays on E. coli β-galactosidase were performed using a capillary electrophoresis-based method. Three types of assays were performed. The catalytic rate of 20 individual molecules was assayed in duplicate in the presence of 50 μM substrate. The ratio of rates for the second incubation relative to the first was 0.96 ± 0.03, showing the reproducibility of the method. In the second assay, the rates were determined in the absence and presence of 210 μM L-ribose, a competitive inhibitor. The ratio of the rate in the presence of inhibitor to that in its absence for 19 individual molecules was 0.44 ± 0.23. This large relative standard deviation suggests that each individual enzyme molecule was affected to a different extent by the presence of the inhibitor, which is consistent with KI being heterogeneous. To estimate KI for individual molecules, a third assay was performed. Each molecule was incubated in the presence of 30 and 50 μM substrate and then in the presence of 50 μM substrate plus 210 μM inhibitor. Comparison of the rates in the two substrate concentrations allowed for the determination of the individual Km of each molecule. From this value and the difference in rates in the presence and absence of inhibitor, the individual molecule KI values were determined. This value was found to differ between individual molecules and was found to increase with an increase in Km . Modeling showed that a heterogeneity in KI results in an alteration in the Michaelis-Menten curve for a population of enzymes in the presence of a competitive inhibitor. PMID:27271375

  3. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  4. Modified gravity in three dimensional metric-affine scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Ghasemi-Nodehi, M.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2015-08-01

    We consider metric-affine scenarios where a modified gravitational action is sourced by electrovacuum fields in a three dimensional space-time. We first study the case of f (R ) theories, finding deviations near the center as compared to the solutions of general relativity. We then consider Born-Infeld gravity, which has raised a lot of interest in the last few years regarding its applications in astrophysics and cosmology, and show that new features always arise at a finite distance from the center. Several properties of the resulting space-times, in particular in presence of a cosmological constant term, are discussed.

  5. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  6. Collision induced dissociation of alpha hydroxy acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandu, Mary L.; Grubbs, Thomas; Kater, Marcus; Desaire, Heather

    2006-03-01

    Alpha hydroxy acids typically dissociate in tandem mass spectrometric experiments to produce product ions representing a neutral loss of 46 Da (CH2O2) in negative ion mode. Although it is widely accepted that the carboxylate group is lost in the dissociation process, the origin of the remaining two hydrogens is unclear. The current study utilizes an alpha hydroxy acid chemical library and deuterium labeling experiments to identify the origin of the two hydrogens lost during dissociation. Secondly, this study investigates the lower m/z region of the CID spectrum, a region previously unexplored, to aid in characterizing the dissociation mechanism. Further experiments testing the energy requirements and time parameters of the dissociation also are consistent with criteria previously defined for ion-neutral complex formation. In addition to describing the mechanism for the loss of CH2O2, we have conducted experiments that demonstrate the important chemical features of molecules that can prevent alpha hydroxy acids from undergoing the loss of 46 Da. By understanding the chemical composition of the 46 Da loss, the dissociation mechanism responsible for the loss, and the factors that hinder this mechanistic pathway, chemical information about alpha hydroxy acids can be obtained from their CID data.

  7. Unimolecular dissociation of cyclopentadiene and indene

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Bersohn, R. )

    1991-05-01

    The dissociation of hydrogen atoms from the methylene group of cyclopentadiene (CP) and indene (ID) excited with a 193 nm photon has been studied by hydrogen atom laser induced fluorescence. The rate of dissociation of IND was 7.4{times}10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1} but that of CP was too fast to measure. The ratio of H atoms to D atoms generated from 5-deuteriocyclopentadiene (5-dCP) was 3.91{plus minus}0.46. Rice--Ramsberger--Kassel--Marcus theory was used to calculate the rates of dissociation of CP and 5-dCP. The quantum yield for dissociating H atoms from CP was 0.85{plus minus}0.07. The ejected H atoms have a Maxwell velocity distribution with temperatures which are equal to the vibrational temperatures, 3690 and 2479 K for CP and IND, respectively. The most important result of the work is this confirmation of an earlier finding on a different set of molecules that the translational temperature of the fragments {ital after} the dissociation is equal to the vibrational temperature {ital before} the dissociation. This is explained by the assumption that the motion of the fast, light hydrogen atom is partly decoupled from that of the heavier, slower atoms.

  8. The β subunit of the high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel contributes to the high-affinity receptor for charybdotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Hanner, Markus; Schmalhofer, William A.; Munujos, Petraki; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Kaczorowski, Gregory J.; Garcia, Maria L.

    1997-01-01

    Transient expression of either α or α+β subunits of the high-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (maxi-K) channel has been achieved in COS-1 cells. Expression has been studied using charybdotoxin (ChTX), a peptidyl inhibitor that binds in the pore on the α subunit. Although some properties of monoiodotyrosine-ChTX (125I-ChTX) binding to membranes derived from each type of transfected cells appear to be identical, other parameters of the binding reaction are markedly different. Under low ionic strength conditions, the affinity constant for 125I-ChTX measured under equilibrium binding conditions is increased ca. 50-fold in the presence of the β subunit. The rate constant for 125I-ChTX association is enhanced ca. 5-fold, whereas the dissociation rate constant is decreased more than 7-fold when the β subunit is present. These data indicate that functional coassembly of maxi-K channel subunits can be obtained in a transient expression system, and that the β subunit has profound effects on 125I-ChTX binding. We postulate that certain negatively charged residues in the large extracellular loop of β attract the positively charged 125I-ChTX to its binding site on α through electrostatic interactions, and account for effects observed on ligand association kinetics. Moreover, another residue(s) in the loop of β must contribute to stabilization of the toxin-bound state, either by a direct interaction with toxin, or through an allosteric effect on the α subunit. Certain regions in the extracellular loop of the β subunit may be in close proximity to the pore of the channel, and could play an important role in maxi-K channel function. PMID:9096310

  9. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed

    Tully, R B

    1993-06-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  10. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  11. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  12. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  13. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed Central

    Tully, R B

    1993-01-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  14. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  15. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  16. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  17. Compact noncontraction semigroups of affine operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynov, A. S.; Protasov, V. Yu

    2015-07-01

    We analyze compact multiplicative semigroups of affine operators acting in a finite-dimensional space. The main result states that every such semigroup is either contracting, that is, contains elements of arbitrarily small operator norm, or all its operators share a common invariant affine subspace on which this semigroup is contracting. The proof uses functional difference equations with contraction of the argument. We look at applications to self-affine partitions of convex sets, the investigation of finite affine semigroups and the proof of a criterion of primitivity for nonnegative matrix families. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  18. Bacterial cadherin domains as carbohydrate binding modules: determination of affinity constants to insoluble complex polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Weiner, Ronald M; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin (CA) and cadherin-like (CADG) doublet domains from the complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans 2-40, demonstrated reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides, which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. Here we describe a procedure based on adsorption of CA and CADG doublet domains to different insoluble complex polysaccharides, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of cadherins between the bound and unbound fractions. Scatchard plots were employed to determine the kinetics of interactions of CA and CADG with several complex carbohydrates. On the basis of these binding studies, the CA and CADG doublet domains are proposed to form a new family of carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). PMID:22843394

  19. An improved potential energy surface and multi-temperature quasiclassical trajectory calculations of N2 + N2 dissociation reactions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jason D; Valentini, Paolo; Nompelis, Ioannis; Paukku, Yuliya; Varga, Zoltan; Truhlar, Donald G; Schwartzentruber, Thomas; Candler, Graham V

    2015-08-01

    Accurate modeling of high-temperature hypersonic flows in the atmosphere requires consideration of collision-induced dissociation of molecular species and energy transfer between the translational and internal modes of the gas molecules. Here, we describe a study of the N2 + N2⟶N2 + 2N and N2 + N2⟶4N nitrogen dissociation reactions using the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method. The simulations used a new potential energy surface for the N4 system; the surface is an improved version of one that was presented previously. In the QCT calculations, initial conditions were determined based on a two-temperature model that approximately separates the translational-rotational temperature from the vibrational temperature of the N2 diatoms. Five values from 8000 K to 30,000 K were considered for each of the two temperatures. Over 2.4 × 10(9) trajectories were calculated. We present results for ensemble-averaged dissociation rate constants as functions of the translational-rotational temperature T and the vibrational temperature T(v). The rate constant depends more strongly on T when T(v) is low, and it depends more strongly on T(v) when T is low. Quasibound reactant states contribute significantly to the rate constants, as do exchange processes at higher temperatures. We discuss two sets of runs in detail: an equilibrium test set in which T = T(v) and a nonequilibrium test set in which T(v) < T. In the equilibrium test set, high-v and moderately-low-j molecules contribute most significantly to the overall dissociation rate, and this state specificity becomes stronger as the temperature decreases. Dissociating trajectories tend to result in a major loss of vibrational energy and a minor loss of rotational energy. In the nonequilibrium test set, as T(v) decreases while T is fixed, higher-j molecules contribute more significantly to the dissociation rate, dissociating trajectories tend to result in a greater rotational energy loss, and the dissociation probability

  20. An improved potential energy surface and multi-temperature quasiclassical trajectory calculations of N2 + N2 dissociation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jason D.; Valentini, Paolo; Nompelis, Ioannis; Paukku, Yuliya; Varga, Zoltan; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwartzentruber, Thomas; Candler, Graham V.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate modeling of high-temperature hypersonic flows in the atmosphere requires consideration of collision-induced dissociation of molecular species and energy transfer between the translational and internal modes of the gas molecules. Here, we describe a study of the N2 + N2⟶N2 + 2N and N2 + N2⟶4N nitrogen dissociation reactions using the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method. The simulations used a new potential energy surface for the N4 system; the surface is an improved version of one that was presented previously. In the QCT calculations, initial conditions were determined based on a two-temperature model that approximately separates the translational-rotational temperature from the vibrational temperature of the N2 diatoms. Five values from 8000 K to 30 000 K were considered for each of the two temperatures. Over 2.4 × 109 trajectories were calculated. We present results for ensemble-averaged dissociation rate constants as functions of the translational-rotational temperature T and the vibrational temperature Tv. The rate constant depends more strongly on T when Tv is low, and it depends more strongly on Tv when T is low. Quasibound reactant states contribute significantly to the rate constants, as do exchange processes at higher temperatures. We discuss two sets of runs in detail: an equilibrium test set in which T = Tv and a nonequilibrium test set in which Tv < T. In the equilibrium test set, high-v and moderately-low-j molecules contribute most significantly to the overall dissociation rate, and this state specificity becomes stronger as the temperature decreases. Dissociating trajectories tend to result in a major loss of vibrational energy and a minor loss of rotational energy. In the nonequilibrium test set, as Tv decreases while T is fixed, higher-j molecules contribute more significantly to the dissociation rate, dissociating trajectories tend to result in a greater rotational energy loss, and the dissociation probability's dependence on v

  1. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Kneafsey, Timothy J; Rees, Emily V L

    2011-06-30

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and/or production of methane (CH(4)) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH(4) and CO(2) hydrate (CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrates. We prepared CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH(4)-CO(2) compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO(2) concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO(2) than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO(2) in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO(2) concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO(2). The dissociation enthalpy of the CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH(4) hydrate and CO(2) hydrate, increasing with the CO(2) fraction in the hydrate phase. PMID:21604671

  2. Differential Mobility Spectrometry: Preliminary Findings on Determination of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti; Boyd, John

    2007-01-01

    The electron capture detector (ECD) has been used for 40+ years (1) to derive fundamental constants such as a compound's electron affinity. Given this historical perspective, it is not surprising that differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) might be used in a like manner. This paper will present data from a gas chromatography (GC)-DMS instrument that illustrates the potential capability of this device to derive fundamental constants for electron-capturing compounds. Potential energy curves will be used to provide possible explanation of the data.

  3. Modeling electrostatic and heterogeneity effects on proton dissociation from humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tipping, E.; Reddy, M.M.; Hurley, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The apparent acid dissociation constant of humic substances increases by 2-4 pK units as ionization of the humic carboxylate groups proceeds. This change in apparent acid strength is due in part to the increase in electrical charge on the humic molecules as protons are shed. In addition, proton dissociation reactions are complicated because humic substances are heterogeneous with respect to proton dissociating groups and molecular size. In this paper, we use the Debye-Hu??ckel theory to describe the effects of electrostatic interactions on proton dissociation of humic substances. Simulations show that, for a size-heterogeneous system of molecules, the weight-average molecular weight is preferable to the number-average value for averaging the effects of electrostatic interactions. Analysis of published data on the proton dissociation of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River shows that the electrostatic interactions can be satisfactorily described by a hypothetical homogeneous compound having a molecular weight of 1000 (similar to the experimentally determined weight-average value). Titration data at three ionic strengths, for several fulvic acid concentrations, and in the pH range from 2.9 to 6.4 can be fitted with three adjustable parameters (pK??int values), given information on molecular size and carboxylate group content. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  4. Direct molecular simulation of nitrogen dissociation based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E. Bender, Jason D. Nompelis, Ioannis Candler, Graham V.

    2015-08-15

    The direct molecular simulation (DMS) approach is used to predict the internal energy relaxation and dissociation dynamics of high-temperature nitrogen. An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) is used to calculate the dynamics of two interacting nitrogen molecules by providing forces between the four atoms. In the near-equilibrium limit, it is shown that DMS reproduces the results obtained from well-established quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) analysis, verifying the validity of the approach. DMS is used to predict the vibrational relaxation time constant for N{sub 2}–N{sub 2} collisions and its temperature dependence, which are in close agreement with existing experiments and theory. Using both QCT and DMS with the same PES, we find that dissociation significantly depletes the upper vibrational energy levels. As a result, across a wide temperature range, the dissociation rate is found to be approximately 4–5 times lower compared to the rates computed using QCT with Boltzmann energy distributions. DMS calculations predict a quasi-steady-state distribution of rotational and vibrational energies in which the rate of depletion of high-energy states due to dissociation is balanced by their rate of repopulation due to collisional processes. The DMS approach simulates the evolution of internal energy distributions and their coupling to dissociation without the need to precompute rates or cross sections for all possible energy transitions. These benchmark results could be used to develop new computational fluid dynamics models for high-enthalpy flow applications.

  5. Development of new peptide-based receptor of fluorescent probe with femtomolar affinity for Cu(+) and detection of Cu(+) in Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwan Ho; Oh, Eun-Taex; Park, Heon Joo; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-11-15

    Developing fluorescent probes for monitoring intracellular Cu(+) is important for human health and disease, whereas a few types of their receptors showing a limited range of binding affinities for Cu(+) have been reported. In the present study, we first report a novel peptide receptor of a fluorescent probe for the detection of Cu(+). Dansyl-labeled tripeptide probe (Dns-LLC) formed a 1:1 complex with Cu(+) and showed a turn-on fluorescent response to Cu(+) in aqueous buffered solutions. The dissociation constant of Dns-LLC for Cu(+) was determined to be 12 fM, showing that Dns-LLC had more potent binding affinity for Cu(+) than those of previously reported chemical probes for Cu(+). The binding mode study showed that the thiol group of the peptide receptor plays a critical role in potent binding with Cu(+) and the sulfonamide and amide groups of the probe might cooperate to form a complex with Cu(+). Dns-LLC detected Cu(+) selectively by a turn-on response among various biologically relevant metal ions, including Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The selectivity of the peptide-based probe for Cu(+) was strongly dependent on the position of the cysteine residue in the peptide receptor part. The fluorescent peptide-based probe penetrated the living RKO cells and successfully detected Cu(+) in the Golgi apparatus in live cells by a turn-on response. Given the growing interest in imaging Cu(+) in live cells, a novel peptide receptor of Cu(+) will offer the potential for developing a variety of fluorescent probes for Cu(+) in the field of copper biochemistry. PMID:27208475

  6. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  7. Thr-E11 regulates O2 affinity in Cerebratulus lacteus mini-hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Geuens, Eva; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Bolognesi, Martino; Riggs, Austen F; Hale, Angela; Deng, Pengchi; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Olson, John S; Nienhaus, Karin

    2004-08-01

    The mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb) belongs to a class of globins containing the polar Tyr-B10/Gln-E7 amino acid pair that normally causes low rates of O2 dissociation and ultra-high O2 affinity, which suggest O2 sensing or NO scavenging functions. CerHb, however, has high rates of O2 dissociation (kO2 = 200-600 s(-1)) and moderate O2 affinity (KO2) approximately 1 microm(-1)) as a result of a third polar amino acid in its active site, Thr-E11. When Thr-E11 is replaced by Val, kO2 decreases 1000-fold and KO2 increases 130-fold at pH 7.0, 20 degrees C. The mutation also shifts the stretching frequencies of both heme-bound and photodissociated CO, indicating marked changes of the electrostatic field at the active site. The crystal structure of Thr-E11 --> Val CerHbO2 at 1.70 A resolution is almost identical to that of the wild-type protein (root mean square deviation of 0.12 A). The dramatic functional and spectral effects of the Thr-E11 --> Val mutation are due exclusively to changes in the hydrogen bonding network in the active site. Replacing Thr-E11 with Val "frees" the Tyr-B10 hydroxyl group to rotate toward and donate a strong hydrogen bond to the heme-bound ligand, causing a selective increase in O2 affinity, a decrease of the rate coefficient for O2 dissociation, a 40 cm(-1) decrease in nuCO of heme-bound CO, and an increase in ligand migration toward more remote intermediate sites. PMID:15161908

  8. Affitins for protein purification by affinity magnetic fishing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Dos Santos, Raquel; Ottengy, Stella; Viecinski, Aline Canani; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-07-29

    Currently most economical and technological bottlenecks in protein production are placed in the downstream processes. With the aim of increasing the efficiency and reducing the associated costs, various affinity ligands have been developed. Affitins are small, yet robust and easy to produce, proteins derived from the archaeal extremophilic "7kDa DNA-binding" protein family. By means of combinatorial protein engineering and ribosome display selection techniques, Affitins have shown to bind a diversity of targets. In this work, two previously developed Affitins (anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG) were immobilized onto magnetic particles to assess their potential for protein purification by magnetic fishing. The optimal lysozyme and human IgG binding conditions yielded 58mg lysozyme/g support and 165mgIgG/g support, respectively. The recovery of proteins was possible in high yield (≥95%) and with high purity, namely ≥95% and 81%, when recovering lysozyme from Escherichia coli supernatant and IgG from human plasma, respectively. Static binding studies indicated affinity constants of 5.0×10(4)M(-1) and 9.3×10(5)M(-1) for the anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG magnetic supports. This work demonstrated that Affitins, which can be virtually evolved for any protein of interest, can be coupled onto magnetic particles creating novel affinity adsorbents for purification by magnetic fishing. PMID:27342136

  9. Dissociations between developmental dyslexias and attention deficits

    PubMed Central

    Lukov, Limor; Friedmann, Naama; Shalev, Lilach; Khentov-Kraus, Lilach; Shalev, Nir; Lorber, Rakefet; Guggenheim, Revital

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether attention deficits underlie developmental dyslexia, or certain types of dyslexia, by presenting double dissociations between the two. We took into account the existence of distinct types of dyslexia and of attention deficits, and focused on dyslexias that may be thought to have an attentional basis: letter position dyslexia (LPD), in which letters migrate within words, attentional dyslexia (AD), in which letters migrate between words, neglect dyslexia, in which letters on one side of the word are omitted or substituted, and surface dyslexia, in which words are read via the sublexical route. We tested 110 children and adults with developmental dyslexia and/or attention deficits, using extensive batteries of reading and attention. For each participant, the existence of dyslexia and the dyslexia type were tested using reading tests that included stimuli sensitive to the various dyslexia types. Attention deficit and its type was established through attention tasks assessing sustained, selective, orienting, and executive attention functioning. Using this procedure, we identified 55 participants who showed a double dissociation between reading and attention: 28 had dyslexia with normal attention and 27 had attention deficits with normal reading. Importantly, each dyslexia with suspected attentional basis dissociated from attention: we found 21 individuals with LPD, 13 AD, 2 neglect dyslexia, and 12 surface dyslexia without attention deficits. Other dyslexia types (vowel dyslexia, phonological dyslexia, visual dyslexia) also dissociated from attention deficits. Examination of 55 additional individuals with both a specific dyslexia and a certain attention deficit found no attention function that was consistently linked with any dyslexia type. Specifically, LPD and AD dissociated from selective attention, neglect dyslexia dissociated from orienting, and surface dyslexia dissociated from sustained and executive attention. These results indicate that

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of the dissociated screw dislocation in silicon.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, R; Gattinoni, C; Makov, G; De Vita, A

    2010-02-24

    Characterizing the motion of dislocations through covalent, high Peierls barrier materials is a key problem in materials science, while despite the progress in experimental studies the actual observation of the atomistic behaviour involved in core migration remains limited. We have applied a hybrid embedding scheme to investigate the dissociated screw dislocation in silicon, consisting of two 30° partials separated by a stacking fault ribbon, under the influence of a constant external strain. Our 'learn on the fly' hybrid technique allows us to calculate the forces on atoms in the vicinity of the core region using the tight binding Kwon potential, whilst the remainder of the bulk matrix is treated within a classical approximation. Applying a 5% strain to the dissociated screw dislocation, for a simulation time of 100 ps at a temperature of 600 K, we observe movement of the partials through two different mechanisms: double kink formation and square ring diffusion at the core. Our results suggest that in these conditions, the role of solitons or anti-phase defects in seeding kink formation and subsequent migration is an important one, which should be taken into account in future studies. PMID:21386388

  11. Experimental and theoretical proton affinities of methionine, methionine sulfoxide and their N- and C-terminal derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioe, Hadi; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; Gronert, Scott; Austin, Allen; Reid, Gavin E.

    2007-11-01

    The proton affinities of methionine, methionine sulfoxide and their derivatives (methionine methyl ester, methionine sulfoxide methyl ester, methionine methyl amide, methionine sulfoxide methyl amide, N-acetyl methionine, N-acetyl methionine sulfoxide, N-acetyl methionine methyl ester, N-acetyl methionine sulfoxide methyl ester, N-acetyl methionine methyl amide and N-acetyl methionine sulfoxide methyl amide) were experimentally determined using the kinetic method, in which proton bound dimers formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) were subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID) in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In addition, theoretical calculations carried out at the MP2/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) level of theory to determine the global minima of the neutral and protonated species of all derivatives studied, were used to predict theoretical proton affinities. The density function theory calculations not only support the experimental proton affinities, but also provide structural insights into the types of hydrogen bonding that stabilize the neutral and protonated methionine or methionine sulfoxide derivatives. Comparison of the proton affinities of the various methionine and methionine sulfoxide derivatives reveals that: (i) oxidation of methionine derivatives to methionine sulfoxide derivatives results in an increase in proton affinity due to higher intrinsic proton affinity and an increase in the ring size formed through charge complexation of the sulfoxide group, which allows more efficient hydrogen bonding compared to the sulfide group; (ii) C-terminal modification by methyl esterification or methyl amidation increases the proton affinity in the order of methyl amide > methyl ester > carboxylic acid due to improved charge stabilization; (iii) N-terminal modification by N-acetylation decreases proton affinity of the derivatives due to lower intrinsic proton affinity of the N-acetyl group as well as due to stabilization of the attached

  12. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set. PMID:20866473

  13. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  14. Affine root systems and dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyakov, I. V.; Gromov, N. A.; Kuratov, V. V.

    The root systems in Carroll spaces with degenerate metric are defined. It is shown that their Cartan matrices and reflection groups are affine. Due to the geometric consideration the root system structure of affine algebras is determined by a sufficiently simple algorithm.

  15. Loop realizations of quantum affine algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Cautis, Sabin; Licata, Anthony

    2012-12-15

    We give a simplified description of quantum affine algebras in their loop presentation. This description is related to Drinfeld's new realization via halves of vertex operators. We also define an idempotent version of the quantum affine algebra which is suitable for categorification.

  16. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  17. Rovibrational energy transfer and dissociation in O2-O collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-03-01

    A set of state-specific transition rates for each rovibrational level is generated for the O 2 ( X 3 Σg - ) - O (" separators=" 3 P ) system using the quasi-classical trajectory method at temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. A system of master equations describes the relaxation of the rovibrational ensemble to thermal equilibrium under ideal heat bath conditions at a constant translational temperature. Vibrational and rotational relaxation times, obtained from the average internal energies, exhibit a pattern inherent in a chemically reactive collisional pair. An intrinsic feature of the O3 molecular system with a large attractive potential is a weak temperature dependence of the rovibrational transition rates. For this reason, the quasi-steady vibrational and rotational temperatures experience a maximum at increasing translational temperature. The energy rate coefficients, that characterize the average loss of internal energy due to dissociation, quickly diminish at high temperatures, compared to other molecular systems.

  18. Dissociation energies of some high temperature molecules containing aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The Knudsen cell mass spectrometric method has been used to investigate the gaseous molecules Al2, AlSi,AlSiO, AlC2, Al2C2, and AlAuC2. Special attention was given to the experimental considerations and techniques needed to identify and to measure ion intensities for very low abundance molecular species. Second- and third-law procedures were used to obtain reaction enthalpies for pressure calibration independent and isomolecular exchange reactions. Dissociation energies for the molecules were derived from the measured ion intensities, free-energy functions obtained from estimated molecular constants, and auxiliary thermodynamic data. The bonding and stability of these aluminum containing molecules are compared with other similar species.

  19. Rovibrational energy transfer and dissociation in O2-O collisions.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2016-03-14

    A set of state-specific transition rates for each rovibrational level is generated for the O2(X(3)Σ(g)(-))-O(3)P system using the quasi-classical trajectory method at temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. A system of master equations describes the relaxation of the rovibrational ensemble to thermal equilibrium under ideal heat bath conditions at a constant translational temperature. Vibrational and rotational relaxation times, obtained from the average internal energies, exhibit a pattern inherent in a chemically reactive collisional pair. An intrinsic feature of the O3 molecular system with a large attractive potential is a weak temperature dependence of the rovibrational transition rates. For this reason, the quasi-steady vibrational and rotational temperatures experience a maximum at increasing translational temperature. The energy rate coefficients, that characterize the average loss of internal energy due to dissociation, quickly diminish at high temperatures, compared to other molecular systems. PMID:26979687

  20. Dissociative electron attachment to C{sub 2}F{sub 5} radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Haughey, Sean A.; Field, Thomas A.; Langer, Judith; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, A. A.

    2012-08-07

    Dissociative electron attachment to the reactive C{sub 2}F{sub 5} molecular radical has been investigated with two complimentary experimental methods; a single collision beam experiment and a new flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique. The beam results show that F{sup -} is formed close to zero electron energy in dissociative electron attachment to C{sub 2}F{sub 5}. The afterglow measurements also show that F{sup -} is formed in collisions between electrons and C{sub 2}F{sub 5} molecules with rate constants of 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} to 4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at temperatures of 300-600 K. The rate constant increases slowly with increasing temperature, but the rise observed is smaller than the experimental uncertainty of 35%.

  1. Refractive index change in dissociating shocked benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    A calculation is made of the refractive index of a shocked solution of hydrocarbon species and spheroidal carbon particles that would be the dissociation products of benzene. The results is evaluated for benzene shocked to 15 GPa, both for an arbitrary endpoint distribution of products and reactant, and for a specific endpoint distribution suggested by a statistical-mechanical calculation. In the case of diamond particles, the refractive index is predicted to decrease by a small amount (from 1.96 to 1.75) as the dissociation proceeds. In the case of graphite particles of large oblateness, the refractive index could increase significantly through the dissociation (from 1.96 to 2.75 for infinitely oblate platelets). Thus the measurement of the time dependent refractive index through the dissociation of shocked benzene can indicate the morphology of the carbon particulates as well as the time scale for this reaction. We propose using the refractive index as a measure of completion of the dissociation reaction. This would allow a determination of the instantaneous amount of carbon in particulate form, information which is valuable in conjunction with Mie scattering experiments for example.

  2. Intrinsic disorder accelerates dissociation rather than association.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Koji; Ohnuki, Jun; Higo, Junichi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) has distinct properties both physically and biologically: it often becomes folded when binding to the target and is frequently involved in signal transduction. The physical property seems to be compatible with the biological property where fast association and dissociation between IDP and the target are required. While fast association has been well studied, fueled by the fly-casting mechanism, the dissociation kinetics has received less attention. We here study how the intrinsic disorder affects the dissociation kinetics, as well as the association kinetics, paying attention to the interaction strength at the binding site (i.e., the quality of the "fly lure"). Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of the pKID-KIX system, a well-studied IDP system, shows that the association rate becomes larger as the disorder-inducing flexibility that was imparted to the model is increased, but the acceleration is marginal and turns into deceleration as the quality of the fly lure is worsened. In contrast, the dissociation rate is greatly enhanced as the disorder is increased, indicating that intrinsic disorder serves for rapid signal switching more effectively through dissociation than association. Proteins 2016; 84:1124-1133. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27122223

  3. Ion-induced dissociation dynamics of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A.; Safvan, C. P.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the results of dissociation dynamics of multiple charged acetylene molecules formed in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar{sup 8+} projectiles. Using the coincidence map, we can separate out the different dissociation pathways between carbon and hydrogen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body breakup events. From the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles, we observe a diatom like behavior of the C-C charged complex during dissociation of multiply charged C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We conclude that this behavior in breakup dynamics is a signature of sequentiality in dissociation of this multiply charged molecular species. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process of two- or many-body dissociation pathways. Kinetic energy release of different breakup channels are reported here and compared with values calculated from the pure Coulomb explosion model.

  4. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G. [Pleasanton, CA

    1978-08-29

    A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

  5. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, C.G.

    1978-08-29

    Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

  6. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  7. Endolysins of Bacillus anthracis Bacteriophages Recognize Unique Carbohydrate Epitopes of Vegetative Cell Wall Polysaccharides with High Affinity and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Kai-For; Li, Xiuru; Li, Huiqing; Low, Lieh Yoon; Quinn, Conrad P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages express endolysins which are the enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan resulting in cell lysis and release of bacteriophages. Endolysins have acquired stringent substrate specificities, which have been attributed to cell wall binding domains (CBD). Although it has been realized that CBDs of bacteriophages that infect Gram-positive bacteria target cell wall carbohydrate structures, molecular mechanisms that confer selectivity are not understood. A range of oligosaccharides, derived from the secondary cell wall polysaccharides of Bacillus anthracis, has been chemically synthesized. The compounds contain an α-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β-D-ManNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcNAc backbone that is modified by various patterns of α-D-Gal and β-D-Gal branching points. The library of compounds could readily be prepared by employing a core trisaccharide modified by the orthogonal protecting groups Nα-9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonate (Fmoc), 2-methylnaphthyl ether (Nap) and levulinoyl ester (Lev) and dimethylthexylsilyl ether (TDS) at key branching points. Dissociation constants for the binding the cell wall binding domains of the endolysins PlyL and PlyG were determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). It was found that the pattern of galactosylation greatly influenced binding affinities, and in particular a compound having a galactosyl moiety at C-4 of the non-reducing GlcNAc moiety bound in the low micromolar range. It is known that secondary cell wall polysaccharides of various bacilli may have both common and variable structural features and in particular differences in the pattern of galactosylation have been noted. Therefore, it is proposed that specificity of endolysins for specific bacilli is achieved by selective binding to a uniquely galactosylated core structure. PMID:22935003

  8. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity

    PubMed Central

    Murashko, Oleg N.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane–protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E–membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1–499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (Kd) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the “large” domain (amino acids 1–400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5′-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E–membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  9. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  10. Shock wave study of the thermal dissociations of C3F6 and c-C3F6. I. dissociation of hexafluoropropene.

    PubMed

    Cobos, C J; Sölter, L; Tellbach, E; Troe, J

    2014-07-10

    The thermal dissociation of C3F6 was studied between 1330 and 2210 K in shock waves monitoring the UV absorption of CF2. CF2 yields of about 2.6 per parent C3F6 were obtained at reactant concentrations of 500-1000 ppm in the bath gas Ar. These yields dropped to about 1.8 when reactant concentrations were lowered to 60 ppm. The increase of the CF2 yield with increasing concentration was attributed to bimolecular reactions between primary and secondary dissociation products. Quantum-chemical and kinetic modeling calculations helped to estimate the contributions from the various primary dissociation steps. It was shown that the measurements correspond to unimolecular reactions in their falloff range. Falloff representations of the rate constants are given, leading to an overall high pressure rate constant k∞ = 2.0 × 10(17)(-104 kcal mol(-1)/RT) s(-1) and a relative rate of about 2/3:1/3 for the reactions C3F6 → CF3CF + CF2 versus C3F6 → C2F3 + CF3. PMID:24905383

  11. Development of a high-affinity GABA uptake system in embryonic amphibian spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lamborghini, J E; Iles, A

    1985-11-01

    High-affinity uptake systems for amino acid neurotransmitter precursors have been highly correlated with the use of the particular amino acid or its derivative as a transmitter. We have found interneurons in the Xenopus embryo spinal cord which accumulate GABA by a high-affinity uptake system. They originate near the end of gastrulation and their ability to accumulate GABA first appears at the early tail bud stage. By position and appearance they are comparable to some of the embryonic interneurons described by A. Roberts and J. D. W. Clarke (1982, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. B 296, 195-212). GABA-accumulating neurons also develop in dissociated cell cultures made from the presumptive spinal cord of neural plate stage Xenopus embryos. GABA accumulation in cultured neurons, as in cells in vivo, occurs via a high-affinity uptake system; GABA-accumulating cells have the same time of origin as the cells in vivo, and the ability to accumulate GABA in the population of cultured neurons appears at a time equivalent to that observed in intact sibling embryos. Thus it seems likely that the population of GABA-accumulating neurons developing in cell culture corresponds to the GABA-accumulating interneurons in vivo. The development of these neurons in dissociated cell cultures permits perturbation experiments that would be difficult to perform in vivo. We have examined the development of high-affinity GABA uptake in conditions that permit no electrical impulse activity in the cultures. The onset and extent of development of GABA accumulation in the neuronal population are normal under these conditions. PMID:3932109

  12. (D-Pen2,4 prime -125I-Phe4,D-Pen5)enkephalin: A selective high affinity radioligand for delta opioid receptors with exceptional specific activity

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.J.; Sharma, S.D.; Toth, G.; Duong, M.T.; Fang, L.; Bogert, C.L.; Weber, S.J.; Hunt, M.; Davis, T.P.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1991-09-01

    (D-Pen2,4{prime}-125I-Phe4,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((125I)DPDPE) is a highly selective radioligand for the delta opioid receptor with a specific activity (2200 Ci/mmol) that is over 50-fold greater than that of tritium-labeled DPDPE analogs. (125I)DPDPE binds to a single site in rat brain membranes with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) value of 421 {plus minus} 67 pM and a receptor density (Bmax) value of 36.4 {plus minus} 2.7 fmol/mg protein. The high affinity of this site for delta opioid receptor ligands and its low affinity for mu or kappa receptor-selective ligands are consistent with its being a delta opioid receptor. The distribution of these sites in rat brain, observed by receptor autoradiography, is also consistent with that of delta opioid receptors. Association and dissociation binding kinetics of 1.0 nM (125I) DPDPE are monophasic at 25 degrees C. The association rate (k + 1 = 5.80 {plus minus} 0.88 {times} 10(7) M-1 min-1) is about 20- and 7-fold greater than that measured for 1.0 nM (3H) DPDPE and 0.8 nM (3H) (D-Pen2,4{prime}-Cl-Phe4, D-Pen5)enkephalin, respectively. The dissociation rate of (125I)DPDPE (0.917 {plus minus} 0.117 {times} 10(-2) min-1) measured at 1.0 nM is about 3-fold faster than is observed for either of the other DPDPE analogs. The rapid binding kinetics of (125I)DPDPE is advantageous because binding equilibrium is achieved with much shorter incubation times than are required for other cyclic enkephalin analogs. This, in addition to its much higher specific activity, makes (125I)DPDPE a valuable new radioligand for studies of delta opioid receptors.

  13. Dissociation in virtual reality: depersonalization and derealization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at virtual worlds such as Second Life7 (SL) as possible incubators of dissociation disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition3 (also known as the DSM-IV). Depersonalization is where "a person feels that he or she has changed in some way or is somehow unreal." Derealization when "the same beliefs are held about one's surroundings." Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder fits users of Second Life who adopt "in-world" avatars and in effect, enact multiple distinct identities or personalities (known as alter egos or alters). Select questions from the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization (SCI-DER)8 will be discussed as they might apply to the user's experience in Second Life. Finally I would like to consider the hypothesis that rather than a pathological disorder, dissociation is a normal response to the "artificial reality" of Second Life.

  14. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  15. Density Functional Study of Structures and Electron Affinities of BrO4F/BrO4F−

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liangfa; Xiong, Jieming; Wu, Xinmin; Qi, Chuansong; Li, Wei; Guo, Wenli

    2009-01-01

    The structures, electron affinities and bond dissociation energies of BrO4F/BrO4F− species have been investigated with five density functional theory (DFT) methods with DZP++ basis sets. The planar F-Br…O2…O2 complexes possess 3A′ electronic state for neutral molecule and 4A′ state for the corresponding anion. Three types of the neutral-anion energy separations are the adiabatic electron affinity (EAad), the vertical electron affinity (EAvert), and the vertical detachment energy (VDE). The EAad value predicted by B3LYP method is 4.52 eV. The bond dissociation energies De (BrO4F → BrO4-mF + Om) (m = 1–4) and De− (BrO4F− → BrO4-mF− + Om and BrO4F− → BrO4-mF + Om−) are predicted. The adiabatic electron affinities (EAad) were predicted to be 4.52 eV for F-Br…O2…O2 (3A′←4A′) (B3LYP method). PMID:19742128

  16. Constant Domain-regulated Antibody Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies. PMID:22948159

  17. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for patients with dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Julie P; Dillon, Kristy S; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2013-02-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called "dissociative disorders," including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma report "dissociative" symptoms. Prevalence of dissociative disorders is unknown, but current estimates are higher than previously thought. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, and epidemiological data regarding diagnosis in general, and illustrates possible treatment interventions for dissociative identity disorder, with a focus on psychotherapy interventions and a review of current psychopharmacology recommendations as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. PMID:23556139

  18. Kinetics of Propargyl Radical Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Klippenstein, Stephen J; Miller, James A; Jasper, Ahren W

    2015-07-16

    Due to the prominent role of the propargyl radical for hydrocarbon growth within combustion environments, it is important to understand the kinetics of its formation and loss. The ab initio transition state theory-based master equation method is used to obtain theoretical kinetic predictions for the temperature and pressure dependence of the thermal decomposition of propargyl, which may be its primary loss channel under some conditions. The potential energy surface for the decomposition of propargyl is first mapped at a high level of theory with a combination of coupled cluster and multireference perturbation calculations. Variational transition state theory is then used to predict the microcanonical rate coefficients, which are subsequently implemented within the multiple-well multiple-channel master equation. A variety of energy transfer parameters are considered, and the sensitivity of the thermal rate predictions to these parameters is explored. The predictions for the thermal decomposition rate coefficient are found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental data. Modified Arrhenius representations of the rate constants are reported for utility in combustion modeling. PMID:25871530

  19. Ligand-Protein Affinity Studies Using Long-Lived States of Fluorine-19 Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-03-10

    The lifetimes TLLS of long-lived states or TLLC of long-lived coherences can be used for the accurate determination of dissociation constants of weak protein-ligand complexes. The remarkable contrast between signals derived from LLS or LLC in free and bound ligands can be exploited to search for weak binders with large dissociation constants KD > 1 mM that are important for fragment-based drug discovery but may escape detection by other screening techniques. Alternatively, the high sensitivity of the proposed method can be exploited to work with large ligand-to-protein ratios, with an evident advantage of reduced consumption of precious proteins. The detection of (19)F-(19)F long-lived states in suitably designed fluorinated spy molecules allows one to perform competition binding experiments with high sensitivity while avoiding signal overlap that tends to hamper the interpretation of proton spectra of mixtures. PMID:26800391

  20. Use of quantitative affinity chromatography for characterizing high-affinity interactions: binding of heparin to antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Jackson, C M; Winzor, D J

    1991-02-01

    The versatility of quantitative affinity chromatography (QAC) for evaluating the binding of macromolecular ligands to macromolecular acceptors has been increased substantially as a result of the derivation of the equations which describe the partitioning of acceptor between matrix-bound and soluble forms in terms of total, rather than free, ligand concentrations. In addition to simplifying the performance of the binding experiments, this development makes possible the application of the technique to systems characterized by affinities higher than those previously amenable to investigation by QAC. Addition of an on-line data acquisition system to monitor the concentration of partitioning solute in the liquid phase as a function of time has permitted the adoption of an empirical approach for determining the liquid-phase concentration of acceptor in the system at partition equilibrium, a development which decreases significantly the time required to obtain a complete binding curve by QAC. The application of these new QAC developments is illustrated by the determination of binding constants for the interactions of high-affinity heparin (Mr 20,300) with antithrombin III at three temperatures. Association constants of 8.0 +/- 2.2 x 10(7), 3.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(7), and 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M-1 were observed at 15, 25, and 35 degrees C, respectively. The standard enthalpy change of -4.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol that is calculated from these data is in good agreement with a reported value obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements. PMID:2035830

  1. Dissociation of ultracold molecules with Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Duerr, Stephan; Volz, Thomas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2004-09-01

    Ultracold molecules are associated from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate by ramping a magnetic field across a Feshbach resonance. The reverse ramp dissociates the molecules. The kinetic energy released in the dissociation process is used to measure the widths of four Feshbach resonances in {sup 87}Rb. This method to determine the width works remarkably well for narrow resonances even in the presence of significant magnetic-field noise. In addition, a quasimonoenergetic atomic wave is created by jumping the magnetic field across the Feshbach resonance.

  2. Dissociation and recombination in an inhomogeneous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuščer, Ivan

    1991-09-01

    The system of Boltzmann equations of Ludwig and Heil for a dissociating gas mixture is reviewed and reformulated in terms of differential cross sections. For the purpose of Monte Carlo simulations, collision models of the type of Borgnakke and Larsen are proposed. In case of short-lived transient flows of molecular gases and at not too high temperatures, simulation of scattering collisions is expected to suffice; the distribution function of the dissociated particles can be evaluated afterwards by integration, and recombination can be ignored.

  3. Quantum Zeno control of coherent dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Khripkov, C.; Vardi, A.

    2011-08-15

    We study the effect of dephasing on the coherent dissociation dynamics of an atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. We show that when phase-noise intensity is strong with respect to the inverse correlation time of the stimulated process, dissociation is suppressed via a Bose enhanced quantum Zeno effect. This is complementary to the quantum Zeno control of phase-diffusion in a bimodal condensate by symmetric noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 220403 (2008)] in that the controlled process here is phase formation and the required decoherence mechanism for its suppression is purely phase noise.

  4. Enhancement of Immune Effector Functions by Modulating IgG’s Intrinsic Affinity for Target Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Yang, Chunning; Borrok, M. Jack; Ayriss, Joanne; Aherne, Karen; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immune effector functions play an essential role in the anti-tumor efficacy of many therapeutic mAbs. While much of the effort to improve effector potency has focused on augmenting the interaction between the antibody-Fc and activating Fc-receptors expressed on immune cells, the role of antibody binding interactions with the target antigen remains poorly understood. We show that antibody intrinsic affinity to the target antigen clearly influences the extent and efficiency of Fc-mediated effector mechanisms, and report the pivotal role of antibody binding valence on the ability to regulate effector functions. More particularly, we used an array of affinity modulated variants of three different mAbs, anti-CD4, anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 against a panel of target cell lines expressing disparate levels of the target antigen. We found that at saturating antibody concentrations, IgG variants with moderate intrinsic affinities, similar to those generated by the natural humoral immune response, promoted superior effector functions compared to higher affinity antibodies. We hypothesize that at saturating concentrations, effector function correlates most directly with the amount of Fc bound to the cell surface. Thus, high affinity antibodies exhibiting slow off-rates are more likely to interact bivalently with the target cell, occupying two antigen sites with a single Fc. In contrast, antibodies with faster off-rates are likely to dissociate each binding arm more rapidly, resulting in a higher likelihood of monovalent binding. Monovalent binding may in turn increase target cell opsonization and lead to improved recruitment of effector cells. This unpredicted relationship between target affinity and effector function potency suggests a careful examination of antibody design and engineering for the development of next-generation immunotherapeutics. PMID:27322177

  5. A Newly-Identified Polymorphism in Rhesus Macaque Complement Factor H Modulates Binding Affinity for Meningococcal FHbp

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Beernink, Peter T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Two meningococcal serogroup B vaccines contain Factor H binding protein (FHbp). Binding of Factor H (FH) to FHbp was thought to be specific for human or chimpanzee FH. However, in a previous study an amino acid polymorphism in rhesus macaque FH domain 6, tyrosine at position 352 (Y352) was associated with high binding to FHbp, whereas histidine at position 352 (H352) was associated with low binding. Methods and Results Here we report that a second FH polymorphism at position 360 also affects macaque FH binding. Of 43 macaques, 11 had high FH binding and 32 had low binding. As in our previous study, all 11 animals with high binding had Y352, and 24 with low binding had H352. However the remaining eight with low FH binding had Y352, which was predicted to yield high binding. All eight had S360 instead of P360. Thus, three allelic variants at positions 352 and 360 affect macaque FH binding to FHbp: HP (low), YS (low), and YP (high). We measured binding affinity of each FH sequence type to FHbp by surface plasmon resonance. Two animals with high binding types (YS/YP and HP/YP) had dissociation constants (KD) of 10.4 and 18.2 nM, respectively, which were similar to human FH (19.8 nM). Two macaques with low binding (HP/HP and HP/YS) had KD values approximately five-fold higher (100.3 and 99.5 nM, respectively). A third macaque with low binding (YS/YS) had a KD value too high to be measured. Conclusions Macaques have at least three allelic variants encoding FH with different affinities for FHbp (five genotypic combinations of these variants). Since in previous studies binding of FH to FHbp vaccines decreased protective antibody responses, our data will aid in selection of macaques with FH binding that is similar to humans for further investigation of FHbp vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:26285122

  6. High-affinity recognition of lanthanide(III) chelate complexes by a reprogrammed human lipocalin 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Eichinger, Andreas; Skerra, Arne

    2009-03-18

    Human lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), also known as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), which naturally scavenges bacterial ferric siderophores, has been engineered to specifically bind rare-earth and related metal ions as chelate complexes with [(R)-2-amino-3-(4-aminophenyl)propyl]-trans-(S,S)-cyclohexane-1,2-diaminepentaacetic acid (p-NH(2)-Bn-CHX-A''-DTPA). To this end, 12 amino acid residues in the ligand pocket of Lcn2, which is formed by four loops at the open end of an eight-stranded beta-barrel, were subjected to targeted random mutagenesis, and from the resulting library, variants with binding activity for the Me x DTPA group were selected using the method of bacterial phage display. One promising candidate was further developed in several cycles of in vitro affinity maturation using partial random mutagenesis and selection (via phage display and/or Escherichia coli colony screening) under conditions of increasing stringency. As result, an Lcn2 variant was obtained that binds Y x DTPA with a dissociation constant as low as 400 pM. The Lcn2 variant specifically recognizes the artificial ligand, as exemplified in (competitive) ELISA and real-time surface plasmon resonance analyses. DTPA-complexed Y(3+), Tb(3+), Gd(3+), and Lu(3+) are most tightly bound, comprising metal ions whose isotopes are in common use for radiotherapy and imaging. All of the Lcn2 variants are stably folded and can be functionally produced in high yield in E. coli. X-ray crystallographic analyses show that the new ligand is well-accommodated in the central cavity of the engineered lipocalin, whose fold is largely preserved, but that the mode of binding differs from the one seen with the natural ligand Fe x enterobactin. This structural study reveals analogies but also differences with respect to previously described antibody-metal chelate complexes. Notably, the functionalized side chain of DTPA protrudes from the ligand pocket of the lipocalin in such a way that its conjugates (with

  7. INAKT--an interactive non-linear regression program for enzyme inactivation and affinity labelling studies.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, A; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1984-01-01

    An interactive program for analysing enzyme activity-time data using non-linear regression analysis is described. Protection studies can also be dealt with. The program computes inactivation rates, dissociation constants and promotion or inhibition parameters with their standard errors. It can also be used to distinguish different inactivation models. The program is written in SIMULA and is menu-oriented for refining or correcting data at the different levels of computing. PMID:6546558

  8. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  9. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  10. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  11. Affinity purification of heme-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2014-01-01

    Protein affinity purification techniques are widely used for isolating pure target proteins for biochemical and structural characterization. Herein, we describe the protocol for affinity-based purification of proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a peptide tag covalently modified with heme c, known as a heme-tag, to an L-histidine immobilized Sepharose resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. In addition, we describe methods for specifically detecting heme-tagged proteins in SDS-PAGE gels using a heme-staining procedure and for quantifying the proteins using a pyridine hemochrome assay. PMID:24943311

  12. Carbon monoxide dissociative attachment and resonant dissociation by electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy dissociative electron attachment and resonant electron impact dissociation of CO molecule are considered. Ro-vibrationally resolved cross sections and rate coefficients for both the processes are calculated using an ab-initio model based on the low-lying \\text{X}{{}2}\\Pi resonance of CO-. Final results show that the cross sections increases very rapidly as a function of the ro-vibrational level; these cross sections should be useful for understanding kinetic dissociation of CO in strongly non-equilibrium plasmas.

  13. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data. PMID:27222917

  14. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  15. Double Dissociation between Reading and Spelling Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moll, Kristina; Landerl, Karin

    2009-01-01

    In two studies dissociations between reading and spelling skills were examined. Study 1 reports equally high prevalence rates for isolated deficits in reading (7%) or spelling (6%) in a representative sample (N = 2,029) of German-speaking elementary school children. In Study 2, children with isolated deficits were presented with the same words to…

  16. EVIDENCE FOR CO DISSOCIATION ON RHODIUM SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, D.G.; Dubois, L.H.; Sexton, B.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-06-01

    Carbon monoxide adsorbs molecularly on rhodium surfaces at 300K, but if the rhodium samples are heated in the presence of carbon monoxide, there is evidence for carbon-oxygen bond breaking at step and/or defect sites. The effects of step and defect site density, subsurface oxygen concentration, and oxygen dissolution into the rhodium lattice on CO dissociation are discussed.

  17. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  18. Minimal information to determine affine shape equivalence.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, J; Van Gool, L; Lamote, C; Foster, D H

    2000-04-01

    Participants judged the affine equivalence of 2 simultaneously presented 4-point patterns. Performance level (d') varied between 1.5 and 2.7, depending on the information available for solving the correspondence problem (insufficient in Experiment 1a, superfluous in Experiment 1b, and minimal in Experiments 1c, 2a, 2b) and on the exposure time (unlimited in Experiments 1 and 2a and 500 ms in Experiment 2b), but it did not vary much with the complexity of the affine transformation (rotation and slant in Experiment 1 and same plus tilt in Experiment 2). Performance in Experiment 3 was lower with 3-point patterns than with 4-point patterns, whereas blocking the trials according to the affine transformation parameters had little effect. Determining affine shape equivalence with minimal-information displays is based on a fast assessment of qualitatively or quasi-invariant properties such as convexity/ concavity, parallelism, and collinearity. PMID:10811156

  19. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  20. Visualizing antibody affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Tas, Jeroen M J; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Mano, Yasuko M; Chen, Casie S; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with nonimmunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  1. Confined Water Dissociation in Microporous Defective Silicates: Mechanism, Dipole Distribution, and Impact on Substrate Properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzano, Hegoi; Moeini, Sina; Marinelli, Francis; Van Duin, Adri C. T.; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interest in microporous materials has risen in recent years, as they offer a confined environment that is optimal to enhance chemical reactions. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel, the main component of cement, presents a layered structure with sub-nanometer-size disordered pores filled with water and cations. The size of the pores and the hydrophilicity of the environment make C-S-H gel an excellent system to study the possibility of confined water reactions. To investigate it, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. The results show that water does dissociate to form hydroxyl groups. We have analyzed the water dissociation mechanism, as well as the changes in the structure and water affinity of the C-S-H matrix and water polarization, comparing the results with the behavior of water in a defective zeolite. Finally, we establish a relationship between water dissociation in C-S-H gel and the increase of hardness due to a transformation from a two- to a three-dimensional structure.

  2. High throughput solution-based measurement of antibody-antigen affinity and epitope binning.

    PubMed

    Estep, Patricia; Reid, Felicia; Nauman, Claire; Liu, Yuqi; Sun, Tingwan; Sun, Joanne; Xu, Yingda

    2013-01-01

    Advances in human antibody discovery have allowed for the selection of hundreds of high affinity antibodies against many therapeutically relevant targets. This has necessitated the development of reproducible, high throughput analytical techniques to characterize the output from these selections. Among these characterizations, epitopic coverage and affinity are among the most critical properties for lead identification. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is an attractive technique for epitope binning due to its speed and low antigen consumption. While surface-based methods such as BLI and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are commonly used for affinity determinations, sensor chemistry and surface related artifacts can limit the accuracy of high affinity measurements. When comparing BLI and solution equilibrium based kinetic exclusion assays, significant differences in measured affinity (10-fold and above) were observed. KinExA direct association (k(a)) rate constant measurements suggest that this is mainly caused by inaccurate k(a) measurements associated with BLI related surface phenomena. Based on the kinetic exclusion assay principle used for KinExA, we developed a high throughput 96-well plate format assay, using a Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) instrument, to measure solution equilibrium affinity. This improved method combines the accuracy of solution-based methods with the throughput formerly only achievable with surface-based methods. PMID:23575269

  3. Single-molecule dissection of the high-affinity cohesin–dockerin complex

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Stefan W.; Nash, Michael A.; Fried, Daniel B.; Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Bayer, Edward A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose-degrading enzyme systems are of significant interest from both a scientific and technological perspective due to the diversity of cellulase families, their unique assembly and substrate binding mechanisms, and their potential applications in several key industrial sectors, notably cellulose hydrolysis for second-generation biofuel production. Particularly fascinating are cellulosomes, the multimodular extracellular complexes produced by numerous anaerobic bacteria. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we analyzed the mechanical stability of the intermolecular interfaces between the cohesin and the dockerin modules responsible for self-assembly of the cellulosomal components into the multienzyme complex. The observed cohesin–dockerin rupture forces (>120 pN) are among the highest reported for a receptor–ligand system to date. Using an atomic force microscope protocol that quantified single-molecule binding activity, we observed force-induced dissociation of calcium ions from the duplicated loop–helix F-hand motif located within the dockerin module, which in the presence of EDTA resulted in loss of affinity to the cohesin partner. A cohesin amino acid mutation (D39A) that eliminated hydrogen bonding with the dockerin’s critically conserved serine residues reduced the observed rupture forces. Consequently, no calcium loss occurred and dockerin activity was maintained throughout multiple forced dissociation events. These results offer insights at the single-molecule level into the stability and folding of an exquisite class of high-affinity protein–protein interactions that dictate fabrication and architecture of cellulose-degrading molecular machines. PMID:23188794

  4. A force-activated trip switch triggers rapid dissociation of a colicin from its immunity protein.

    PubMed

    Farrance, Oliver E; Hann, Eleanore; Kaminska, Renata; Housden, Nicholas G; Derrington, Sasha R; Kleanthous, Colin; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2013-01-01

    Colicins are protein antibiotics synthesised by Escherichia coli strains to target and kill related bacteria. To prevent host suicide, colicins are inactivated by binding to immunity proteins. Despite their high avidity (K(d) ≈ fM, lifetime ≈ 4 days), immunity protein release is a pre-requisite of colicin intoxication, which occurs on a timescale of minutes. Here, by measuring the dynamic force spectrum of the dissociation of the DNase domain of colicin E9 (E9) and immunity protein 9 (Im9) complex using an atomic force microscope we show that application of low forces (<20 pN) increases the rate of complex dissociation 10(6)-fold, to a timescale (lifetime ≈ 10 ms) compatible with intoxication. We term this catastrophic force-triggered increase in off-rate a trip bond. Using mutational analysis, we elucidate the mechanism of this switch in affinity. We show that the N-terminal region of E9, which has sparse contacts with the hydrophobic core, is linked to an allosteric activator region in E9 (residues 21-30) whose remodelling triggers immunity protein release. Diversion of the force transduction pathway by the introduction of appropriately positioned disulfide bridges yields a force resistant complex with a lifetime identical to that measured by ensemble techniques. A trip switch within E9 is ideal for its function as it allows bipartite complex affinity, whereby the stable colicin:immunity protein complex required for host protection can be readily converted to a kinetically unstable complex whose dissociation is necessary for cellular invasion and competitor death. More generally, the observation of two force phenotypes for the E9:Im9 complex demonstrates that force can re-sculpt the underlying energy landscape, providing new opportunities to modulate biological reactions in vivo; this rationalises the commonly observed discrepancy between off-rates measured by dynamic force spectroscopy and ensemble methods. PMID:23431269

  5. Phenyl radical thermolysis and rate constants for phenyl + O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, S.S.; Michael, J.V.

    1997-08-01

    The thermal decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}I has been used to prepare in-situ known initial concentrations of phenyl radicals at high temperatures. These can be degraded by direct decomposition at T > 1350 K giving H + C{sub 6}H{sub 4}. Using H-atom ARAS, rate constants for C{sub 6}H{sub 5} dissociation have been measured. Using the same ARAS technique, constants for C{sub 6}H{sub 5} dissociation have been measured. Using the same ARAS technique, the H- and O-atoms formed from the reaction, C{sub 6}H{sub 5} + O{sub 2}, have both been measured. The rate constant results are discussed along with lower T measurements in terms of RRKM calculations using published ab initio electronic structure determinations of transition states.

  6. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2011-02-15

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

  7. Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Julie P.; Dillon, Kristy S.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called “dissociative disorders,” including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma report “dissociative” symptoms. Prevalence of dissociative disorders is unknown, but current estimates are higher than previously thought. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, and epidemiological data regarding diagnosis in general, and illustrates possible treatment interventions for dissociative identity disorder, with a focus on psychotherapy interventions and a review of current psychopharmacology recommendations as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. PMID:23556139

  8. What contributes to predicting change in the treatment of dissociation: initial levels of dissociation, PTSD, or overall distress?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Stadnik, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with dissociative disorders (DDs) suffer from high levels of dissociation as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general distress. No research has investigated how changes in dissociation relate to changes in other symptoms over the course of treatment in patients with DD. Using a prospective, naturalistic design, we collected reports of symptoms from a sample of therapists and their patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified who participated in the Treatment Outcome of Patients with Dissociative Disorders study. The patients completed surveys at intake (Time 1) into the study and at 30-month follow-up (Time 4). We found that dissociative symptoms, including amnesia, depersonalization/derealization, and absorption, at the initial assessment of the study ("initial") were related to initial levels of PTSD and general distress and that changes in dissociative symptoms were related to changes in PTSD and general distress. Initial dissociation was a significant predictor of change in dissociation at 30 months when we controlled for length of time for follow-up, length of time practicing therapy, and length of time treating dissociative patients. Our results suggest that a reduction in dissociative symptoms in DD patients is associated with reductions in the overall severity of dissociative, posttraumatic stress, and distress symptoms. PMID:23627481

  9. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Torres, Oscar B; Antoline, Joshua F G; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2016-02-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antibodies with K d in the low nanomolar range. Since heroin is rapidly degraded in sera, esterase inhibitors were included in the assay, greatly reducing heroin hydrolysis. MS/MS detection directly measured the heroin in the assay after overnight ED, thereby allowing the quantitation of % bound heroin in lieu of K d as an alternative measurement to assess heroin binding to polyclonal antibody sera. This is the first report that utilizes a solution-based assay to quantify heroin-antibody binding without being confounded by the presence of 6-AM and morphine and to measure K d of polyclonal antibody to 6-AM. Hapten surrogates 6-AcMorHap, 6-PrOxyHap, MorHap, DiAmHap, and DiPrOxyHap coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) were used to generate high affinity antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In comparison to competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS which gave K d values in the nanomolar range, the commonly used competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values in the micromolar range. Despite the differences in K d and IC50 values, similar trends in affinities of hapten antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine were observed by both methods. Competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS revealed that among the five TT-hapten bioconjugates, TT-6-AcMorHap and TT-6-PrOxyHap induced antibodies that bound heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In contrast, TT-MorHap induced antibodies that poorly bound heroin, while TT-DiAmHap and TT-DiPrOxyHap induced antibodies either did not

  10. Dissociation of acetaldehyde in intense laser field: Coulomb explosion or field-assisted dissociation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshakre, Mohamed E.; Gao, Lirong; Tang, Xiaoping; Wang, Sufan; Shu, Yafei; Kong, Fanao

    2003-09-01

    Dissociation of acetaldehyde in moderate strong laser field of 1013-1014W/cm2 was investigated. Singly charged parent ion CH3CHO+ and fragmental ions CH3+, CHO+, C2H4+, O+, CH2CHO+, and H+ were produced by 800 nm laser of 100 fs pulse duration and recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CH3+ fragment further dissociated to CH2+, CH+, and C+ ions at higher intensity. Ab initio calculated results show that the singly-, doubly-, and triply charged parent ions are stable. So, the dissociation mechanism was not due to Coulomb explosion of multicharged ion. A field-assisted dissociation (FAD) theory, which assumes that only one bond undergoes dissociation while the rest of the molecular geometry stays unchanged, was employed to treat the dissociation dynamics. Accordingly, the dressed potential energy surfaces of the ground state for the parent and the fragment ions were calculated. Corresponding quasiclassical trajectory calculations show that the bond ruptures take place in the order of C-C, C-O, and C-H, agreeing with the observation. The observed angular dependence and charge distribution of the product ions can also be interpreted by the FAD theory.

  11. Does phasic trauma treatment make patients with dissociative identity disorder treatment more dissociative?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany; Loewenstein, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Proponents of the iatrogenic model of the etiology of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have expressed concern that treatment focused on direct engagement and interaction with dissociated self-states harms DID patients. However, empirical data have shown that this type of DID treatment is beneficial. Analyzing data from the prospective Treatment of Patients With Dissociative Disorders (TOP DD) Study, we test empirically whether DID treatment is associated with clinically adverse manifestations of dissociated self-states: acting so differently that one feels like different people, hearing voices, and dissociative amnesia. We show that, over the course of the study, there were significant decreases in feeling like different people and hearing voices. These results indicate that this form of DID treatment does not lead to symptomatic worsening in these dimensions, as predicted by the iatrogenic model. Indeed, treatment provided by TOP DD therapists reduced, rather than increased, the extent to which patients experienced manifestations of pathological dissociation. Because severe symptomatology and impairment are associated with DID, iatrogenic harm may come from depriving DID patients of treatment that targets DID symptomatology. PMID:24377972

  12. In-Vacuum Dissociator for Atomic-Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal control and vacuum sealing achieved while contamination avoided. Simple, relatively inexpensive molecular-hydrogen dissociator for atomic-hydrogen masers used on Earth or in vacuum of space. No air cooling required, and absence of elastomeric O-ring seals prevents contamination. In-vacuum dissociator for atomic hydrogen masers, hydrogen gas in glass dissociator dissociated by radio-frequency signal transmitted from surrounding 3-turn coil. Heat in glass conducted away by contacting metal surfaces.

  13. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCOSTA, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding. PMID:23802200

  14. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  15. Fractal binding and dissociation kinetics of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), a heart-related compound, on biosensor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doke, Atul M.; Sadana, Ajit

    2006-05-01

    A fractal analysis is presented for the binding and dissociation of different heart-related compounds in solution to receptors immobilized on biosensor surfaces. The data analyzed include LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) concentrations in solution to egg-white apoA-I rHDL immobilized on a biosensor chip surface.1 Single- and dual- fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s), affinity values, and the fractal dimensions were obtained from the regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited).2 The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. Predictive equations are developed for the binding rate coefficient as a function of the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface and on the LCAT concentration in solution, and for the affinity as a function of the ratio of fractal dimensions present in the binding and the dissociation phases. The analysis presented provided physical insights into these analyte-receptor reactions occurring on different biosensor surfaces.

  16. Affinity engineering of maltoporin: variants with enhanced affinity for particular ligands.

    PubMed

    Clune, A; Lee, K S; Ferenci, T

    1984-05-31

    Affinity-chromatographic selection on immobilized starch was used to selectively enhance the affinity of the maltodextrin-specific pore protein ( maltoporin , LamB protein, or lambda receptor protein) in the outer membrane of E. coli. Selection strategies were established for rare bacteria in large populations producing maltoporin variants with enhanced affinities for both starch and maltose, for starch but not maltose and for maltose but not starch. Three classes of lamB mutants with up to eight-fold increase in affinity for particular ligands were isolated. These mutants provide a unique range of modifications in the specificity of a transport protein. PMID:6375667

  17. EF5 Is the High-Affinity Mg(2+) Site in ALG-2.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J; Frey, Benjamin B; Pemberton, Travis; Henzl, Michael T

    2016-09-13

    The penta-EF-hand (PEF) protein ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2) has been implicated in several important physiological processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi vesicular transport and endosomal biogenesis/transport. ALG-2 was recently shown to harbor a metal ion-binding site with a high affinity for Mg(2+) and a low affinity for Ca(2+). We herein present the X-ray structure of Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2des23(wt). Although the C(α) trace is nearly indistinguishable from that of the Ca(2+)-free protein, the orientation of the C-terminal helix differs in the two structures. Consistent with that observation, replacement of the +x ligand in EF5, D169, with alanine eliminates high-affinity Mg(2+) binding. It also eliminates the low-affinity Ca(2+) site and lowers the affinity of the remaining Ca(2+)-binding sites, EF3 and EF1. The coordination environment in EF5 approaches ideal Mg(2+) octahedral geometry. The ligand array, consisting of three carboxylates (+x, +y, +z), a backbone carbonyl (-y), and two water molecules (-x, -z), may offer a recipe for a high-affinity, high-selectivity Mg(2+)-binding site. Sequence data for other PEF proteins indicate that select calpain large subunits, notably CAPN1 and CAPN8, may also possess a high-affinity Mg(2+)-binding site. In Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2, the carbonyl of F188 and the C-terminal carboxylate of V191 interact with the ε-ammonium group of K137 in the opposing subunit, suggesting that Mg(2+) binding could have an impact on dimerization. Interestingly, EF1 and EF3 are also occupied in the crystal, despite having modest affinity for Mg(2+). The results of a calorimetry-based analysis indicate that their Mg(2+) binding constants are 2 orders of magnitude lower than that determined for EF5. PMID:27541325

  18. Derivatives of imidopyrophosphoric acids as extractants. Part I. The preparation and fundamental constants of tetraalkylimidopyrophosphoric acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, J.G.H. du; Knabl, K.U.; Krueger, L.; Brecht, B.J.A.M. van )

    1992-12-01

    Improved methods for the preparation of imidotetraalkylpyrophosphates are reported. The dissociation constant of the water soluble tetraethyl analogue was determined by potentiometric titration. The values for the partition constant and aggregation constant of the tetradodecyl analogue were determined by two phase EMF potentiometric titration of which the data were processed through a sophisticated general optimization technique. The application of this method also made it possible to obtain a species distribution curve of the organic phase in terms of variation of pH in the aqueous phase. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Self-consistent-field treatment of the dissociation of bound molecules in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Carlos E.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    1993-10-01

    We present calculations of the dissociation of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solution, using a mean-field theory based on a variational method [N.R. Werthamer, in Rare Gas Solids, edited by M. L. Klein and J. A. Venables (Academic, New York, 1976), Vol. I, Chap. V]. The solvent is accounted for by a dielectric constant, and the effect of salt ions in solution on hydrogen bonding is treated by means of Soumpasis's potential of mean force [D. M. Soumpasis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 5116 (1984)]. At high concentrations, the effect of salt ions on the interaction is dominated by an effective temperature-dependent interaction, which results from a position-dependent term in the entropy resulting from the hard-core volume exclusion. In addition to describing the dissociation transition, this procedure provides the temperature and electrolyte-concentration dependence of the vibrational spectrum. The sample calculation by Gao and Prohofsky [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 2242 (1984)] of two ammonia molecules bound together by a hydrogen bond in a vacuum is reconsidered in an ionic solution. Our method is also applied to the treatment of the hydrogen-bond dissociation of a pair of water molecules and of a hydrogen-bonded pair of negative point-charge ions. The latter is intended as a simple model for the dissociation of a single hydrogen-bonded base-pair unit of a DNA double helix.

  20. Dissociation quotient of benzoic acid in aqueous sodium chloride media to 250{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kettler, R.M.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The dissociation quotient of benzoic acid was determined potentiometrically in a concentration cell fitted with hydrogen electrodes. The hydrogen ion molality of benzoic acid/benzoate solutions was measured relative to a standard aqueous HCl solution at seven temperatures from 5 to 250{degrees}C and at seven ionic strengths ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 molal (NaCl). The molal dissociation quotients and selected literature data were fitted in the isocoulombic (all anionic) form by a six-term equation. This treatment yielded the following thermodynamic quantities for the acid dissociation equilibrium at 25{degrees}C and 1 bar: logK{sub a} = -4.206{+-}0.006, {Delta}H{sub a}{sup 0} = 0.3{+-}0.3 kJ-mol{sup {minus}1}, {Delta}S{sub a}{sup 0} = -79.6{+-}1.0 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}, and {Delta}C{sub p;a}{sup 0} = -207{+-}5 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}. A five-term equation derived to describe the dependence of the dissociation constant on solvent density is accurate to 250{degrees}C and 200 MPa.

  1. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  2. Effects of thermodynamic inhibitors on the dissociation of methane hydrate: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the effects of methanol and NaCl, which are known as thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, on the dissociation kinetics of methane hydrate in aqueous solutions by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that the dissociation rate is not constant but changes with time. The dissociation rate in the initial stage is increased by methanol whereas it is decreased by NaCl. This difference arises from the opposite effects of the two thermodynamic inhibitors on the hydration free energy of methane. The dissociation rate of methane hydrate is increased by the formation of methane bubbles in the aqueous phase because the bubbles absorb surrounding methane molecules. It is found that both methanol and NaCl facilitate the bubble formation. However, their mechanisms are completely different from each other. The presence of ions enhances the hydrophobic interactions between methane molecules. In addition, the ions in the solution cause a highly non-uniform distribution of dissolved methane molecules. These two effects result in the easy formation of bubbles in the NaCl solution. In contrast, methanol assists the bubble formation because of its amphiphilic character. PMID:26587576

  3. Formulas for determining rotational constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelachvili, G.

    This document is part of Subvolume B `Linear Triatomic Molecules', Part 9, of Volume 20 `Molecular Constants mostly from Infrared Spectroscopy' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'. Part of the introduction, it states formulas for determining rotational constants, band center, band origin, and quadrupole coupling. Specific comments relate to BHO (HBO) and COS (OCS).

  4. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  5. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: Comment on Giesbrecht et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In their recent review "Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions," published in "Psychological Bulletin", Giesbrecht, Lynn, Lilienfeld, and Merckelbach (2008) have challenged the widely accepted trauma theory of dissociation, which holds that dissociative symptoms are caused by traumatic stress. In doing so,…

  6. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  9. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  10. Development, Reliability, and Validity of a Child Dissociation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Frank W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation of the Child Dissociative Checklist found it to be a reliable and valid observer report measure of dissociation in children, including sexually abused girls and children with dissociative disorder and with multiple personality disorder. The checklist, which is appended, is intended as a clinical screening instrument and research measure…

  11. Speech-Language Dissociations, Distractibility, and Childhood Stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.; Lambert, Warren E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relation among speech-language dissociations, attentional distractibility, and childhood stuttering. Method Participants were 82 preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and 120 who do not stutter (CWNS). Correlation-based statistics (Bates, Appelbaum, Salcedo, Saygin, & Pizzamiglio, 2003) identified dissociations across 5 norm-based speech-language subtests. The Behavioral Style Questionnaire Distractibility subscale measured attentional distractibility. Analyses addressed (a) between-groups differences in the number of children exhibiting speech-language dissociations; (b) between-groups distractibility differences; (c) the relation between distractibility and speech-language dissociations; and (d) whether interactions between distractibility and dissociations predicted the frequency of total, stuttered, and nonstuttered disfluencies. Results More preschool-age CWS exhibited speech-language dissociations compared with CWNS, and more boys exhibited dissociations compared with girls. In addition, male CWS were less distractible than female CWS and female CWNS. For CWS, but not CWNS, less distractibility (i.e., greater attention) was associated with more speech-language dissociations. Last, interactions between distractibility and dissociations did not predict speech disfluencies in CWS or CWNS. Conclusions The present findings suggest that for preschool-age CWS, attentional processes are associated with speech-language dissociations. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the directionality of effect of this association (e.g., inefficient attentional processes → speech-language dissociations vs. inefficient attentional processes ← speech-language dissociations). PMID:26126203

  12. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Lilienfield, Scott O.; Lynn, Steven Jay; Merckelbach, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Dissociation is typically defined as the lack of normal integration of thoughts, feelings, and experiences into consciousness and memory. The present article critically evaluates the research literature on cognitive processes in dissociation. The authors' review indicates that dissociation is characterized by subtle deficits in neuropsychological…

  13. MDMA, cannabis, and cocaine produce acute dissociative symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-Van der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; van Wel, Janelle; Bosker, Wendy M; Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; Spronk, Desirée B; Jan Verkes, Robbert; Merckelbach, Harald; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2015-08-30

    Some drugs of abuse may produce dissociative symptoms, but this aspect has been understudied. We explored the dissociative potential of three recreational drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cannabis, and cocaine) during intoxication and compared their effects to literature reports of dissociative states in various samples. Two placebo-controlled studies were conducted. In Study 1 (N=16), participants received single doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg of MDMA, and placebo. In Study 2 (N=21), cannabis (THC 300 µg/kg), cocaine (HCl 300 mg), and placebo were administered. Dissociative symptoms as measured with the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS) significantly increased under the influence of MDMA and cannabis. To a lesser extent, this was also true for cocaine. Dissociative symptoms following MDMA and cannabis largely exceeded those observed in schizophrenia patients, were comparable with those observed in Special Forces soldiers undergoing survival training, but were lower compared with ketamine-induced dissociation. Cocaine produced dissociative symptoms that were comparable with those observed in schizophrenia patients, but markedly less than those in Special Forces soldiers and ketamine users. Thus, MDMA and cannabis can produce dissociative symptoms that resemble dissociative pathology. The study of drug induced dissociation is important, because it may shed light on the mechanisms involved in dissociative psychopathology. PMID:26003508

  14. Prediction of Rate Constant for Supramolecular Systems with Multiconfigurations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Li, Haiyan; Wu, Li; Guo, Zhen; Yin, Xianzhen; Wang, Caifen; Sun, Lixin; Shao, Qun; Gu, Jingkai; York, Peter; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-25

    The control of supramolecular systems requires a thorough understanding of their dynamics, especially on a molecular level. It is extremely difficult to determine the thermokinetic parameters of supramolecular systems, such as drug-cyclodextrin complexes with fast association/dissociation processes by experimental techniques. In this paper, molecular modeling combined with novel mathematical relationships integrating the thermodynamic/thermokinetic parameters of a series of isomeric multiconfigurations to predict the overall parameters in a range of pH values have been employed to study supramolecular dynamics at the molecular level. A suitable form of Eyring's equation was derived and a two-stage model was introduced. The new approach enabled accurate prediction of the apparent dissociation/association (koff/kon) and unbinding/binding (k-r/kr) rate constants of the ubiquitous multiconfiguration complexes of the supramolecular system. The pyronine Y (PY) was used as a model system for the validation of the presented method. Interestingly, the predicted koff value ((40 ± 1) × 10(5) s(-1), 298 K) of PY is largely in agreement with that previously determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy ((5 ± 3) × 10(5) s(-1), 298 K). Moreover, the koff/kon and k-r/kr for flurbiprofen-β-cylcodextrin and ibuprofen-β-cyclodextrin systems were also predicted and suggested that the association processes are diffusion-controlled. The methodology is considered to be especially useful in the design and selection of excipients for a supramolecular system with preferred association and dissociation rate constants and understanding their mechanisms. It is believed that this new approach could be applicable to a wide range of ligand-receptor supramolecular systems and will surely help in understanding their complex mechanism. PMID:26840799

  15. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  16. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    sensors for the immobilization of peptide ligands with low nonspecific binding. The silica surface was first modified by the formation of self-assembling monolayer (SAM) of 3-amino-propyl triethoxy silane as an anchor layer. Short chains of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with Fmoc-protected amino groups at one end and carboxyl groups at the other end were then coupled through the carboxyl terminal to the amino groups on the silane. The short PEG chains served as spacer arms to reduce nonspecific binding to the substrate. The gold surface was modified by a two-component SAM using mixtures of HS(CH 2)11(CH2CH2O)6NH2 and HS(CH2)11(CH2CH2O)3OH. The advantage of using a modified silica surface is its relatively higher stability than the SAM on gold during the peptide functionalization step, however the SPR sensors do not work on silica surfaces. In addition, the modification process of the gold surface is relatively simple compared with that of the silica surface. The peptide immobilization process was optimized with silica surfaces and the best conditions were applied for the immobilization on gold surfaces. The results of surface modifications and peptide immobilizations were characterized by various surface analysis techniques including, ellipsometry, contact angle goniometer, chemical force microscopy (CFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). QCM and SPR results indicated that this peptide ligand HWRGWV immobilized on modified silica or gold surfaces has high affinity and specificity to hIgG binding even in a complex medium such as cMEM. Both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of affinity interaction were obtained by the analysis of QCM and SPR data. Compared with QCM, SPR is more suitable for quantitative analysis of the protein binding, which is essential for the investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics parameters. The maximum binding capacity (4.15 mg m-2 ) and the dissociation constant (1.83 mu

  17. [3H]-lifarizine, a high affinity probe for inactivated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, A. C.; Wyatt, K. M.; McGivern, J. G.; Sheridan, R. D.; Brown, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. [3H]-lifarizine bound saturably and reversibly to an apparently homogeneous class of high affinity sites in rat cerebrocortical membranes (Kd = 10.7 +/- 2.9 nM; Bmax = 5.10 +/- 1.43 pmol mg-1 protein). 2. The binding of [3H]-lifarizine was unaffected by sodium channel toxins binding to site 1 (tetrodotoxin), site 3 (alpha-scorpion venom) or site 5 (brevetoxin), Furthermore, lifarizine at concentrations up to 10 microM had no effect on [3H]-saxitoxin (STX) binding to toxin site 1. Lifarizine displaced [3H]-batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX) binding with moderate affinity (pIC50 7.31 +/- 0.24) indicating an interaction with toxin site 2. However, lifarizine accelerated the dissociation of [3H]-BTX and decreased both the affinity and density of sites labelled by [3H]-BTX, suggesting an allosteric interaction with toxin site 2. 3. The binding of [3H]-lifarizine was voltage-sensitive, binding to membranes with higher affinity than to synaptosomes (pIC50 for cold lifarizine = 7.99 +/- 0.09 in membranes and 6.68 +/- 0.14 in synaptosomes). Depolarization of synaptosomes with 130 mM KCl increased the affinity of lifarizine almost 10 fold (pIC50 = 7.86 +/- 0.25). This suggests that lifarizine binds selectively to inactivated sodium channels which predominate both in the membrane preparation and in the depolarized synaptosomal preparation. 4. There was negligible [3H]-lifarizine and [3H]-BTX binding to solubilized sodium channels, although [3H]-STX binding was retained under these conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582509

  18. Proton affinity determinations and proton-bound dimer structure indications in C2 to C15, (alpha),(omega)-alkyldiamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Harden, C. S.; Smith, P. B. W.

    1995-01-01

    The 'kinetic method' was used to determine the proton affinity (PA) of a,coalkyldiamines from collision induced dissociation (CID) studies of protonated heterodimers. These PA values were consistently lower than those reported in the proton affinity scale. The apparent discrepancy was rationalized in terms of differences in the conformation of the protonated diamine monomers. The minimum energy species, formed by equilibrium proton transfer processes, have a cyclic conformation and the ion charge is shared by both amino-groups which are bridged by the proton. On the other hand, the species formed through dissociation of protonated dimers have a linear structure and the charge is localized on one of the amino-groups. Thus, the difference in the PA values obtained by both methods is a measure of the additional stability acquired by the protonated diamines through cyclization and charge delocalization. The major collision dissociation pathway of the protonated diamine monomers involved elimination of an ammonia moiety. Other reactions observed included loss of the second amino-group and several other bond cleavages. CID of the protonated dimers involved primarily formation of a protonated monomer through cleavage of the weaker hydrogen bond and subsequently loss of ammonia at higher collision energies. As observed from the CID studies, doubly charged ions were also formed from the diamines under conditions of the electrospray ionization.

  19. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  20. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767