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Sample records for affinity dna binding

  1. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  2. Comparing binding site information to binding affinity reveals that Crp/DNA complexes have several distinct binding conformers

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, Peter C.; Holmquist, Gerald P.; Summers, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) binds to DNA as several different conformers. This situation has precluded discovering a high correlation between any sequence property and binding affinity for proteins that bend DNA. Experimentally quantified affinities of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cAMP receptor protein (SyCrp1), the Escherichia coli Crp (EcCrp, also CAP) and DNA were analyzed to mathematically describe, and make human-readable, the relationship of DNA sequence and binding affinity in a given system. Here, sequence logos and weight matrices were built to model SyCrp1 binding sequences. Comparing the weight matrix model to binding affinity revealed several distinct binding conformations. These Crp/DNA conformations were asymmetrical (non-palindromic). PMID:21586590

  3. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Tamara R.; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins. PMID:25552413

  4. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  5. A New Bisintercalating Anthracycline with Picomolar DNA Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, José; Cashman, Derek J.; Trent, John O.; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Przewloka, Teresa; Fokt, Izabela; Priebe, Waldemar; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2008-01-01

    A new bisintercalating anthracycline (WP762) has been designed, in which monomeric units of daunorubicin have been linked through their amino groups on the daunosamine moieties using an m-xylenyl linker. Differential scanning calorimetry and UV melting experiments were used to measure the ultratight binding of WP762 to DNA. The binding constant for the interaction of WP762 with herring sperm DNA was determined to be 7.3 (±0.2) × 1012 M−1 at 20°C. The large favorable binding free energy of −17.3 kcal mol−1 was found to result from a large negative enthalpic contribution of −33.8 kcal mol−1 and an opposing entropic term (−TΔS = +16.5 kcal mol−1). A comparative molecular modeling study rationalized the increased binding by the m-xylenyl linker of WP762 positioning in the DNA minor groove compared to the p-xylenyl linker found in WP631, the first bis-anthracycline of this type. The cytotoxicity of WP762 was compared to that of other anthracyclines in Jurkat T lymphocytes. These studies, together with an analysis of the cell-cycle traverse in the presence of WP762, suggest that in these cells the new drug is more cytotoxic than the structurally related WP631. PMID:16366602

  6. Sequence and structural requirements for high-affinity DNA binding by the WT1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagama, H; Heinrich, G; Pelletier, J; Housman, D E

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor gene, WT1, encodes a zinc finger polypeptide which plays a key role regulating cell growth and differentiation in the urogenital system. Using the whole-genome PCR approach, we searched murine genomic DNA for high-affinity WT1 binding sites and identified a 10-bp motif 5'GCGTGGGAGT3' which we term WTE). The WTE motif is similar to the consensus binding sequence 5'GCG(G/T)GGGCG3' recognized by EGR-1 and is also suggested to function as a binding site for WT1, setting up a competitive regulatory loop. To evaluate the underlying biochemical basis for such competition, we compared the binding affinities of WT1 and EGR1 for both sequences. WT1 shows a 20- to 30-fold-higher affinity for the WTE sequence compared with that of the EGR-1 binding motif. Mutational analysis of the WTE motif revealed a significant contribution to binding affinity by the adenine nucleotide at the eighth position (5'GCGTGGGAGT3') as well as by the 3'-most thymine (5'GCGTGGGAGT3'), whereas mutations in either flanking nucleotides or other nucleotides in the core sequence did not significantly affect the specific binding affinity. Mutations within WT1 zinc fingers II to IV abolished the sequence-specific binding of WT1 to WTE, whereas alterations within the first WT1 zinc finger reduced the binding affinity approximately 10-fold but did not abolish sequence recognition. We have thus identified a WT1 target, which, although similar in sequence to the EGR-1 motif, shows a 20- to 30-fold-higher affinity for WT1. These results suggest that physiological action of WT1 is mediated by binding sites of significantly higher affinity than the 9-bp EGR-1 binding motif. The role of the thymine base in contributing to binding affinity is discussed in the context of recent structural analysis. PMID:7862142

  7. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G.; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [3H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element. PMID:26657626

  8. A novel assay for drug-DNA binding mode, affinity, and exclusion number: scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Coury, J E; McFail-Isom, L; Williams, L D; Bottomley, L A

    1996-01-01

    Determining the mode-of-binding of a DNA ligand is not always straightforward. Here, we establish a scanning force microscopic assay for mode-of-binding that is (i) direct: lengths of individual DNA-ligand complexes are directly measured; (ii) rapid: there are no requirements for staining or elaborate sample preparation; and (iii) unambiguous: an observed increase in DNA length upon addition of a ligand is definitive evidence for an intercalative mode-of-binding. Mode-of-binding, binding affinity, and site-exclusion number are readily determined from scanning force microscopy measurements of the changes in length of individual drug-DNA complexes as a function of drug concentration. With this assay, we resolve the ambiguity surrounding the mode of binding of 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl) furan (APF) to DNA and show that it binds to DNA by nonintercalative modes. APF is a member of an important class of aromatic dicationic drugs that show significant activity in the treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, an opportunistic infection that is the leading cause of death in AIDS patients. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8901572

  9. Identification of novel DNA binding proteins using DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L; Verma, Ashutosh

    2012-01-01

    Methods are presented through which one may isolate and identify novel bacterial DNA-binding proteins. Briefly, the DNA sequence of interest is affixed to beads, then incubated with bacterial cytoplasmic extract. Washes with buffers containing non-specific DNA and low salt concentrations will remove non-adhering and low-specificity DNA-binding proteins, while subsequent washes with higher salt concentrations will elute more specific DNA-binding proteins. Eluted proteins may then be identified by standard proteomic techniques. PMID:22307548

  10. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan ; Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Wang, Wei-Ting; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Tsai, Jing-Shin; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Wu, Chien-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  11. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  12. In vitro binding affinity of the Bacillus subtilis AbrB protein to six different DNA target regions.

    PubMed Central

    Strauch, M A

    1995-01-01

    AbrB is a transcriptional regulator of many Bacillus subtilis genes. A number of AbrB-binding sites have previously been delimited by DNase I footprinting studies, but the heterogeneity of the protected sequences and sizes has not led to a determination of a possible consensus motif for recognition. We have examined the affinity of AbrB for binding to six known target regions when the regions were placed in DNA fragments of various sizes. The sites are shown to vary dramatically in AbrB-binding affinity when they are present in smaller fragments, but the differences are smaller when the affinities of larger fragments are compared. Additional observations that indicate that AbrB binding may be a multistep cooperative process are reported. PMID:7635837

  13. Indirect readout: detection of optimized subsequences and calculation of relative binding affinities using different DNA elastic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Nils B.; Wolff, Lars; Everaers, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Essential biological processes require that proteins bind to a set of specific DNA sites with tuned relative affinities. We focus on the indirect readout mechanism and discuss its theoretical description in relation to the present understanding of DNA elasticity on the rigid base pair level. Combining existing parametrizations of elastic potentials for DNA, we derive elastic free energies directly related to competitive binding experiments, and propose a computationally inexpensive local marker for elastically optimized subsequences in protein–DNA co-crystals. We test our approach in an application to the bacteriophage 434 repressor. In agreement with known results we find that indirect readout dominates at the central, non-contacted bases of the binding site. Elastic optimization involves all deformation modes and is mainly due to the adapted equilibrium structure of the operator, while sequence-dependent elasticity plays a minor role. These qualitative observations are robust with respect to current parametrization uncertainties. Predictions for relative affinities mediated by indirect readout depend sensitively on the chosen parametrization. Their quantitative comparison with experimental data allows for a critical evaluation of DNA elastic potentials and of the correspondence between crystal and solution structures. The software written for the presented analysis is included as Supplementary Data. PMID:17038333

  14. Mutations within Helix I of Twist1 Result in Distinct Limb Defects and Variation of DNA-Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Beth A.; Redick, Bradley A.; Conway, Simon J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor that plays an important role in limb development. Haploinsufficiency of Twist1 results in polydactyly via the inability of Twist1 to antagonistically regulate the related factor Hand2. The mechanism modulating Twist1-Hand2 antagonism is via phosphoregulation of conserved threonine and serine residues in helix I of the bHLH domain. Phosphoregulation alters the dimerization affinities for both proteins. Here we show that the expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants result in distinct limb phenotypes in mice. In addition to dimer regulation, Twist1 phosphoregulation affects the DNA-binding affinities of Twist1 in a partner dependent and cis-element dependent manner. In order to gain a better understanding of the specific Twist1 transcriptional complexes that function during limb morphogensis, we employ a series of Twist1-tethered dimers that include the known Twist1 partners, E12 and Hand2, as well as a tethered Twist1 homodimer. We show that these dimers behave in a manner similar to monomerically expressed bHLH factors and result in distinct limb phenotypes that correlate well with those observed from the limb expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants. Taken together, this study shows that the Twist1 dimer affinity for a given partner can modulate the DNA binding affinity and that Twist1 dimer choice determines phenotypic outcome during limb development. PMID:17652084

  15. An affinity-based scoring scheme for predicting DNA-binding activities of modularly assembled zinc-finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Jeffry D.; Zaback, Peter; Joung, J. Keith; Voytas, Daniel F.; Dobbs, Drena

    2009-01-01

    Zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) have long been recognized for their potential to manipulate genetic information because they can be engineered to bind novel DNA targets. Individual zinc-finger domains (ZFDs) bind specific DNA triplet sequences; their apparent modularity has led some groups to propose methods that allow virtually any desired DNA motif to be targeted in vitro. In practice, however, ZFPs engineered using this ‘modular assembly’ approach do not always function well in vivo. Here we report a modular assembly scoring strategy that both identifies combinations of modules least likely to function efficiently in vivo and provides accurate estimates of their relative binding affinities in vitro. Predicted binding affinities for 53 ‘three-finger’ ZFPs, computed based on energy contributions of the constituent modules, were highly correlated (r = 0.80) with activity levels measured in bacterial two-hybrid assays. Moreover, Kd values for seven modularly assembled ZFPs and their intended targets, measured using fluorescence anisotropy, were also highly correlated with predictions (r = 0.91). We propose that success rates for ZFP modular assembly can be significantly improved by exploiting the score-based strategy described here. PMID:19056825

  16. Oxidation State of the XRCC1 N-terminal Domain Regulates DNA Polymerase Beta Binding Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.; London, R

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a complex between the XRCC1 N-terminal domain (NTD) and DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) is central to base excision repair of damaged DNA. Two crystal forms of XRCC1-NTD complexed with Pol {beta} have been solved, revealing that the XRCC1-NTD is able to adopt a redox-dependent alternate fold, characterized by a disulfide bond, and substantial variations of secondary structure, folding topology, and electrostatic surface. Although most of these structural changes occur distal to the interface, the oxidized XRCC1-NTD forms additional interactions with Pol {beta}, enhancing affinity by an order of magnitude. Transient disulfide bond formation is increasingly recognized as an important molecular regulatory mechanism. The results presented here suggest a paradigm in DNA repair in which the redox state of a scaffolding protein plays an active role in organizing the repair complex.

  17. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  18. Dithiocarbamate/piperazine bridged pyrrolobenzodiazepines as DNA-minor groove binders: synthesis, DNA-binding affinity and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Sreekanth, Kokkonda; Shankaraiah, Nagula; Sathish, Manda; Nekkanti, Shalini; Srinivasulu, Vunnam

    2015-04-01

    A new series of C8-linked dithiocarbamate/piperazine bridged pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine conjugates (5a-c, 6a,b) have been synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxic potential and DNA-binding ability. The representative conjugates 5a and 5b have been screened for their cytotoxicity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. Compound 5a has shown promising cytotoxic activity on selected cancer cell lines that display melanoma, leukemia, CNS, ovarian, breast and renal cancer phenotypes. The consequence of further replacement of the 3-cyano-3,3-diphenylpropyl 1-piperazinecarbodithioate in 5b and 5c with 4-methylpiperazine-1-carbodithioate yielded new conjugates 6a and 6b respectively. In addition, the compounds 5c and 6a,b have been evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity on some of the selected human cancer cell lines and these conjugates have exhibited significant cytotoxic activity. Further, the DNA-binding ability of these new conjugates has been evaluated by using thermal denaturation (ΔTm) studies. The correlation between structure and DNA-binding ability has been investigated by molecular modeling studies which predicted that 6b exhibits superior DNA-binding ability and these are in agreement with the experimental DNA-binding studies. PMID:25665519

  19. Applying DNA affinity chromatography to specifically screen for sucrose-related DNA-binding transcriptional regulators of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Alkhateeb, Rabeaa S; Schulte, Fabian; Steffens, Tim; Loka, Tobias Pascal; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2016-08-20

    At a molecular level, the regulation of many important cellular processes is still obscure in xanthomonads, a bacterial group of outstanding relevance as world-wide plant pathogens and important for biotechnology as producers of the polysaccharide xanthan. Transcriptome analysis indicated a sucrose-dependent regulation of 18 genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100. The expression of 12 of these genes was clearly increased in the presence of sucrose. Only part of these genes was obviously involved in sucrose utilization. To identify regulatory proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, a DNA fragment-specific pull-down approach was established for Xcc. Putative promoter regions were identified and used to isolate DNA-binding proteins, which were separated by SDS PAGE and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. This led to the identification of four transcriptional regulators, among them the global transcriptional regulator Clp and a previously identified regulator of sucrose utilization, SuxR, plus a third DNA-binding transcriptional regulator encoded by xcc-b100_2861 and recently shown to interact with a cyclic di-GMP-binding protein. The fourth regulatory protein was encoded by xcc-b100_2791. These results indicate DNA fragment-specific pull-down experiments as promising approaches to screen for specific DNA-binding regulatory proteins in Xcc. PMID:27060555

  20. DNA-binding affinity and anticancer activity of β-carboline-chalcone conjugates as potential DNA intercalators: Molecular modelling and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shankaraiah, Nagula; Siraj, K P; Nekkanti, Shalini; Srinivasulu, Vunnam; Sharma, Pankaj; Senwar, Kishna Ram; Sathish, Manda; Vishnuvardhan, M V P S; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Jadala, Chetna; Nagesh, Narayana; Kamal, Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    A new series of DNA-interactive β-carboline-chalcone conjugates have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity and DNA-binding affinity. It has been observed that most of these new hybrids have shown potent cytotoxic activities on A-549 (lung adenocarcinoma) cell lines with IC50 values lower than 10 μM. The hybrid 7b is more effective against some of the selected cancer cell lines with IC50 values less than 50 μM. In addition, compounds 7e, 7k, 7p-u has displayed significant elevation in ΔTm of DNA in comparison to Adriamycin, suggesting significant interaction and remarkable DNA stabilization. The DNA intercalation of these new hybrids has been investigated by fluorescence titration, DNA viscosity measurements, molecular docking as well as molecular dynamics and the results are in agreement with the thermal denaturation studies. PMID:25771335

  1. Determinants of affinity and mode of DNA binding at the carboxy terminus of the bacteriophage SPO1-encoded type II DNA-binding protein, TF1.

    PubMed Central

    Andera, L; Geiduschek, E P

    1994-01-01

    The role of the carboxy-terminal amino acids of the bacteriophage SPO1-encoded type II DNA-binding protein, TF1, in DNA binding was analyzed. Chain-terminating mutations truncating the normally 99-amino-acid TF1 at amino acids 96, 97, and 98 were constructed, as were missense mutations substituting cysteine, arginine, and serine for phenylalanine at amino acid 97 and tryptophan for lysine at amino acid 99. The binding of the resulting proteins to a synthetic 44-bp binding site in 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil DNA, to binding sites in larger SPO1 [5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil-containing] DNA fragments, and to thymine-containing homologous DNA was analyzed by gel retardation and also by DNase I and hydroxy radical footprinting. We conclude that the C tail up to and including phenylalanine at amino acid 97 is essential for DNA binding and that the two C-terminal amino acids, 98 and 99, are involved in protein-protein interactions between TF1 dimers bound to DNA. Images PMID:8113176

  2. Relative DNA binding affinity of helix 3 homeodomain analogues, major groove binders, can be rapidly screened by displacement of prebound ethidium bromide. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yong-Ho; Arimondo, Paola B; Laigle, Alain; Garbesi, Anna; Lavielle, Solange

    2004-03-21

    The binding affinity for a 12-bp dsDNA of Antennapedia helix 3 analogues, major groove binders, has been measured by displacement of prebound ethidium bromide, a fluorescent displacement assay proposed for minor groove binders by Boger et al.(J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2000, 122, 6382-6394). Relative binding affinities determined by this method were compared to those obtained by gel mobility shift and footprinting assays for the 12-bp dsDNA and a 178-bp DNA fragment. The present work demonstrates that the fluorescence displacement assay is suitable for rapid screening of major groove binders, even though about 60 to 70% of the prebound ethidium bromide is displaced by these peptides. Total (100%) displacement of ethidium bromide was serendipitously achieved by addition in the peptide sequence, at the N-terminus, of a S-3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl-N-acetyl-cysteine residue. S-3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenylcysteine was shown to (i) bind to dsDNA with a micromolar affinity and (ii) direct within DNA grooves a peptide with no affinity for dsDNA. PMID:15007422

  3. Immobilization of DNA for affinity chromatography and drug-binding studies.

    PubMed Central

    Macdougall, A J; Brown, J R; Plumbridge, T W

    1980-01-01

    A method is described in which double-stranded DNA is alkylated with 4-bis-(2-chloroethyl)amino-L-phenylalanine and the product immobilized on an insoluble support via the primary amino group of the phenylalanine moiety. The DNA is hence irreversibly bound to the matrix by both strands at a limited number of points. PMID:7283977

  4. Building accurate sequence-to-affinity models from high-throughput in vitro protein-DNA binding data using FeatureREDUCE.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd R; Lazarovici, Allan; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are crucial regulators of gene expression. Accurate quantitative definition of their intrinsic DNA binding preferences is critical to understanding their biological function. High-throughput in vitro technology has recently been used to deeply probe the DNA binding specificity of hundreds of eukaryotic transcription factors, yet algorithms for analyzing such data have not yet fully matured. Here, we present a general framework (FeatureREDUCE) for building sequence-to-affinity models based on a biophysically interpretable and extensible model of protein-DNA interaction that can account for dependencies between nucleotides within the binding interface or multiple modes of binding. When training on protein binding microarray (PBM) data, we use robust regression and modeling of technology-specific biases to infer specificity models of unprecedented accuracy and precision. We provide quantitative validation of our results by comparing to gold-standard data when available. PMID:26701911

  5. The single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain of the GAGA protein flanked by basic residues is sufficient for high-affinity specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Pedone, P V; Ghirlando, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Felsenfeld, G; Omichinski, J G

    1996-04-01

    Specific DNA binding to the core consensus site GAGAGAG has been shown with an 82-residue peptide (residues 310-391) taken from the Drosophila transcription factor GAGA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was demonstrated that the minimal domain required for specific binding (residues 310-372) includes a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family and a stretch of basic amino acids located on the N-terminal end of the zinc finger. In gel retardation assays, the specific binding seen with either the peptide or the whole protein is zinc dependent and corresponds to a dissociation constant of approximately 5 x 10(-9) M for the purified peptide. It has previously been thought that a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family is incapable of specific, high-affinity binding to DNA. The combination of an N-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger in the GAGA protein can thus be viewed as a novel DNA binding domain. This raises the possibility that other proteins carrying only one Cys2-His2 finger are also capable of high-affinity specific binding to DNA. PMID:8610125

  6. Modulation of DNA-polyamide interaction by β-alanine substitutions: a study of positional effects on binding affinity, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Aston, Karl; Koeller, Kevin J; Harris, G Davis; Rath, Nigam P; Bashkin, James K; Wilson, W David

    2014-10-14

    Hairpin polyamides (PAs) are an important class of sequence-specific DNA minor groove binders, and frequently employ a flexible motif, β-alanine (β), to reduce the molecular rigidity to maintain the DNA recognition register. To better understand the diverse effects that β can have on DNA-PA binding affinity, selectivity, and especially kinetics, which have rarely been reported, we have initiated a detailed study for an eight-heterocyclic hairpin PA and its β derivatives with their cognate and mutant sequences. With these derivatives, all internal pyrroles of the parent PA are systematically substituted with single or double βs. A set of complementary experiments have been conducted to evaluate the molecular interactions in detail: UV-melting, biosensor-surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry. The β substitutions generally weaken the binding affinities of these PAs with cognate DNA, and have large and diverse influences on PA binding kinetics in a position- and number-dependent manner. The DNA base mutations have also shown positional effects on the binding of a single PA. Besides the β substitutions, the monocationic Dp group [3-(dimethylamino)propylamine] in parent PA has been modified into a dicationic Ta group (3,3'-diamino-N-methyldipropylamine) to minimize the frequently observed PA aggregation with ITC experiments. The results clearly show that the Ta modification not only maintains the DNA binding mode and affinity of PA, but also significantly reduces PA aggregation and allows the complete thermodynamic signature of eight-ring hairpin PA to be determined for the first time. This combined set of results significantly extends our understanding of the energetic basis of specific DNA recognition by PAs. PMID:25141096

  7. Modulation of DNA-Polyamide Interaction by β-alanine Substitutions: A Study of Positional Effects on Binding Affinity, Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Aston, Karl; Koeller, Kevin J.; Harris, G. Davis; Rath, Nigam P.

    2014-01-01

    Hairpin polyamides (PAs) are an important class of sequence-specific DNA minor groove binders, and frequently employ a flexible motif, β-alanine (β), to reduce the molecular rigidity to maintain the DNA recognition register. To better understand the diverse effects β can have on DNA-PA binding affinity, selectivity, and especially kinetics, which have rarely been reported, we have initiated a detailed study for an eight-heterocyclic hairpin PA and its β derivatives with their cognate and mutant sequences. With these derivatives, all internal pyrroles of the parent PA are systematically substituted with single or double βs. A set of complementary experiments have been conducted to evaluate the molecular interactions in detail: UV-melting, biosensor-surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry. The β substitutions generally weaken the binding affinities of these PAs with cognate DNA, and have large and diverse influences on PA binding kinetics in a position- and number-dependent manner. The DNA base mutations have also shown positional effects on binding of a single PA. Besides the β substitutions, the monocationic Dp group [3-(dimethylamino) propylamine] in parent PA has been modified into a dicationic Ta group (3, 3'-Diamino-N-methyldipropylamine) to minimize the frequently observed PA aggregation with ITC experiments. The results clearly show that the Ta modification not only maintains the DNA binding mode and affinity of PA, but also significantly reduces PA aggregation and allows the complete thermodynamic signature of eight-ring hairpin PA to be determined for the first time. This combined set of results significantly extends our understanding of the energetic basis of specific DNA recognition by PAs. PMID:25141096

  8. Nuclear heparanase-1 activity suppresses melanoma progression via its DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Gorzelanny, C; Bauer, A T; Halter, N; Komljenovic, D; Bäuerle, T; Borsig, L; Roblek, M; Schneider, S W

    2015-11-19

    Heparanase-1 (HPSE) plays a pivotal role in structural remodeling of the ECM and the glycocalyx, thus conferring protumorigenic, proangiogenic and prometastatic properties to many cancer entities. In addition to its extracellular function, recent studies suggest an intracellular activity of HPSE with a largely unknown significance during tumor progression. Therefore, we investigated the relevance of the dual functions of HPSE to malignant melanoma in vitro, as well as in different mouse melanoma models based on the intradermal or intravenous injection of melanoma cells. Consistent with its extracellular action, an HPSE deficiency led to a reduced shedding of the glycocalyx accompanied by a reduced availability of vascular endothelial growth factor, affecting tumor growth and vascularization. In contrast, we measured an elevated expression of the protumorigenic factors pentraxin-3, tissue factor, TNF-α and most prominently, MMP-9, upon HPSE knockdown. In vivo, an HPSE deficiency was related to increased lymph node metastasis. Since the inhibition of its extracellular function with heparin was unable to block the gene regulatory impact of HPSE, we proposed an intracellular mechanism. Immunostaining revealed a counter-staining of HPSE and NF-κB in the nucleus, suggesting a close relationship between both proteins. This finding was further supported by the discovery of a direct charge-driven molecular interaction between HPSE and DNA by using atomic force microscopy and a co-precipitation approach. Our findings are novel and point towards a dual function for HPSE in malignant melanoma with a protumorigenic extracellular activity and a tumor-suppressive nuclear action. The identification of molecular strategies to shuttle extracellular HPSE into the nuclei of cancer cells could provide new therapeutic options. PMID:25745999

  9. Synthesis of Biotinylated Inositol Hexakisphosphate To Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair and Affinity Capture of IP6-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Chensong; Summerlin, Matthew; Bruzik, Karol S; Hanakahi, Leslyn

    2015-10-20

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is a soluble inositol polyphosphate, which is abundant in mammalian cells. Despite the participation of IP6 in critical cellular functions, few IP6-binding proteins have been characterized. We report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of biotin-labeled IP6 (IP6-biotin), which has biotin attached at position 2 of the myo-inositol ring via an aminohexyl linker. Like natural IP6, IP6-biotin stimulated DNA ligation by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in vitro. The Ku protein is a required NHEJ factor that has been shown to bind IP6. We found that IP6-biotin could affinity capture Ku and other required NHEJ factors from human cell extracts, including the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), XRCC4, and XLF. Direct binding studies with recombinant proteins show that Ku is the only NHEJ factor with affinity for IP6-biotin. DNA-PKcs, XLF, and the XRCC4:ligase IV complex interact with Ku in cell extracts and likely interact indirectly with IP6-biotin. IP6-biotin was used to tether streptavidin to Ku, which inhibited NHEJ in vitro. These proof-of-concept experiments suggest that molecules like IP6-biotin might be used to molecularly target biologically important proteins that bind IP6. IP6-biotin affinity capture experiments show that numerous proteins specifically bind IP6-biotin, including casein kinase 2, which is known to bind IP6, and nucleolin. Protein binding to IP6-biotin is selective, as IP3, IP4, and IP5 did not compete for binding of proteins to IP6-biotin. Our results document IP6-biotin as a useful tool for investigating the role of IP6 in biological systems. PMID:26397942

  10. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-01

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb=(7.6±0.21)×10(5)) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2±0.11)×10(6)M(-1). Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules. PMID:27214273

  11. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-01

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298 K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb = (7.6 ± 0.21) × 105) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298 K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2 ± 0.11) × 106 M- 1. Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  12. Calculation of the binding affinity of the anticancer drug daunomycin to DNA by a statistical mechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Zhang, Yong-Li

    1997-06-01

    Equilibrium binding constants of the anticancer drug daunomycin, bound to several GC containing polymeric DNAs (G represent guanine and C cytosine), are calculated by means of a microscopic statistical mechanics approach and based on observed x-ray crystal structures. Our calculation shows base sequence specificity of daunomycin in agreement with the observations. We find the drug binding constant to be sensitive to the base composition of the host sequence. The binding stability decreases in the order of CGTACG, CGATCG, and CGGCCG, which is consistent with observations (T represents thymine and A adenine). This binding specificity arises from sequence specific hydrogen bond and nonbonded interactions between the drug and a host DNA. These interactions are affected by sequence specific structural features exhibited from x-ray crystallography. The agreement between our calculations and experiments shows that our method is of practical application in analyzing sequence specific binding stability of anticancer drugs.

  13. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  14. Runx1 Phosphorylation by Src Increases Trans-activation via Augmented Stability, Reduced Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Binding, and Increased DNA Affinity, and Activated Runx1 Favors Granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wan Yee; Guo, Hong; Ma, Ou; Huang, Hui; Cantor, Alan B; Friedman, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    Src phosphorylates Runx1 on one central and four C-terminal tyrosines. We find that activated Src synergizes with Runx1 to activate a Runx1 luciferase reporter. Mutation of the four Runx1 C-terminal tyrosines to aspartate or glutamate to mimic phosphorylation increases trans-activation of the reporter in 293T cells and allows induction of Cebpa or Pu.1 mRNAs in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells, whereas mutation of these residues to phenylalanine to prevent phosphorylation obviates these effects. Three mechanisms contribute to increased Runx1 activity upon tyrosine modification as follows: increased stability, reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) interaction, and increased DNA binding. Mutation of the five modified Runx1 tyrosines to aspartate markedly reduced co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC1 and HDAC3, markedly increased stability in cycloheximide or in the presence of co-expressed Cdh1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase coactivator, with reduced ubiquitination, and allowed DNA-binding in gel shift assay similar to wild-type Runx1. In contrast, mutation of these residues to phenylalanine modestly increased HDAC interaction, modestly reduced stability, and markedly reduced DNA binding in gel shift assays and as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation with the -14-kb Pu.1 or +37-kb Cebpa enhancers after stable expression in 32Dcl3 cells. Affinity for CBFβ, the Runx1 DNA-binding partner, was not affected by these tyrosine modifications, and in vitro translated CBFβ markedly increased DNA affinity of both the translated phenylalanine and aspartate Runx1 variants. Finally, further supporting a positive role for Runx1 tyrosine phosphorylation during granulopoiesis, mutation of the five Src-modified residues to aspartate but not phenylalanine allows Runx1 to increase Cebpa and granulocyte colony formation by Runx1-deleted murine marrow. PMID:26598521

  15. Building accurate sequence-to-affinity models from high-throughput in vitro protein-DNA binding data using FeatureREDUCE

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Todd R; Lazarovici, Allan; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are crucial regulators of gene expression. Accurate quantitative definition of their intrinsic DNA binding preferences is critical to understanding their biological function. High-throughput in vitro technology has recently been used to deeply probe the DNA binding specificity of hundreds of eukaryotic transcription factors, yet algorithms for analyzing such data have not yet fully matured. Here, we present a general framework (FeatureREDUCE) for building sequence-to-affinity models based on a biophysically interpretable and extensible model of protein-DNA interaction that can account for dependencies between nucleotides within the binding interface or multiple modes of binding. When training on protein binding microarray (PBM) data, we use robust regression and modeling of technology-specific biases to infer specificity models of unprecedented accuracy and precision. We provide quantitative validation of our results by comparing to gold-standard data when available. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06397.001 PMID:26701911

  16. Structure-activity studies of dicationically substituted bis-benzimidazoles against Giardia lamblia: correlation of antigiardial activity with DNA binding affinity and giardial topoisomerase II inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C A; Dykstra, C C; Naiman, N A; Cory, M; Fairley, T A; Tidwell, R R

    1993-01-01

    Nine dicationically substituted bis-benzimidazoles were examined for their in vitro activities against Giardia lamblia WB (ATCC 30957). The potential mechanisms of action of these compounds were evaluated by investigating the relationship among in vitro antigiardial activity and the affinity of the molecules for DNA and their ability to inhibit the activity of giardial topoisomerase II. Each compound demonstrated antigiardial activity, as measured by assessing the incorporation of [methyl-3H]thymidine by giardial trophozoites exposed to the test agents. Three compounds exhibited excellent in vitro antigiardial activities, with 50% inhibitory concentrations which compared very favorably with those of two currently used drugs, quinacrine HCl and metronidazole. Putative mechanisms of action for these compounds were suggested by the strong correlation observed among in vitro antigiardial activity and the affinity of the molecules for natural and synthetic DNA and their ability to inhibit the relaxation activity of giardial topoisomerase II. A strong correlation between the DNA binding affinity of these compounds and their inhibition of giardial topoisomerase II activity was also observed. Images PMID:8109934

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions with repetitive DNA elements in the Mta promoter to stimulate DNA binding of RBP-Jk/CSL.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Diana; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Gonzalez-Lopez, Olga; Lukac, David M

    2011-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8 [HHV-8]) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and lymphoproliferative diseases. We previously demonstrated that the KSHV lytic switch protein Rta stimulates DNA binding of the cellular RBP-Jk/CSL protein, the nuclear component of the Notch pathway, on Rta target promoters. In the current study, we define the promoter requirements for formation of transcriptionally productive Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. We show that highly pure Rta footprints 7 copies of a previously undescribed repetitive element in the promoter of the essential KSHV Mta gene. We have termed this element the "CANT repeat." CANT repeats are found on both strands of DNA and have a consensus sequence of ANTGTAACANT(A/T)(A/T)T. We demonstrate that Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions (i.e., nM) with 64 bp of the Mta promoter but not single CANT units. The number of CANT repeats, their presence in palindromes, and their positions relative to the RBP-Jk binding site determine the optimal target for Rta stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding and formation of ternary Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. DNA binding and tetramerization mutants of Rta fail to stimulate RBP-Jk DNA binding. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that RBP-Jk DNA binding is broadly, but selectively, stimulated across the entire KSHV genome during reactivation. We propose a model in which tetramerization of Rta allows it to straddle RBP-Jk and contact repeat units on both sides of RBP-Jk. Our study integrates high-affinity Rta DNA binding with the requirement for a cellular transcription factor in Rta transactivation. PMID:21880753

  18. Experimentally based contact energies decode interactions responsible for protein–DNA affinity and the role of molecular waters at the binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, N. Alpay; Camacho, Carlos J.

    2009-01-01

    A major obstacle towards understanding the molecular basis of transcriptional regulation is the lack of a recognition code for protein–DNA interactions. Using high-quality crystal structures and binding data on the promiscuous family of C2H2 zinc fingers (ZF), we decode 10 fundamental specific interactions responsible for protein–DNA recognition. The interactions include five hydrogen bond types, three atomic desolvation penalties, a favorable non-polar energy, and a novel water accessibility factor. We apply this code to three large datasets containing a total of 89 C2H2 transcription factor (TF) mutants on the three ZFs of EGR. Guided by molecular dynamics simulations of individual ZFs, we map the interactions into homology models that embody all feasible intra- and intermolecular bonds, selecting for each sequence the structure with the lowest free energy. These interactions reproduce the change in affinity of 35 mutants of finger I (R2 = 0.998), 23 mutants of finger II (R2 = 0.96) and 31 finger III human domains (R2 = 0.94). Our findings reveal recognition rules that depend on DNA sequence/structure, molecular water at the interface and induced fit of the C2H2 TFs. Collectively, our method provides the first robust framework to decode the molecular basis of TFs binding to DNA. PMID:19429892

  19. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of In Vitro DNA/Protein Binding Affinity, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Antitumor Activity of Mononuclear Ru(II) Mixed Polypyridyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Putta, Venkat Reddy; Chintakuntla, Nagamani; Mallepally, Rajender Reddy; Avudoddi, Srishailam; K, Nagasuryaprasad; Nancherla, Deepika; V V N, Yaswanth; R S, Prakasham; Surya, Satyanarayana Singh; Sirasani, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    The four novel Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2MAFIP](2+) (1) [MAFIP = 2-(5-(methylacetate)furan-2-yl)-1 H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1, 10]phenanthroline, phen = 1,10-Phenanthroline], [Ru(bpy)2MAFIP](2+) (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(dmb)2MAFIP](2+) (3) (dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(hdpa)2MAFIP](2+) (4) (hdpa = 2,2-dipyridylamine) have been synthesized and fully characterized via elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, EI-MS and FT-IR spectroscopy. In addition, the DNA-binding behaviors of the complexes 1-4 with calf thymus DNA were investigated by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence studies and viscosity measurement. The DNA-binding experiments showed that the complexes 1-4 interact with CT-DNA through an intercalative mode. BSA protein binding affinity of synthesized complexes was determined by UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The binding affinity of ruthenium complexes was supported by molecular docking. The photoactivated cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA by ruthenium complexes 1-4 was investigated. All the synthesized compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity by using three Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium) organisms, these results indicated that complex 3 was more activity compared to other complexes against all tested microbial strains while moderate antimicrobial activity profile was noticed for complex 4. The antioxidant activity experiments show that the complexes exhibit moderate antioxidant activity. The cytotoxicity of synthesized complexes on HeLa cell lines has been examined by MTT assay. The apoptosis assay was carried out with Acridine Orange (AO) staining methods and the results indicate that complexes can induce the apoptosis of HeLa cells. The cell cycle arrest investigated by flow cytometry and these results indicate that complexes 1-4 induce the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1

  1. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates HMGA1a at Ser-35, Thr-52, and Thr-77 and modulates its DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-12-01

    The chromosomal high-mobility group A (HMGA) proteins, composed of HMGA1a, HMGA1b and HMGA2, play important roles in the regulation of numerous processes in eukaryotic cells, such as transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, RNA processing, and chromatin remodeling. The biological activities of HMGA1 proteins are highly regulated by their post-translational modifications (PTMs), including acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. Recently, it was found that the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2), a newly identified serine/threonine kinase, co-immunoprecipitated with, and phosphorylated, HMGA1 proteins. However, the sites and the biological significance of the phosphorylation have not been elucidated. Here, we found that HIPK2 phosphorylates HMGA1a at Ser-35, Thr-52, and Thr-77, and HMGA1b at Thr-41 and Thr-66. In addition, we demonstrated that cdc2, which is known to phosphorylate HMGA1 proteins, could induce the phosphorylation of HMGA1 proteins at the same Ser/Thr sites. The two kinases, however, exhibited different site preferences for the phosphorylation: The preference for HIPK2 phosphorylation followed the order of Thr-77 > Thr-52 > Ser-35, whereas the order for cdc2 phosphorylation was Thr-52 > Thr-77 > Ser-35. Moreover, we found that the HIPK2-phosphorylated HMGA1a reduced the binding affinity of HMGA1a to human germ line promoter, and the drop in binding affinity induced by HIPK2 phosphorylation was lower than that introduced by cdc2 phosphorylation, which is consistent with the notion that the second AT-hook in HMGA1a is more important for DNA binding than the third AT-hook. PMID:17960875

  2. Chemically Modified DNA Aptamers Bind Interleukin-6 with High Affinity and Inhibit Signaling by Blocking Its Interaction with Interleukin-6 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shashi; Hirota, Masao; Waugh, Sheela M.; Murakami, Ikuo; Suzuki, Tomoki; Muraguchi, Masahiro; Shibamori, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jarvis, Thale C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Chi; Gawande, Bharat; Vrkljan, Michael; Janjic, Nebojsa; Schneider, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses, and its overproduction is a hallmark of inflammatory diseases. Inhibition of IL-6 signaling with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab has provided some clinical benefit to patients; however, direct cytokine inhibition may be a more effective option. We used the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process to discover slow off-rate modified aptamers (SOMAmers) with hydrophobic base modifications that inhibit IL-6 signaling in vitro. Two classes of IL-6 SOMAmers were isolated from modified DNA libraries containing 40 random positions and either 5-(N-benzylcarboxamide)-2′-deoxyuridine (Bn-dU) or 5-[N-(1-naphthylmethyl)carboxamide]-2′-deoxyuridine (Nap-dU) replacing dT. These modifications facilitate the high affinity binding interaction with IL-6 and provide resistance against degradation by serum endonucleases. Post-SELEX optimization of one Bn-dU and one Nap-dU SOMAmer led to improvements in IL-6 binding (10-fold) and inhibition activity (greater than 20-fold), resulting in lead SOMAmers with sub-nanomolar affinity (Kd = 0.2 nm) and potency (IC50 = 0.2 nm). Although similar in inhibition properties, the two SOMAmers have unique sequences and different ortholog specificities. Furthermore, these SOMAmers were stable in human serum in vitro for more than 48 h. Both SOMAmers prevented IL-6 signaling by blocking the interaction of IL-6 with its receptor and inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro as effectively as tocilizumab. This new class of IL-6 inhibitor may be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients suffering from inflammatory diseases. PMID:24415766

  3. DNA Sequence Determinants Controlling Affinity, Stability and Shape of DNA Complexes Bound by the Nucleoid Protein Fis

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.

    2016-01-01

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. The affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions. PMID:26959646

  4. DNA Sequence Determinants Controlling Affinity, Stability and Shape of DNA Complexes Bound by the Nucleoid Protein Fis.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Stephen P; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C

    2016-01-01

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. The affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions. PMID:26959646

  5. DNA sequence determinants controlling affinity, stability and shape of DNA complexes bound by the nucleoid protein Fis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-03-09

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequencesmore » in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. Lastly, the affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions.« less

  6. Spectra and DNA-binding affinities of Copper(II), Nickel(II) complexes with a novel glycine Schiff base derived from chromone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-dong; Yang, Zheng-yin; Wang, Bao-dui

    2007-11-01

    New [CuL·(H 2O) 3]NO 3·H 2O and [NiL·H 2O]NO 3·2H 2O complexes with Schiff base (LNa) derived from 6-hydroxy-3-carbaldehyde chromone (CDC) and glycine are reported. Two complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR data, TG/DTA and molar conductivity. The binding of these two complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated, respectively, with UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The experiment results indicate that the two complexes may bind to CT-DNA through an intercalative mode and [CuL·(H 2O) 3]NO 3·H 2O intercalates into DNA more deeply than [NiL·H 2O]NO 3·2H 2O. Their intrinsic binding constants ( K) with DNA are 6.08 × 10 5 and 2.76 × 10 5 M -1.

  7. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A Regulates Sporulation, but Does Not Contribute to Toxin Production, by Direct High-Affinity Binding to Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E.; Bakker, Dennis; Kuijper, Ed J.; Smits, Wiep Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI), for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative) targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely. PMID:23119071

  8. Synthesis, structure information, DNA/BSA binding affinity and in vitro cytotoxic studies of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes containing a phenylalanine derivative and diimine co-ligands.

    PubMed

    Annaraj, B; Balakrishnan, C; Neelakantan, M A

    2016-07-01

    Binary [Cu(PAIC)(H2O)2]·H2O (1) and mixed ligand [Cu(PAIC)(L)]·2H2O complexes, where PAIC=phenylalanine imidazole carboxylic acid, L=diimine coligands [2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (2) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3)] have been synthesized and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. The X-ray structure of [Cu(PAIC)(phen)]·2H2O (3) shows a N4O coordination with square pyramidal geometry around the copper (II) atom. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated for the complexes account for the distorted square planar structure and rules out the possibility of a trigonal bipyramidal structure. Interaction of the complexes (1-3) with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was studied by using different techniques (absorption titration, fluorescence quenching and thermal melting) and the studies suggest that these complexes bind to CT DNA through intercalation. The DNA-binding affinity of the complexes has further been explained by DFT computational results. Binding activity of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the complexes can strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. DNA cleavage experiments using plasmid DNA pUC 19 show that the complexes exhibit efficient chemical nuclease activity even in the absence of any external additives. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human normal cell line (HBL 100) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) shows that metal complexation of the ligands results in a significant enhancement in the cell death of MCF-7. Finally, docking studies on DNA and protein binding interactions were performed. PMID:27155593

  9. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  10. Effects of nucleoside analog incorporation on DNA binding to the DNA binding domain of the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Omichinski, J G; Stahl, S; Maloney, D; West, J; Schweitzer, B I

    1999-02-01

    We investigate here the effects of the incorporation of the nucleoside analogs araC (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) and ganciclovir (9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine) into the DNA binding recognition sequence for the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor. A 10-fold decrease in binding affinity was observed for the ganciclovir-substituted DNA complex in comparison to an unmodified DNA of the same sequence composition. AraC substitution did not result in any changes in binding affinity. 1H-15N HSQC and NOESY NMR experiments revealed a number of chemical shift changes in both DNA and protein in the ganciclovir-modified DNA-protein complex when compared to the unmodified DNA-protein complex. These changes in chemical shift and binding affinity suggest a change in the binding mode of the complex when ganciclovir is incorporated into the GATA DNA binding site. PMID:10037146

  11. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  12. Low affinity binding site clusters confer hox specificity and regulatory robustness.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Abe, Namiko; Rinaldi, Lucrezia; McGregor, Alistair P; Frankel, Nicolás; Wang, Shu; Alsawadi, Ahmad; Valenti, Philippe; Plaza, Serge; Payre, François; Mann, Richard S; Stern, David L

    2015-01-15

    In animals, Hox transcription factors define regional identity in distinct anatomical domains. How Hox genes encode this specificity is a paradox, because different Hox proteins bind with high affinity in vitro to similar DNA sequences. Here, we demonstrate that the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in complex with its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) bound specifically to clusters of very low affinity sites in enhancers of the shavenbaby gene of Drosophila. These low affinity sites conferred specificity for Ubx binding in vivo, but multiple clustered sites were required for robust expression when embryos developed in variable environments. Although most individual Ubx binding sites are not evolutionarily conserved, the overall enhancer architecture-clusters of low affinity binding sites-is maintained and required for enhancer function. Natural selection therefore works at the level of the enhancer, requiring a particular density of low affinity Ubx sites to confer both specific and robust expression. PMID:25557079

  13. A palindromic regulatory site within vertebrate GATA-1 promoters requires both zinc fingers of the GATA-1 DNA-binding domain for high-affinity interaction.

    PubMed

    Trainor, C D; Omichinski, J G; Vandergon, T L; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-05-01

    GATA-1, a transcription factor essential for the development of the erythroid lineage, contains two adjacent highly conserved zinc finger motifs. The carboxy-terminal finger is necessary and sufficient for specific binding to the consensus GATA recognition sequence: mutant proteins containing only the amino-terminal finger do not bind. Here we identify a DNA sequence (GATApal) for which the GATA-1 amino-terminal finger makes a critical contribution to the strength of binding. The site occurs in the GATA-1 gene promoters of chickens, mice, and humans but occurs very infrequently in other vertebrate genes known to be regulated by GATA proteins. GATApal is a palindromic site composed of one complete [(A/T)GATA(A/G)] and one partial (GAT) canonical motif. Deletion of the partial motif changes the site to a normal GATA site and also reduces by as much as eightfold the activity of the GATA-1 promoter in an erythroid precursor cell. We propose that GATApal is important for positive regulation of GATA-1 expression in erythroid cells. PMID:8628290

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M = Co, Ni or Cu, m = 4, 0 and n = 2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34 × 104 and 2.5 × 104 M-1, respectively.

  15. Assessment of DNA-binding affinity of cholinesterase reactivators and electrophoretic determination of their effect on topoisomerase I and II activity.

    PubMed

    Janockova, J; Zilecka, E; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Soukup, O; Kuca, K; Kozurkova, M

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we describe the biochemical properties and biological activity of a series of cholinesterase reactivators (symmetrical bisquaternary xylene-linked compounds, K106-K114) with ctDNA. The interaction of the studied derivatives with ctDNA was investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence, CD and LD spectrometry, and electrophoretic and viscometric methods. The binding constants K were estimated to be in the range 1.05 × 10(5)-5.14 × 10(6) M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 10.64-19.28% (from UV-Vis titration). The used methods indicate that the studied samples are groove binders. Electrophoretic methods proved that the studied compounds clearly influence calf thymus Topo I (at 5 μM concentration, except for compounds K107, K111 and K114 which were effective at higher concentrations) and human Topo II (K110 partially inhibited Topo II effects even at 5 μM concentration) activity. PMID:27412811

  16. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  17. Novel symmetric amphiphilic dendritic poly(L-lysine)-b-poly(L-lactide)-b-dendritic poly(L-lysine) with high plasmid DNA binding affinity as a biodegradable gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Cui, Liang; Li, Qiaobo; Jia, Lin; Xu, Yuhong; Fang, Qiang; Cao, Amin

    2007-05-01

    This study communicates the molecular design, preparation, and biological application of novel symmetric amphiphilic polycationic dendritic poly(L-lysine)-b-poly(L-lactide)-b-dendritic poly(L-lysine) D2-LLA15-D2 bearing two two-generation poly(L-lysine) PLL dendrons D2 and a central hydrophobic biodegradable poly(L-lactide) block LLA15. First, an amino-protected precursor of L1-OH was designed and synthesized and was further employed to prepare L1-LLA15 with an organic 4-(dimethylamino)-pyridine-mediated living-ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide. Subsequently, the hydroxy end-capped L1-LLA15 was coupled to synthesize a new triblock L1-LLA15-L1 with two one-generation amino-protected PLL dendrons L1. Furthermore, with a repeated trifluoroacetic-acid-mediated amino deprotection-protection cycle, new amphiphilic triblock D2-LLA15-D2 was successfully prepared. By means of NMR, mass spectrometry, and gel permeation chromatography, these synthetic precursors and final amphiphilic product were characterized to bear well-defined triblock structures. In addition, this synthesized amphiphilic triblock polycationic macromolecule was applied as a new polycationic plasmid DNA carrier, and its DNA binding affinity was examined via an agarose electrophoresis and a fluorescence titration assay along with two important references of hydrophilic dendritic D2-HEX-D2 and double-hydrophilic D2-PEG-4K-D2 bearing the same two D2 dendrons; much enhanced DNA binding affinity was interestingly revealed for the new amphiphilic structural D2-LLA15-D2. Moreover, the assembled polyplex microparticles of plasmid DNA/polycationic carrier were further analyzed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, indicating their averaged nanoparticle size around 150-200 nm. As for the cytotoxicity of the new D2-LLA15-D2, MTT assays were conducted with a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721), indicating a very low cytotoxicity as compared with commercial linear PLL

  18. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  19. Functional Similarities between the Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Regulator PrfA and Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein: the PrfA* (Gly145Ser) Mutation Increases Binding Affinity for Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Dickneite, Carmen; Ripio, María-Teresa; Böckmann, Regine; González-Zorn, Bruno; Novella, Susana; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Goebel, Werner; Vázquez-Boland, José A.

    1998-01-01

    Most Listeria monocytogenes virulence genes are positively regulated by the PrfA protein, a transcription factor sharing sequence similarities with cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP). Its coding gene, prfA, is regulated by PrfA itself via an autoregulatory loop mediated by the upstream PrfA-dependent plcA promoter. We have recently characterized prfA* mutants from L. monocytogenes which, as a result of a single amino acid substitution in PrfA, Gly145Ser, constitutively overexpress prfA and the genes of the PrfA virulence regulon. Here, we show that about 10 times more PrfA protein is produced in a prfA* strain than in the wild type. Thus, the phenotype of prfA* mutants is presumably due to the synthesis of a PrfA protein with higher promoter-activating activity (PrfA*), which keeps its intracellular levels constantly elevated by positive feedback. We investigated the interaction of PrfA and PrfA* (Gly145Ser) with target DNA. Gel retardation assays performed with a DNA fragment carrying the PrfA binding site of the plcA promoter demonstrated that the PrfA* mutant form is much more efficient than wild-type PrfA at forming specific DNA-protein complexes. In footprinting experiments, the two purified PrfA forms interacted with the same nucleotides at the target site, although the minimum amount required for protection was 6 to 7 times lower with PrfA*. These results show that the primary functional consequence of the Gly145Ser mutation is an increase in the affinity of PrfA for its target sequence. Interestingly, similar mutations at the equivalent position in CRP result in a transcriptionally active, CRP* mutant form which binds with high affinity to target DNA in the absence of the activating cofactor, cAMP. Our observations suggest that the structural similarities between PrfA and CRP are also functionally relevant and support a model in which the PrfA protein, like CRP, shifts from transcriptionally inactive to active conformations by interaction with a

  20. Building the bacterial orisome: high affinity DnaA recognition plays a role in setting the conformation of oriC DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gulpreet; Vora, Mansi P.; Czerwonka, Christopher A.; Rozgaja, Tania A.; Grimwade, Julia E.; Leonard, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During assembly of the E. coli pre-replicative complex (pre-RC), initiator DnaA oligomers are nucleated from three widely separated high affinity DnaA recognition sites in oriC. Oligomer assembly is then guided by low affinity DnaA recognition sites, but is also regulated by a switch-like conformational change in oriC mediated by sequential binding of two DNA bending proteins, Fis and IHF, serving as inhibitor and activator, respectively. Although their recognition sites are separated by up to 90 bp, Fis represses IHF binding and weak DnaA interactions until accumulating DnaA displaces Fis from oriC. It remains unclear whether high affinity DnaA binding plays any role in Fis repression at a distance and it is also not known whether all high affinity DnaA recognition sites play an equivalent role in oligomer formation. To examine these issues, we developed origin-selective recombineering methods to mutate E. coli chromosomal oriC. We found that, although oligomers were assembled in the absence of any individual high affinity DnaA binding site, loss of DnaA binding at peripheral sites eliminated Fis repression, and made binding of both Fis and IHF essential. We propose a model in which interaction of DnaA molecules at high affinity sites regulates oriC DNA conformation. PMID:24443848

  1. Programmable DNA-binding Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Meghan S.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant gene expression is responsible for a myriad of human diseases from infectious diseases to cancer. Precise regulation of these genes via specific interactions with the DNA double helix could pave the way for novel therapeutics. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are small molecules capable of binding to pre-determined DNA sequences up to 16 base pairs with affinity and specificity comparable to natural transcription factors. In the three decades since their development, great strides have been made relating to synthetic accessibility and improved sequence specificity and binding affinity. This perspective presents a brief history of early seminal developments in the field and highlights recent reports of the utility of polyamides as both genetic modulators and molecular probes. PMID:23665141

  2. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  3. Rationally Manipulating Aptamer Binding Affinities in a Stem-Loop Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA sequences that are highly specific for a target ligand are called aptamers. While the incorporation of aptamer sequences into stem-loop molecular beacons has become an essential tool in optical biosensors, the design principles that determine the magnitude of binding affinity and its relationship to placement of the aptamer sequence in the stem-loop architecture are not well defined. By controlled placement of the aptamer along the loop region of the molecular beacon, it is observed that the binding affinity can be tuned over 4 orders of magnitude (1.3 nM – 203 μM) for the Huizenga and Szostak ATP DNA aptamer sequence. It is observed that the Kd is enhanced for the fully exposed sequence, with reduced binding affinity when the aptamer is part of the stem region of the beacon. Analysis of the ΔG values indicate a clear correlation between the aptamer hybridized length in the stem and its observed Kd. The use of a nanometal surface energy transfer probe method for monitoring ATP binding to the aptamer sequence allows the observation of negative cooperativity between the two ATP binding events. Maintenance of the high binding affinity of this ATP aptamer and the observation of two separate Kd’s for ATP binding indicate NSET as an effective, nonmanipulative, optical method for tracking biomolecular changes. PMID:25170558

  4. The DNA-Binding Domain of Yeast Rap1 Interacts with Double-Stranded DNA in Multiple Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae repressor-activator protein 1 (Rap1) is an essential protein involved in multiple steps of DNA regulation, as an activator in transcription, as a repressor at silencer elements, and as a major component of the shelterin-like complex at telomeres. All the known functions of Rap1 require the known high-affinity and specific interaction of the DNA-binding domain with its recognition sequences. In this work, we focus on the interaction of the DNA-binding domain of Rap1 (Rap1DBD) with double-stranded DNA substrates. Unexpectedly, we found that while Rap1DBD forms a high-affinity 1:1 complex with its DNA recognition site, it can also form lower-affinity complexes with higher stoichiometries on DNA. These lower-affinity interactions are independent of the presence of the recognition sequence, and we propose they originate from the ability of Rap1DBD to bind to DNA in two different binding modes. In one high-affinity binding mode, Rap1DBD likely binds in the conformation observed in the available crystal structures. In the other alternative lower-affinity binding mode, we propose that a single Myb-like domain of the Rap1DBD makes interactions with DNA, allowing for more than one protein molecule to bind to the DNA substrates. Our findings suggest that the Rap1DBD does not simply target the protein to its recognition sequence but rather it might be a possible point of regulation. PMID:25382181

  5. Aminoglycoside binding to Oxytricha Nova Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Nihar; Andreasen, Katrine F.; Kumar, Sunil; Hyde-volpe, David; Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA sequences have been at the center stage of drug design for cancer treatment in recent years. The ability of these DNA structures to form four stranded nucleic acid structures, called G-quadruplexes, has been perceived as target for inhibiting telomerase activity vital for the longevity of cancer cells. Being highly diverse in structural forms, these G-quadruplexes are subjects of detailed studies of ligand–DNA interactions of different classes, which will pave the way for logical design of more potent ligands in future. The binding of aminoglycosides were investigated with Oxytricha Nova quadruplex forming DNA sequence (GGGGTTTTGGGG)2. Isothermal Titration calorimetry (ITC) determined ligand to quadruplex binding ratio shows 1:1 neomycin:quadruplex binding with association constants (Ka ) ~ 105M−1 while paromomycin was found to have a two-fold weaker affinity than neomycin. The CD titration experiments with neomycin resulted in minimal changes in the CD signal. FID assays, performed to determine the minimum concentration required to displace half of the fluorescent probe bound, showed neomycin as the best of the all aminoglycosides studied for quadruplex binding. Initial NMR footprint suggests that ligand-DNA interactions occur in the wide groove of the quadruplex. Computational docking studies also indicate that aminoglycosides bind in the wide groove of the quadruplex. PMID:20886815

  6. Detection of two tissue-specific DNA-binding proteins with affinity for sites in the mouse beta-globin intervening sequence 2.

    PubMed Central

    Galson, D L; Housman, D E

    1988-01-01

    To identify proteins from uninduced murine erythroleukemia nuclear extracts which specifically bind to sequences from the DNase I-hypersensitive region within the mouse beta-globin intervening sequence 2 (IVS2), a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used. Two distinct sequence-specific binding proteins were detected. The specific binding sites for these factors were delineated by both DNase I protection footprinting and methylation interference. Factor B1 bound specifically to two homologous sites, B1-A and B1-B, approximately 100 base pairs apart within the IVS2 and on opposite strands. These two regions could interact with factor B1 independently. Factor B1 was limited to cells of hematopoietic lineages. Factor B2 bound to a site approximately 5 base pairs away from the B1-A site and was limited to cells of the erythroid lineage. The limited tissue distribution of these factors and the locations of their binding sites suggest that one or both of these factors may be involved in the formation of the tissue-specific DNase I-hypersensitive site in the IVS2 of the mouse beta-globin gene. Images PMID:3422099

  7. DNA binding and recognition by binuclear transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changlin; Yan, Rui; Xu, Yan; Yu, Siwang; Liao, Zhanru; Li, Dongfeng; Xu, Hui-Bie F.

    2001-09-01

    The development of small molecules that can bind and recognize DNA with sequence- or stereo-specificity under physiological conditions has been attracting a great interest in chemistry and biochemistry. Here, spectroscopic characterization and gel electrophoresis methods have been utilized to investigate the DNA binding and recognition by a variety of binuclear transition metal complexes. The result indicate that the structures and charges of binuclear transition metal complexes, compositions of coordination spheres, central metal ions and their coordination unsaturation, and separations between two central metal atoms can exert significant effects on the DNA binding and recognition. If there are not intercalative ligands into DNA base pairs or kinetically substitutable ligands by DNA phosphate groups within coordination sphere, the coordination saturation and compact binuclear transition metal complexes weaker bind to DNA than the coordination unsaturation and extended ones to DNA. Since the different transtiometal ions exhibit different affinities to DNA phosphate oxygen atoms, the binding interactions between their binuclear complexes and DNA are controlled by the affinity. He binuclear complexes with one or more negative charges lead to a consequence that they can not efficient associate with DNA, because DNA phosphodiester backbone is negatively charged. Whenthe separations between two central transition metal atoms is more than the distance between two DNA base pairs, the binuclear complexes could bind and recognize the DNA sequence with two or more base pairs. The protonated and positively charged ligands can strengthen the DNA binding and recognition by these binuclear metal complexes. Based on such DNA binding and recognition principles, the binuclear zinc complex designed in the study preferentially bind and recognize the following DNA sequence on pBR322 DNA with binding constant K.

  8. Disorder and residual helicity alter p53-Mdm2 binding affinity and signaling in cells.

    PubMed

    Borcherds, Wade; Theillet, François-Xavier; Katzer, Andrea; Finzel, Ana; Mishall, Katie M; Powell, Anne T; Wu, Hongwei; Manieri, Wanda; Dieterich, Christoph; Selenko, Philipp; Loewer, Alexander; Daughdrill, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Levels of residual structure in disordered interaction domains determine in vitro binding affinities, but whether they exert similar roles in cells is not known. Here, we show that increasing residual p53 helicity results in stronger Mdm2 binding, altered p53 dynamics, impaired target gene expression and failure to induce cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. These results establish that residual structure is an important determinant of signaling fidelity in cells. PMID:25362358

  9. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  10. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  11. Affinity Chromatography Purification of Cytochrome c Binding Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Angelo; Bill, Kurt; Broger, Clemens

    1982-04-01

    An efficient affinity chromatography procedure for the isolation of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and reductase is described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c was used as a ligand, bound to a thiol-Sepharose 4B gel through cysteine-107. In this way, the site of interaction of cytochrome c with cytochrome oxidase and reductase remained unmodified and available for binding to a number of partner enzymes. The procedure is adequate for the purification of all those proteins having in common the property of binding with high affinity to cytochrome c--e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, reductase, and peroxidase, sulfite oxidase, and reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria.

  12. Relative Binding Affinities of Monolignols to Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-08-11

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic -OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic -OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate. PMID:27447548

  13. CAP binding to B and Z forms of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, M G; Wu, H M; Crothers, D M

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the interaction between the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CAP) and a small DNA fragment containing its specific recognition sequence by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding of CAP to this fragment induces a B to "C-like" change in the CD spectrum, which is different from that observed for non-specific binding. A one-to-one (CAP dimer to DNA) binding stoichiometry was deduced from spectroscopic titration data, as was a non-specific binding site size of 17 bp/dimer. In addition, we have compared the non-specific binding affinity of CAP for the B and Z forms of synthetic DNA copolymers. A slight preference for the B form was found. These results do not support the recent specific suggestion that CAP binds to a left-handed form of DNA (1), but indicate more generally that an optically detectable conformational change takes place in DNA on binding CAP. Images PMID:6344018

  14. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  15. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. PMID:24566637

  16. Unusual monoclonal DNA binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Iijima, S; Kuwana, K; Nishinarita, S; Takeuchi, J; Shida, M; Karasaki, M; Amaki, I

    1983-03-01

    The monoclonal antibodies directed against DNA were produced by somatic cell hybridization with parental cells (SP-2) and spleen cells from nonimmunized autoimmune MRL/lpr mice. The immunoglobulins were recovered from the culture supernatant from hybridoma by a solid immunoadsorbent and antibody immunoprecipitation. The results from the specificities of DNA binding monoclonal immunoglobulins suggest that the antibodies to DNA have the antibody combining sites for both epitope of double stranded helix and base of DNA and support the concept of the multiple antigen binding potentials of the hybridoma autoantibodies. PMID:6857646

  17. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. T R Henry1, J S Denny2 and P K Schmieder2. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, 1Experimental Toxicology Division and 2Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN, USA.
    The USEPA has been mandated to screen industria...

  18. Recent advances in affinity capillary electrophoresis for binding studies.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; El Deeb, Sami; AlGarabli, Noura; AlAstal, Raghda; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The present review covers recent advances and important applications of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). It provides an overview about various ACE types, including ACE-MS, the multiple injection mode, the use of microchips and field-amplified sample injection-ACE. The most common scenarios of the studied affinity interactions are protein-drug, protein-metal ion, protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-carbohydrate, carbohydrate-drug, peptide-peptide, DNA-drug and antigen-antibody. Approaches for the improvements of ACE in term of precision, rinsing protocols and sensitivity are discussed. The combined use of computer simulation programs to support data evaluation is presented. In conclusion, the performance of ACE is compared with other techniques such as equilibrium dialysis, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, high-performance affinity chromatography as well as surface plasmon resonance, ultraviolet, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, MS and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:25534793

  19. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  20. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  1. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  2. High affinity binding sites for the Wilms' tumour suppressor protein WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T B; Barilla, K C; Romaniuk, P J

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumour suppressor protein (WT1) is a putative transcriptional regulatory protein with four zinc fingers, the last three of which have extensive sequence homology to the early growth response-1 (EGR-1) protein. Although a peptide encoding the zinc finger domain of WT1[-KTS] can bind to a consensus 9 bp EGR-1 binding site, current knowledge about the mechanisms of zinc finger-DNA interactions would predict a more extended recognition site for WT1. Using a WT1[-KTS] zinc finger peptide (WT1-ZFP) and the template oligonucleotide GCG-TGG-GCG-NNNNN in a binding site selection assay, we have determined that the highest affinity binding sites for WT1[-KTS] consist of a 12 bp sequence GCG-TGG-GCG-(T/G)(G/A/T)(T/G). The binding of WT1-ZFP to a number of the selected sequences was measured by a quantitative nitrocellulose filter binding assay, and the results demonstrated that these sequences have a 4-fold higher affinity for the protein than the nonselected sequence GCG-TGG-GCG-CCC. The full length WT1 protein regulates transcription of reporter genes linked to these high affinity sequences. A peptide lacking the first zinc finger of WT1[-KTS], but containing the three zinc fingers homologous to EGR-1 failed to select any specific sequences downstream of the GCG-TGG-GCG consensus sequence in the binding site selection assay. DNA sequences in the fetal promoter of the insulin-like growth factor II gene that confer WT1 responsiveness in a transient transfection assay bind to the WT1-ZFP with affinities that vary according to the number of consensus bases each sequence possesses in the finger 1 subsite. PMID:7862533

  3. The binding modes and binding affinities of epipodophyllotoxin derivatives with human topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Dubey, Abhishek; Soni, Komal; Kumar, Rishay; Singh, Harvinder

    2010-12-01

    Epipodophyllotoxin derivatives have important therapeutic value in the treatment of human cancers. These drugs kill cells by inhibiting the ability of topoisomerase II (TP II) to ligate nucleic acids that it cleaves during the double-stranded DNA passage reaction. The 3D structure of human TP IIα was modeled by homology modeling. A virtual library consisting of 143 epipodophyllotoxin derivatives has been developed. Their molecular interactions and binding affinities with modeled human TP IIα have been studied using the docking and Bimolecular Association with Energetics (eMBrAcE) developed by Schrödinger. Structure activity relationship models were developed between the experimental activity expressed in terms of percentage of intracellular covalent TP II-DNA complexes (log PCPDCF) of these compounds and molecular descriptors like docking score and free energy of binding. For both the cases the r2 was in the range of 0.624-0.800 indicating good data fit and r2(cv) was in the range of 0.606-774 indicating that the predictive capabilities of the models were acceptable. Low levels of root mean square error for the majority of inhibitors establish the docking and eMBrAcE based prediction model as an efficient tool for generating more potent and specific inhibitors of human TP IIα by testing rationally designed lead compounds based on epipodophyllotoxin derivatization. PMID:21075653

  4. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  5. Distorted DNA structures induced by HMGB2 possess a high affinity for HMGB2.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Michiteru

    2002-01-01

    HMGB2 (HMG2) protein binds with DNA duplex in a sequence-nonspecific manner, then bends and unwinds the DNA. In DNA cyclization analyses for the bending activity of HMGB2, two unidentified bands, denoted alpha and beta, were observed in addition to monomer circular DNA (1C) on the gel. Re-electrophoresis and proteinase K digestion revealed that alpha and beta are complexes of circularized probe DNA (seeming 1C) with HMGB2 (K(d) approximately 10(-10) M). The DNA components of alpha and beta (alpha- and beta-DNA) showed higher affinities to HMGB2 than did the linear probe DNA (K(d) approximately 10(-7) M). The DNAs have distorted structures containing partial single-stranded regions. Nicked circular molecules presumably due to severe DNA distortion by HMGB2 were observed in alpha- and beta-DNA, in addition to closed circular double-stranded molecules. The alpha and beta bands were not formed in the presence of sole DNA binding regions which are necessary for DNA bending, indicating that the acidic C-tail in the HMGB2 molecule is necessary for inducing the peculiar distorted structures of higher affinity to HMGB2. HMGB2 binds with linker DNA and/or the entry and exit of nucleosomes fixed at both ends likewise mini-circles similar to alpha-DNA and beta-DNA. Thus, the distorted structures present in alpha-DNA and beta-DNA should be important in considering the functional mechanisms in which HMGB2 participates. PMID:11754747

  6. Functional characterization of the Escherichia coli Fis-DNA binding sequence

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yongping; Feldman-Cohen, Leah S.; Osuna, Robert

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The Escherichia coli protein Fis is remarkable for its ability to interact specifically with DNA sites of highly variable sequences. The mechanism of this sequence-flexible DNA recognition is not well understood. In a previous study, we examined the contributions of Fis residues to high-affinity binding at different DNA sequences using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and identified several key residues for Fis-DNA recognition. In this work, we investigated the contributions of the 15 bp core Fis binding sequence and its flanking regions to the Fis-DNA interactions. Systematic base pair replacements made in both half sites of a palindromic Fis binding sequence were examined for their effects on the relative Fis binding affinity. Missing contact assays were also used to examine the effects of base removal within the core binding site and its flanking regions on the Fis-DNA binding affinity. The results revealed that 1) the -7G and +3Y bases in both DNA strands (relative to the central position of the core binding site) are major determinants for high-affinity binding, 2) the C5 methyl group of thymine, when present at the +4 position, strongly hinders Fis binding, and 3) an AT-rich sequence in the central and flanking DNA regions facilitate Fis-DNA interactions by altering the DNA structure and increasing local DNA flexibility. We infer that the degeneracy of specific Fis binding sites results from the numerous base pair combinations that are possible at the non-critical DNA positions from -6 to -4, -2 to +2, and +4 to +6 with only moderate penalties on the binding affinity, the roughly similar contributions of -3A or G and +3T or C to the binding affinity, and the minimal requirement of three of the four critical base pairs to achieve considerably high binding affinities. PMID:18178221

  7. Total Binding Affinity Profiles of Regulatory Regions Predict Transcription Factor Binding and Gene Expression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Molineris, Ivan; Provero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors regulate gene expression by binding regulatory DNA. Understanding the rules governing such binding is an essential step in describing the network of regulatory interactions, and its pathological alterations. We show that describing regulatory regions in terms of their profile of total binding affinities for transcription factors leads to increased predictive power compared to methods based on the identification of discrete binding sites. This applies both to the prediction of transcription factor binding as revealed by ChIP-seq experiments and to the prediction of gene expression through RNA-seq. Further significant improvements in predictive power are obtained when regulatory regions are defined based on chromatin states inferred from histone modification data. PMID:26599758

  8. Precise temporal control of the eye regulatory gene Pax6 via enhancer-binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Siggers, Trevor; Lachke, Salil A; Yue, Yingzi; Bulyk, Martha L; Maas, Richard L

    2010-05-15

    How transcription factors interpret the cis-regulatory logic encoded within enhancers to mediate quantitative changes in spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns during animal development is not well understood. Pax6 is a dosage-sensitive gene essential for eye development. Here, we identify the Prep1 (pKnox1) transcription factor as a critical dose-dependent upstream regulator of Pax6 expression during lens formation. We show that Prep1 activates the Pax6 lens enhancer by binding to two phylogenetically conserved lower-affinity DNA-binding sites. Finally, we describe a mechanism whereby Pax6 levels are determined by transcriptional synergy of Prep1 bound to the two sites, while timing of enhancer activation is determined by binding site affinity. PMID:20413611

  9. Mechanism for recognition of polyubiquitin chains: balancing affinity through interplay between multivalent binding and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Xiao, Wei; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2010-08-18

    RAP80 plays a key role in signal transduction in the DNA damage response by recruiting proteins to DNA damage foci by binding K63-polyubiquitin chains with two tandem ubiquitin-interacting motifs (tUIM). It is generally recognized that the typically weak interaction between ubiquitin (Ub) and various recognition motifs is intensified by themes such as tandem recognition motifs and Ub polymerization to achieve biological relevance. However, it remains an intricate problem to develop a detailed molecular mechanism to describe the process that leads to amplification of the Ub signal. A battery of solution-state NMR methods and molecular dynamics simulations were used to demonstrate that RAP80-tUIM employs mono- and multivalent interactions with polyUb chains to achieve enhanced affinity in comparison to monoUb interactions for signal amplification. The enhanced affinity is balanced by unfavorable entropic effects that include partial quenching of rapid reorientation between individual UIM domains and individual Ub domains in the bound state. For the RAP80-tUIM-polyUb interaction, increases in affinity with increasing chain length are a result of increased numbers of mono- and multivalent binding sites in the longer polyUb chains. The mono- and multivalent interactions are characterized by intrinsically weak binding and fast off-rates; these weak interactions with fast kinetics may be an important factor underlying the transient nature of protein-protein interactions that comprise DNA damage foci. PMID:20698691

  10. Search for Amyloid-Binding Proteins by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    ‘Amyloid binging proteins’ is a generic term used to designate proteins that interact with different forms of amyloidogenic peptides or proteins and that, as a result, may modulate their physiological and pathological functions by altering solubility, transport, clearance, degradation, and fibril formation. We describe a simple affinity chromatography protocol to isolate and characterize amyloid-binding proteins based on the use of sequential elution steps that may provide further information on the type of binding interaction. As an example, we depict the application of this protocol to the study of Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) peptide-binding proteins derived from human plasma. Biochemical analysis of the proteins eluted under different conditions identified serum amyloid P component (SAP) and apolipoprotein J (clusterin) as the main plasma Aβ-binding proteins while various apolipoproteins (apoA-IV, apoE, and apoA-I), as well as albumin (HSA) and fibulin were identified as minor contributors. PMID:22528093

  11. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  12. On the connection between inherent DNA flexure and preferred binding of hydroxymethyluracil-containing DNA by the type II DNA-binding protein TF1.

    PubMed

    Grove, A; Galeone, A; Mayol, L; Geiduschek, E P

    1996-07-12

    TF1 is a member of the family of type II DNA-binding proteins, which also includes the bacterial HU proteins and the Escherichia coli integration host factor (IHF). Distinctive to TF1, which is encoded by the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage SPO1, is its preferential binding to DNA in which thymine is replaced by 5-hydroxymethyluracil (hmU), as it is in the phage genome. TF1 binds to preferred sites within the phage genome and generates pronounced DNA bending. The extent to which DNA flexibility contributes to the sequence-specific binding of TF1, and the connection between hmU preference and DNA flexibility has been examined. Model flexible sites, consisting of consecutive mismatches, increase the affinity of thymine-containing DNA for TF1. In particular, tandem mismatches separated by nine base-pairs generate an increase, by orders of magnitude, in the affinity of TF1 for T-containing DNA with the sequence of a preferred TF1 binding site, and fully match the affinity of TF1 for this cognate site in hmU-containing DNA (Kd approximately 3 nM). Other placements of loops generate suboptimal binding. This is consistent with a significant contribution of site-specific DNA flexibility to complex formation. Analysis of complexes with hmU-DNA of decreasing length shows that a major part of the binding affinity is generated within a central 19 bp segment (delta G0 = 41.7 kJ mol-1) with more-distal DNA contributing modestly to the affinity (delta delta G = -0.42 kJ mol-1 bp-1 on increasing duplex length to 37 bp). However, a previously characterised thermostable and more tightly binding mutant TF1, TF1(E15G/T32I), derives most of its extra affinity from interaction with flanking DNA. We propose that inherent but sequence-dependent deformability of hmU-containing DNA underlies the preferential binding of TF1 and that TF1-induced DNA bendings is a result of distortions at two distinct sites separated by 9 bp of duplex DNA. PMID:8764400

  13. DNA binding proteins that alter nucleic acid flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Micah; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. J., III; Williams, Mark C.

    2007-09-01

    Dual - beam optical tweezers experiments subject single molecules of DNA to high forces (~ 300 pN) with 0.1 pN accuracy, probing the energy and specificity of nucleic acid - ligand structures. Stretching phage λ-DNA reveals an increase in the applied force up to a critical force known as the overstretching transition. In this region, base pairing and stacking are disrupted as double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is melted. Proteins that bind to the double strand will tend to stabilize dsDNA, and melting will occur at higher forces. Proteins that bind to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) destabilize melting, provided that the rate of association is comparable to the pulling rate of the experiment. Many proteins, however, exhibit some affinity for both dsDNA and ssDNA. We describe experiments upon DNA + HMGB2 (box A), a nuclear protein that is believed to facilitate transcription. By characterizing changes in the structure of dsDNA with a polymer model of elasticity, we have determined the equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to be K ds = 0.15 +/- 0.7 10 9 M -1 for dsDNA binding. Analysis of the melting transition reveals an equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to ssDNA to be K ss = 0.039 +/- 0.019 10 9 M -1 for ssDNA binding.

  14. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  15. An in solution assay for interrogation of affinity and rational minimer design for small molecule-binding aptamers.

    PubMed

    Frost, Nadine R; McKeague, Maureen; Falcioni, Darren; DeRosa, Maria C

    2015-10-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that fold into unique three-dimensional structures, facilitating selective and high affinity binding to their cognate targets. It is not well understood how aptamer-target interactions affect regions of structure in an aptamer, particularly for small molecule targets where binding is often not accompanied by a dramatic change in structure. The DNase I footprinting assay is a classical molecular biology technique for studying DNA-protein interactions. The simplest application of this method permits identification of protein binding where DNase I digestion is inhibited. Here, we describe a novel variation of the classical DNase I assay to study aptamer-small molecule interactions. Given that DNase I preferentially cleaves duplex DNA over single-stranded DNA, we are able to identify regions of aptamer structure that are affected by small molecule target binding. Importantly, our method allows us to quantify these subtle effects, providing an in solution measurement of aptamer-target affinity. We applied this method to study aptamers that bind to the mycotoxin fumonisin B1, allowing the first identification of high affinity putative minimers for this important food contaminant. We confirmed the binding affinity of these minimers using a magnetic bead binding assay. PMID:26336657

  16. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion. PMID:2888155

  17. The DNA-bending protein HMG-1 enhances progesterone receptor binding to its target DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Oñate, S A; Prendergast, P; Wagner, J P; Nissen, M; Reeves, R; Pettijohn, D E; Edwards, D P

    1994-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-dependent transcriptional activators that exert their effects by binding as dimers to cis-acting DNA sequences termed hormone response elements. When human progesterone receptor (PR), expressed as a full-length protein in a baculovirus system, was purified to homogeneity, it retained its ability to bind hormonal ligand and to dimerize but exhibited a dramatic loss in DNA binding activity for specific progesterone response elements (PREs). Addition of nuclear extracts from several cellular sources restored DNA binding activity, suggesting that PR requires a ubiquitous accessory protein for efficient interaction with specific DNA sequences. Here we have demonstrated that the high-mobility-group chromatin protein HMG-1, as a highly purified protein, dramatically enhanced binding of purified PR to PREs in gel mobility shift assays. This effect appeared to be highly selective for HMG-1, since a number of other nonspecific proteins failed to enhance PRE binding. Moreover, HMG-1 was effective when added in stoichiometric amounts with receptor, and it was capable of enhancing the DNA binding of both the A and B amino-terminal variants of PR. The presence of HMG-1 measurably increased the binding affinity of purified PR by 10-fold when a synthetic palindromic PRE was the target DNA. The increase in binding affinity for a partial palindromic PRE present in natural target genes was greater than 10-fold. Coimmunoprecipitation assays using anti-PR or anti-HMG-1 antibodies demonstrated that both PR and HMG-1 are present in the enhanced complex with PRE. HMG-1 protein has two conserved DNA binding domains (A and B), which recognize DNA structure rather than specific sequences. The A- or B-box domain expressed and purified from Escherichia coli independently stimulated the binding of PR to PRE, and the B box was able to functionally substitute for HMG-1 in enhancing PR binding. DNA ligase-mediated ring closure assays demonstrated that both the

  18. Multiple Levels of Affinity-Dependent DNA Discrimination in Cre-LoxP Recombination†

    PubMed Central

    Gelato, Kathy A.; Martin, Shelley S.; Wong, Scott; Baldwin, Enoch P.

    2010-01-01

    Cre recombinase residue Arg259 mediates a canonical bidentate hydrogen-bonded contact with Gua27 of its LoxP DNA substrate. Substituting Cyt8-Gua27 with the three other basepairs, to give LoxAT, LoxTA, and LoxGC, reduced Cre-mediated recombination in vitro, with the preference order of Gua27 >Ade27 ~ Thy27 ≫ Cyt27. While LoxAT and LoxTA exhibited 2.5-fold reduced affinity and 2.5-5-fold slower reaction rates, LoxGC was a barely functional substrate. Its maximum level of turnover was 6-fold reduced over other substrates, and it exhibited 8.5-fold reduced Cre binding and 6.3-fold slower turnover rate. With LoxP, the rate-limiting step for recombination occurs after protein-DNA complex assembly but before completion of the first strand exchange to form the Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate. With the mutant substrates, it occurs after HJ formation. Using an increased DNA-binding E262Q/E266Q “CreQQ” variant, all four substrates react more readily, but with much less difference between them, and maintained the earlier rate-limiting step. The data indicate that Cre discriminates substrates through differences in (i) concentration dependence of active complex assembly, (ii) turnover rate, and (iii) maximum yield of product at saturation, all of which are functions of the Cre-DNA binding interaction. CreQQ suppression of Lox mutant defects implies that coupling between binding and turnover involves a change in Cre subunit DNA affinities during the “conformational switch” that occurs prior to the second strand exchange. These results provide an example of how a DNA-binding enzyme can exert specificity via affinity modulation of conformational transitions that occur along its reaction pathway. PMID:17014075

  19. Multiple levels of affinity-dependent DNA discrimination in Cre-LoxP recombination.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Kathy A; Martin, Shelley S; Wong, Scott; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2006-10-10

    Cre recombinase residue Arg259 mediates a canonical bidentate hydrogen-bonded contact with Gua27 of its LoxP DNA substrate. Substituting Cyt8-Gua27 with the three other basepairs, to give LoxAT, LoxTA, and LoxGC, reduced Cre-mediated recombination in vitro, with the preference order of Gua27 > Ade27 approximately Thy27 > Cyt27. While LoxAT and LoxTA exhibited 2.5-fold reduced affinity and 2.5-5-fold slower reaction rates, LoxGC was a barely functional substrate. Its maximum level of turnover was 6-fold reduced over other substrates, and it exhibited 8.5-fold reduced Cre binding and 6.3-fold slower turnover rate. With LoxP, the rate-limiting step for recombination occurs after protein-DNA complex assembly but before completion of the first strand exchange to form the Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate. With the mutant substrates, it occurs after HJ formation. Using an increased DNA-binding E262Q/E266Q "CreQQ" variant, all four substrates react more readily, but with much less difference between them, and maintained the earlier rate-limiting step. The data indicate that Cre discriminates substrates through differences in (i) concentration dependence of active complex assembly, (ii) turnover rate, and (iii) maximum yield of product at saturation, all of which are functions of the Cre-DNA binding interaction. CreQQ suppression of Lox mutant defects implies that coupling between binding and turnover involves a change in Cre subunit DNA affinities during the "conformational switch" that occurs prior to the second strand exchange. These results provide an example of how a DNA-binding enzyme can exert specificity via affinity modulation of conformational transitions that occur along its reaction pathway. PMID:17014075

  20. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  1. A designed DNA binding motif that recognizes extended sites and spans two adjacent major grooves†

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rational design of a DNA-binding peptide construct composed of the DNA-contacting regions of two transcription factors (GCN4 and GAGA) linked through an AT-hook DNA anchor. The resulting chimera, which represents a new, non-natural DNA binding motif, binds with high affinity and selectivity to a long composite sequence of 13 base pairs (TCAT-AATT-GAGAG). PMID:27252825

  2. Affinity and kinetic modulation of polyamide-DNA interactions by N-modification of the heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Joseph P; Babu, Balaji; Chavda, Sameer; Liu, Yang; Plaunt, Adam; Ferguson, Amanda; Savagian, Mia; Lee, Megan; Tzou, Samuel; Lin, Shicai; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Wang, Shuo; Lee, Moses; Hartley, John A; Wilson, W David

    2013-08-01

    Synthetic N-methyl imidazole and N-pyrrole containing polyamides (PAs) that can form "stacked" dimers can be programmed to target and bind to specific DNA sequences and control gene expression. To accomplish this goal, the development of PAs with lower molecular mass which allows for the molecules to rapidly penetrate cells and localize in the nucleus, along with increased water solubility, while maintaining DNA binding sequence specificity and high binding affinity is key. To meet these challenges, six novel f-ImPy*Im PA derivatives that contain different orthogonally positioned moieties were designed to target 5'-ACGCGT-3'. The synthesis and biophysical characterization of six f-ImPy*Im were determined by CD, ΔTM, DNase I footprinting, SPR, and ITC studies, and were compared with those of their parent compound, f-ImPyIm. The results gave evidence for the minor groove binding and selectivity of PAs 1 and 6 for the cognate sequence 5'-ACGCGT-3', and with strong affinity, Keq = 2.8 × 10(8) M(-1) and Keq = 6.2 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. The six novel PAs presented in this study demonstrated increased water solubility, while maintaining low molecular mass, sequence specificity, and binding affinity, addressing key issues in therapeutic development. PMID:23712486

  3. Affinity and Kinetic Modulation of Polyamide–DNA Interactions by N-Modification of the Heterocycles

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Joseph P.; Babu, Balaji; Chavda, Sameer; Liu, Yang; Plaunt, Adam; Ferguson, Amanda; Savagian, Mia; Lee, Megan; Tzou, Samuel; Lin, Shicai; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Wang, Shuo; Lee, Moses; Hartley, John A.; Wilson, W. David

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic N-methyl imidazole and N-pyrrole containing polyamides (PAs) that can form “stacked” dimers can be programmed to target and bind to specific DNA sequences and control gene expression. To accomplish this goal, the development of PAs with lower molecular mass which allows for the molecules to rapidly penetrate cells and localize in the nucleus, along with increased water solubility, while maintaining DNA binding sequence specificity and high binding affinity is key. To meet these challenges, six novel f-ImPy*Im PA derivatives that contain different orthogonally positioned moieties were designed to target 5′-ACGCGT-3′. The synthesis and biophysical characterization of six f-ImPy*Im were determined by CD, ΔTM, DNase I footprinting, SPR, and ITC studies, and were compared with those of their parent compound, f-ImPyIm. The results gave evidence for the minor groove binding and selectivity of PAs 1 and 6 for the cognate sequence 5′-ACGCGT-3′, and with strong affinity, Keq = 2.8 × 108 M−1 and Keq = 6.2 × 107 M−1, respectively. The six novel PAs presented in this study demonstrated increased water solubility, while maintaining low molecular mass, sequence specificity, and binding affinity, addressing key issues in therapeutic development. PMID:23712486

  4. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity. PMID:26263125

  5. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  6. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein-ligand binding affinities and structures.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D; Clark, Jordan J; Dunbar, James B; Carlson, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein-ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23,269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  7. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  8. Fluorescent measurement of affinity binding between thrombin and its aptamers using on-chip affinity monoliths.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Woolley, Adam T

    2013-05-24

    A microfluidic chip with integrated 2mm long monoliths incorporated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups was developed for thrombin-aptamer interaction study. The non-G quartet forming oligonucleotide coated monoliths was compared to a 15 mer thrombin-binding aptamer, in which affinity binding and elution processes were real-time monitored fluorescently. The results showed that the fluorescence intensity of aptamer stationary phase is approximately 10 times higher than that of the control column, which is probably due to the successful suppression of nonspecific adsorption between thrombin and aptamers/monoliths by using PEG-monolith. The experiment was repeated using human serum albumin (HSA) and green fluorescence protein (GFP) as interferences, it was double confirmed that thrombin was selectively retained by PEG-monolith. An elution efficiency of 75% was achieved with an elute of 200mM acetic acid and 2M NaCI, and the eluted thrombin was successfully separated in an ionic buffer system of 20mM NaHCO3 (pH 9.5) with 3% PEG. The hydrophilic and antifouling properties of PEG-monolith greatly decrease nonspecific adsorption and enhance detection sensitivity, which provided an alternative method to perform on-chip fluorescent measurement of bioaffinity binding. PMID:23587316

  9. Photochemistry and DNA-affinity of some pyrimidine-substituted styryl-azinium iodides.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Alessandra; Carlotti, Benedetta; Bonaccorso, Carmela; Fortuna, Cosimo G; Mazzucato, Ugo; Miolo, Giorgia; Spalletti, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The relaxation properties of the excited states of three iodides of trans-1,2-diarylethene analogues (where one aryl group is a methylpyridinium, methylquinolinium or dimethylimidazolium group and the other one is a phenyl ring para-substituted by a pyrimidine ring) have been investigated in buffered (pH = 7) aqueous solution. As found in previous works for several analogues, these quaternized salts undergo efficient trans→cis photoisomerization while the yield of the radiative deactivation is very small at room temperature. The solvent effect on the spectral behaviour indicates the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer which can induce interesting non-linear optical properties. The results of a study of the interactions of these salts with DNA, which might affect the cell metabolism, showed a relatively modest binding affinity for the pyridinium and imidazolium salts and a more substantial affinity for the quinolinium analogue. The formation of ligand-DNA complexes affects only slightly the radiative relaxation yield while leading to a relevant reduction of the isomerization yield. Measurements of the linear dichroism behaviour of the three compounds and comparison with three analogues bearing furan or thienyl groups, which have been found to display different affinity with DNA in previous works, gave interesting information on the nature of the ligand-DNA binding of these compounds. PMID:21993496

  10. Generation of high-affinity DNA aptamers using an expanded genetic alphabet.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Yamashige, Rie; Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirao, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    DNA aptamers produced with natural or modified natural nucleotides often lack the desired binding affinity and specificity to target proteins. Here we describe a method for selecting DNA aptamers containing the four natural nucleotides and an unnatural nucleotide with the hydrophobic base 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds). We incorporated up to three Ds nucleotides in a random sequence library, which is expected to increase the chemical and structural diversity of the DNA molecules. Selection experiments against two human target proteins, vascular endothelial cell growth factor-165 (VEGF-165) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), yielded DNA aptamers that bind with KD values of 0.65 pM and 0.038 nM, respectively, affinities that are >100-fold improved over those of aptamers containing only natural bases. These results show that incorporation of unnatural bases can yield aptamers with greatly augmented affinities, suggesting the potential of genetic alphabet expansion as a powerful tool for creating highly functional nucleic acids. PMID:23563318

  11. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  12. Cloning of murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA: expression in human cells mediates high-affinity binding but is not sufficient to confer sensitivity to murine interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmi, S; Peghini, P; Metzler, M; Merlin, G; Dembic, Z; Aguet, M

    1989-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor was isolated from a lambda gt11 library using a human IFN-gamma receptor cDNA probe. The deduced amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows approximately 53% homology to its human counterpart but no homology to other known proteins. Murine IFN-gamma receptor cDNA was expressed in human HEp-2 cells, which do not bind murine IFN-gamma and are insensitive to its action. Transfectants displayed the same binding properties as mouse cells. The biological responsiveness of such transfectants to various biological effects of both human and murine IFN-gamma was investigated, including modulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigen expression, inhibition of cell growth, and antiviral activity. Like parental HEp-2 cells, these transfectants responded only to human, but not to murine, IFN-gamma. Inversely, mouse L929 cells transfected with human IFN-gamma receptor cDNA were insensitive to human IFN-gamma. These results confirm and extend previous findings, suggesting that species-specific cofactors are needed for IFN-gamma-mediated signal transduction. Images PMID:2532365

  13. Modelling the binding affinity of steroids to zebrafish sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Devillers, J; Pery, A R R; Beaudouin, R; Balaramnavar, V M; Ahmed, S

    2014-01-01

    The circulating endogenous steroids are transported in the bloodstream. These are bound to a highly specific sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and in lower affinity to proteins such as the corticosteroid-binding protein and albumin in vertebrates, including fish. It is generally believed that the glycoprotein SHBG protects these steroids from rapid metabolic degradation and thus intervenes in its availability at the target tissues. Endocrine disrupters binding to SHBG affect the normal activity of natural steroids. Since xenobiotics are primarily released in the aquatic environment, there is a need to evaluate the binding affinity of xenosteroid mimics on fish SHBG, especially in zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish originating in India and widely employed in ecotoxicology, toxicology, and genetics. In this context, a zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) homology model was developed using the human SHBG (hSHBG) receptor structure as template. It was shown that interactions with amino acids Ser-36, Asp-59 and Thr-54 were important for binding affinity. A ligand-based pharmacophore model was also developed for both zfSHBG and hSHBG inhibitors that differentiated binders from non-binders, but also demonstrated structural requirements for zfSHBG and hSHBG ligands. The study provides insights into the mechanism of action of endocrine disruptors in zebrafish as well as providing a useful tool for identifying anthropogenic compounds inhibiting zfSHBG. PMID:24874994

  14. DNA purification by triplex-affinity capture and affinity capture electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Ito, Takashi; Smith, C.L.

    1996-01-09

    The invention provides a method for purifying or isolating double stranded DNA intact using triple helix formation. The method includes the steps of complexing an oligonucleotide and double stranded DNA to generate a triple helix and immobilization of the triple helix on a solid phase by means of a molecular recognition system such as avidin/biotin. The purified DNA is then recovered intact by treating the solid phase with a reagent that breaks the bonds between the oligonucleotide and the intact double stranded DNA while not affecting the Watson-Crick base pairs of the double helix. The present invention also provides a method for purifying or isolating double stranded DNA intact by complexing the double stranded DNA with a specific binding partner and recovering the complex during electrophoresis by immobilizing it on a solid phase trap imbedded in an electrophoretic gel. 6 figs.

  15. DNA purification by triplex-affinity capture and affinity capture electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Ito, Takashi; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1996-01-01

    The invention provides a method for purifying or isolating double stranded DNA intact using triple helix formation. The method includes the steps of complexing an oligonucleotide and double stranded DNA to generate a triple helix and immobilization of the triple helix on a solid phase by means of a molecular recognition system such as avidin/biotin. The purified DNA is then recovered intact by treating the solid phase with a reagent that breaks the bonds between the oligonucleotide and the intact double stranded DNA while not affecting the Watson-Crick base pairs of the double helix. The present invention also provides a method for purifying or isolating double stranded DNA intact by complexing the double stranded DNA with a specific binding partner and recovering the complex during electrophoresis by immobilizing it on a solid phase trap imbedded in an electrophoretic gel.

  16. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  17. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  18. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  19. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database in which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  20. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database inmore » which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  1. IFI16 Preferentially Binds to DNA with Quadruplex Structure and Enhances DNA Quadruplex Formation.

    PubMed

    Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Kejnovská, Iva; Jagelská, Eva B; Fojta, Miroslav; Dvořáková, Petra; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Brázda, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is a member of the HIN-200 protein family, containing two HIN domains and one PYRIN domain. IFI16 acts as a sensor of viral and bacterial DNA and is important for innate immune responses. IFI16 binds DNA and binding has been described to be DNA length-dependent, but a preference for supercoiled DNA has also been demonstrated. Here we report a specific preference of IFI16 for binding to quadruplex DNA compared to other DNA structures. IFI16 binds to quadruplex DNA with significantly higher affinity than to the same sequence in double stranded DNA. By circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy we also demonstrated the ability of IFI16 to stabilize quadruplex structures with quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides derived from human telomere (HTEL) sequences and the MYC promotor. A novel H/D exchange mass spectrometry approach was developed to assess protein interactions with quadruplex DNA. Quadruplex DNA changed the IFI16 deuteration profile in parts of the PYRIN domain (aa 0-80) and in structurally identical parts of both HIN domains (aa 271-302 and aa 586-617) compared to single stranded or double stranded DNAs, supporting the preferential affinity of IFI16 for structured DNA. Our results reveal the importance of quadruplex DNA structure in IFI16 binding and improve our understanding of how IFI16 senses DNA. IFI16 selectivity for quadruplex structure provides a mechanistic framework for IFI16 in immunity and cellular processes including DNA damage responses and cell proliferation. PMID:27280708

  2. IFI16 Preferentially Binds to DNA with Quadruplex Structure and Enhances DNA Quadruplex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Kejnovská, Iva; Jagelská, Eva B.; Fojta, Miroslav; Dvořáková, Petra; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Brázda, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is a member of the HIN-200 protein family, containing two HIN domains and one PYRIN domain. IFI16 acts as a sensor of viral and bacterial DNA and is important for innate immune responses. IFI16 binds DNA and binding has been described to be DNA length-dependent, but a preference for supercoiled DNA has also been demonstrated. Here we report a specific preference of IFI16 for binding to quadruplex DNA compared to other DNA structures. IFI16 binds to quadruplex DNA with significantly higher affinity than to the same sequence in double stranded DNA. By circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy we also demonstrated the ability of IFI16 to stabilize quadruplex structures with quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides derived from human telomere (HTEL) sequences and the MYC promotor. A novel H/D exchange mass spectrometry approach was developed to assess protein interactions with quadruplex DNA. Quadruplex DNA changed the IFI16 deuteration profile in parts of the PYRIN domain (aa 0–80) and in structurally identical parts of both HIN domains (aa 271–302 and aa 586–617) compared to single stranded or double stranded DNAs, supporting the preferential affinity of IFI16 for structured DNA. Our results reveal the importance of quadruplex DNA structure in IFI16 binding and improve our understanding of how IFI16 senses DNA. IFI16 selectivity for quadruplex structure provides a mechanistic framework for IFI16 in immunity and cellular processes including DNA damage responses and cell proliferation. PMID:27280708

  3. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function. PMID:25775564

  4. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  5. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA. PMID:25787788

  6. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  7. Determinants of Bacteriophage 933W Repressor DNA Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J.; Samorodnitsky, Daniel; Rosati, Rayna C.; Koudelka, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that 933W repressor apparently does not cooperatively bind to adjacent sites on DNA and that the relative affinities of 933W repressor for its operators differ significantly from that of any other lambdoid bacteriophage. These findings indicate that the operational details of the lysis-lysogeny switch of bacteriophage 933W are unique among lambdoid bacteriophages. Since the functioning of the lysis-lysogeny switch in 933W bacteriophage uniquely and solely depends on the order of preference of 933W repressor for its operators, we examined the details of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. To identify the specificity determinants, we first created a molecular model of the 933W repressor-DNA complex and tested the predicted protein-DNA interactions. These results of these studies provide a picture of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. We also show that, opposite of what is normally observed for lambdoid phages, 933W operator sequences have evolved in such a way that the presence of the most commonly found base sequences at particular operator positions serves to decrease, rather than increase, the affinity of the protein for the site. This finding cautions against assuming that a consensus sequence derived from sequence analysis defines the optimal, highest affinity DNA binding site for a protein. PMID:22509323

  8. [Affinity capture of specific DNA fragments with the use of short synthetic sequences].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlov, V S; Potapov, V K; Amirkhanov, R N; Amirkhanov, N V; Bulanenkova, S S; Akopov, S B; Zarytova, V F; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-01-01

    The ability of short peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers and oligonucleotides containing modified residues of 5-methylcitidine, 2-aminoadenosine and 5-propynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (strong binding oligonucleotides, SBO) to affinity capture the target double-stranded DNA fragment from mixture by means of the end invasion was compared. Both types of probes were highly effective at the conditions used. The SBO-based probes may represent a handy and easily prepared alternative to PNA for selection of target DNA fragments from mixtures. PMID:23844509

  9. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  10. Cytotoxic activity and DNA-binding properties of isoeuxanthone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui Fang; Yan, Hong; Gao, Xianghua; Niu, Baolong; Guo, Ruijie; Wei, Liqiao; Xu, Bingshe; Tang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the interactions of different groups substituted isoeuxanthone derivatives with calf thymus DNA (ct DNA) were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the xanthone derivatives could intercalate into the DNA base pairs by the plane of xanthone ring and the various substituents may influence the binding affinity with DNA according to the calculated quenching constant values. Furthermore, two tumor cell lines including the human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were used to evaluate the cytotoxic activities of xanthone derivatives by acid phosphatase assay. Analyses showed that the oxiranylmethoxy substituted xanthone exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against the cancer cells than the other substituted xanthones. The effects on the inhibition of tumor cells in vitro agreed with the studies of DNA-binding. PMID:24583780

  11. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  12. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction. PMID:26473627

  13. Covalent attachment of Arc repressor subunits by a peptide linker enhances affinity for operator DNA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C R; Sauer, R T

    1996-01-01

    By designing a recombinant gene containing tandem copies of the arc coding sequence with intervening DNA encoding the linker sequence GGGSGGGTGGGSGGG, the two subunits of the P22 Are repressor dimer have been covalently linked to form a single-chain protein called Arc-L1-Arc. The 15-residue linker joins the C-terminus of one monomer to the N-terminus of the second, a distance of approximately 45 A in the Arc-operator cocrystal structure. Arc-L1-Arc is expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli, with no evidence of degradation or proteolytic clipping of the linker, and is more active than wild-type Arc in repression assays. The purified Arc-L1-Arc protein has the molecular weight expected for the designed protein and unfolds cooperatively, reversibly, and with no concentration dependence in thermal-denaturation studies. Arc-L1-Arc protects operator DNA in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type Arc in DNase I and copper-phenanthroline footprinting studies, but the covalent attachment of the two monomers results in enhanced affinity for operator DNA. Arc-L1-Arc binds operator DNA half-maximally at a concentration of 1.7 pM, compared with the wild-type value of 185 pM, and also binds DNA fragments containing the left or right operator half-sites more tightly than wild type. Because wild-type Arc is monomeric at sub-nanomolar concentrations and must dimerize before binding to the operator, it was anticipated that Arc-L1-Arc would exhibit a lower half-maximal binding concentration. However, even when the change from a monomeric to a dimeric species is taken into account, the affinity of Arc-L1-Arc for operator and half-operator DNA is greater than the wild-type affinity. This tighter binding appears to result from slower dissociation, as Arc-L1-Arc DNA complexes with full or half-site operators dissociate at rates 5-10 times slower than the corresponding Arc--DNA complexes. Hence, the activity of the designed Arc-L1-Arc protein is substantially increased

  14. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brázda, Václav; Hároníková, Lucia; Liao, Jack C. C.; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc.), the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGG)n, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2) and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development. PMID:25268620

  15. DNA and RNA quadruplex-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Hároníková, Lucia; Liao, Jack C C; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc.), the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGG)n, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2) and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development. PMID:25268620

  16. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  17. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  18. Determinants of affinity and specificity in RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helder, Stephanie; Blythe, Amanda J; Bond, Charles S; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data suggest that the mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with RNA and the rules governing specificity might be substantially more complex than those underlying their DNA-binding counterparts. Even our knowledge of what constitutes the RNA-bound proteome is contentious; recent studies suggest that 10-30% of RBPs contain no known RNA-binding domain. Adding to this situation is a growing disconnect between the avalanche of identified interactions between proteins and long noncoding RNAs and the absence of biophysical data on these interactions. RNA-protein interactions are also at the centre of what might emerge as one of the biggest shifts in thinking about cell and molecular biology this century, following from recent reports of ribonucleoprotein complexes that drive reversible membrane-free phase separation events within the cell. Unexpectedly, low-complexity motifs are important in the formation of these structures. Here we briefly survey recent advances in our understanding of the specificity of RBPs. PMID:27315040

  19. Modeling Spatial Correlation of DNA Deformation: DNA Allostery in Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinliang; Ge, Hao; Gu, Chan; Gao, Yi Qin; Wang, Siyuan S.; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald; Hynes, James T.; Xie, X. Sunney; Cao, Jianshu

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of DNA deformations using a coarse-grained mechanical model and quantitatively interpret the allosteric effects in protein-DNA binding affinity. A recent single molecule study (Kim et al. (2013) Science, 339, 816) showed that when a DNA molecule is deformed by specific binding of a protein, the binding affinity of a second protein separated from the first protein is altered. Experimental observations together with molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the origin of the DNA allostery is related to the observed deformation of DNA’s structure, in particular the major groove width. In order to unveil and quantify the underlying mechanism for the observed major groove deformation behavior related to the DNA allostery, here we provide a simple but effective analytical model where DNA deformations upon protein binding are analyzed and spatial correlations of local deformations along the DNA are examined. The deformation of the DNA base orientations, which directly affect the major groove width, is found in both an analytical derivation and coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulations. This deformation oscillates with a period of 10 base pairs with an amplitude decaying exponentially from the binding site with a decay length lD~10 base pairs, as a result of the balance between two competing terms in DNA base stacking energy. This length scale is in agreement with that reported from the single molecule experiment. Our model can be reduced to the worm-like chain form at length scales larger than lP but is able to explain DNA’s mechanical properties on shorter length scales, in particular the DNA allostery of protein-DNA interactions. PMID:23795567

  20. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-05-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific TSP-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect.

  1. Binding of topotecan to chromatin: Insights into cooperative binding and comparison with DNA.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Masoome; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Ghadam, Parinaz

    2015-09-01

    Topotecan (TPT) is an anticancer drug widely used in cancer therapy. Although the interaction of TPT with DNA is a subject of few reports, no work has been reported on the binding affinity of TPT to DNA-histone complex in chromatin structure. In the present study we have focused on the effect of TPT on chromatin employing various types of spectroscopy and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that TPT quenched with chromatin chromophores and decreased fluorescence emission intensity corresponding to aromatic residues of histone proteins. The UV absorbance at 260 and 210 nm in decreased in a dose dependent manner. Upon binding of the drug, ellipticity at 222 nm in the circular dichroism profile became more positive implying reduction of α-helix content of histones. The binding is positive cooperative with association constant (Ka) of 2.65×10(2) M(-1) and 1.11×10(2) M(-1) for chromatin and DNA respectively indicating higher affinity of TPT to chromatin compared to DNA. From the results it is concluded that in the cell nucleus, TPT, as a potent anticancer drug, exerts its biological action through binding to chromatin and in this process not only DNA but also histone proteins play a fundamental role. PMID:26092169

  2. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: MODEL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The training set used to derive a common reactivity pattern (COREPA) model for estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinity in Model I (see Abstract I in this series) was extended to include 47 rat estrogen receptor (rER) relative binding affinity (RBA) measurements in addition to the...

  3. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  4. Relationship between binding affinities to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and biological potency of a new series of retinoids.

    PubMed

    Sani, B P; Dawson, M I; Hobbs, P D; Chan, R L; Schiff, L J

    1984-01-01

    Binding affinities of a new and unusual series of retinoic acid analogues to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein, a possible mediator of their biological function in the control of differentiation and tumorigenesis, and to serum albumin, their plasma transport protein, were determined. Also, biological activity of these retinoids in the reversal of keratinization in hamster tracheal organ cultures was assessed and compared with their binding affinities. Analogues that possessed high biological activity showed high binding efficiency to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein. Those that were biologically less active were poor binders to the binding protein. Three retinoids, 4657-57, 3920-59, and 4445-75, which showed 90 to 100% binding efficiency of that of retinoic acid for cellular retinoic acid-binding protein expressed high biological activity detectable in the range of 10(-10) M as against 10(-11) M for retinoic acid. The correlation noticed in these two activities not only enhances the confidence in the two assay procedures but also paves the way for design and development of potential chemopreventive agents. No apparent differences were observed in the binding affinities of the retinoids to binding proteins of a normal tissue or a tumor tissue. No correlation existed between the binding affinities of these retinoids to serum albumin and their biological activity. Structure-activity relationships of the retinoids in relation to their binding affinities and biological activities have been discussed. PMID:6317169

  5. Balancing between affinity and speed in target DNA search by zinc-finger proteins via modulation of dynamic conformational ensemble.

    PubMed

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Vuzman, Dana; Kemme, Catherine A; Levy, Yaakov; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-09-15

    Although engineering of transcription factors and DNA-modifying enzymes has drawn substantial attention for artificial gene regulation and genome editing, most efforts focus on affinity and specificity of the DNA-binding proteins, typically overlooking the kinetic properties of these proteins. However, a simplistic pursuit of high affinity can lead to kinetically deficient proteins that spend too much time at nonspecific sites before reaching their targets on DNA. We demonstrate that structural dynamic knowledge of the DNA-scanning process allows for kinetically and thermodynamically balanced engineering of DNA-binding proteins. Our current study of the zinc-finger protein Egr-1 (also known as Zif268) and its nuclease derivatives reveals kinetic and thermodynamic roles of the dynamic conformational equilibrium between two modes during the DNA-scanning process: one mode suitable for search and the other for recognition. By mutagenesis, we were able to shift this equilibrium, as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Using fluorescence and biochemical assays as well as computational simulations, we analyzed how the shifts of the conformational equilibrium influence binding affinity, target search kinetics, and efficiency in displacing other proteins from the target sites. A shift toward the recognition mode caused an increase in affinity for DNA and a decrease in search efficiency. In contrast, a shift toward the search mode caused a decrease in affinity and an increase in search efficiency. This accelerated site-specific DNA cleavage by the zinc-finger nuclease, without enhancing off-target cleavage. Our study shows that appropriate modulation of the dynamic conformational ensemble can greatly improve zinc-finger technology, which has used Egr-1 (Zif268) as a major scaffold for engineering. PMID:26324943

  6. Balancing between affinity and speed in target DNA search by zinc-finger proteins via modulation of dynamic conformational ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Vuzman, Dana; Kemme, Catherine A.; Levy, Yaakov; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Although engineering of transcription factors and DNA-modifying enzymes has drawn substantial attention for artificial gene regulation and genome editing, most efforts focus on affinity and specificity of the DNA-binding proteins, typically overlooking the kinetic properties of these proteins. However, a simplistic pursuit of high affinity can lead to kinetically deficient proteins that spend too much time at nonspecific sites before reaching their targets on DNA. We demonstrate that structural dynamic knowledge of the DNA-scanning process allows for kinetically and thermodynamically balanced engineering of DNA-binding proteins. Our current study of the zinc-finger protein Egr-1 (also known as Zif268) and its nuclease derivatives reveals kinetic and thermodynamic roles of the dynamic conformational equilibrium between two modes during the DNA-scanning process: one mode suitable for search and the other for recognition. By mutagenesis, we were able to shift this equilibrium, as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Using fluorescence and biochemical assays as well as computational simulations, we analyzed how the shifts of the conformational equilibrium influence binding affinity, target search kinetics, and efficiency in displacing other proteins from the target sites. A shift toward the recognition mode caused an increase in affinity for DNA and a decrease in search efficiency. In contrast, a shift toward the search mode caused a decrease in affinity and an increase in search efficiency. This accelerated site-specific DNA cleavage by the zinc-finger nuclease, without enhancing off-target cleavage. Our study shows that appropriate modulation of the dynamic conformational ensemble can greatly improve zinc-finger technology, which has used Egr-1 (Zif268) as a major scaffold for engineering. PMID:26324943

  7. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E.; Baase, Walter A.; Michael, Miya M.; von Hippel, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5′-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  8. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; Michael, Miya M; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5'-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  9. DNA Binding to the Silica Surface.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bobo; Shin, Yun Kyung; Hassanali, Ali A; Singer, Sherwin J

    2015-08-27

    We investigate the DNA-silica binding mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations. This system is of technological importance, and also of interest to explore how negatively charged DNA can bind to a silica surface, which is also negatively charged at pH values above its isoelectric point near pH 3. We find that the two major binding mechanisms are attractive interactions between DNA phosphate and surface silanol groups and hydrophobic bonding between DNA base and silica hydrophobic region. Umbrella sampling and the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) are used to calculate the free energy surface for detachment of DNA from a binding configuration to a location far from the silica surface. Several factors explain why single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has been observed to be more strongly attracted to silica than double-stranded (dsDNA): (1) ssDNA is more flexible and therefore able to maximize the number of binding interactions. (2) ssDNA has free unpaired bases to form hydrophobic attachment to silica while dsDNA has to break hydrogen bonds with base partners to get free bases. (3) The linear charge density of dsDNA is twice that of ssDNA. We devise a procedure to approximate the atomic forces between biomolecules and amorphous silica to enable large-scale biomolecule-silica simulations as reported here. PMID:25966319

  10. A Genome-Inspired DNA Ligand for Affinity Capture of Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junfeng; Carter, Jennifer A.; Frederick, Kimberley A.; McGown, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-linked polymorphic region (ILPR) of the human insulin gene contains tandem repeats of similar G-rich sequences, some of which form intramolecular G-quadruplex structures in vitro. Previous work showed affinity binding of insulin to an intramolecular G-quadruplex formed by ILPR variant a. Here we report on interactions of insulin and the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) with ILPR variants a, h and i. Circular dichroism indicated intramolecular G-quadruplex formation for variants a and h. Affinity MALDI mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance were used to compare protein capture and binding strengths. Insulin and IGF-2 exhibited high binding affinity for variants a and h but not i, indicating the involvement of intramolecular G-quadruplexes. Interaction between insulin and variant a was unique in the appearance of two binding interactions with KD~10−13 M and KD~10−7 M, which was not observed for insulin with variant h (KD~10−8 M) or IGF-2 with either variant (KD’s~10−9 D M). The results provide a basis for design of DNA binding ligands for insulin and IGF-2 and support a new approach to discovery of DNA affinity binding ligands based on genome-inspired sequences rather than the traditional combinatorial selection route to aptamer discovery. PMID:19391177

  11. Characterizing informative sequence descriptors and predicting binding affinities of heterodimeric protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in various biological processes, and underlying mechanism of the interactions plays a crucial role in therapeutics and protein engineering. Most machine learning approaches have been developed for predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes based on structure and functional information. This work aims to predict the binding affinity of heterodimeric protein complexes from sequences only. Results This work proposes a support vector machine (SVM) based binding affinity classifier, called SVM-BAC, to classify heterodimeric protein complexes based on the prediction of their binding affinity. SVM-BAC identified 14 of 580 sequence descriptors (physicochemical, energetic and conformational properties of the 20 amino acids) to classify 216 heterodimeric protein complexes into low and high binding affinity. SVM-BAC yielded the training accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, AUC and test accuracy of 85.80%, 0.89, 0.83, 0.86 and 83.33%, respectively, better than existing machine learning algorithms. The 14 features and support vector regression were further used to estimate the binding affinities (Pkd) of 200 heterodimeric protein complexes. Prediction performance of a Jackknife test was the correlation coefficient of 0.34 and mean absolute error of 1.4. We further analyze three informative physicochemical properties according to their contribution to prediction performance. Results reveal that the following properties are effective in predicting the binding affinity of heterodimeric protein complexes: apparent partition energy based on buried molar fractions, relations between chemical structure and biological activity in principal component analysis IV, and normalized frequency of beta turn. Conclusions The proposed sequence-based prediction method SVM-BAC uses an optimal feature selection method to identify 14 informative features to classify and predict binding affinity of heterodimeric protein

  12. Methylsorb: a simple method for quantifying DNA methylation using DNA-gold affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Carrascosa, Laura G; Palanisamy, Ramkumar; Rauf, Sakandar; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-10-21

    The analysis of DNA methylation is becoming increasingly important both in the clinic and also as a research tool to unravel key epigenetic molecular mechanisms in biology. Current methodologies for the quantification of regional DNA methylation (i.e., the average methylation over a region of DNA in the genome) are largely affected by comprehensive DNA sequencing methodologies which tend to be expensive, tedious, and time-consuming for many applications. Herein, we report an alternative DNA methylation detection method referred to as "Methylsorb", which is based on the inherent affinity of DNA bases to the gold surface (i.e., the trend of the affinity interactions is adenine > cytosine ≥ guanine > thymine).1 Since the degree of gold-DNA affinity interaction is highly sequence dependent, it provides a new capability to detect DNA methylation by simply monitoring the relative adsorption of bisulfite treated DNA sequences onto a gold chip. Because the selective physical adsorption of DNA fragments to gold enable a direct read-out of regional DNA methylation, the current requirement for DNA sequencing is obviated. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we present data on the regional methylation status of two CpG clusters located in the EN1 and MIR200B genes in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The methylation status of these regions was obtained from the change in relative mass on gold surface with respect to relative adsorption of an unmethylated DNA source and this was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a label-free and real-time manner. We anticipate that the simplicity of this method, combined with the high level of accuracy for identifying the methylation status of cytosines in DNA, could find broad application in biology and diagnostics. PMID:25226077

  13. The Sunscreen Octyl Methoxycinnamate Binds to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrell, Johannes; Vohra, Shikhar; Nordlund, T. M.

    2000-03-01

    Sunscreens are designed to prevent skin cancer by absorbing ultraviolet radiation from the sun before it gets to the DNA in skin cells. The purpose of this work is to determine whether or not octyl methoxycinnamate, an active ingredient in many sunscreens, will bind to DNA. If so, the sunscreen could transfer the energy it absorbed from the sun to the DNA and cause damage. To determine this, we prepared samples with varying concentrations of cinnamate added to herring sperm DNA, sonicating the mixture to disperse the hydrophobic sunscreen into solution. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the mixtures showed (i) much more sunscreen was dispersed into solution when DNA was present, and (ii) the spectra of both DNA and sunscreen differed from those of the separate solutions. We conclude that the octyl methoxycinnamate can indeed bind to DNA in aqueous solution. Energy transfer experiments from DNA to sunscreen and from sunscreen to 2-aminopurine- (a fluorescent DNA base) labeled DNA will be presented.

  14. A Naturally Occurring Mutation K220T in the Pleiotropic Activator PrfA of Listeria Monocytogenes Results in a Loss of Virulence Due to Decreasing DNA-Binding Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Velge,P.; Herler, M.; Johansson, J.; Roches, S.; Temoin, S.; Fedorov, A.; Gracieux, P.; Almo, S.; Goebel, W.; Cossart, P.

    2007-01-01

    The sequencing of prfA, encoding the transcriptional regulator of virulence genes, in 26 low-virulence field Listeria monocytogenes strains showed that eight strains exhibited the same single amino-acid substitution: PrfAK220T. These strains exhibited no expression of PrfA-regulated proteins and thus no virulence. This substitution inactivated PrfA, since expression of the PrfAK220T mutant gene in an EGD{Delta}prfA strain did not restore the haemolytic and phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C activities, in contrast to the wild-type prfA gene. The substitution of the lysine at position 220 occurred in the helix H. However, the data showed that the PrfAK220T protein is dimerized just as well as its wild-type counterpart, but does not bind to PrfA-boxes. PrfAK220T did not form a PrfA-DNA complex in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, but low concentrations of CI complexes (PrfAK220T-RNA polymerase-DNA complex) were formed by adding RNA polymerase, suggesting that PrfA interacted with RNA polymerase in solution in the absence of DNA. Formation of some transcriptionally active complexes was confirmed by in vitro runoff transcription assays and quantitative RT-PCR. Crystallographic analyses described the structure of native PrfA and highlighted the key role of allosteric changes in the activity of PrfA and especially the role of the Lys220 in the conformation of the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif.

  15. Predicting ligand binding affinity with alchemical free energy methods in a polar model binding site

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Sarah E.; Mobley, David L.; Rocklin, Gabriel; Graves, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and modeling study of organic ligand molecules binding to a slightly polar engineered cavity site in T4 lysozyme (L99A/M102Q). For modeling, we computed alchemical absolute binding free energies. These were blind tests performed prospectively on 13 diverse, previously untested candidate ligand molecules. We predicted that eight compounds would bind to the cavity and five would not; 11 of 13 predictions were correct at this level. The RMS error to the measurable absolute binding energies was 1.8 kcal/mol. In addition, we computed relative binding free energies for six phenol derivatives starting from two known ligands: phenol and catechol. The average RMS error in the relative free energy prediction was 2.5 (phenol) and 1.1 (catechol) kcal/mol. To understand these results at atomic resolution, we obtained x-ray co-complex structures for nine of the diverse ligands and for all six phenol analogs. The average RMSD of the predicted pose to the experiment was 2.0Å (diverse set), 1.8Å (phenol derived predictions) and 1.2Å (catechol derived predictions). We found that to predict accurate affinities and rank-orderings required near-native starting orientations of the ligand in the binding site. Unanticipated binding modes, multiple ligand binding, and protein conformational change all proved challenging for the free energy methods. We believe these results can help guide future improvements in physics-based absolute binding free energy methods. PMID:19782087

  16. Dual affinity method for plasmid DNA purification in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, H S C; Hine, A V; Brocchini, S; Slater, N K H; Marcos, J C

    2010-02-26

    The DNA binding fusion protein, LacI-His6-GFP, together with the conjugate PEG-IDA-Cu(II) (10 kDa) was evaluated as a dual affinity system for the pUC19 plasmid extraction from an alkaline bacterial cell lysate in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/dextran (DEX) aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). In a PEG 600-DEX 40 ATPS containing 0.273 nmol of LacI fusion protein and 0.14% (w/w) of the functionalised PEG-IDA-Cu(II), more than 72% of the plasmid DNA partitioned to the PEG phase, without RNA or genomic DNA contamination as evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. In a second extraction stage, the elution of pDNA from the LacI binding complex proved difficult using either dextran or phosphate buffer as second phase, though more than 75% of the overall protein was removed in both systems. A maximum recovery of approximately 27% of the pCU19 plasmid was achieved using the PEG-dextran system as a second extraction system, with 80-90% of pDNA partitioning to the bottom phase. This represents about 7.4 microg of pDNA extracted per 1 mL of pUC19 desalted lysate. PMID:20083249

  17. Controlling Affinity Binding with Peptide-Functionalized Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels**

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with peptide moieties have been widely used in regenerative medicine applications. While many studies have suggested the importance of affinity binding within PEG hydrogels, the relationships between the structures of the peptide motifs and their binding to protein therapeutics remain largely unexplored, especially in the recently developed thiol-acrylate photopolymerization systems. Herein, we employ Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and thiol-acrylate photopolymerizations to investigate how the architectures of affinity peptides in crosslinked hydrogels affect their binding to diffusible proteins. The binding between diffusible streptavidin and biotinylated peptide immobilized to PEG hydrogel network was used as a model system to reveal the interplay between affinity binding and peptide sequences/architectures. In addition, we design peptides with different structures to enhance affinity binding within PEG hydrogels and to provide tunable affinity-based controlled delivery of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). This study demonstrates the importance of affinity binding in controlling the availability of hydrogel-encapsulated proteins and provides strategies for enhancing affinity binding of protein therapeutics to bound peptide moieties in thiol-acrylate photopolymerized PEG hydrogels. The results presented herein should find useful on the design and fabrication of hydrogels to retain and sustained release of growth factors for promoting tissue regeneration. PMID:20148198

  18. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  19. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H.; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA–DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  20. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA-DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  1. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  2. Purification of a cellular, double-stranded DNA-binding protein required for initiation of adenovirus DNA replication by using a rapid filter-binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, J F; Stillman, B

    1986-01-01

    A rapid and quantitative nitrocellulose filter-binding assay is described for the detection of nuclear factor I, a HeLa cell sequence-specific DNA-binding protein required for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. In this assay, the abundant nonspecific DNA-binding activity present in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts was greatly reduced by preincubation of these extracts with a homopolymeric competitor DNA. Subsequently, specific DNA-binding activity was detected as the preferential retention of a labeled 48-base-pair DNA fragment containing a functional nuclear factor I binding site compared with a control DNA fragment to which nuclear factor I did not bind specifically. This specific DNA-binding activity was shown to be both quantitative and time dependent. Furthermore, the conditions of this assay allowed footprinting of nuclear factor I in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts and quantitative detection of the protein during purification. Using unfrozen HeLa cells and reagents known to limit endogenous proteolysis, nuclear factor I was purified to near homogeneity from HeLa nuclear extracts by a combination of standard chromatography and specific DNA affinity chromatography. Over a 400-fold purification of nuclear factor I, on the basis of the specific activity of both sequence-specific DNA binding and complementation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro, was affected by this purification. The most highly purified fraction was greatly enriched for a polypeptide of 160 kilodaltons on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Furthermore, this protein cosedimented with specific DNA-binding activity on glycerol gradients. That this fraction indeed contained nuclear factor I was demonstrated by both DNase I footprinting and its function in the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Finally, the stoichiometry of specific DNA binding by nuclear factor I is shown to be most consistent with 2 mol of the 160-kilodalton polypeptide

  3. DNA-binding and regulation mechanisms of the SIX family of retinal determination proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengyong; Mamedova, Aygun; Hegde, Rashmi S

    2008-03-18

    The Six/sine oculis proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that are part of the Pax/Eya/Six/Dach retinal determination cascade involved in embryonic cell fate determination. There are six mammalian Six homologues, divided into three classes on the basis of sequence homology. In the present study we examined the DNA-binding specificity and mechanisms of Six2 and Six6 toward the Trex/MEF3 consensus sequence and the core tetranucleotide ATTA commonly recognized by homeodomain proteins. The results suggest that the Six homeodomain does not bind DNA owing to the absence of a key structural feature, the basic N-terminal arm, implicated in canonical homeodomain-DNA binding. Furthermore, the DNA-binding mechanisms and DNA sequence specificity differ among these Six proteins despite the complete conservation of predicted DNA-contacting residues in their homeodomains. Inclusion of 14 amino acid residues immediately C-terminal to the homeodomain of Six6 yields a protein construct able to bind both DNA sequences tested with nanomolar affinity. However, an analogous Six2 construct remains unable to bind DNA. Furthermore, we show that the DNA-binding affinity of Six2 is increased nearly 12-fold by complex formation with the Eyes Absent tyrosine phosphatase, while Six6-DNA binding is not similarly enhanced. This phenomenon could contribute to the synergy observed between Six2 and Eyes Absent in transcriptional activation and in eye development. PMID:18293925

  4. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  5. Time-Resolved Detection of Light-Induced Dimerization of Monomeric Aureochrome-1 and Change in Affinity for DNA.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yuki; Nakasone, Yusuke; Nakatani, Yoichi; Hisatomi, Osamu; Terazima, Masahide

    2016-08-01

    Aureochrome (Aureo) is a recently discovered blue light sensor protein initially from Vaucheria frigida, in which it controls blue light-dependent branch formation and/or development of a sex organ by a light-dependent change in the affinity for DNA. Although photochemical reactions of Aureo-LOV (LOV is a C-terminal light-oxygen-voltage domain) and the N-terminal truncated construct containing a bZIP (N-terminal basic leucine zipper domain) and a LOV domain have previously been reported, the reaction kinetics of the change in affinity for DNA have never been elucidated. The reactions of Aureo where the cysteines are replaced by serines (AureoCS) as well as the kinetics of the change in affinity for a target DNA are investigated in the time-domain. The dimerization rate constant is obtained as 2.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), which suggests that the photoinduced dimerization occurs in the LOV domain and the bZIP domain dimerizes using the interaction with DNA. Surprisingly, binding with the target DNA is completed very quickly, 7.7 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), which is faster than the protein dimerization rate. It is proposed that the nonspecific electrostatic interaction, which is observed as a weak binding with DNA, may play a role in the efficient searching for the target sequence within the DNA. PMID:27404115

  6. Metal-polybenzimidazole complexes as a nonviral gene carrier: effects of the DNA affinity on gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueying; Dong, Xiongwei; Li, Xue; Meng, Xianggao; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Changlin

    2013-12-01

    The metal complex-based carriers are emerging likely as a new type of gene-delivery systems prone to systematic structural alteration and chemical tailoring. In our work, the DNA affinity of metal complexes with polybenzimidazoles was found to be one of the determinants that can regulate expression of the transgenes. Here, the correlations between the DNA affinity and transfection efficacy were explored by characterizing gene-delivering properties of a series of Co(2+)- and Ca(2+)-polybenzimidazole complexes. The binding equilibrium constants (Kobs) of the divalent metal complexes to DNA, which is considered as a measure of the DNA affinity of metal complexes, were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV-visible absorption titration. The properties of DNA condensates formed with the metal complexes including sizes, ζ potential and morphology were observed to be altered with Kobs values. The monodispersed spherical condensates were found only for the Ca(2+) complexes whose DNA affinity is weaker than that of the Co(2+) complexes. However, the cell internalization examination indicated that cell uptake of the DNA condensates is independent of homogeneity in their sizes and morphology. The comparison of transgene expression showed that that the Ca(2+) complex-mediated transfection has higher efficiency than the Co(2+) complexes under the conditions tested, and the transfection efficacy cannot be correlated with the cell uptake of DNA condensates. Moreover, the Ca(2+) complexes and their DNA condensates had lower cytotoxicity than the Co(2+) complexes. Thus, the DNA affinity should be one of the factors to be capable of regulating the gene-delivering property of metal complexes. PMID:24099694

  7. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  8. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  9. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  10. Parameterization of an effective potential for protein–ligand binding from host–guest affinity data

    PubMed Central

    Wickstrom, Lauren; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Nguyen, Crystal; Gilson, Michael K.; Kurtzman, Tom; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Force field accuracy is still one of the “stalemates” in biomolecular modeling. Model systems with high quality experimental data are valuable instruments for the validation and improvement of effective potentials. With respect to protein–ligand binding, organic host–guest complexes have long served as models for both experimental and computational studies because of the abundance of binding affinity data available for such systems. Binding affinity data collected for cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes, a popular model for molecular recognition, is potentially a more reliable resource for tuning energy parameters than hydration free energy measurements. Convergence of binding free energy calculations on CD host–guest systems can also be obtained rapidly, thus offering the opportunity to assess the robustness of these parameters. In this work, we demonstrate how implicit solvent parameters can be developed using binding affinity experimental data and the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) and validated using the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory analysis. These new solvation parameters were used to study protein–ligand binding in two drug targets against the HIV-1 virus and improved the agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding affinities. This work illustrates how benchmark sets of high quality experimental binding affinity data and physics-based binding free energy models can be used to evaluate and optimize force fields for protein–ligand systems. PMID:26256816

  11. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  12. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Brian H.; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J.; Engelke, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  13. The Affinity of EBNA1 for Its Origin of DNA Synthesis Is a Determinant of the Origin's Replicative Efficiency▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Scott E.; Zeller, Krisztina; Schepers, Aloys; Sugden, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replicates its genome as a licensed plasmid in latently infected cells. Although replication of this plasmid is essential for EBV latent infection, its synthesis still fails for 16% of the templates in S phase. In order to understand these failures, we sought to determine whether the affinity of the initiator protein (EBNA1) for its binding sites in the origin affects the efficiency of plasmid replication. We have answered this question by using several engineered origins modeled upon the arrangement of EBNA1-binding sites found in DS, the major plasmid origin of EBV. The human TRF2 protein also binds to half-sites in DS and increases EBNA1's affinity for its own sites; we therefore also tested origin efficiency in the presence or absence of these sites. We have found that if TRF2-half-binding sites are present, the efficiency of supporting the initiation of DNA synthesis and of establishing a plasmid bearing that origin directly correlates with the affinity of EBNA1 for that origin. Moreover, the presence of TRF2-half-binding sites also increases the average level of EBNA1 and ORC2 bound to those origins in vivo, as measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Lastly, we have created an origin of DNA synthesis from high-affinity EBNA1-binding sites and TRF2-half-binding sites that functions severalfold more efficiently than does DS. This finding indicates that EBV has selected a submaximally efficient origin of DNA synthesis for the latent phase of its life cycle. This enhanced origin could be used practically in human gene vectors to improve their efficiency in therapy and basic research. PMID:18385243

  14. Structure-based protocol for identifying mutations that enhance protein-protein binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Eletr, Ziad M; Purbeck, Carrie; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Kuhlman, Brian

    2007-08-31

    The ability to manipulate protein binding affinities is important for the development of proteins as biosensors, industrial reagents, and therapeutics. We have developed a structure-based method to rationally predict single mutations at protein-protein interfaces that enhance binding affinities. The protocol is based on the premise that increasing buried hydrophobic surface area and/or reducing buried hydrophilic surface area will generally lead to enhanced affinity if large steric clashes are not introduced and buried polar groups are not left without a hydrogen bond partner. The procedure selects affinity enhancing point mutations at the protein-protein interface using three criteria: (1) the mutation must be from a polar amino acid to a non-polar amino acid or from a non-polar amino acid to a larger non-polar amino acid, (2) the free energy of binding as calculated with the Rosetta protein modeling program should be more favorable than the free energy of binding calculated for the wild-type complex and (3) the mutation should not be predicted to significantly destabilize the monomers. The performance of the computational protocol was experimentally tested on two separate protein complexes; Galpha(i1) from the heterotrimeric G-protein system bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif, and the E2, UbcH7, bound to the E3, E6AP from the ubiquitin pathway. Twelve single-site mutations that were predicted to be stabilizing were synthesized and characterized in the laboratory. Nine of the 12 mutations successfully increased binding affinity with five of these increasing binding by over 1.0 kcal/mol. To further assess our approach we searched the literature for point mutations that pass our criteria and have experimentally determined binding affinities. Of the eight mutations identified, five were accurately predicted to increase binding affinity, further validating the method as a useful tool to increase protein-protein binding affinities. PMID:17603074

  15. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  16. RNA Bind-n-Seq: Measuring the Binding Affinity Landscape of RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nicole J; Robertson, Alex D; Burge, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) coordinate post-transcriptional control of gene expression, often through sequence-specific recognition of primary transcripts or mature messenger RNAs. Hundreds of RBPs are encoded in the human genome, most with undefined or incompletely defined biological roles. Understanding the function of these factors will require the identification of each RBP's distinct RNA binding specificity. RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS) is a high-throughput, cost-effective in vitro method capable of resolving sequence and secondary structure preferences of RBPs. Dissociation constants can also be inferred from RBNS data when provided with additional experimental information. Here, we describe the experimental procedures to perform RBNS and discuss important parameters of the method and ways that the experiment can be tailored to the specific RBP under study. Additionally, we present the conceptual framework and execution of the freely available RBNS computational pipeline and describe the outputs of the pipeline. Different approaches to quantify binding specificity, quality control metrics, and estimation of binding constants are also covered. PMID:26068750

  17. Experimental and theoretical binding affinity between polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and selected phenolic compounds from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; López-Cortés, Xaviera A; Castro, Ricardo I; Avila-Salas, Fabián; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Laurie, V Felipe; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-02-01

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent, widely used in winemaking and brewing, whose mode of action in removing phenolic compounds has not been fully characterised. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental and theoretical binding affinity of PVPP towards six phenolic compounds representing different types of phenolic species. The interaction between PVPP and phenolics was evaluated in model solutions, where hydroxyl groups, hydrophobic bonding and steric hindrance were characterised. The results of the study indicated that PVPP exhibits high affinity for quercetin and catechin, moderate affinity for epicatechin, gallic acid and lower affinity for 4-methylcatechol and caffeic acid. The affinity has a direct correlation with the hydroxylation degree of each compound. The results show that the affinity of PVPP towards phenols is related with frontier orbitals. This work demonstrates a direct correlation between the experimental affinity and the interaction energy calculations obtained through computational chemistry methods. PMID:25172736

  18. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  19. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  20. Binding affinities of CRBPI and CRBPII for 9-cis-retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Bright, Frank V.; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular retinol binding-protein I (CRBPI) and cellular retinol binding-protein II (CRBPII) serve as intracellular retinoid chaperones that bind retinol and retinal with high affinity and facilitate substrate delivery to select enzymes that catalyze retinoic acid (RA) and retinyl ester biosynthesis. Recently, 9-cis-RA has been identified in vivo in the pancreas, where it contributes to regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In vitro, 9-cis-RA activates RXR (retinoid×receptors), which serve as therapeutic targets for treating cancer and metabolic diseases. Binding affinities and structure–function relationships have been well characterized for CRBPI and CRBPII with all-trans-retinoids, but not for 9-cis-retinoids. This study extended current knowledge by establishing binding affinities for CRBPI and CRBPII with 9-cis-retinoids. Methods We have determined apparent dissociation constants, Kd′, through monitoring binding of 9-cis-retinol, 9-cis-retinal, and 9-cis-RA with CRBPI and CRBPII by fluorescence spectroscopy, and analyzing the data with non-linear regression. We compared these data to the data we obtained for all-trans- and 13-cis-retinoids under identical conditions. Results CRBPI and CRBPII, respectively, bind 9-cis-retinol ( Kd′, 11 nM and 68 nM) and 9-cis-retinal ( Kd′, 8 nM and 5 nM) with high affinity. No significant 9-cis-RA binding was observed with CRBPI or CRBPII. Conclusions CRBPI and CRBPII bind 9-cis-retinol and 9-cis-retinal with high affinities, albeit with affinities somewhat lower than for all-trans-retinol and all-trans-retinal. General significance These data provide further insight into structure–binding relationships of cellular retinol binding-proteins and are consistent with a model of 9-cis-RA biosynthesis that involves chaperoned delivery of 9-cis-retinoids to enzymes that recognize retinoid binding-proteins. PMID:21382444

  1. One-step selection of Vaccinia virus-binding DNA aptamers by MonoLEX

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Andreas; Kurth, Andreas; Dunkhorst, Anna; Pänke, Oliver; Sielaff, Hendrik; Junge, Wolfgang; Muth, Doreen; Scheller, Frieder; Stöcklein, Walter; Dahmen, Claudia; Pauli, Georg; Kage, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background As a new class of therapeutic and diagnostic reagents, more than fifteen years ago RNA and DNA aptamers were identified as binding molecules to numerous small compounds, proteins and rarely even to complete pathogen particles. Most aptamers were isolated from complex libraries of synthetic nucleic acids by a process termed SELEX based on several selection and amplification steps. Here we report the application of a new one-step selection method (MonoLEX) to acquire high-affinity DNA aptamers binding Vaccinia virus used as a model organism for complex target structures. Results The selection against complete Vaccinia virus particles resulted in a 64-base DNA aptamer specifically binding to orthopoxviruses as validated by dot blot analysis, Surface Plasmon Resonance, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and real-time PCR, following an aptamer blotting assay. The same oligonucleotide showed the ability to inhibit in vitro infection of Vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion The MonoLEX method is a straightforward procedure as demonstrated here for the identification of a high-affinity DNA aptamer binding Vaccinia virus. MonoLEX comprises a single affinity chromatography step, followed by subsequent physical segmentation of the affinity resin and a single final PCR amplification step of bound aptamers. Therefore, this procedure improves the selection of high affinity aptamers by reducing the competition between aptamers of different affinities during the PCR step, indicating an advantage for the single-round MonoLEX method. PMID:17697378

  2. Family 42 carbohydrate-binding modules display multiple arabinoxylan-binding interfaces presenting different ligand affinities.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Teresa; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Alves, Victor D; Dias, Fernando M V; Luís, Ana S; Prates, José A M; Ferreira, Luís M A; Romão, Maria J; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2010-10-01

    Enzymes that degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides display a modular architecture comprising a catalytic domain bound to one or more non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs display considerable variation in primary structure and are grouped into 59 sequence-based families organized in the Carbohydrate-Active enZYme (CAZy) database. Here we report the crystal structure of CtCBM42A together with the biochemical characterization of two other members of family 42 CBMs from Clostridium thermocellum. CtCBM42A, CtCBM42B and CtCBM42C bind specifically to the arabinose side-chains of arabinoxylans and arabinan, suggesting that various cellulosomal components are targeted to these regions of the plant cell wall. The structure of CtCBM42A displays a beta-trefoil fold, which comprises 3 sub-domains designated as alpha, beta and gamma. Each one of the three sub-domains presents a putative carbohydrate-binding pocket where an aspartate residue located in a central position dominates ligand recognition. Intriguingly, the gamma sub-domain of CtCBM42A is pivotal for arabinoxylan binding, while the concerted action of beta and gamma sub-domains of CtCBM42B and CtCBM42C is apparently required for ligand sequestration. Thus, this work reveals that the binding mechanism of CBM42 members is in contrast with that of homologous CBM13s where recognition of complex polysaccharides results from the cooperative action of three protein sub-domains presenting similar affinities. PMID:20637315

  3. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaA(ATP) is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  4. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaAATP is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  5. Prediction and Analysis of Canonical EF Hand Loop and Qualitative Estimation of Ca2+ Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Mohit; Padhan, Narendra; Bhattacharya, Alok; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of functions carried out by EF hand-containing calcium-binding proteins is due to various interactions made by these proteins as well as the range of affinity levels for Ca2+ displayed by them. However, accurate methods are not available for prediction of binding affinities. Here, amino acid patterns of canonical EF hand sequences obtained from available crystal structures were used to develop a classifier that distinguishes Ca2+-binding loops and non Ca2+-binding regions with 100% accuracy. To investigate further, we performed a proteome-wide prediction for E. histolytica, and classified known EF-hand proteins. We compared our results with published methods on the E. histolytica proteome scan, and demonstrated our method to be more specific and accurate for predicting potential canonical Ca2+-binding loops. Furthermore, we annotated canonical EF-hand motifs and classified them based on their Ca2+-binding affinities using support vector machines. Using a novel method generated from position-specific scoring metrics and then tested against three different experimentally derived EF-hand-motif datasets, predictions of Ca2+-binding affinities were between 87 and 90% accurate. Our results show that the tool described here is capable of predicting Ca2+-binding affinity constants of EF-hand proteins. The web server is freely available at http://202.41.10.46/calb/index.html. PMID:24760183

  6. Investigating the Antiproliferative Activity of High Affinity DNA Aptamer on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Li, Jasmine J.; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic mitogen involved in promoting tumor angiogenesis inside the body. VEGF is a key protein required for progression of tumor from benign to malignant phenotype. In this study, we investigated the binding affinity of a previously selected 26-mer DNA aptamer sequence (SL2-B) against heparin binding domain (HBD) of VEGF165 protein. The SL2-B was first chemically modified by introduction of phosphorothioate linkages (PS-linkages). Subsequently, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) were used to determine the binding affinity, specificity and to deduce the conformation of PS-modified SL2-B sequence. Finally, antiproliferative activity of the modified SL2-B sequence on Hep G2 cancer cells was investigated. Our results demonstrate a marked enhancement in the biostability of the SL2-B sequence after PS modification. The modified SL2-B sequence also exhibits enhanced antiproliferative activity against Hep G2 cancer cells in hypoxia conditions. In addition, modified SL2-B sequence inhibits the expression of Jagged-1 protein, which is one of the ligands to VEGF linked delta/jagged-notch signaling pathway. PMID:23341879

  7. Determination of protein-ligand binding affinity by NMR: observations from serum albumin model systems.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Lee; Rutherford, Samantha; Fletcher, Dan

    2005-06-01

    The usefulness of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein for testing NMR methods for the study of protein-ligand interactions is discussed. Isothermal titration calorimetry established the binding affinity and stoichiometry of the specific binding site for L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, naproxen, ibuprofen, salicylic acid and warfarin. The binding affinities of the same ligands determined by NMR methods are universally weaker (larger KD). This is because the NMR methods are susceptible to interference from additional non-specific binding. The L-tryptophan-BSA and naproxen-BSA systems were the best behaved model systems. PMID:15816062

  8. Specific binding of the adenovirus terminal protein precursor-DNA polymerase complex to the origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Rijnders, A W; van Bergen, B G; van der Vliet, P C; Sussenbach, J S

    1983-01-01

    Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication is dependent on a complex of the precursor of the terminal protein and the adenovirus-coded DNA polymerase (pTP-pol complex). This complex catalyzes the formation of a covalent linkage between dCMP and pTP in the presence of a functional origin of DNA replication residing in the terminal nucleotide sequence of adenovirus DNA. We have purified the pTP-pol complex of adenovirus type 5 and studied its binding to double-stranded DNA. Using DNA-cellulose chromatography it could be shown that the pTP-pol complex has a higher affinity for adenovirus DNA than for calf thymus or pBR322 DNA. From the differential binding of the pTP-pol complex to plasmids containing adenovirus terminal sequences with different deletions, it has been concluded that a sequence of 14 nucleotide pairs at positions 9-22 plays a crucial role in the binding of pTP-pol to adenovirus DNA. This region is conserved in the DNA's of all human adenovirus serotypes and is obviously an important structural element of the adenovirus origin of DNA replication. Comparative binding studies with adenovirus DNA polymerase and pTP-pol indicated that pTP is responsible for the binding. The nature of the binding of pTP-pol to the conserved sequence will be discussed. Images PMID:6672772

  9. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Luis A; Vedenko, Anastasia; Kurland, Jesse V; Rogers, Julia M; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E; Bulyk, Martha L

    2016-03-25

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA binding activity and used universal protein-binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  10. Automethylation of SUV39H2, an oncogenic histone lysine methyltransferase, regulates its binding affinity to substrate proteins.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lianhua; Nakakido, Makoto; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2016-04-19

    We previously reported that the histone lysine methyltransferase SUV39H2, which is overexpressed in various types of human cancer, plays a critical role in the DNA repair after double strand breakage, and possesses oncogenic activity. Although its biological significance in tumorigenesis has been elucidated, the regulatory mechanism of SUV39H2 activity through post-translational modification is not well known. In this study, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo automethylation of SUV39H2 at lysine 392. Automethylation of SUV39H2 led to impairment of its binding affinity to substrate proteins such as histone H3 and LSD1. Furthermore, we observed that hyper-automethylated SUV39H2 reduced methylation activities to substrates through affecting the binding affinity to substrate proteins. Our finding unveils a novel autoregulatory mechanism of SUV39H2 through lysine automethylation. PMID:26988914

  11. Automethylation of SUV39H2, an oncogenic histone lysine methyltransferase, regulates its binding affinity to substrate proteins

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Lianhua; Nakakido, Makoto; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the histone lysine methyltransferase SUV39H2, which is overexpressed in various types of human cancer, plays a critical role in the DNA repair after double strand breakage, and possesses oncogenic activity. Although its biological significance in tumorigenesis has been elucidated, the regulatory mechanism of SUV39H2 activity through post-translational modification is not well known. In this study, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo automethylation of SUV39H2 at lysine 392. Automethylation of SUV39H2 led to impairment of its binding affinity to substrate proteins such as histone H3 and LSD1. Furthermore, we observed that hyper-automethylated SUV39H2 reduced methylation activities to substrates through affecting the binding affinity to substrate proteins. Our finding unveils a novel autoregulatory mechanism of SUV39H2 through lysine automethylation. PMID:26988914

  12. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    PubMed

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-10-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experiments establish that metal ion is required for binding to DNA and that the amino-terminal zinc finger shows a significantly greater affinity for glucocorticoid response element-containing DNA over control DNA. These observations indicate that a single synthetic "zinc finger peptide" is able to bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. PMID:2120703

  13. (/sup 125/I)diiodoinsulins. Binding affinities, biologic potencies, and properties of their decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Maceda, B.; Linde, S.; Sonne, O.; Gliemann, J.

    1982-07-01

    Insulin was iodinated with 0.3-0.4 mol /sup 125/I/mol insulin using the lactoperoxidase method. About one-third of the radioactivity incorporated into insulin was in diiodoinsulins and about 40% of these molecules contained diiodotyrosine in residue 14 of the A chain. Most of the remaining molecules contained one A14-monoiodotyrosine and one monoiodotyrosine in either position A19, B16, or B26. The binding affinity and biologic potency of this heterogeneous diiodoinsulin preparation was not significantly different from that of A14-(/sup 125/I)monoiodoinsulin in rat adipocytes, whereas it was slightly reduced in hepatocytes and IM-9 lymphocytes. From the iodine distribution and previous data on the binding affinity of each of the four monoiodoinsulin isomers it was calculated that A14-diiodotyrosine-insulin possesses full binding affinity and biologic potency in adipocytes. Diiodoinsulins isolated from another iodoinsulin preparation (iodate method) contained 58% A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin, and most remaining molecules contained one A19-monoiodotyrosine. The binding affinity of this mixed diiodoinsulin preparation was approximately one-fourth of that of A14-monoiodoinsulin in adipocytes, IM-9 lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. It was calculated that A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin is nearly devoid of binding affinity. The diiodoinsulins (lactoperoxidase method) decayed to iodide (probably from diiodotyrosine-insulin) or to polymers with little specific but a markedly increased nonspecific binding. In addition, the polymers had a marked tendency to adsorb to cellulose acetate filters. Conclusions: 1. The binding affinities of diiodoinsulins range from very low values to values at least as high as that of insulin depending on the positions of the iodine moieties. 2. The relative binding affinities vary among tissues. 3. Polymeric decay products give high nonspecific binding.

  14. Stretching DNA to quantify nonspecific protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sachin; Fountain, Chandler; Dunlap, David; Family, Fereydoon; Finzi, Laura

    2012-07-01

    Nonspecific binding of regulatory proteins to DNA can be an important mechanism for target search and storage. This seems to be the case for the lambda repressor protein (CI), which maintains lysogeny after infection of E. coli. CI binds specifically at two distant regions along the viral genome and induces the formation of a repressive DNA loop. However, single-molecule imaging as well as thermodynamic and kinetic measurements of CI-mediated looping show that CI also binds to DNA nonspecifically and that this mode of binding may play an important role in maintaining lysogeny. This paper presents a robust phenomenological approach using a recently developed method based on the partition function, which allows calculation of the number of proteins bound nonspecific to DNA from measurements of the DNA extension as a function of applied force. This approach was used to analyze several cycles of extension and relaxation of λ DNA performed at several CI concentrations to measure the dissociation constant for nonspecific binding of CI (˜100 nM), and to obtain a measurement of the induced DNA compaction (˜10%) by CI.

  15. Affinity of the heparin binding motif of Noggin1 to heparan sulfate and its visualization in the embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Nesterenko, Alexey M; Orlov, Eugeny E; Ermakova, Galina V; Ivanov, Igor A; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Martynova, Natalia Y; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    Heparin binding motifs were found in many secreted proteins and it was suggested that they are responsible for retardation of the protein diffusion within the intercellular space due to the binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycanes (HSPG). Here we used synthetic FITC labeled heparin binding motif (HBM peptide) of the Xenopus laevis secreted BMP inhibitor Noggin1 to study its diffusion along the surface of the heparin beads by FRAP method. As a result, we have found out that diffusivity of HBM-labeled FITC was indeed much lesser than those predicted by theoretical calculations even for whole protein of the Noggin size. We also compared by isothermal titration calorimetry the binding affinity of HBM and the control oligolysine peptide to several natural polyanions including heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, the bacterial dextran sulfate and salmon sperm DNA, and demonstrated that HBM significantly exceeds oligolysine peptide in the affinity to HS, heparin and DNA. By contrast, oligolysine peptide bound with higher affinity to dextran sulfate. We speculate that such a difference may ensure specificity of the morphogen binding to HSPG and could be explained by steric constrains imposed by different distribution of the negative charges along a given polymeric molecule. Finally, by using EGFP-HBM recombinant protein we have visualized the natural pattern of the Noggin1 binding sites within the X. laevis gastrula and demonstrated that these sites forms a dorsal-ventral concentration gradient, with a maximum in the dorsal blastopore lip. In sum, our data provide a quantitative basis for modeling the process of Noggin1 diffusion in embryonic tissues, considering its interaction with HSPG. PMID:26525852

  16. Dicyanovinylnaphthalenes for neuroimaging of amyloids and relationships of electronic structures and geometries to binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Petrič, Andrej; Johnson, Scott A.; Pham, Hung V.; Li, Ying; Čeh, Simon; Golobič, Amalija; Agdeppa, Eric D.; Timbol, Gerald; Liu, Jie; Keum, Gyochang; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Kepe, Vladimir; Houk, Kendall N.; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2012-01-01

    The positron-emission tomography (PET) probe 2-(1-[6-[(2-fluoroethyl)(methyl)amino]-2-naphthyl]ethylidene) (FDDNP) is used for the noninvasive brain imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) and other amyloid aggregates present in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. A series of FDDNP analogs has been synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic and computational methods. The binding affinities of these molecules have been measured experimentally and explained through the use of a computational model. The analogs were created by systematically modifying the donor and the acceptor sides of FDDNP to learn the structural requirements for optimal binding to Aβ aggregates. FDDNP and its analogs are neutral, environmentally sensitive, fluorescent molecules with high dipole moments, as evidenced by their spectroscopic properties and dipole moment calculations. The preferred solution-state conformation of these compounds is directly related to the binding affinities. The extreme cases were a nonplanar analog t-butyl-FDDNP, which shows low binding affinity for Aβ aggregates (520 nM Ki) in vitro and a nearly planar tricyclic analog cDDNP, which displayed the highest binding affinity (10 pM Ki). Using a previously published X-ray crystallographic model of 1,1-dicyano-2-[6-(dimethylamino)naphthalen-2-yl]propene (DDNP) bound to an amyloidogenic Aβ peptide model, we show that the binding affinity is inversely related to the distortion energy necessary to avoid steric clashes along the internal surface of the binding channel. PMID:23012452

  17. Quinolone-DNA Interaction: Sequence-Dependent Binding to Single-Stranded DNA Reflects the Interaction within the Gyrase-DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Christian G.; Barnard, Faye M.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of quinolones with DNA by a number of methods to establish whether a particular binding mode correlates with quinolone potency. The specificities of the quinolone-mediated DNA cleavage reaction of DNA gyrase were compared for a number of quinolones. Two patterns that depended on the potency of the quinolone were identified. Binding to plasmid DNA was examined by measuring the unwinding of pBR322 by quinolones; no correlation with quinolone potency was observed. Quinolone binding to short DNA oligonucleotides was measured by surface plasmon resonance. The quinolones bound to both single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides in an Mg2+-dependent manner. Quinolones bound to single-stranded DNA with a higher affinity, and the binding exhibited sequence dependence; binding to double-stranded DNA was sequence independent. The variations in binding in the presence of metal ions showed that Mg2+ promoted tighter, more specific binding to single-stranded DNA than softer metal ions (Mn2+ and Cd2+). Single-stranded DNA binding by quinolones correlated with the in vitro quinolone potency, indicating that this mode of interaction may reflect the interaction of the quinolone with DNA in the context of the gyrase-DNA complex. PMID:12604512

  18. Structure-function analysis of the DNA binding domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ABF1.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, G; Kim, J; Rho, H M; Jung, G

    1995-01-01

    To localize the DNA binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ars binding factor 1 (ABF1), a multifunctional DNA binding protein, plasmid constructs carrying point mutations and internal deletions in the ABF1 gene were generated and expressed in Escherichia coli. Normal and mutant ABF1 proteins were purified by affinity chromatography and their DNA binding activities were analyzed. The substitution of His61, Cys66 and His67 respectively, located in the zinc finger motif in the N-terminal region (amino acids 40-91), eliminated the DNA binding activity of ABF1 protein. Point mutations in the middle region of ABF1, specifically at Leu353, Leu399, Tyr403, Gly404, Phe410 and Lys434, also eliminated or reduced DNA binding activity. However, the DNA binding activity of point mutants of Ser307, Ser496 and Glu649 was the same as that of wild-type ABF1 protein and deletion mutants of amino acids 200-265, between the zinc finger region and the middle region (residues 323-496) retained DNA binding activity. As a result, we confirmed that the DNA binding domain of ABF1 appears to be bipartite and another DNA binding motif, other than the zinc finger motif, is situated between amino acid residues 323 and 496. Images PMID:7659521

  19. A systematic survey of the Cys2His2 zinc finger DNA-binding landscape

    PubMed Central

    Persikov, Anton V.; Wetzel, Joshua L.; Rowland, Elizabeth F.; Oakes, Benjamin L.; Xu, Denise J.; Singh, Mona; Noyes, Marcus B.

    2015-01-01

    Cys2His2 zinc fingers (C2H2-ZFs) comprise the largest class of metazoan DNA-binding domains. Despite this domain's well-defined DNA-recognition interface, and its successful use in the design of chimeric proteins capable of targeting genomic regions of interest, much remains unknown about its DNA-binding landscape. To help bridge this gap in fundamental knowledge and to provide a resource for design-oriented applications, we screened large synthetic protein libraries to select binding C2H2-ZF domains for each possible three base pair target. The resulting data consist of >160 000 unique domain–DNA interactions and comprise the most comprehensive investigation of C2H2-ZF DNA-binding interactions to date. An integrated analysis of these independent screens yielded DNA-binding profiles for tens of thousands of domains and led to the successful design and prediction of C2H2-ZF DNA-binding specificities. Computational analyses uncovered important aspects of C2H2-ZF domain–DNA interactions, including the roles of within-finger context and domain position on base recognition. We observed the existence of numerous distinct binding strategies for each possible three base pair target and an apparent balance between affinity and specificity of binding. In sum, our comprehensive data help elucidate the complex binding landscape of C2H2-ZF domains and provide a foundation for efforts to determine, predict and engineer their DNA-binding specificities. PMID:25593323

  20. Structure-affinity relationship of the cocaine-binding aptamer with quinine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Slavkovic, Sladjana; Altunisik, Merve; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E

    2015-05-15

    In addition to binding its target molecule, cocaine, the cocaine-binding aptamer tightly binds the alkaloid quinine. In order to understand better how the cocaine-binding aptamer interacts with quinine we have used isothermal titration calorimetry-based binding experiments to study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a series of structural analogs of quinine. As a basis for comparison we also investigated the binding of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a set of cocaine metabolites. The bicyclic aromatic ring on quinine is essential for tight affinity by the cocaine-binding aptamer with 6-methoxyquinoline alone being sufficient for tight binding while the aliphatic portion of quinine, quinuclidine, does not show detectable binding. Compounds with three fused aromatic rings are not bound by the aptamer. Having a methoxy group at the 6-position of the bicyclic ring is important for binding as substituting it with a hydrogen, an alcohol or an amino group all result in lower binding affinity. For all ligands that bind, association is driven by a negative enthalpy compensated by unfavorable binding entropy. PMID:25858454

  1. Sequence requirement for specific interaction of an enhancer binding protein (EBP1) with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, L; Hay, R T

    1989-01-01

    Short DNA sequence motifs have been identified in viral and cellular enhancers which represent the binding sites for a variety of trans- acting factors. One such HeLa cell factor, EBP1, has been purified and shown to bind to sequences in the SV40 enhancer. The PRDII element in the human beta-interferon gene regulatory element (IRE) shows strong sequence similarity to the EBP1 binding site in the SV40 enhancer. We demonstrate here that EBP1 binds to its sites in the SV40 enhancer and IRE in a similar manner, making base specific contacts over one complete turn of the DNA double helix. Mutational analysis of the EBP1 sites in the IRE and SV40 enhancer has identified the DNA sequence requirements necessary for specific EBP1/DNA complex formation. In addition, 34 DNA sequences related to the EBP1 binding site were analysed for their ability to bind EBP1. Sequences constituting high affinity binding sites possess the sequence 5'-GG(N)6CC-3'. Single base pair changes in the region between the conserved Gs and Cs can generally be tolerated although it is clear that these intervening bases contribute to binding affinity. Mutations in the recognition site which could lead to gross structural changes in the DNA abolish EBP1 binding. Images PMID:2536920

  2. Modeling spatial correlation of DNA deformations: Allosteric effects of DNA protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinliang; Cao, Jianshu; Hao Ge Collaboration; X. Sunney Xie Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    We report a study of DNA deformations by a coarse grained mechanical model. Recent single molecule experimental studies show that when DNA molecule is deformed by its binding to a protein, the binding affinity of a second protein at distance L away from the first binding site is altered. To explain this observation, the relaxation of deformation along the DNA chain is examined. Our method predicts a general exponentially decaying behavior for differenct deformation modes. As an example, inter-helical distance deformation is studied in details, and is found to decay at a previously unknown lengthscale of 10 base pairs as a result of the balance between inter and intra DNA strand energy. This lengthscale is in good agreement with the said single molecule experimental observation. This model of local deformation relaxation helps us better understand many important issues in DNA such as the enhanced flexibility of DNA at short lengthscales and DNA repair mechanism inside cells. Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University

  3. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  4. A Controllable Aptamer-Based Self-Assembled DNA Dendrimer for High Affinity Targeting, Bioimaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Xie, Yi; An, Yuan; Huang, Yishun; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery is important in cancer therapy to decrease the systemic toxicity resulting from nonspecific drug distribution and to enhance drug delivery efficiency. We have developed an aptamer-based DNA dendritic nanostructure as a multifunctional vehicle for targeted cancer cell imaging and drug delivery. The multifunctional DNA dendrimer is constructed from functional Y-shaped building blocks with predesigned base-pairing hybridization including fluorophores, targeting DNA aptamers and intercalated anticancer drugs. With controllable step-by-step self-assembly, the programmable DNA dendrimer has several appealing features, including facile modular design, excellent biostability and biocompatibility, high selectivity, strong binding affinity, good cell internalization efficiency, and high drug loading capacity. Due to the unique structural features of DNA dendrimers, multiple copies of aptamers can be incorporated into each dendrimer, generating a multivalent aptamer-tethered nanostructure with enhanced binding affinity. A model chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was delivered via these aptamer-based DNA dendrimers and exerted a potent toxicity for target cancer cells (human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line) with low side effects for the non-target cells (human Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line). This controllable aptamer-based DNA dendrimer is a promising candidate for biomedical applications. PMID:25959874

  5. Monolayers of a Model Anesthetic-Binding Membrane Protein: Formation, Characterization, and Halothane-Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Churbanova, Inna Y.; Tronin, Andrey; Strzalka, Joseph; Gog, Thomas; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Johansson, Jonas S.; Blasie, J. Kent

    2006-01-01

    hbAP0 is a model membrane protein designed to possess an anesthetic-binding cavity in its hydrophilic domain and a cation channel in its hydrophobic domain. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction shows that hbAP0 forms four-helix bundles that are vectorially oriented within Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface. Single monolayers of hbAP0 on alkylated solid substrates would provide an optimal system for detailed structural and dynamical studies of anesthetic-peptide interaction via x-ray and neutron scattering and polarized spectroscopic techniques. Langmuir-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaeffer deposition and self-assembly techniques were used to form single monolayer films of the vectorially oriented peptide hbAP0 via both chemisorption and physisorption onto suitably alkylated solid substrates. The films were characterized by ultraviolet absorption, ellipsometry, circular dichroism, and polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The α-helical secondary structure of the peptide was retained in the films. Under certain conditions, the average orientation of the helical axis was inclined relative to the plane of the substrate, approaching perpendicular in some cases. The halothane-binding affinity of the vectorially oriented hbAP0 peptide in the single monolayers, with the volatile anesthetic introduced into the moist vapor environment of the monolayer, was found to be similar to that for the detergent-solubilized peptide. PMID:16473900

  6. Metal chelate affinity precipitation of RNA and purification of plasmid DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, Sindhu; Murphy, Jason; Galaev, Igor; Kumar, Ashok; Fox, George E.; Mattiasson, Bo; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    The affinity of metal chelates for amino acids, such as histidine, is widely used in purifying proteins, most notably through six-histidine 'tails'. We have found that metal affinity interactions can also be applied to separation of single-stranded nucleic acids through interactions involving exposed purines. Here we describe a metal affinity precipitation method to resolve RNA from linear and plasmid DNA. A copper-charged copolymer of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) and vinyl imidazole (VI) is used to purify plasmid from an alkaline lysate of E. coli. The NIPAM units confer reversible solubility on the copolymer while the imidazole chelates metal ions in a manner accessible to interaction with soluble ligands. RNA was separated from the plasmid by precipitation along with the polymer in the presence of 800 mM NaCl. Bound RNA could be recovered by elution with imidazole and separated from copolymer by a second precipitation step. RNA binding showed a strong dependence on temperature and on the type of buffer used.

  7. DNA-affinity-purified Chip (DAP-chip) Method to Determine Gene Targets for Bacterial Two component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. PMID:25079303

  8. Use of quantitative affinity chromatography for characterizing high-affinity interactions: binding of heparin to antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Jackson, C M; Winzor, D J

    1991-02-01

    The versatility of quantitative affinity chromatography (QAC) for evaluating the binding of macromolecular ligands to macromolecular acceptors has been increased substantially as a result of the derivation of the equations which describe the partitioning of acceptor between matrix-bound and soluble forms in terms of total, rather than free, ligand concentrations. In addition to simplifying the performance of the binding experiments, this development makes possible the application of the technique to systems characterized by affinities higher than those previously amenable to investigation by QAC. Addition of an on-line data acquisition system to monitor the concentration of partitioning solute in the liquid phase as a function of time has permitted the adoption of an empirical approach for determining the liquid-phase concentration of acceptor in the system at partition equilibrium, a development which decreases significantly the time required to obtain a complete binding curve by QAC. The application of these new QAC developments is illustrated by the determination of binding constants for the interactions of high-affinity heparin (Mr 20,300) with antithrombin III at three temperatures. Association constants of 8.0 +/- 2.2 x 10(7), 3.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(7), and 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M-1 were observed at 15, 25, and 35 degrees C, respectively. The standard enthalpy change of -4.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol that is calculated from these data is in good agreement with a reported value obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements. PMID:2035830

  9. Temperature dependence of high-affinity CCK receptor binding and CCK internalization in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Bailey, A.C.; Roach, E. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1988-04-01

    {sup 125}I-labeled cholecystokinin (CCK) binding and internalization were studied as a function of temperatures in isolated rat pancreatic acini. At 37{degree}C, acini readily bound and degraded {sup 125}I-CCK. When labeled hormone binding was inhibited by increasing amounts of unlabeled CCK, competition-inhibition curves were biphasic, consistent with both high- (K{sub d}, 18 pM) and low-affinity (K{sub d}, 13 nM) binding sites. At 4{degree}C, acini bound only one-third as much {sup 125}I-CCK and degradation was essentially abolished. At 4{degree}C, CCK competition curves were consistent with a single class of low-affinity binding sites (K{sub d}, 19 nM). Internalization of {sup 125}I-CCK was evaluated by three washing procedures utilizing acid, base, and trypsin. All were shown to remove membrane-bound {sup 125}I-CCK, and this finding was validated for trypsin by electron microscope autotradiography. When internalization of {sup 125}I-CCK was evaluated as a function of the medium concentration of CCK, both high- and low-affinity components were observed. These results suggest that high-affinity CCK binding and CCK internalization are separate temperature-sensitive processes. Moreover, internalization is not uniquely associated with high-affinity binding.

  10. Fluorescence-determined preferential binding of quinacrine to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, G; Doglia, S; Dolci, S; Sassi, G

    1981-01-01

    Quinacrine complexes with native DNA (Calf thymus, Micrococcus lysodeikticus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Colstridium perfringens) and synthetic polynucleotides (poly(dA) . poly(dT), poly[d(A-T)] . poly[d(A-T)], poly(dG) . poly(dC) and poly[d(G-C)] . poly[d(G-C)]) has been investigated in solution at 0.1 M NaCl, 0.05 M Tris HCl, 0.001 M EDTA, pH 7.5, at 20 degrees C. Fluorescence excitation spectra of complexes with dye concentration D = 5-30 microM and DNA phosphate concentration P = 400 microM have been examined from 300 to 500 nm, while collecting the emission above 520 nm. The amounts of free and bound quinacrine in the dye-DNA complexes have been determined by means of equilibrium dialysis experiments. Different affinities have been found for the various DNAs and their values have been examined with a model that assumes that the binding constants associated with alternating purine and pyrimidine sequences are larger than those relative to nonalternating ones. Among the alternating nearest neighbor base sequences, the Pyr(3'-5')Pur sequences, i.e., C-G, T-G, C-A and T-A seem to bind quinacrine stronger than the remaining sequences. In particular the three sites, where a G . C base pair is involved, are found to display higher affinities. Good agreement is found with recent calculations on the energetics of intercalation sites in DNA. The analysis of the equilibrium shows also that the strength of the excitation spectrum of bound dye depends strongly upon the ratio of bound quinacrine to DNA. This effect can be attributed to dye-dye energy transfer along DNA. PMID:7326321

  11. The shape of the DNA minor groove directs binding by the DNA-bending protein Fis

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.

    2010-06-21

    The bacterial nucleoid-associated protein Fis regulates diverse reactions by bending DNA and through DNA-dependent interactions with other control proteins and enzymes. In addition to dynamic nonspecific binding to DNA, Fis forms stable complexes with DNA segments that share little sequence conservation. Here we report the first crystal structures of Fis bound to high- and low-affinity 27-base-pair DNA sites. These 11 structures reveal that Fis selects targets primarily through indirect recognition mechanisms involving the shape of the minor groove and sequence-dependent induced fits over adjacent major groove interfaces. The DNA shows an overall curvature of {approx}65{sup o}, and the unprecedented close spacing between helix-turn-helix motifs present in the apodimer is accommodated by severe compression of the central minor groove. In silico DNA structure models show that only the roll, twist, and slide parameters are sufficient to reproduce the changes in minor groove widths and recreate the curved Fis-bound DNA structure. Models based on naked DNA structures suggest that Fis initially selects DNA targets with intrinsically narrow minor grooves using the separation between helix-turn-helix motifs in the Fis dimer as a ruler. Then Fis further compresses the minor groove and bends the DNA to generate the bound structure.

  12. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores.

    PubMed

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are iron (Fe)-binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium-binding properties. Previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl (UO2)-binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of UO2, yet they have not been widely studied. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore that is not commercially available and so was obtained from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe-depleted conditions. The relative affinity for UO2 binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between UO2 acetate and different concentrations of Fe(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A), were studied to understand their relative affinities for the UO2(2+) ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxamate siderophores to UO2(2+) ions were observed to decrease with increasing Fe(III)Cl3 concentration at the lower pH. On the other hand, decreasing the pH has a smaller impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and the UO2(2+) ion. Desmalonichrome in particular was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for UO2 at all pH and Fe(III) concentrations examined. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are important for strong chelation with UO2 at lower pH. PMID:27232848

  13. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  14. Dual aptamer-immobilized surfaces for improved affinity through multiple target binding in potentiometric thrombin biosensing.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Higashi, Daiki; Matsumoto, Akira; Hoshi, Toru; Sawaguchi, Takashi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2015-11-15

    We developed a label-free and reagent-less potentiometric biosensor with improved affinity for thrombin. Two different oligomeric DNA aptamers that can recognize different epitopes in thrombin were introduced in parallel or serial manners on the sensing surface to capture the target via multiple contacts as found in many biological systems. The spacer and linker in the aptamer probes were optimized for exerting the best performance in molecular recognition. To gain the specificity of the sensor to the target, an antifouling molecule, sulfobeaine-3-undecanethiol (SB), was introduced on the sensor to form a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Surface characterization revealed that the aptamer probe density was comparable to the distance of the two epitopes in thrombin, while the backfilling SB SAM was tightly aligned on the surface to resist nonspecific adsorption. The apparent binding parameters were obtained by thrombin sensing in potentiometry using the 1:1 Langmuir adsorption model, showing the improved dissociation constants (Kd) with the limit of detection of 5.5 nM on the dual aptamer-immobilized surfaces compared with single aptamer-immobilized ones. A fine control of spacer and linker length in the aptamer ligand was essential to realize the multivalent binding of thrombin on the sensor surface. The findings reported herein are effective for improving the sensitivity of potentiometric biosensor in an affordable way towards detection of tiny amount of biomolecules. PMID:26067329

  15. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings. PMID:25989233

  16. One-step surface modification of polyurethane using affinity binding peptides for enhanced fouling resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Liting; Qin, Peng; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Affinity binding peptides were examined for surface fabrication of synthetic polymeric materials. Peptides possessing strong binding affinities toward polyurethane (PU) were discovered via biopanning of M13 phage peptide library. The apparent binding constant (K(app)) was as high as 2.68 × 10(9) M(-1) with surface peptide density exceeded 1.8 μg/cm(2). Structural analysis showed that the ideal peptide had a high content (75%) of H-donor amino acid residues, and that intensified hydrogen bond interaction was the key driving force for the highly stable binding of peptides on PU. PU treated with such affinity peptides promises applications as low-fouling materials, as peptides increased its wettability and substantially reduced protein adsorption and cell adhesion. These results demonstrated a facile but highly efficient one-step strategy for surface property modification of polymeric materials for biotechnological applications. PMID:25732121

  17. DNA binding properties of human Cdc45 suggest a function as molecular wedge for DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Szambowska, Anna; Tessmer, Ingrid; Kursula, Petri; Usskilat, Christian; Prus, Piotr; Pospiech, Helmut; Grosse, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The cell division cycle protein 45 (Cdc45) represents an essential replication factor that, together with the Mcm2-7 complex and the four subunits of GINS, forms the replicative DNA helicase in eukaryotes. Recombinant human Cdc45 (hCdc45) was structurally characterized and its DNA-binding properties were determined. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed that hCdc45 exists as an alpha-helical monomer and possesses a structure similar to its bacterial homolog RecJ. hCdc45 bound long (113-mer or 80-mer) single-stranded DNA fragments with a higher affinity than shorter ones (34-mer). hCdc45 displayed a preference for 3′ protruding strands and bound tightly to single-strand/double-strand DNA junctions, such as those presented by Y-shaped DNA, bubbles and displacement loops, all of which appear transiently during the initiation of DNA replication. Collectively, our findings suggest that hCdc45 not only binds to but also slides on DNA with a 3′–5′ polarity and, thereby acts as a molecular ‘wedge’ to initiate DNA strand displacement. PMID:24293646

  18. Binding of disparate transcriptional activators to nucleosomal DNA is inherently cooperative.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C C; Workman, J L

    1995-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms by which multiple transcription factors access complex promoters and enhancers within cellular chromatin, we have analyzed the binding of disparate factors to nucleosome cores. We used a purified in vitro system to analyze binding of four activator proteins, two GAL4 derivatives, USF, and NF-kappa B (KBF1), to reconstituted nucleosome cores containing different combinations of binding sites. Here we show that binding of any two or all three of these factors to nucleosomal DNA is inherently cooperative. Thus, the binuclear Zn clusters of GAL4, the helix-loop-helix/basic domains of USF, and the rel domain of NF-kappa B all participated in cooperative nucleosome binding, illustrating that this effect is not restricted to a particular DNA-binding domain. Simultaneous binding by two factors increased the affinity of individual factors for nucleosomal DNA by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, cooperative binding resulted in efficient nucleosome binding by factors (USF and NF-kappa B) which independently possess little nucleosome-binding ability. The participation of GAL4 derivatives in cooperative nucleosome binding required only DNA-binding and dimerization domains, indicating that disruption of histone-DNA contacts by factor binding was responsible for the increased affinity of additional factors. Cooperative nucleosome binding required sequence-specific binding of all transcription factors, appeared to have spatial constraints, and was independent of the orientation of the binding sites on the nucleosome. These results indicate that cooperative nucleosome binding is a general mechanism that may play a significant role in loading complex enhancer and promoter elements with multiple diverse factors in chromatin and contribute to the generation of threshold responses and transcriptional synergy by multiple activator sites in vivo. PMID:7862134

  19. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  20. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain. PMID:24269284

  1. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  2. Relationship of nonreturn rates of dairy bulls to binding affinity of heparin to sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.L.; Ax, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The binding of the glycosaminoglycan (3H) heparin to bull spermatozoa was compared with nonreturn rates of dairy bulls. Semen samples from five bulls above and five below an average 71% nonreturn rate were used. Samples consisted of first and second ejaculates on a single day collected 1 d/wk for up to 5 consecutive wk. Saturation binding assays using (TH) heparin were performed to quantitate the binding characteristics of each sample. Scatchard plot analyses indicated a significant difference in the binding affinity for (TH) heparin between bulls of high and low fertility. Dissociation constants were 69.0 and 119.3 pmol for bulls of high and low fertility, respectively. In contrast, the number of binding sites for (TH) heparin did not differ significantly among bulls. Differences in binding affinity of (TH) heparin to bull sperm might be used to predict relative fertility of dairy bulls.

  3. DNA binding characteristics of mithramycin and chromomycin analogues obtained by combinatorial biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Francisca; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel; Martorell, Miquel; Oliver, Miquel; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A; Portugal, José

    2010-12-14

    The antitumor antibiotics mithramycin A and chromomycin A(3) bind reversibly to the minor groove of G/C-rich regions in DNA in the presence of dications such as Mg(2+), and their antiproliferative activity has been associated with their ability to block the binding of certain transcription factors to gene promoters. Despite their biological activity, their use as anticancer agents is limited by severe side effects. Therefore, in our pursuit of new structurally related molecules showing both lower toxicity and higher biological activity, we have examined the binding to DNA of six analogues that we have obtained by combinatorial biosynthetic procedures in the producing organisms. All these molecules bear a variety of changes in the side chain attached to C-3 of the chromophore. The spectroscopic characterization of their binding to DNA followed by the evaluation of binding parameters and associated thermodynamics revealed differences in their binding affinity. DNA binding was entropically driven, dominated by the hydrophobic transfer of every compound from solution into the minor groove of DNA. Among the analogues, mithramycin SDK and chromomycin SDK possessed the higher DNA binding affinities. PMID:21067184

  4. Radioligand binding assays for high affinity binders in the presence of endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    White, H.B. III; McGahan, T.

    1986-05-01

    Endogenous ligands complicate radioligand-binding assays of high-affinity binding proteins by obscuring binding sites or by diluting the labeled ligand. They have developed a mathematical model for such systems where structurally identical radioligand and endogenous ligand can be equilibrated on the binding site and bound radioligand measured. A double-reciprocal plot of bound radioligand, *L/sub B/, versus sample volume, V, yields a straight line. Introduction of scaling factors for sample dilution, F, and total radioligand available, *L/sub T/, produces a plot in which the x-intercept yields the endogenous ligand concentration, (L/sub T/); the slope is the reciprocal of the binding protein concentration, (P/sub T/)/sup -1/; and the y-intercept is the fractional saturation of the high-affinity binder, L/sub T//P/sub T/. This type of analysis has been applied to the assay of high-affinity biotin-binding proteins in egg yolk. Its use led to the detection of a second biotin-binding protein which is heat labile. The conceptual approach can be applied to the assay of other high-affinity binders.

  5. The extended arms of DNA-binding domains: a tale of tails.

    PubMed

    Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Dragan, Anatoly I; Privalov, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    DNA-binding domains (DBDs) frequently have N- or C-terminal tails, rich in lysine and/or arginine and disordered in free solution, that bind the DNA separately from and in the opposite groove to the folded domain. Is their role simply to increase affinity for DNA or do they have a role in specificity, that is, sequence recognition? One approach to answering this question is to analyze the contribution of such tails to the overall energetics of binding. It turns out that, despite similarities of amino acid sequence, three distinct categories of DBD extension exist: (i) those that are purely electrostatic and lack specificity, (ii) those that are largely non-electrostatic with a high contribution to specificity and (iii) those of mixed character that show sequence preference. Because in all cases the tails also increase the affinity for target DNA, they represent a crucial component of the machinery for selective gene activation or repression. PMID:16920361

  6. DNA Origami Seesaws as Comparative Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Philipp C; Høiberg, Hans C; Simmel, Stephanie S; Holzmeister, Phil; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2016-06-16

    The application of commonly used force spectroscopy in biological systems is often limited by the need for an invasive tether connecting the molecules of interest to a bead or cantilever tip. Here we present a DNA origami-based prototype in a comparative binding assay. It has the advantage of in situ readout without any physical connection to the macroscopic world. The seesaw-like structure has a lever that is able to move freely relative to its base. Binding partners on each side force the structure into discrete and distinguishable conformations. Model experiments with competing DNA hybridisation reactions yielded a drastic shift towards the conformation with the stronger binding interaction. With reference DNA duplexes of tuneable length on one side, this device can be used to measure ligand interactions in comparative assays. PMID:27038073

  7. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic dynein microtubule binding domain (MTBD) in a weak affinity conformation was published, containing a covalently constrained β+ registry for the coiled-coil stalk segment (Carter, A. P., Garbarino, J. E., Wilson-Kubalek, E. M., Shipley, W. E., Cho, C., Milligan, R. A., Vale, R. D., and Gibbons, I. R. (2008) Science 322, 1691–1695). We here present an NMR analysis of the isolated MTBD from Dictyostelium discoideum that demonstrates the coiled-coil β+ registry corresponds to the low energy conformation for this functional region of dynein. Addition of sequence encoding roughly half of the coiled-coil stalk proximal to the binding tip results in a decreased affinity of the MTBD for microtubules. In contrast, addition of the complete coiled-coil sequence drives the MTBD to the conformationally unstable, high affinity binding state. These results suggest a thermodynamic coupling between conformational free energy differences in the α and β+ registries of the coiled-coil stalk that acts as a switch between high and low affinity conformations of the MTBD. A balancing of opposing conformations in the stalk and MTBD enables potentially modest long-range interactions arising from ATP binding in the motor core to induce a relaxation of the MTBD into the stable low affinity state. PMID:20351100

  8. DNA affinity cleaving analysis of homeodomain-DNA interaction: identification of homeodomain consensus sites in genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Z; Ebright, Y W; Iler, N; Pendergrast, P S; Echelard, Y; McMahon, A P; Ebright, R H; Abate, C

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated the DNA-cleaving moiety o-phenanthroline-copper at amino acid 10 of the Msx-1 homeodomain, and we have analyzed site-specific DNA cleavage by the resulting Msx-1 derivative. We show that amino acid 10 of the Msx-1 homeodomain is close to the 5' end of the consensus DNA site 5'-(C/G)TAATTG-3' in the Msx-1-DNA complex. Our results indicate that the orientation of the Msx-1 homeodomain relative to DNA is analogous to the orientation of the engrailed and Antennapedia homeodomains. We show further that DNA affinity cleaving permits identification of consensus DNA sites for Msx-1 in kilobase DNA substrates. The specificity of the approach enabled us to identify an Msx-1 consensus DNA site within the transcriptional control region of the developmental regulatory gene Wnt-1. We propose that incorporation of o-phenanthroline-copper at amino acid 10 of a homeodomain may provide a generalizable strategy to determine the orientation of a homeodomain relative to DNA and to identify homeodomain consensus DNA sites in genomic DNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7904065

  9. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    PubMed

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  10. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of DNA Minor Groove Binding Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K.; Mascara, Gerard P.; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W.; Bobola, Michael S.; Silber, John R.; Gold, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases the N-terminus was appended with a O-methyl sulfonate ester while the C-terminus group was varied with non-polar and polar sidechains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) vs. major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is > 10-fold higher than the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells over-expressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization. PMID:23234400

  12. Synthesis and characterization of DNA minor groove binding alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K; Mascara, Gerard P; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W; Bobola, Michael S; Silber, John R; Gold, Barry

    2013-01-18

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases, the N-terminus was appended with an O-methyl sulfonate ester, while the C-terminus group was varied with nonpolar and polar side chains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) versus major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is >10-fold higher than that of the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells overexpressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to the expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and the diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization. PMID:23234400

  13. Phase Behavior of DNA in the Presence of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Le Treut, Guillaume; Képès, François; Orland, Henri

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the thermodynamical equilibrium of DNA chains interacting with a solution of nonspecific binding proteins, we implemented a Flory-Huggins free energy model. We explored the dependence on DNA and protein concentrations of the DNA collapse. For physiologically relevant values of the DNA-protein affinity, this collapse gives rise to a biphasic regime with a dense and a dilute phase; the corresponding phase diagram was computed. Using an approach based on Hamiltonian paths, we show that the dense phase has either a molten globule or a crystalline structure, depending on the DNA bending rigidity, which is influenced by the ionic strength. These results are valid at the thermodynamical equilibrium and therefore should be consistent with many biological processes, whose characteristic timescales range typically from 1 ms to 10 s. Our model may thus be applied to biological phenomena that involve DNA-binding proteins, such as DNA condensation with crystalline order, which occurs in some bacteria to protect their chromosome from detrimental factors; or transcription initiation, which occurs in clusters called transcription factories that are reminiscent of the dense phase characterized in this study. PMID:26745409

  14. Impedance-derived electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy for the evaluation of lectin-glycoprotein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano; Carvalho, Fernanda C; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Bueno, Paulo R

    2014-12-15

    Characterization of lectin-carbohydrate binding using label-free methods such as impedance-derived electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy (ECS) is desirable to evaluate specific interactions, for example, ArtinM lectin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) glycoprotein, used here as a model for protein-carbohydrate binding affinity. An electroactive molecular film comprising alkyl ferrocene as a redox probe and ArtinM as a carbohydrate receptive center to target HRP was successfully used to determine the binding affinity between ArtinM and HRP. The redox capacitance, a transducer signal associated with the alkyl ferrocene centers, was obtained by ECS and used in the Langmuir adsorption model to obtain the affinity constant (1.6±0.6)×10(8) L mol(-1). The results shown herein suggest the feasibility of ECS application for lectin glycoarray characterization. PMID:24994505

  15. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold. PMID:24862193

  16. CSAR Benchmark of Flexible MedusaDock in Affinity Prediction and Nativelike Binding Pose Selection.

    PubMed

    Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Jemec, Domen B; Ding, Feng

    2016-06-27

    While molecular docking with both ligand and receptor flexibilities can help capture conformational changes upon binding, correct ranking of nativelike binding poses and accurate estimation of binding affinities remains a major challenge. In addition to the commonly used scoring approach with intermolecular interaction energies, we included the contribution of intramolecular energies changes upon binding in our flexible docking method, MedusaDock. In CSAR 2013-2014 binding prediction benchmark exercises, the new scoring function MScomplex was found to better recapitulate experimental binding affinities and correctly identify ligand-binding sequences from decoy receptors. Our further analysis with the DUD data sets indicates significant improvement of virtual screening enrichment using the new scoring function when compared to the previous intermolecular energy based scoring method. Our postanalysis also suggests a new approach to select nativelike poses in the clustering-based pose ranking approach by MedusaDock. Since the calculation of intramolecular energy changes and clustering-based pose ranking and selection are not MedusaDock specific, we expect a broad application in force-field based estimation of binding affinities and pose ranking using flexible ligand-receptor docking. PMID:26252196

  17. Purification and characterization of a mitochondrial, single-stranded-DNA-binding protein from Paracentrotus lividus eggs.

    PubMed

    Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Loguercio Polosa, P; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E; Cantatore, P

    1997-07-01

    A binding protein for single-stranded DNA was purified from Paracentrotus lividus egg mitochondria to near homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel and single-stranded-DNA-cellulose. The protein consists of a single polypeptide of about 15 kDa. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis suggested that P. lividus mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding protein exists as a homo-oligomer, possibly a tetramer, in solution. The protein shows a stronger preference for poly(dT) with respect to single-stranded M13, poly(dI) and poly(dC). Binding to poly(dA) takes place with much lower affinity. The binding-site size, determined by gel mobility-shift experiments with oligonucleotides of different length, is approximately 45 nucleotides. The binding to single-stranded DNA occurs with low or no cooperativity and is not influenced by ionic strength. The protein has a very high affinity for the DNA: its apparent macroscopic association constant is 2x10(9) M(-1), a value which is the highest among the mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins characterized to date. The lack of cooperativity and the high association constant represent distinctive features of this protein and might be related to the peculiar mechanism of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:9249008

  18. Domain Selection in Metallothionein 1A: Affinity-Controlled Mechanisms of Zinc Binding and Cadmium Exchange.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Tyler B J; Irvine, Gordon W; Stillman, Martin J

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) are small, metal binding proteins implicated in cellular metal ion homeostasis and heavy metal detoxification. Divalent, metal-saturated MTs form two distinct domains; the N-terminal β domain binds three metals using nine Cys residues, and the C-terminal α domain binds four metals with 11 Cys residues. Domain selection during zinc binding and cadmium exchange to human MT1A was examined using a series of competition reactions with mixtures of the isolated domain fragments. These experiments were conducted at two biologically significant pH conditions where MTs exist in vivo. Neither zinc binding nor cadmium exchange showed any significant degree of specificity or selectivity based on detailed analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectrometric and circular dichroic data. Under acidic conditions, zinc binding and cadmium exchange showed slight α domain selectivity because of the increased preference for cooperative clustering of the α domain. Modeling of the reactions showed that at both physiological (7.4) and acidic (5.8) pHs, zinc binding and cadmium exchanges occur essentially randomly between the two fragments. The metal binding affinity distributions between the domain fragments are comingled and not significantly separated as required for a domain specific mechanism. The models show rather that the order of the binding events follows the order of the binding affinities that are distributed across both domains and that this can be considered quantitatively by the KF(Cd)/KF(Zn) binding constant ratio for each metal bound. PMID:26167879

  19. DNA binding by GATA transcription factor suggests mechanisms of DNA looping and long-range gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongheng; Bates, Darren L.; Dey, Raja; Chen, Po-Han; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Rohs, Remo; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Summary GATA transcription factors regulate transcription during development and differentiation by recognizing distinct GATA sites with a tandem of two conserved zinc fingers and by mediating long-range DNA looping. However, the molecular basis of these processes is not well understood yet. Here, we determined three crystal structures of the full DNA binding domain (DBD) of human GATA3 protein, which contains both zinc fingers, in complex with different DNA sites. In one structure, both zinc fingers wrap around a palindromic GATA site, cooperatively enhancing the binding affinity and kinetic stability. Strikingly, in the other two structures, the two fingers of GATA DBD bind GATA sites on different DNA molecules, thus bridging two separate DNA fragments, which is confirmed in solution by an in-gel FRET analysis. These findings not only provide new insights into the structure and function of GATA proteins, but also shed light on the molecular basis of long-range gene regulation. PMID:23142663

  20. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  1. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  2. Affinity labeling and binding of nitrobenzylthionosine (NBTI) to a membrane fraction (MF) of cultured cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Woffendin, C.; Plagemann, P.G.W.

    1986-05-01

    Equilibrium binding identified high affinity NBTI binding sites (K/sub D/ = 1-3 nM) on the MF's of L929, L1210, P388, S49 and CHO cells. High affinity NBTI binding sites are associated with the nucleoside transporter since none were present in a MF of a transport-deficient mutant of S49 cells (AE1). MF's of Novikoff cells, like intact Novikoff cells, also lacked high affinity NBTI binding sites. MF's of the cell lines were equilibrium labeled with (/sup 3/H)NBTI using photoaffinity conditions and analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Radioactivity was specifically incorporated covalently into a 50-70 Kd protein fraction, but the labeled proteins from CHO and L929 cells had a higher apparent molecular weight than those from S49 and P388 cells. In addition, in MF's from some cell lines lower molecular weight components became photoaffinity labeled. Maximum photoaffinity labeling of the MF proteins was observed with much higher (/sup 3/H)NBTI concentrations (100-200 nM) than those saturating the nucleoside transporter. This finding is explained by a reduced affinity of the photoactivated NBTI intermediate(s) for the transporter. When detergent solubilized MF's from cultured cells were chromotographed on a DEAE cellulose column, only 5-10% of the protein, but practically all high affinity NBTI sites, were recovered in the flow through fraction.

  3. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  4. Structural basis for Tetrahymena telomerase processivity factor Teb1 binding to single-stranded telomeric-repeat DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhixiong; Min, Bosun; Huang, Jing; Hong, Kyungah; Yang, Yuting; Collins, Kathleen; Lei, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase copies its internal RNA template to synthesize telomeric DNA repeats. Unlike other polymerases, telomerase can retain its single-stranded product through multiple rounds of template dissociation and repositioning to accomplish repeat addition processivity (RAP). Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme RAP depends on a subunit, Teb1, with autonomous DNA-binding activity. Sequence homology and domain modeling suggest that Teb1 is a paralog of RPA70C, the largest subunit of the single-stranded DNA-binding factor replication protein (RPA), but unlike RPA, Teb1 binds DNA with high specificity for telomeric repeats. To understand the structural basis and significance of telomeric-repeat DNA recognition by Teb1, we solved crystal structures of three proposed Teb1 DNA-binding domains and defined amino acids of each domain that contribute to DNA interaction. Our studies indicate that two central Teb1 DNA-binding oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding-fold domains, Teb1A and Teb1B, achieve high affinity and selectivity of telomeric-repeat recognition by principles similar to the telomere end-capping protein POT1 (protection of telomeres 1). An additional C-terminal Teb1 oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding-fold domain, Teb1C, has features shared with the RPA70 C-terminal domain including a putative direct DNA-binding surface that is critical for high-RAP activity of reconstituted holoenzyme. The Teb1C zinc ribbon motif does not contribute to DNA binding but is nonetheless required for high-RAP activity, perhaps contributing to Teb1 physical association with the remainder of the holoenzyme. Our results suggest the biological model that high-affinity DNA binding by Teb1AB recruits holoenzyme to telomeres and subsequent Teb1C–DNA association traps product in a sliding-clamp-like manner that does not require high-affinity DNA binding for high stability of enzyme-product association. PMID:22143754

  5. Isolation of ubiquitinated substrates by tandem affinity purification of E3 ligase-polyubiquitin-binding domain fusions (ligase traps).

    PubMed

    Mark, Kevin G; Loveless, Theresa B; Toczyski, David P

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential protein modification that influences eukaryotic processes ranging from substrate degradation to nonproteolytic pathway alterations, including DNA repair and endocytosis. Previous attempts to analyze substrates via physical association with their respective ubiquitin ligases have had some success. However, because of the transient nature of enzyme-substrate interactions and rapid protein degradation, detection of substrates remains a challenge. Ligase trapping is an affinity purification approach in which ubiquitin ligases are fused to a polyubiquitin-binding domain, which allows the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates. Immunoprecipitation is first used to enrich for proteins that are bound to the ligase trap. Subsequently, affinity purification is used under denaturing conditions to capture proteins conjugated with hexahistidine-tagged ubiquitin. By using this protocol, ubiquitinated substrates that are specific for a given ligase can be isolated for mass spectrometry or western blot analysis. After cells have been collected, the described protocol can be completed in 2-3 d. PMID:26766115

  6. Separation of TFIIIC into two functional components by sequence specific DNA affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, N; Berk, A J

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that mammalian transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) activity can be separated by anion exchange FPLC chromatography into two functional components (1), both of which are required for transcription of tRNA and the adenovirus VA RNA genes. Here we show that these two functional components, designated TFIIIC1 and TFIIIC2, can also be separated by sequence specific DNA affinity chromatography. These results confirm the observation that TFIIIC can be fractionated into two components, which are both required for transcription of VA I and tRNA genes in vitro. Thus in the mammalian reconstituted system, a minimum of three proteins, in addition to RNA polymerase III, are required for the transcription of the VA and tRNA genes in vitro. The DNA binding component, TFIIIC2, binds specifically to the 3' segment of the internal promoter (the B block), demonstrated by its ability to protect this region from digestion by DNase I. TFIIIC2 is the limiting, titratable component in the phosphocellulose C fraction required for the formation of a stable pre-initiation complex on the VAI RNA gene in vitro, as demonstrated with a template competition and rescue assay. Images PMID:3697084

  7. 2-O-[2-(Methylthio)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide: An Analog of 2-O-[2-(Methoxy)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide with Improved Protein Binding Properties and High Binding Affinity to Target RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Fraser, A.S.; Kawasaki, A.M.; Lesnik, E.; Sioufi, N.; Leeds, J.M.; Teplova, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel 2'-modification, 2'-O-[2-(methylthio)ethyl] or 2'-O-MTE, has been incorporated into oligonucleotides and evaluated for properties relevant to antisense activity. The results were compared with the previously characterized 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] 2'-O-MOE modification. As expected, the 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides exhibited improved binding to human serum albumin compared to the 2'-O-MOE modified oligonucleotides. The 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides maintained high binding affinity to target RNA. Nuclease digestion of 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides showed that they have limited resistance to exonuclease degradation. We analyzed the crystal structure of a decamer DNA duplex containing the 2'-O-MTE modifcation. Analysis of the crystal structure provides insight into the improved RNA binding affinity, protein binding affinity and limited resistance of 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides to exonuclease degradation.

  8. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  9. Characterization of DNA recognition by the human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Masutani, C; Mizukoshi, T; Kondo, J; Hanaoka, F; Iwai, S

    1999-07-01

    The UV-damaged DNA-binding (UV-DDB) protein is the major factor that binds DNA containing damage caused by UV radiation in mammalian cells. We have investigated the DNA recognition by this protein in vitro, using synthetic oligonucleotide duplexes and the protein purified from a HeLa cell extract. When a 32P-labeled 30-mer duplex containing the (6-4) photoproduct at a single site was used as a probe, only a single complex was detected in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. It was demonstrated by Western blotting that both of the subunits (p48 and p127) were present in this complex. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using various duplexes showed that the UV-DDB protein formed a specific, high affinity complex with the duplex containing an abasic site analog, in addition to the (6-4) photoproduct. By circular permutation analyses, these DNA duplexes were found to be bent at angles of 54 degrees and 57 degrees in the complexes with this protein. From the previously reported NMR studies and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments in the present study, it can be concluded that the UV-DDB protein binds DNA that can be bent easily at the above angle. PMID:10391953

  10. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Cofactors are critical for energy-consuming processes in the cell. Harnessing such processes for practical applications requires control over the concentration of cofactors. We have recently shown that DNA triplex motifs with a designed binding site can be used to capture and release nucleotides with low micromolar dissociation constants. In order to increase the storage capacity of such triplex motifs, we have explored the limits of ligand binding through designed cavities in the oligopurine tract. Oligonucleotides with up to six non-nucleotide bridges between purines were synthesized and their ability to bind ATP, cAMP or FAD was measured. Triplex motifs with several single-nucleotide binding sites were found to bind purines more tightly than triplexes with one large binding site. The optimized triplex consists of 59 residues and four C3-bridges. It can bind up to four equivalents of ligand with apparent Kd values of 52 µM for ATP, 9 µM for FAD, and 2 µM for cAMP. An immobilized version fuels bioluminescence via release of ATP at body temperature. These results show that motifs for high-density capture, storage and release of energy-rich biomolecules can be constructed from synthetic DNA. PMID:26561335

  11. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered. PMID:26938582

  12. CORAL: prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors based on attributes of molecular structure extracted from simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES) are established using the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is used as the measure of the binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors. Molecular features which are statistically reliable promoters of increase and decrease for IC50 are suggested. The examples of modifications of molecular structure which lead to the increase or to the decrease of the endpoint are represented. PMID:26188619

  13. Further characterization of the low and high affinity binding components of the thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McQuade, R.; Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Nayfeh, S.N.

    1986-05-29

    Following cross-linking with disuccinimdiyl suberate and analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, both the high- and low-affinity TSH binding components exhibited two similar /sup 125/I-TSH-labeled bands, with Mr values of 80,000 and 68,000. IgG fractions from patients with Graves' disease inhibited /sup 125/I-TSH binding to both components, while normal IgG had no effect. Although not entirely conclusive, these results suggest that the high- and low-affinity components share similar subunit composition and antigenic determinants.

  14. Comparison of Relative Binding Affinities for Trout and Human Estrogen Receptor Based upon Different Competitive Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a predictive model based upon a single aquatic species inevitably raises the question of whether this information is valid for other species. To partially address this question, relative binding affinities (RBA) for six alkylphenols (para-substituted, n- and b...

  15. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  16. Prolactin-binding components in rabbit mammary gland: characterization by partial purification and affinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, M.; Djiane, J.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-06-01

    The molecular characteristics of the PRL receptor isolated from rabbit mammary gland microsomes were investigated. Two approaches were employed: 1) affinity purification of PRL receptors and direct electrophoretic analysis, and 2) affinity cross-linking of microsomal receptors with (/sup 125/I)ovine PRL ((/sup 125/I)oPRL). PRL receptors were solubilized from mammary microsomes with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)1-propane sulfonate and purified using an oPRL agarose affinity column. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining of the gel revealed at least nine bands, including a 32,000 mol wt band which was most intensively labeled with /sup 125/I using the chloramine-T method. Covalent labeling of PRL receptors with (/sup 125/I)oPRL was performed using N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azido benzoate, disuccinimidyl suberate, or ethylene glycol bis (succinimidyl succinate). A single band of 59,000 mol wt was produced by all three cross-linkers when sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed under reducing conditions. Assuming 1:1 binding of hormone and binding subunit and by subtracting the mol wt of (/sup 125/I)oPRL, which was estimated from the migration distance on the gel, the mol wt of the binding subunit was calculated as 32,000. In the absence of dithiothreitol during electrophoresis, only one major hormone-receptor complex band was observed. The same mol wt binding components were also detected in microsomal fractions of rabbit kidney, ovary, and adrenal. A slightly higher mol wt binding subunit was observed in rat liver microsomes. Rabbit liver microsomes revealed five (/sup 125/I)oPRL-binding components, three of which were considered to be those of a GH receptor. Moreover, affinity labeling of detergent-solubilized and affinity purified mammary PRL receptors showed a similar major binding subunit.

  17. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  18. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  19. Cr(3+) Binding to DNA Backbone Phosphate and Bases: Slow Ligand Exchange Rates and Metal Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Yu, Tianmeng; Vazin, Mahsa; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-08-15

    The interaction between chromium ions and DNA is of great interest in inorganic chemistry, toxicology, and analytical chemistry. Most previous studies focused on in situ reduction of Cr(VI), producing Cr(3+) for DNA binding. Recently, Cr(3+) was reported to activate the Ce13d DNAzyme for RNA cleavage. Herein, the Ce13d is used to study two types of Cr(3+) and DNA interactions. First, Cr(3+) binds to the DNA phosphate backbone weakly through reversible electrostatic interactions, which is weakened by adding competing inorganic phosphate. However, Cr(3+) coordinates with DNA nucleobases forming stable cross-links that can survive denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. The binding of Cr(3+) to different nucleobases was further studied in terms of binding kinetics and affinity by exploiting carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA homopolymers. Once binding takes place, the stable Cr(3+)/DNA complex cannot be dissociated by EDTA, attributable to the ultraslow ligand exchange rate of Cr(3+). The binding rate follows the order of G > C > T ≈ A. Finally, Cr(3+) gradually loses its DNA binding ability after being stored at neutral or high pH, attributable to hydrolysis. This hydrolysis can be reversed by lowering the pH. This work provides a deeper insight into the bioinorganic chemistry of Cr(3+) coordination with DNA, clarifies some inconsistency in the previous literature, and offers practically useful information for generating reproducible results. PMID:27478904

  20. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  1. Oligomerization of Peptides LVEALYL and RGFFYT and Their Binding Affinity to Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Ngo, Son Tung; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hu, Chin-Kun; Li, Mai Suan

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed a model for fibrils of human insulin in which the fibril growth proceeds via stacking LVEALYL (fragment 11–17 from chain B of insulin) into pairs of tightly interdigitated -sheets. The experiments have also shown that LVEALYL has high propensity to self-assembly and binding to insulin. This necessitates study of oligomerization of LVEALYL and its binding affinity to full-length insulin. Using the all-atom simulations with Gromos96 43a1 force field and explicit water it is shown that LVEALYL can aggregate. Theoretical estimation of the binding free energy of LVEALYL to insulin by the molecular mechanic Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method reveals its strong binding affinity to chain B, implying that, in agreement with the experiments, LVEALYL can affect insulin aggregation via binding mechanism. We predict that, similar to LVEALYL, peptide RGFFYT (fragment B22-27) can self-assemble and bind to insulin modulating its fibril growth process. The binding affinity of RGFFYT is shown to be comparable with that of LVEALYL. PMID:23805182

  2. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  3. IL-3 specifically inhibits GM-CSF binding to the higher affinity receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taketazu, F.; Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Kuwaki, T.; Tsumura, H.; Miyazono, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1991-02-01

    The inhibition of binding between human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and its receptor by human interleukin-3 (IL-3) was observed in myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1 which bore the receptors both for GM-CSF and IL-3. In contrast, this phenomenon was not observed in histiocytic lymphoma cell line U-937 or in gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III, both of which have apparent GM-CSF receptor but an undetectable IL-3 receptor. In KG-1 cells, the cross-inhibition was preferentially observed when the binding of GM-CSF was performed under the high-affinity binding condition; i.e., a low concentration of 125I-GM-CSF was incubated. Scatchard analysis of 125I-GM-CSF binding to KG-1 cells in the absence and in the presence of unlabeled IL-3 demonstrated that IL-3 inhibited GM-CSF binding to the higher-affinity component of GM-CSF receptor on KG-1 cells. Moreover, a chemical cross-linking study has revealed that the cross-inhibition of the GM-CSF binding observed in KG-1 cells is specific for the beta-chain, Mr 135,000 binding protein which has been identified as a component forming the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor existing specifically on hemopoietic cells.

  4. DNA-binding specificity of NGFI-A and related zinc finger transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Swirnoff, A H; Milbrandt, J

    1995-01-01

    NGFI-A is the prototypic member of a family of immediate-early gene-encoded transcription factors which includes NGFI-C, Egr3, and Krox20. These proteins possess highly homologous DNA-binding domains, composed of three Cys2-His2 zinc fingers, and all bind to and activate transcription from the sequence GCGGGGGCG. We used a PCR-mediated random site selection protocol to determine whether other sites could be bound by these proteins and the extent to which their binding site preferences are similar or different. The high-affinity consensus sites generated from the selection data are similar, and the combined consensus sequence is T-G-C-G-T/g-G/A-G-G-C/a/t-G-G/T (lowercase letters indicate bases selected less frequently). Using gel shift assays, we found that sequences that diverge from the consensus were bound by NGFI-A, confirming that there is greater variability in binding sites than has generally been acknowledged. We also provide evidence that protein-DNA interactions not noted, or whose importance was not apparent from the X-ray cocrystal structure of the NGFI-A zinc fingers complexed with DNA, contribute significantly to the binding energy of these proteins and confirm that an optimal site is at least 10 instead of 9 nucleotides in length. In contrast to the similarities in binding specificity among these proteins we found that while NGFI-A, Egr3, and Krox20 have comparable DNA binding affinities and kinetics of dissociation, the affinity of NGFI-C is more than threefold lower. This could result in differential regulation of target genes in cells where NGFI-C and the other proteins are coexpressed. Furthermore, we show that this affinity difference is a property not of the zinc fingers themselves but rather of the protein context of the DNA-binding domain. PMID:7891721

  5. Dynamic Coupling among Protein Binding, Sliding, and DNA Bending Revealed by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2016-07-13

    Protein binding to DNA changes the DNA's structure, and altered DNA structure can, in turn, modulate the dynamics of protein binding. This mutual dependency is poorly understood. Here we investigated dynamic couplings among protein binding to DNA, protein sliding on DNA, and DNA bending by applying a coarse-grained simulation method to the bacterial architectural protein HU and 14 other DNA-binding proteins. First, we verified our method by showing that the simulated HU exhibits a weak preference for A/T-rich regions of DNA and a much higher affinity for gapped and nicked DNA, consistent with biochemical experiments. The high affinity was attributed to a local DNA bend, but not the specific chemical moiety of the gap/nick. The long-time dynamic analysis revealed that HU sliding is associated with the movement of the local DNA bending site. Deciphering single sliding steps, we found the coupling between HU sliding and DNA bending is akin to neither induced-fit nor population-shift; instead they moved concomitantly. This is reminiscent of a cation transfer on DNA and can be viewed as a protein version of polaron-like sliding. Interestingly, on shorter time scales, HU paused when the DNA was highly bent at the bound position and escaped from pauses once the DNA spontaneously returned to a less bent structure. The HU sliding is largely regulated by DNA bending dynamics. With 14 other proteins, we explored the generality and versatility of the dynamic coupling and found that 6 of the 15 assayed proteins exhibit the polaron-like sliding. PMID:27309278

  6. A Novel Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatographic Method for Differentiating the DNA Interaction Affinity of Environmental Contaminants.

    PubMed

    D'Ulivo, Lucia; Feng, Yong-Lai

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of chemicals with DNA may lead to genotoxicity, mutation or carcinogenicity. A simple open tubular capillary electrochromatographic method is proposed to rapidly assess the interaction affinity of three environmental contaminants (1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene) to DNA by measuring their retention in the capillaries coated with DNA probes. DNA oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on the inner wall of a fused silica capillary that was first derivatized with 3-(aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (APTES). The difference in retention times and factors was considered as the difference in interaction affinity of the contaminants to the DNA probes. The interaction of the contaminants with both double-stranded (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) coatings was compared. Retention factors of 1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the capillary coated with ssDNA probe were 0.29, 0.42, and 0.44, respectively. A similar trend was observed in the capillary coated with dsDNA, indicating that 2,4-diaminotoluene has the highest affinity among the three contaminants. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for the retention factors was in the range of 0.05-0.69% (n = 3). The results demonstrated that the developed technique could be applied for preliminary screening purpose to provide DNA interaction affinity information of various environmental contaminants. PMID:27055261

  7. A Novel Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatographic Method for Differentiating the DNA Interaction Affinity of Environmental Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    D’Ulivo, Lucia; Feng, Yong-Lai

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of chemicals with DNA may lead to genotoxicity, mutation or carcinogenicity. A simple open tubular capillary electrochromatographic method is proposed to rapidly assess the interaction affinity of three environmental contaminants (1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene) to DNA by measuring their retention in the capillaries coated with DNA probes. DNA oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on the inner wall of a fused silica capillary that was first derivatized with 3-(aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (APTES). The difference in retention times and factors was considered as the difference in interaction affinity of the contaminants to the DNA probes. The interaction of the contaminants with both double-stranded (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) coatings was compared. Retention factors of 1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the capillary coated with ssDNA probe were 0.29, 0.42, and 0.44, respectively. A similar trend was observed in the capillary coated with dsDNA, indicating that 2,4-diaminotoluene has the highest affinity among the three contaminants. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for the retention factors was in the range of 0.05–0.69% (n = 3). The results demonstrated that the developed technique could be applied for preliminary screening purpose to provide DNA interaction affinity information of various environmental contaminants. PMID:27055261

  8. Selection of a high-affinity and in vivo bioactive ssDNA aptamer against angiotensin II peptide.

    PubMed

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2016-08-01

    Unique features of aptamers have attracted interests for a broad range of applications. Aptamers are able to specifically bind to targets and inhibit their functions. This study, aimed to isolate the high affinity ssDNA aptamers against bio-regulator peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) and investigate their bioactivity in cellular and animal models. To isolate ssDNA aptamers, 12 rounds of affinity chromatography SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) procedure were carried out. The SPR (surface plasmon resonance) and ELONA (enzyme linked oligonucleotide assay) analysis were used to determine the affinity and specificity of aptamers. The ability of selected aptamers to inhibit the proliferative effect of Ang II on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HA-VSMCs) and their performance on Wistar rat urinary system and serum electrolyte levels were investigated. Two full-length aptamers (FLC112 and FLC125) with high affinity of respectively 7.52±2.44E-10 and 5.87±1.3E-9M were isolated against Ang II. The core regions of these aptamers (CRC112 and CRC125) also showed affinity of 5.33±1.15E-9 and 4.11±1.09E-9M. In vitro analysis revealed that FLC112 and FLC125 can inhibit the proliferative effect of Ang II on HA-VSMCs (P<0.05). They also significantly reduced the serum sodium level and increased the urine volume (P<0.05). The core regions of aptamers did not show high inhibitory potential against Ang II. It can be a spotlight that ssDNA aptamers have high potential for blocking Ang II. In conclusion, it appears that the researches focusing on high affinity and bioactive aptamers may lead to excellent results in blocking Ang II activity. PMID:27298205

  9. The histone-like protein HU binds specifically to DNA recombination and repair intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Kamashev, D.; Rouviere-Yaniv, J.

    2000-01-01

    The heterodimeric HU protein associated with the Escherichia coli nucleoid shares some properties with histones and HMG proteins. HU binds DNA junctions and DNA containing a nick much more avidly than double-stranded (ds-) DNA. Cells lacking HU are extremely sensitive to γ irradiation and we wondered how HU could play a role in maintaining the integrity of the bacterial chromosome. We show that HU binds with high affinity to DNA repair and recombination intermediates, including DNA invasions, DNA overhangs and DNA forks. The DNA structural motif that HU specifically recognizes in all these structures consists of a ds-DNA module joined to a second module containing either ds- or single-stranded (ss-) DNA. The two modules rotate freely relative to one another. Binding specificity results from the simultaneous interaction of HU with these two modules: HU arms bind the ds-DNA module whereas the HU body contacts the ‘variable’ module containing either ds- or ss-DNA. Both structural motifs are recognized by HU at least 1000-fold more avidly than duplex DNA. PMID:11101525

  10. Synthesis, characterization and thermal studies of binary and/or mixed ligand complexes of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(III) based on 2-(Hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazone: DNA binding affinity of binary Cu(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Fouad, R.

    A new series of metal complexes of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(III) with Schiff base ligand, H2L, 2-(Hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazone were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using glycine (Gly), 2-aminopyridine (2-Ampy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as secondary ligands. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirmed by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as TG-DSC technique. The discussions of the prepared complexes indicate that the ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand through ONS donor sites. Thermal studies suggested a mechanism for the degradation of the metal complexes as a function of temperature supporting the chelation modes and showed the possibility of obtaining new complexes pyrolytically in the solid state which cannot be synthesized from the solution. The absorption studies support that the binary Cu(II) complex exhibits a significant binding affinity to HS-DNA through intercalative mode.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and thermal studies of binary and/or mixed ligand complexes of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(III) based on 2-(Hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazone: DNA binding affinity of binary Cu(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Saif, M; Mashaly, Mahmoud M; Eid, Mohamed F; Fouad, R

    2012-06-15

    A new series of metal complexes of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(III) with Schiff base ligand, H(2)L, 2-(Hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazone were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using glycine (Gly), 2-aminopyridine (2-Ampy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as secondary ligands. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirmed by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as TG-DSC technique. The discussions of the prepared complexes indicate that the ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand through ONS donor sites. Thermal studies suggested a mechanism for the degradation of the metal complexes as a function of temperature supporting the chelation modes and showed the possibility of obtaining new complexes pyrolytically in the solid state which cannot be synthesized from the solution. The absorption studies support that the binary Cu(II) complex exhibits a significant binding affinity to HS-DNA through intercalative mode. PMID:22446784

  12. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  13. Putative binding modes of Ku70-SAP domain with double strand DNA: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-05-01

    The channel structure of the Ku protein elegantly reveals the mechanistic basis of sequence-independent DNA-end binding, which is essential to genome integrity after exposure to ionizing radiation or in V(D)J recombination. However, contradicting evidence indicates that this protein is also involved in the regulation of gene expression and in other regulatory processes with intact chromosomes. This computational study predicts that a putative DNA binding domain of this protein, the SAP domain, can form DNA-bound complexes with relatively high affinities (ΔG ≈ -20 kcal mol(-1)). The binding modes are searched by low frequency vibration modes driven by the fully flexible docking method while binding affinities are calculated by the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. We find this well defined 5 kDa domain with a helix-extended loop-helix structure is suitable to form favorable electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with either the major groove or the minor groove of DNA. The calculation also reveals the sequence specified binding preference which may relate to the observed pause sites when Ku translocates along DNA and the perplex binding of Ku with circular DNA. PMID:21947447

  14. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018856

  15. Interaction of nicotinic receptor affinity reagents with central nervous system. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin-binding entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, R.J.; Bennett, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane-bound ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin-binding entities derived from rat brain are found to interact specifically with the affinity reagents maleimidobenzyltrimethylammonium (MBTA) and bromoacetylcholine (BAC), originally designed to label nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from electroplax and skeletal muscle. Following treatment of membranes with dithiothreitol, all specific toxin binding sites are irreversibly blocked by reaction with MBTA or BAC. Affinity reagent labeling of dithiothreitol-reduced membranes is prevented (toxin binding sites are not blocked) by prior alkylaction with N-ethylmaleimide, by prior oxidation with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), or by incubation with neurotoxin. Reversibly associating cholinergic agonists and antagonists retard the rate of affinity reagent interaction with toxin receptors. The apparent rates of affinity reagent alkylation of toxin receptors, and the influences of other sulfhydryl/disulfide reagents on affinity labeling are comparable to those observed for reaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the periphery. The results provide further evidence that central nervous system ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin receptors share a remarkable number of biochemical properties with nicotinic receptors from the periphery.

  16. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  17. Characterization and directed evolution of a methyl-binding domain protein for high-sensitivity DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Heimer, Brandon W; Tam, Brooke E; Sikes, Hadley D

    2015-12-01

    Methyl-binding domain (MBD) family proteins specifically bind double-stranded, methylated DNA which makes them useful for DNA methylation analysis. We displayed three of the core members MBD1, MBD2 and MBD4 on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Using the yeast display platform, we determined the equilibrium dissociation constant of human MBD2 (hMBD2) to be 5.9 ± 1.3 nM for binding to singly methylated DNA. The measured affinity for DNA with two methylated sites varied with the distance between the sites. We further used the yeast display platform to evolve the hMBD2 protein for improved binding affinity. Affecting five amino acid substitutions doubled the affinity of the wild-type protein to 3.1 ± 1.0 nM. The most prevalent of these mutations, K161R, occurs away from the DNA-binding site and bridges the N- and C-termini of the protein by forming a new hydrogen bond. The F208Y and L170R mutations added new non-covalent interactions with the bound DNA strand. We finally concatenated the high-affinity MBD variant and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a green fluorescent protein fusion. Concatenating the protein from 1× to 3× improved binding 6-fold for an interfacial binding application. PMID:26384511

  18. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jae Hong; Nakane, Takashi; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Toru; Kitamoto, Dai

    2001-01-01

    Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A) and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1) for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid. PMID:11604104

  19. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  20. The statistical-thermodynamic basis for computation of binding affinities: a critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, M K; Given, J A; Bush, B L; McCammon, J A

    1997-01-01

    Although the statistical thermodynamics of noncovalent binding has been considered in a number of theoretical papers, few methods of computing binding affinities are derived explicitly from this underlying theory. This has contributed to uncertainty and controversy in certain areas. This article therefore reviews and extends the connections of some important computational methods with the underlying statistical thermodynamics. A derivation of the standard free energy of binding forms the basis of this review. This derivation should be useful in formulating novel computational methods for predicting binding affinities. It also permits several important points to be established. For example, it is found that the double-annihilation method of computing binding energy does not yield the standard free energy of binding, but can be modified to yield this quantity. The derivation also makes it possible to define clearly the changes in translational, rotational, configurational, and solvent entropy upon binding. It is argued that molecular mass has a negligible effect upon the standard free energy of binding for biomolecular systems, and that the cratic entropy defined by Gurney is not a useful concept. In addition, the use of continuum models of the solvent in binding calculations is reviewed, and a formalism is presented for incorporating a limited number of solvent molecules explicitly. PMID:9138555

  1. The impact of DNA intercalators on DNA and DNA-processing enzymes elucidated through force-dependent binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, Andreas S.; Heller, Iddo; Roijmans, Roel F. H.; Hoekstra, Tjalle P.; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2015-01-01

    DNA intercalators are widely used as fluorescent probes to visualize DNA and DNA transactions in vivo and in vitro. It is well known that they perturb DNA structure and stability, which can in turn influence DNA-processing by proteins. Here we elucidate this perturbation by combining single-dye fluorescence microscopy with force spectroscopy and measuring the kinetics of DNA intercalation by the mono- and bis-intercalating cyanine dyes SYTOX Orange, SYTOX Green, SYBR Gold, YO-PRO-1, YOYO-1 and POPO-3. We show that their DNA-binding affinity is mainly governed by a strongly tension-dependent dissociation rate. These rates can be tuned over a range of seven orders of magnitude by changing DNA tension, intercalating species and ionic strength. We show that optimizing these rates minimizes the impact of intercalators on strand separation and enzymatic activity. These new insights provide handles for the improved use of intercalators as DNA probes with minimal perturbation and maximal efficacy. PMID:26084388

  2. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  3. The intrinsically disordered amino-terminal region of human RecQL4: multiple DNA-binding domains confer annealing, strand exchange and G4 DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Heidi; Kiosze, Kristin; Sachsenweger, Juliane; Haumann, Sebastian; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Nuutinen, Tarmo; Syväoja, Juhani E.; Görlach, Matthias; Grosse, Frank; Pospiech, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Human RecQL4 belongs to the ubiquitous RecQ helicase family. Its N-terminal region represents the only homologue of the essential DNA replication initiation factor Sld2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and also participates in the vertebrate initiation of DNA replication. Here, we utilized a random screen to identify N-terminal fragments of human RecQL4 that could be stably expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of these fragments revealed that the Sld2 homologous RecQL4 N-terminal domain carries large intrinsically disordered regions. The N-terminal fragments were sufficient for the strong annealing activity of RecQL4. Moreover, this activity appeared to be the basis for an ATP-independent strand exchange activity. Both activities relied on multiple DNA-binding sites with affinities to single-stranded, double-stranded and Y-structured DNA. Finally, we found a remarkable affinity of the N-terminus for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA, exceeding the affinities for other DNA structures by at least 60-fold. Together, these findings suggest that the DNA interactions mediated by the N-terminal region of human RecQL4 represent a central function at the replication fork. The presented data may also provide a mechanistic explanation for the role of elements with a G4-forming propensity identified in the vicinity of vertebrate origins of DNA replication. PMID:25336622

  4. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hanson, Charlotte; Sanford, Michael; Young, Howard A.; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (KD of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 °C after 3 days under our experimental conditions, and sustainably inhibited the biological activity of interferon-γ. PMID:26690672

  5. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hanson, Charlotte; Sanford, Michael; Young, Howard A; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (KD of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 °C after 3 days under our experimental conditions, and sustainably inhibited the biological activity of interferon-γ. PMID:26690672

  6. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected. PMID:26830536

  7. Soybean. beta. -glucan binding sites display maximal affinity for a heptaglucoside phytoalexin-elicitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cosio, E.G.; Waldmueller, T.; Frey, T.; Ebel, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The affinity of soybean {beta}-glucan-binding sites for a synthetic heptaglucan elicitor was tested in a ligand-competition assay against a {sup 125}I-labeled 1,3-1,6-{beta}-glucan preparation (avg. DP=20). Half-maximal displacement of label (IC{sub 50}) was obtained at 9nM heptaglucan, the highest affinity of all fractions tested to date. Displacement followed a uniform sigmoidal pattern and was complete at 1{mu}M indicating access of heptaglucan to all sites available to the labeled elicitor. A mathematical model was used to predict IC{sub 50} values according to the DP of glucan fragments obtained from fungal cell walls. The lowest IC{sub 50} predicted by this model is 3nM. Binding affinity of the glucans was compared with their elicitor activity in a bioassay.

  8. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM) is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates. PMID:19878581

  9. Estimating Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity using High-Throughput Screening by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Hage, David S.; Harbison, Gerard S.; Powers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Many of today’s drug discovery programs utilize high-throughput screening methods that rely on quick evaluations of protein activity to rank potential chemical leads. By monitoring biologically relevant protein-ligand interactions, NMR can provide a means to validate these discovery leads and to optimize the drug discovery process. NMR-based screens typically use a change in chemical shift or linewidth to detect a protein-ligand interaction. However, the relatively low throughput of current NMR screens and their high demand on sample requirements generally makes it impractical to collect complete binding curves to measure the affinity for each compound in a large and diverse chemical library. As a result, NMR ligand screens are typically limited to identifying candidates that bind to a protein and do not give any estimate of the binding affinity. To address this issue, a methodology has been developed to rank binding affinities for ligands based on NMR-based screens that use 1D 1H NMR line-broadening experiments. This method was demonstrated by using it to estimate the dissociation equilibrium constants for twelve ligands with the protein human serum albumin (HSA). The results were found to give good agreement with previous affinities that have been reported for these same ligands with HSA. PMID:18831571

  10. Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Acridine-Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; Amorim, Cézar Augusto da Cruz; de Oliveira, Tiago Bento; Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the acridine nucleus was used as a lead-compound for structural modification by adding different substituted thiosemicarbazide moieties. Eight new (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide derivatives (3a-h) were synthesized, their antiproliferative activities were evaluated, and DNA binding properties were performed with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both hyperchromic and hypochromic effects, as well as red or blue shifts were demonstrated by addition of ctDNA to the derivatives. The calculated binding constants ranged from 1.74 × 10(4) to 1.0 × 10(6) M(-1) and quenching constants from -0.2 × 10(4) to 2.18 × 10(4) M(-1) indicating high affinity to ctDNA base pairs. The most efficient compound in binding to ctDNA in vitro was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N- (4-chlorophenyl) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3f), while the most active compound in antiproliferative assay was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (3a). There was no correlation between DNA-binding and in vitro antiproliferative activity, but the results suggest that DNA binding can be involved in the biological activity mechanism. This study may guide the choice of the size and shape of the intercalating part of the ligand and the strategic selection of substituents that increase DNA-binding or antiproliferative properties. PMID:26068233

  11. Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Acridine-Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; Gomes da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra; Amorim, Cézar Augusto da Cruz; de Oliveira, Tiago Bento; Gois Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the acridine nucleus was used as a lead-compound for structural modification by adding different substituted thiosemicarbazide moieties. Eight new (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide derivatives (3a–h) were synthesized, their antiproliferative activities were evaluated, and DNA binding properties were performed with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both hyperchromic and hypochromic effects, as well as red or blue shifts were demonstrated by addition of ctDNA to the derivatives. The calculated binding constants ranged from 1.74 × 104 to 1.0 × 106 M−1 and quenching constants from −0.2 × 104 to 2.18 × 104 M−1 indicating high affinity to ctDNA base pairs. The most efficient compound in binding to ctDNA in vitro was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-(4-chlorophenyl) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3f), while the most active compound in antiproliferative assay was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (3a). There was no correlation between DNA-binding and in vitro antiproliferative activity, but the results suggest that DNA binding can be involved in the biological activity mechanism. This study may guide the choice of the size and shape of the intercalating part of the ligand and the strategic selection of substituents that increase DNA-binding or antiproliferative properties. PMID:26068233

  12. Deciphering the Binding between Nupr1 and MSL1 and Their DNA-Repairing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doménech, Rosa; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Santoro, Jorge; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Neira, José L.; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2013-01-01

    The stress protein Nupr1 is a highly basic, multifunctional, intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). MSL1 is a histone acetyl transferase-associated protein, known to intervene in the dosage compensation complex (DCC). In this work, we show that both Nupr1 and MSL1 proteins were recruited and formed a complex into the nucleus in response to DNA-damage, which was essential for cell survival in reply to cisplatin damage. We studied the interaction of Nupr1 and MSL1, and their binding affinities to DNA by spectroscopic and biophysical methods. The MSL1 bound to Nupr1, with a moderate affinity (2.8 µM) in an entropically-driven process. MSL1 did not bind to non-damaged DNA, but it bound to chemically-damaged-DNA with a moderate affinity (1.2 µM) also in an entropically-driven process. The Nupr1 protein bound to chemically-damaged-DNA with a slightly larger affinity (0.4 µM), but in an enthalpically-driven process. Nupr1 showed different interacting regions in the formed complexes with Nupr1 or DNA; however, they were always disordered (“fuzzy”), as shown by NMR. These results underline a stochastic description of the functionality of the Nupr1 and its other interacting partners. PMID:24205110

  13. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  14. High-resolution specificity from DNA sequencing highlights alternative modes of Lac repressor binding.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor-operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  15. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  16. DETECTION OF HETEROGENEOUS DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY FRONTAL ANALYSIS AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of frontal analysis and high-performance affinity chromatography for detecting heterogeneous binding in biomolecular interactions, using the binding of acetohexamide with human serum albumin (HSA) as a model. It was found through the use of this model system and chromatographic theory that double-reciprocal plots could be used more easily than traditional isotherms for the initial detection of binding site heterogeneity. The deviations from linearity that were seen in double-reciprocal plots as a result of heterogeneity were a function of the analyte concentration, the relative affinities of the binding sites in the system and the amount of each type of site that was present. The size of these deviations was determined and compared under various conditions. Plots were also generated to show what experimental conditions would be needed to observe these deviations for general heterogeneous systems or for cases in which some preliminary information was available on the extent of binding heterogeneity. The methods developed in this work for the detection of binding heterogeneity are not limited to drug interactions with HSA but could be applied to other types of drug-protein binding or to additional biological systems with heterogeneous binding. PMID:21612784

  17. Tsetse Salivary Gland Proteins 1 and 2 Are High Affinity Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins with Residual Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Ridder, Karin De; Stijlemans, Benoît; Coosemans, Marc; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans) saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2) display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with KD values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents. PMID:23110062

  18. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R(2) = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R(2) = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures. PMID:26572910

  19. Novel Ubiquitin-derived High Affinity Binding Proteins with Tumor Targeting Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Lorey, Susan; Fiedler, Erik; Kunert, Anja; Nerkamp, Jörg; Lange, Christian; Fiedler, Markus; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva; Meysing, Maren; Gloser, Manja; Rundfeldt, Chris; Rauchhaus, Una; Hänssgen, Ilka; Göttler, Thomas; Steuernagel, Arnd; Fiedler, Ulrike; Haupts, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Targeting effector molecules to tumor cells is a promising mode of action for cancer therapy and diagnostics. Binding proteins with high affinity and specificity for a tumor target that carry effector molecules such as toxins, cytokines, or radiolabels to their intended site of action are required for these applications. In order to yield high tumor accumulation while maintaining low levels in healthy tissues and blood, the half-life of such conjugates needs to be in an optimal range. Scaffold-based binding molecules are small proteins with high affinity and short systemic circulation. Due to their low molecular complexity, they are well suited for combination with effector molecules as well as half-life extension technologies yielding therapeutics with half-lives adapted to the specific therapy. We have identified ubiquitin as an ideal scaffold protein due to its outstanding biophysical and biochemical properties. Based on a dimeric ubiquitin library, high affinity and specific binding molecules, so-called Affilin® molecules, have been selected against the extradomain B of fibronectin, a target almost exclusively expressed in tumor tissues. Extradomain B-binding molecules feature high thermal and serum stability as well as strong in vitro target binding and in vivo tumor accumulation. Application of several half-life extension technologies results in molecules of largely unaffected affinity but significantly prolonged in vivo half-life and tumor retention. Our results demonstrate the utility of ubiquitin as a scaffold for the generation of high affinity binders in a modular fashion, which can be combined with effector molecules and half-life extension technologies. PMID:24474690

  20. Analysis and prediction of affinity of TAP binding peptides using cascade SVM.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Manoj; Raghava, G P S

    2004-03-01

    The generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from an antigenic sequence involves number of intracellular processes, including production of peptide fragments by proteasome and transport of peptides to endoplasmic reticulum through transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In this study, 409 peptides that bind to human TAP transporter with varying affinity were analyzed to explore the selectivity and specificity of TAP transporter. The abundance of each amino acid from P1 to P9 positions in high-, intermediate-, and low-affinity TAP binders were examined. The rules for predicting TAP binding regions in an antigenic sequence were derived from the above analysis. The quantitative matrix was generated on the basis of contribution of each position and residue in binding affinity. The correlation of r = 0.65 was obtained between experimentally determined and predicted binding affinity by using a quantitative matrix. Further a support vector machine (SVM)-based method has been developed to model the TAP binding affinity of peptides. The correlation (r = 0.80) was obtained between the predicted and experimental measured values by using sequence-based SVM. The reliability of prediction was further improved by cascade SVM that uses features of amino acids along with sequence. An extremely good correlation (r = 0.88) was obtained between measured and predicted values, when the cascade SVM-based method was evaluated through jackknife testing. A Web service, TAPPred (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/tappred/ or http://bioinformatics.uams.edu/mirror/tappred/), has been developed based on this approach. PMID:14978300

  1. Quantitative and qualitative effects of N10-methylfolate on high-affinity folate binding in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Holm, J; Hansen, S I; Lyngbye, J

    1984-01-01

    N10-methylfolate acted as a potent competitive inhibitor of high-affinity [3H] folate binding in human leukocytes, while methotrexate had no effect. Furthermore, folate binding changed into a non-cooperative type in the presence of N10-methylfolate. Hence, in qualitative and quantitative respects, the substrate specificity characteristics of leukocyte folate binding resemble those of other high-affinity folate binding systems. PMID:6500843

  2. Competitive DNA-Binding Studies between Metal Complexes and GelRed as a New and Safe Fluorescent DNA Dye.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2016-07-01

    The focus of this work is introduction of GelRed (GR) as a stable, sensitive and environmentally safe fluorescent DNA dye instead of the highly toxic ethidium bromide (EB). Competitive DNA-binding studies between metal complexes, [Cu(phen-dion)(phen)Cl]Cl (1), [Cu(phen-dione)(bpy)Cl]Cl (2), [Cu(dppt)2(H2O)]PF6 (3), [Ni(dppt)2Cl2] (4), [Zn(dppt)2Cl2] (5), and K3[Fe(CN)6] (6) (where phen-dione is 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione, phen is 1,10- phenanthroline, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and dppt is 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine), and GelRed have been investigated under physiological conditions by fluorescence spectroscopy. This simple method can reveal the binding affinity and mode of metal complexes with DNA. The method is based on the decrease of fluorescence derived from the displacement of GelRed from DNA by metal complexes. The % fluorescence decrease is directly related to the extent of DNA binding. Results indicate the DNA binding affinities of complexes follow the order 3 > 4 > 1 > 2 > 5 > 6. The significant quenching of the emission band of the GR-DNA with the addition of complexes 1, 3, and 4 suggests that complexes compete for DNA-binding sites with GR and displace GR from the GR-DNA, which is usually characteristic of the intercalative interaction of compounds with DNA. A small quenching of the emission band of the GR-DNA with the addition of the complex 2 was observed that show the complex weaker competes for DNA-binding sites with GR than complexes 1, 3, and 4. Results show complexes 5 and 6 cannot compete for DNA-binding sites with GR and their interaction with DNA is external binding (groove or electrostatic bindig). PMID:27324950

  3. RNA-Binding Affinities and Crystal Structure of Oligonucleotides Containing Five-Atom Amide-Based Backbone Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; von Matt, Peter; Wilds, Christopher J.; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Egli, Martin

    2010-03-08

    Among the hundreds of nucleic acid analogues that have been studied over the last two decades only very few exhibit backbones with linkers between residues that are either shorter or longer than the four-atom linker O3{prime}-P-O5{prime}-C5{prime} connecting sugar ring moieties in DNA and RNA. 2{prime}-Deoxyribonucleoside dimers connected by a five-atom linker O3{prime}-CH*(CH{sub 3})-CO-NH-CH{sub 2} (* designates a chiral center) were reported to lead to only a slight destabilization of RNA-DNA hybrids in which the DNA strand contained one or several of these amide-linked dimers (De Napoli, L., Iadonisi, A., Montesarchio, D., Varra, M., and Piccialli, G. (1995) Synthesis of thymidine dimers containing a new internucleosidic amide linkage and their incorporation into oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 5, 1647-1652). To analyze the influence of various chemistries of such five-atom amide linkers on the RNA-binding affinity of modified DNA strands, we have synthesized five different amide-linked dimers, including structures with homochiral linkers of the type X3{prime}-C*H(CH{sub 3})-CO-NH-CH{sub 2} (X = O, CH{sub 2}) as well as the corresponding analogues carrying methoxy groups at the 2{prime}-position of the 3{prime}-nucleosides. We have conducted a detailed thermodynamic analysis of duplex formation between the modified DNA and RNA, with the DNA strands containing between one and seven consecutive modified dimers. Some of the five-atom-linked dimers lead to significantly higher RNA-binding affinities compared with that of native DNA. Interestingly, the linkers with opposite stereochemistry at the chiral center stabilize duplexes between the modified DNA and RNA to different degrees. CD spectroscopy in solution and a crystal structure of an RNA-DNA duplex with a single amide-linked dimer demonstrate that the longer amide backbones do not disrupt the duplex geometry. These observations provide further evidence that stable cross-pairing between two

  4. GST-Induced dimerization of DNA-binding domains alters characteristics of their interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Niedziela-Majka, A; Rymarczyk, G; Kochman, M; Ozyhar, A

    1998-11-01

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) plays a key role in the induction and modulation of morphogenetic events throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. Two members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, the product of the EcR (EcR) and of the ultraspiracle genes (Usp), heterodimerize to form its functional receptor. To study the receptor-DNA interaction, critical for regulating 20E-dependent gene expression, it is necessary to produce large quantities of EcR and Usp DNA-binding domains. Toward this end DNA-binding domains of EcR and Usp (EcRDBD and UspDBD, respectively) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase (GST). However, the results of DNA-binding studies obtained with purified GST-DBDs were found to be questionable because the fused proteins oligomerized in solution due to the presence of GST. Therefore DBDs were released from GST-chimeric proteins by thrombin cleavage and then purified by glutathione-Sepharose 4B chromatography and by gel filtration on Superdex 75 HR. The gel mobility-shift experiments showed that UspDBD exhibited higher affinity than EcRDBD toward a 20-hydroxyecdysone response element from the Drosophila hsp 27 gene (hsp 27pal). Furthermore, formation of the heterodimeric EcRDBD-UspDBD complex was observed to be synergistic when equimolar mixture of both DBDs was incubated with hsp 27pal. Surprisingly, GST-EcRDBD bound hsp 27pal with higher affinity than GST-UspDBD. This difference was accompanied by the impaired ability of the GST-DBDs to interact synergistically with hsp 27pal. This is the first report on expression and purification of the soluble DBDs of the functional ecdysteroid receptor with satisfying yields. Furthermore, our results add to the recent findings which indicate the need for caution in interpreting the activities of GST fusion proteins. PMID:9790883

  5. Role of the Cro repressor carboxy-terminal domain and flexible dimer linkage in operator and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, A J; Bracco, L P; Eisenbeis, S J; Gayle, R B; Beaton, G; Caruthers, M H

    1990-10-01

    A series of mutations comprising single and multiple substitutions, deletions, and extensions within the carboxy-terminal domain of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor have been constructed. These mutations generally affect the affinity of repressor for specific and nonspecific DNA. Additionally, substitution of the carboxy-terminal alanine with several amino acids capable of hydrogen-bonding interactions leads to improved specific binding affinities. A mutation is also described whereby cysteine links the two Cro monomers by a disulfide bond. As a consequence, a significant improvement in nonspecific binding and a concomitant reduction in specific binding are observed with this mutant. These results provide evidence that the carboxy terminus of Cro repressor is an important DNA binding domain and that a flexible connection between the two repressor monomers is a critical factor in modulating the affinity of wild-type repressor for DNA. PMID:2271592

  6. Biotinylated Cyclophane: Synthesis, Cyclophane-Avidin Conjugates, and Their Enhanced Guest-Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Osamu; Kojima, Miwa; Kusano, Shuhei

    2015-10-01

    Cationic and anionic cyclophanes bearing a biotin moiety were synthesized as a water-soluble host (1a and 1b, respectively). Both hosts 1a and 1b were found to strongly bind avidin with binding constants of 1.3 × 10(8) M(-1), as confirmed by surface plasmon resonance measurements. The present conjugate of 1a with avidin (1a-avidin) showed an enhanced guest binding affinity toward fluorescence guests such as TNS and 2,6-ANS. The K values of 1a-avidin conjugate with TNS and 2,6-ANS were ~19-fold larger than those of monocyclic cyclophane 1a with the identical guests. Favorable hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between 1a-avidin and TNS were suggested by computer-aided molecular modeling calculations. Moreover, addition of excess biotin to the complexes of 1a-avidin with the guests resulted in dissociation of 1a-avidin to avidin and 1a having less guest-binding affinity. Conversely, such enhancements in the guest-binding affinity were not obviously observed for the conjugate of anionic 1b with avidin (1b-avidin) due to electrostatic repulsion between anionic 1b and anionic guests. PMID:26360807

  7. Microcantilever-Based Label-Free Characterization of Temperature-Dependent Biomolecular Affinity Binding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Fengliang; Nguyen, ThaiHuu; Xu, Yong; Lin, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents label-free characterization of temperature-dependent biomolecular affinity binding on solid surfaces using a microcantilever-based device. The device consists of a Parylene cantilever one side of which is coated with a gold film and functionalized with molecules as an affinity receptor to a target analyte. The cantilever is located in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chamber that is integrated with a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) resistive temperature sensor on the underlying substrate. The ITO sensor allows for real-time measurements of the chamber temperature, as well as unobstructed optical access for reflection-based optical detection of the cantilever deflection. To test the temperature-dependent binding between the target and receptor, the temperature of the chamber is maintained at a constant setpoint, while a solution of unlabeled analyte molecules is continuously infused through the chamber. The measured cantilever deflection is used to determine the target-receptor binding characteristics. We demonstrate label-free characterization of temperature-dependent binding kinetics of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) protein with an aptamer receptor. Affinity binding properties including the association and dissociation rate constants as well as equilibrium dissociation constant are obtained, and shown to exhibit significant dependencies on temperature. PMID:24723743

  8. Predicting the Impact of Missense Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil; Panchenko, Anna R

    2014-04-01

    The crucial prerequisite for proper biological function is the protein's ability to establish highly selective interactions with macromolecular partners. A missense mutation that alters the protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of the function, potentially leading to diseases. The availability of computational methods to evaluate the impact of mutations on protein-protein binding is critical for a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report an efficient computational approach for predicting the effect of single and multiple missense mutations on protein-protein binding affinity. It is based on a well-tested simulation protocol for structure minimization, modified MM-PBSA and statistical scoring energy functions with parameters optimized on experimental sets of several thousands of mutations. Our simulation protocol yields very good agreement between predicted and experimental values with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.69 and 0.63 and root-mean-square errors of 1.20 and 1.90 kcal mol(-1) for single and multiple mutations, respectively. Compared with other available methods, our approach achieves high speed and prediction accuracy and can be applied to large datasets generated by modern genomics initiatives. In addition, we report a crucial role of water model and the polar solvation energy in estimating the changes in binding affinity. Our analysis also reveals that prediction accuracy and effect of mutations on binding strongly depends on the type of mutation and its location in a protein complex. PMID:24803870

  9. Optimal fusion of antibody binding domains resulted in higher affinity and wider specificity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhua; Kojima, Tomoki; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Antibody is a very important protein in biotechnological and biomedical fields because of its high affinity and specificity to various antigens. Due to the rise of human antibody therapeutics, its cost-effective purification is an urgent issue for bio-industry. In this study, we made novel fusion proteins PAxPG with a flexible (DDAKK)n linker between the two Ig binding domains derived from Staphylococcus protein A and Streptococcus protein G. The fusion proteins bound human and mouse IgGs and their fragments with up to 58-times higher affinity and wider specificity than the parental binding domains. Interestingly, the optimal linker for human Fab fragment was n = 4, which was close to the modeled distance between the termini of domains bound to heavy chain, implying increased avidity as a possible mechanism. For binding to Fc, the longest n=6 linker gave the highest affinity, implying longer interchain distance between the two binding sites. The novel fusion protein with optimized interdomain linker length will be a useful tool for the purification and detection of various IgGs including mouse IgG1 that binds only weakly to natural protein A. PMID:25910963

  10. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase. PMID:25748632

  11. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-08-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  12. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis of DNA minor groove complexes of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Koonammackal, Mathew Varghese; Nellipparambil, Unnikrishnan Viswambharan Nair; Sudarsanakumar, Chellappanpillai

    2011-11-01

    Curcumin is a natural phytochemical that exhibits a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antitumor and anticancer activities. The similarity in the shape of curcumin to DNA minor groove binding drugs is the motivation for exploring its binding affinity in the minor grooves of DNA sequences. Interactions of curcumin with DNA have not been extensively examined, while its pharmacological activities have been studied and documented in depth. Curcumin was docked with two DNA duplexes, d(GTATATAC)(2) and d(CGCGATATCGCG)(2), and molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes were performed in explicit solvent to determine the stability of the binding. In all systems, the curcumin is positioned in the minor groove in the A·T region, and was stably bound throughout the simulation, causing only minor modifications to the structural parameters of DNA. Water molecules were found to contribute to the stability of the binding of the ligand. Free energy analyses of the complexes were performed with MM-PBSA, and the binding affinities that were calculated are comparable to the values reported for other similar nucleic acid-ligand systems, indicating that curcumin is a suitable natural molecule for the development of minor groove binding drugs. PMID:21287216

  14. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M. PMID:23325100

  15. Engineering Streptavidin and a Streptavidin-Binding Peptide with Infinite Binding Affinity and Reversible Binding Capability: Purification of a Tagged Recombinant Protein to High Purity via Affinity-Driven Thiol Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Fogen, Dawson; Wu, Sau-Ching; Ng, Kenneth Kai-Sing; Wong, Sui-Lam

    2015-01-01

    To extend and improve the utility of the streptavidin-binding peptide tag (SBP-tag) in applications ranging from affinity purification to the reversible immobilization of recombinant proteins, a cysteine residue was introduced to the streptavidin mutein SAVSBPM18 and the SBP-tag to generate SAVSBPM32 and SBP(A18C), respectively. This pair of derivatives is capable of forming a disulfide bond through the newly introduced cysteine residues. SAVSBPM32 binds SBP-tag and biotin with binding affinities (Kd ~ 10-8M) that are similar to SAVSBPM18. Although SBP(A18C) binds to SAVSBPM32 more weakly than SBP-tag, the binding affinity is sufficient to bring the two binding partners together efficiently before they are locked together via disulfide bond formation–a phenomenon we have named affinity-driven thiol coupling. Under the condition with SBP(A18C) tags in excess, two SBP(A18C) tags can be captured by a tetrameric SAVSBPM32. The stoichiometry of the disulfide-bonded SAVSBPM32-SBP(A18C) complex was determined using a novel two-dimensional electrophoresis method which has general applications for analyzing the composition of disulfide-bonded protein complexes. To illustrate the application of this reversible immobilization technology, optimized conditions were established to use the SAVSBPM32-affinity matrix for the purification of a SBP(A18C)-tagged reporter protein to high purity. Furthermore, we show that the SAVSBPM32-affinity matrix can also be applied to purify a biotinylated protein and a reporter protein tagged with the unmodified SBP-tag. The dual (covalent and non-covalent) binding modes possible in this system offer great flexibility to many different applications which need reversible immobilization capability. PMID:26406477

  16. Mutually Exclusive Binding of Telomerase RNA and DNA by Ku Alters Telomerase Recruitment Model

    PubMed Central

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S.; Goodrich, Karen J.; Taabazuing, Cornelius; Ouenzar, Faissal; Chartrand, Pascal; Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ku heterodimer contributes to telomere maintenance as a component of telomeric chromatin and as an accessory subunit of telomerase. How Ku binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and to telomerase RNA (TLC1) promotes its telomeric functions is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that deletions designed to constrict the DNA-binding ring of Ku80 disrupt non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), telomeric gene silencing and telomere length maintenance, suggesting that these functions require Ku's DNA end-binding activity. Contrary to the current model, a mutant Ku with low affinity for dsDNA also loses affinity for TLC1 both in vitro and in vivo. Competition experiments reveal that wild-type Ku binds dsDNA and TLC1 mutually exclusively. Cells expressing the mutant Ku are deficient in nuclear accumulation of TLC1, as expected from the RNA-binding defect. These findings force reconsideration of the mechanisms by which Ku assists in recruiting telomerase to natural telomeres and broken chromosome ends. PMID:22365814

  17. Quantifying the DNA binding characteristics of ruthenium based threading intercalator Λ Λ -P with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, Nicholas; McCauley, Micah; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Utilizing optical tweezers, biophysics researchers have been able to study drug-DNA interactions on the single molecule level. Binuclear ruthenium complexes are a particular type of drug molecule that have been found to have potential cancer-fighting qualities, due to their high binding affinity and low dissociation rates. These complexes are threading intercalators, meaning that they must thread their bulky side chains through DNA base pairs to allow the central planar moiety to intercalate between the bases. In this study, we explored the binding properties of the binuclear ruthenium complex, ΛΛ -P (ΛΛ -[µ-bidppz(phen)4Ru2]4+) . A single DNA molecule is held at a constant force and the ΛΛ -P solution introduced to the system in varying concentrations until equilibrium is reached. DNA extension data at various concentrations of ΛΛ -P recorded as a function of time provide the DNA binding kinetics and equilibrium binding affinity. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ΛΛ -P exhibits fast binding kinetics compared to the very similar ΔΔ -P. These complexes have the same chemical structure and only differ in their chirality, which suggests that the left handed (ΛΛ) threading moieties require less DNA structural distortion for threading compared with the right handed (ΔΔ) threading moieties.

  18. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  19. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Invited for the cover of this issue are Sven Vollmer and Clemens Richert of the University of Stuttgart. The cover image hints at the analogy between a honey comb, as a macroscopic storage device, and DNA triplexes with designed binding sites, as molecular storage motifs that can release ATP to fuel a bioluminescence reaction. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.201503220. PMID:26534779

  20. Thymine DNA glycosylase exhibits negligible affinity for nucleobases that it removes from DNA

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shuja S.; Coey, Christopher T.; Varney, Kristen M.; Pozharski, Edwin; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) performs essential functions in maintaining genetic integrity and epigenetic regulation. Initiating base excision repair, TDG removes thymine from mutagenic G·T mispairs caused by 5-methylcytosine (mC) deamination and other lesions including uracil (U) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (hmU). In DNA demethylation, TDG excises 5-formylcytosine (fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (caC), which are generated from mC by Tet (ten–eleven translocation) enzymes. Using improved crystallization conditions, we solved high-resolution (up to 1.45 Å) structures of TDG enzyme–product complexes generated from substrates including G·U, G·T, G·hmU, G·fC and G·caC. The structures reveal many new features, including key water-mediated enzyme–substrate interactions. Together with nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, the structures demonstrate that TDG releases the excised base from its tight product complex with abasic DNA, contrary to previous reports. Moreover, DNA-free TDG exhibits no significant binding to free nucleobases (U, T, hmU), indicating a Kd >> 10 mM. The structures reveal a solvent-filled channel to the active site, which might facilitate dissociation of the excised base and enable caC excision, which involves solvent-mediated acid catalysis. Dissociation of the excised base allows TDG to bind the beta rather than the alpha anomer of the abasic sugar, which might stabilize the enzyme–product complex. PMID:26358812

  1. Targeting CpG DNA to screen and isolate anti-sepsis fraction and monomers from traditional Chinese herbs using affinity biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Cheng, Juan; Zheng, Xinchuang; Chen, Yiguo; Wu, Chong; Li, Bin; Fu, Jianfeng; Cao, Hongwei; Lu, Yongling; Li, Jun; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial DNA/CpG DNA is recognized as a key molecule during the pathogenesis of sepsis. Therefore, preventing CpG DNA from binding to its receptor is considered as the most promising strategy. In the present experiments, Radix et Rhizoma Rhei had the highest CpG DNA-binding ability among the seventy-eight traditional Chinese herbs. After the isolation of silica gel chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and evaluation with affinity biosensor, the active fraction was confirmed and named Fraction D. It was found that in vitro, Fraction D bound to both CpG DNA and lipid A with high affinity, and strongly inhibited LPS- and CpG DNA-induced TNF-alpha release from RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Fraction D reduced the expression of TLR9 mRNA up-regulated by CpG DNA. In vivo, Fraction D protected mice challenged with lethal heat-killed E. coli. Using HPLC method, two monomers with high affinity for CpG DNA were isolated and identified as rhein and emodin. Rhein could significantly reduce CpG DNA- and LPS-induced TNF-alpha release, but emodin only reduced CpG DNA-induced TNF-alpha release. Rhein in combination with emodin could play synergistic inhibitory effect on both CpG DNA and LPS-induced TNF-alpha release, which contributed to the bioactivity of Fraction D. In conclusion, we successfully established the platform to screen anti-CpG DNA components of traditional Chinese herbs using affinity biosensor technology, got active Fraction D from Radix et Rhizoma Rhei and determined rhein and emodin as the main bioactive ingredients in Fraction D. PMID:19376273

  2. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  3. Blind prediction of SAMPL4 cucurbit[7]uril binding affinities with the mining minima method

    PubMed Central

    Muddana, Hari S.; Yin, Jian; Sapra, Neil V.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate methods for predicting protein-ligand binding affinities are of central interest to computer-aided drug design for hit identification and lead optimization. Here, we used the mining minima (M2) method to predict cucurbit[7]uril binding affinities from the SAMPL4 blind prediction challenge. We tested two different energy models, an empirical classical force field, CHARMm with VCharge charges, and the Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (PBSA) solvation model; and a semiempirical quantum mechanical Hamiltonian, PM6-DH+, coupled with the COSMO solvation model and a surface area term for nonpolar solvation free energy. Binding affinities based on the classical force field correlated strongly with the experiments with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.74. On the other hand, binding affinities based on the quantum mechanical energy model correlated poorly with experiments (R2 = 0.24), due largely to two major outliers. As we used extensive conformational search methods, these results point to possible inaccuracies in the PM6-DH+ energy model or the COSMO solvation model. Furthermore, the different binding free energy components, solute energy, solvation free energy, and configurational entropy showed significant deviations between the classical M2 and quantum M2 calculations. Comparison of different classical M2 free energy components to experiments show that the change in the total energy, i.e. the solute energy plus the solvation free energy, is the key driving force for binding, with a reasonable correlation to experiment (R2 = 0.56); however, accounting for configurational entropy further improves the correlation. PMID:24510191

  4. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, P A

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I{center_dot}C base pairs are functional analogs of A{center_dot}T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  5. Inclusion of an RGD Motif Alters Invasin Integrin-Binding Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tarik A; Wang, Xianzhe; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2016-04-12

    Invasin is a key adhesin displayed on the outer membrane of Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis that mediates the initial stages of infection. Invasin specifically targets microfold (M) cells in the small intestine by binding β1 integrins and is sufficient to trigger eukaryotic uptake of invasin-coated particles, including Yersinia, Escherichia coli, and latex beads. As a result, invasin has generated interest to mediate oral delivery of vaccines and other biologics. Integrin binding affinity has been shown to correlate with particle uptake; thus we hypothesized that invasin variants with higher affinity would confer enhanced internalization. We first performed alanine scanning of surface-exposed tyrosine residues to identify those contributing to integrin binding. We identified two residues, which, when substituted with alanine, reduced binding to soluble α5β1 integrin. Next, we constructed four targeted mutagenesis libraries spanning these and other residues known to contribute to binding, followed by enrichment of variants able to mediate Caco-2 cellular invasion and to bind soluble α5β1 integrin. We identified three amino acid substitutions that increased α5β1 integrin binding affinity as measured by flow cytometry and ELISA assays, two of which created a novel RGD motif surrounding the D911 residue critical for binding. This variant confers enhanced internalization into CHO cells but not Caco-2 cells when expressed on the E. coli surface. Further analysis showed that inclusion of an RGD expands invasin-integrin specificity, thereby impacting cellular selectivity. This work provides a molecular explanation for the lack of an RGD motif in invasin that is present in many other adhesins. PMID:27015583

  6. Impact of D2 Receptor Internalization on Binding Affinity of Neuroimaging Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ningning; Guo, Wen; Kralikova, Michaela; Jiang, Man; Schieren, Ira; Narendran, Raj; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Javitch, Jonathan A; Rayport, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic dopamine (DA) levels seem to affect the in vivo binding of many D2 receptor radioligands. Thus, release of endogenous DA induced by the administration of amphetamine decreases ligand binding, whereas DA depletion increases binding. This is generally thought to be due to competition between endogenous DA and the radioligands for D2 receptors. However, the temporal discrepancy between amphetamine-induced increases in DA as measured by microdialysis, which last on the order of 2 h, and the prolonged decrease in ligand binding, which lasts up to a day, has suggested that agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization may contribute to the sustained decrease in D2 receptor-binding potential seen following a DA surge. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro system showing robust agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization following treatment with the agonist quinpirole. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were stably co-transfected with human D2 receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and arrestin 3. Agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and radioligand competition binding. The binding of seven D2 antagonists and four agonists to the surface and internalized receptors was measured in intact cells. All the imaging ligands bound with high affinity to both surface and internalized D2 receptors. Affinity of most of the ligands to internalized receptors was modestly lower, indicating that internalization would reduce the binding potential measured in imaging studies carried out with these ligands. However, between-ligand differences in the magnitude of the internalization-associated affinity shift only partly accounted for the data obtained in neuroimaging experiments, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms beyond competition and internalization. PMID:19956086

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BINDING OF SULFONYLUREA DRUGS TO HSA BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfonylurea drugs are often prescribed as a treatment for type II diabetes to help lower blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion. These drugs are believed to primarily bind in blood to human serum albumin (HSA). This study used high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to examine the binding of sulfonylureas to HSA. Frontal analysis with an immobilized HSA column was used to determine the association equilibrium constants (Ka) and number of binding sites on HSA for the sulfonylurea drugs acetohexamide and tolbutamide. The results from frontal analysis indicated HSA had a group of relatively high affinity binding regions and weaker binding sites for each drug, with average Ka values of 1.3 (± 0.2) × 105 M−1 and 3.5 (± 3.0) × 102 M−1 for acetohexamide and values of 8.7 (± 0.6) × 104 and 8.1 (± 1.7) × 103 M−1 for tolbutamide. Zonal elution and competition studies with site-specific probes were used to further examine the relatively high affinity interactions of these drugs by looking directly at the interactions that were occurring at Sudlow sites I and II of HSA (i.e., the major drug binding sites on this protein). It was found that acetohexamide was able to bind at both Sudlow sites I and II, with Ka values of 1.3 (± 0.1) × 105 and 4.3 (± 0.3) × 104 M−1, respectively, at 37°C. Tolbutamide also appeared to interact with both Sudlow sites I and II, with Ka values of 5.5 (± 0.2) × 104 and 5.3 (± 0.2) × 104 M−1, respectively. The results provide a more quantitative picture of how these drugs bind with HSA and illustrate how HPAC and related tools can be used to examine relatively complex drug-protein interactions. PMID:20435530

  8. Escherichia coli Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein: NanoESI-MS Studies of Salt-Modulated Subunit Exchange and DNA Binding Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Claire E.; Jergic, Slobodan; Lo, Allen T. Y.; Wang, Yao; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2013-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are ubiquitous oligomeric proteins that bind with very high affinity to single-stranded DNA and have a variety of essential roles in DNA metabolism. Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) was used to monitor subunit exchange in full-length and truncated forms of the homotetrameric SSB from Escherichia coli. Subunit exchange in the native protein was found to occur slowly over a period of hours, but was significantly more rapid in a truncated variant of SSB from which the eight C-terminal residues were deleted. This effect is proposed to result from C-terminus mediated stabilization of the SSB tetramer, in which the C-termini interact with the DNA-binding cores of adjacent subunits. NanoESI-MS was also used to examine DNA binding to the SSB tetramer. Binding of single-stranded oligonucleotides [one molecule of (dT)70, one molecule of (dT)35, or two molecules of (dT)35] was found to prevent SSB subunit exchange. Transfer of SSB tetramers between discrete oligonucleotides was also observed and is consistent with predictions from solution-phase studies, suggesting that SSB-DNA complexes can be reliably analyzed by ESI mass spectrometry.

  9. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding.

    PubMed

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A T; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  10. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  11. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  12. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  13. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  14. Modulating uranium binding affinity in engineered calmodulin EF-hand peptides: effect of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T(9)TKE(12) sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from K(d) = 25±6 nM to K(d) = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (K(d) = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the ν(as)(P-O) and ν(s)(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in ν(as)(UO(2))(2+) vibration (from 923 cm(-1) to 908 cm(-1)) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  15. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  16. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  17. PBSA_E: A PBSA-Based Free Energy Estimator for Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-23

    Improving the accuracy of scoring functions for estimating protein-ligand binding affinity is of significant interest as well as practical utility in drug discovery. In this work, PBSA_E, a new free energy estimator based on the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) descriptors, has been developed. This free energy estimator was optimized using high-quality experimental data from a training set consisting of 145 protein-ligand complexes. The method was validated on two separate test sets containing 121 and 130 complexes. Comparison of the binding affinities predicted using the present method with those obtained using three popular scoring functions, i.e., GlideXP, GlideSP, and SYBYL_F, demonstrated that the PBSA_E method is more accurate. This new energy estimator requires a MM/PBSA calculation of the protein-ligand binding energy for a single complex configuration, which is typically obtained by optimizing the crystal structure. The present study shows that PBSA_E has the potential to become a robust tool for more reliable estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity in structure-based drug design. PMID:27088302

  18. Optimizing the affinity and specificity of ligand binding with the inclusion of solvation effect.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2015-09-01

    Solvation effect is an important factor for protein-ligand binding in aqueous water. Previous scoring function of protein-ligand interactions rarely incorporates the solvation model into the quantification of protein-ligand interactions, mainly due to the immense computational cost, especially in the structure-based virtual screening, and nontransferable application of independently optimized atomic solvation parameters. In order to overcome these barriers, we effectively combine knowledge-based atom-pair potentials and the atomic solvation energy of charge-independent implicit solvent model in the optimization of binding affinity and specificity. The resulting scoring functions with optimized atomic solvation parameters is named as specificity and affinity with solvation effect (SPA-SE). The performance of SPA-SE is evaluated and compared to 20 other scoring functions, as well as SPA. The comparative results show that SPA-SE outperforms all other scoring functions in binding affinity prediction and "native" pose identification. Our optimization validates that solvation effect is an important regulator to the stability and specificity of protein-ligand binding. The development strategy of SPA-SE sets an example for other scoring function to account for the solvation effect in biomolecular recognitions. PMID:26111900

  19. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, K d) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in K d (range 2.0-7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The K d values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5-5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the K d in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists. PMID:27293705

  20. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J.; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in Kd (range 2.0–7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The Kd values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5–5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the Kd in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists. PMID:27293705

  1. DNA Shape versus Sequence Variations in the Protein Binding Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-02-01

    The binding process of a protein with a DNA involves three stages: approach, encounter, and association. It has been known that the complexation of protein and DNA involves mutual conformational changes, especially for a specific sequence association. However, it is still unclear how the conformation and the information in the DNA sequences affects the binding process. What is the extent to which the DNA structure adopted in the complex is induced by protein binding, or is instead intrinsic to the DNA sequence? In this study, we used the multiscale simulation method to explore the binding process of a protein with DNA in terms of DNA sequence, conformation, and interactions. We found that in the approach stage the protein can bind both the major and minor groove of the DNA, but uses different features to locate the binding site. The intrinsic conformational properties of the DNA play a significant role in this binding stage. By comparing the specific DNA with the nonspecific in unbound, intermediate, and associated states, we found that for a specific DNA sequence, ∼40% of the bending in the association forms is intrinsic and that ∼60% is induced by the protein. The protein does not induce appreciable bending of nonspecific DNA. In addition, we proposed that the DNA shape variations induced by protein binding are required in the early stage of the binding process, so that the protein is able to approach, encounter, and form an intermediate at the correct site on DNA. PMID:26840719

  2. New luminescent probe based on a terbium(III) complex for studying DNA affinity of aminoalkoxy fluorenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorova, A. V.; Leonenko, I. I.; Scrypynets, Yu. V.; Antonovich, V. P.; Malzev, G. V.; Ukrainets, I. V.; Aleksandrova, D. I.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied the spectral luminescent properties of complexes of Tb(III) ions with a series of new derivatives of 2-oxo-4-hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylic acid amides (L1-L4). We have established that DNA significantly enhances the 4f luminescence of terbium(III) in these complex compounds. We show satisfactory agreement between the logarithms of the DNA binding constants for a series of aminoalkoxy fluorenones (R1-R6), obtained using ethidium bromide and the complex Tb(III)-L1, which we propose using as a new luminescent probe for studying the affinity of drugs (prodrugs) for DNA molecules in a series of structurally similar biologically active substances.

  3. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sulatskaya, Anna I.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Belousov, Mikhail V.; Bondarev, Stanislav A.; Zhouravleva, Galina A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  4. High-affinity binding sites involved in the import of porin into mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, R; Neupert, W

    1987-01-01

    The specific recognition by mitochondria of the precursor of porin and the insertion into the outer membrane were studied with a radiolabeled water-soluble form of porin derived from the mature protein. High-affinity binding sites had a number of 5-10 pmol/mg mitochondrial protein and a ka of 1-5 X 10(8) M-1. Binding was abolished after trypsin pretreatment of mitochondria indicating that binding sites were of protein-aceous nature. Specifically bound porin could be extracted at alkaline pH but not by high salt and was protected against low concentrations of proteinase K. It could be chased to a highly protease resistant form corresponding to mature porin. High-affinity binding sites could be extracted from mitochondria with detergent and reconstituted in asolectin-ergosterol liposomes. Water-soluble porin competed for the specific binding and import of the precursor of the ADP/ATP carrier, an inner membrane protein. We suggest that (i) binding of precursors to proteinaceous receptors serves as an initial step for recognition, (ii) the receptor for porin may also be involved in the import of precursors of inner membrane proteins, and (iii) interaction with the receptor triggers partial insertion of the precursor into the outer membrane. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2960520

  5. Identification of high affinity folate binding proteins in human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Antony, A C; Kincade, R S; Verma, R S; Krishnan, S R

    1987-09-01

    Mature human erythrocyte membranes contained specific, high affinity (Kd 3.3 X 10(-11) M) folate binding moieties. Folate binding was pH, time- and temperature-dependent, saturable, and was much greater for pteroylmonoglutamate and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate than 5-formyltetrahydrofolate and amethopterin. On detergent solubilization of membranes, two peaks of specific folate binding with Mr greater than or equal to 200,000 and 160,000 were identified on Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography in Triton X-100, and this corresponded to two similar peaks of immunoprecipitated material when solubilized iodinated membranes were probed with anti-human placental folate receptor antiserum. Age-dependent separation of erythrocytes by Stractan density gradients revealed a sevenfold greater folate binding capacity in membranes purified from younger compared with aged erythrocytes. Since this difference was not reflected in proportionately higher immunoreactive folate binding protein, (as determined by a specific radioimmunoassay for these proteins), or differences in affinity in younger than aged cells, these findings indicate that erythrocyte folate binding proteins become progressively nonfunctional at the onset of red cell aging. PMID:3624486

  6. Insights into the DNA-binding mechanism of a LytTR-type transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Behr, Stefan; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial response regulators (RRs) make contact with DNA through a recognition α-helix in their DNA-binding domains. An emerging class of RRs interacts with DNA via a relatively novel type of binding domain, called the LytTR domain, which is mainly composed of β-strands. YpdB belongs to this latter class, is part of a nutrient-sensing network in Escherichia coli and triggers expression of its only target gene, yhjX, in response to extracellular pyruvate. Expression of yhjX mainly occurs in the late exponential growth phase, and in a pulsed manner. Although the DNA-binding sites for YpdB are well defined, exactly how YpdB initiates pulsed gene expression has remained elusive. To address this question, we measured the binding kinetics of wild-type YpdB and the phosphomimetic variant YpdB-D53E to the yhjX promoter region (PyhjX) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy combined with interaction map® (IM) analysis. Both YpdB and YpdB-D53E bound as monomers to the tandem-repeat sequences in the promoter, with YpdB-D53E displaying a higher maximal binding rate than YpdB. Furthermore, we identified a high-affinity (A-site) and a low-affinity binding site (B-site) within the yhjX promoter. Only YpdB-D53E utilizes an 'AB-BA' DNA-binding mechanism, involving sequential and cooperative promoter binding, and rapid, successive promoter clearance. We propose that response regulator phosphorylation, in combination with the cycle of cooperative DNA binding and rapid promoter clearance just described, can account for pulsed gene expression. PMID:27013338

  7. Insights into the DNA-binding mechanism of a LytTR-type transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Stefan; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial response regulators (RRs) make contact with DNA through a recognition α-helix in their DNA-binding domains. An emerging class of RRs interacts with DNA via a relatively novel type of binding domain, called the LytTR domain, which is mainly composed of β-strands. YpdB belongs to this latter class, is part of a nutrient-sensing network in Escherichia coli and triggers expression of its only target gene, yhjX, in response to extracellular pyruvate. Expression of yhjX mainly occurs in the late exponential growth phase, and in a pulsed manner. Although the DNA-binding sites for YpdB are well defined, exactly how YpdB initiates pulsed gene expression has remained elusive. To address this question, we measured the binding kinetics of wild-type YpdB and the phosphomimetic variant YpdB-D53E to the yhjX promoter region (PyhjX) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy combined with interaction map® (IM) analysis. Both YpdB and YpdB-D53E bound as monomers to the tandem-repeat sequences in the promoter, with YpdB-D53E displaying a higher maximal binding rate than YpdB. Furthermore, we identified a high-affinity (A-site) and a low-affinity binding site (B-site) within the yhjX promoter. Only YpdB-D53E utilizes an ‘AB-BA’ DNA-binding mechanism, involving sequential and cooperative promoter binding, and rapid, successive promoter clearance. We propose that response regulator phosphorylation, in combination with the cycle of cooperative DNA binding and rapid promoter clearance just described, can account for pulsed gene expression. PMID:27013338

  8. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Christopher; Mathonet, Pascale; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Diamandakis, Agata; Tomei, Licia; Demartis, Anna; Nardi, Chiara; Sambucini, Sonia; Missineo, Antonino; Alt, Karen; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Harris, Matt; Hedt, Amos; Weis, Roland; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2). Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26313909

  9. Computational Design of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer; Song, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of engineered and naturally occurring sequence perturbations to protein-DNA interfaces requires accurate computational modeling technologies. It has been well established that computational design to accommodate small numbers of DNA target site substitutions is possible. This chapter details the basic method of design used in the Rosetta macromolecular modeling program that has been successfully used to modulate the specificity of DNA-binding proteins. More recently, combining computational design and directed evolution has become a common approach for increasing the success rate of protein engineering projects. The power of such high-throughput screening depends on computational methods producing multiple potential solutions. Therefore, this chapter describes several protocols for increasing the diversity of designed output. Lastly, we describe an approach for building comparative models of protein-DNA complexes in order to utilize information from homologous sequences. These models can be used to explore how nature modulates specificity of protein-DNA interfaces and potentially can even be used as starting templates for further engineering. PMID:27094297

  10. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  11. A rapid method for the isolation of DNA-binding proteins from purified nuclei of tissues and cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hagenbüchle, O; Wellauer, P K

    1992-01-01

    We describe a rapid and general method for isolating DNA-binding proteins in high yield from purified nuclei of animal cells. The method has been tested for the isolation of a series of different DNA-binding activities including those of transcription factors PTF1 and SP1. The rationale consists of first preparing purified nuclei from tissue or cells in culture by centrifugation over sucrose cushions. A synthetic, biotinylated oligonucleotide bearing the binding site for the protein of interest is then added directly to nuclei resuspended in binding buffer. At the end of the binding reaction, nuclei are removed by centrifugation; and protein-DNA complexes present in the postnuclear supernatant are attached to streptavidin-agarose. Two rounds of DNA-affinity chromatography are carried out to yield highly purified preparations of DNA-binding proteins. Images PMID:1641323

  12. Blue light-induced LOV domain dimerization enhances the affinity of Aureochrome 1a for its target DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Udo; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    The design of synthetic optogenetic tools that allow precise spatiotemporal control of biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic control has developed rapidly over the last years. Rational design of such tools requires detailed knowledge of allosteric light signaling in natural photoreceptors. To understand allosteric communication between sensor and effector domains, characterization of all relevant signaling states is required. Here, we describe the mechanism of light-dependent DNA binding of the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) transcription factor Aureochrome 1a from Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAu1a) and present crystal structures of a dark state LOV monomer and a fully light-adapted LOV dimer. In combination with hydrogen/deuterium-exchange, solution scattering data and DNA-binding experiments, our studies reveal a light-sensitive interaction between the LOV and basic region leucine zipper DNA-binding domain that together with LOV dimerization results in modulation of the DNA affinity of PtAu1a. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of synthetic LOV-based photosensors with application in optogenetics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11860.001 PMID:26754770

  13. Binding-Induced DNA Nanomachines Triggered by Proteins and Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongquan; Lai, Maode; Zuehlke, Albert; Peng, Hanyong; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2015-11-23

    We introduce the concept and operation of a binding-induced DNA nanomachine that can be activated by proteins and nucleic acids. This new type of nanomachine harnesses specific target binding to trigger assembly of separate DNA components that are otherwise unable to spontaneously assemble. Three-dimensional DNA tracks of high density are constructed on gold nanoparticles functionalized with hundreds of single-stranded oligonucleotides and tens of an affinity ligand. A DNA swing arm, free in solution, is linked to a second affinity ligand. Binding of a target molecule to the two ligands brings the swing arm to AuNP and initiates autonomous, stepwise movement of the swing arm around the AuNP surface. The movement of the swing arm, powered by enzymatic cleavage of conjugated oligonucleotides, cleaves hundreds of oligonucleotides in response to a single binding event. We demonstrate three nanomachines that are specifically activated by streptavidin, platelet-derived growth factor, and the Smallpox gene. Substituting the ligands enables the nanomachine to respond to other molecules. The new nanomachines have several unique and advantageous features over DNA nanomachines that rely on DNA self-assembly. PMID:26457803

  14. FacB, the Aspergillus nidulans activator of acetate utilization genes, binds dissimilar DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Todd, R B; Andrianopoulos, A; Davis, M A; Hynes, M J

    1998-04-01

    The facB gene is required for acetate induction of acetamidase (amdS) and the acetate utilization enzymes acetyl-CoA synthase (facA), isocitrate lyase (acuD) and malate synthase (acuE) in Aspergillus nidulans. The facB gene encodes a transcriptional activator with a GAL4-type Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc binuclear cluster DNA-binding domain which is shown to be required for DNA binding. In vitro DNA-binding sites for FacB in the 5' regions of the amdS, facA, acuD and acuE genes have been identified. Mutations in amdS FacB DNA-binding sites affected expression of an amdS-lacZ reporter in vivo and altered the affinity of in vitro DNA binding. This study shows that the FacB Zn(II)2Cys6 cluster binds to dissimilar sites which show similarity in form but not sequence with DNA-binding sites of other Zn(II)2Cys6 proteins. Sequences with homology to FacB sites are found in the 5' regions of genes regulated by the closely related yeast Zn(II)2Cys6 protein CAT8. PMID:9524126

  15. Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture

    DOEpatents

    Ji, H.; Smith, L.M.

    1997-01-07

    A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support. 3 figs.

  16. Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture

    DOEpatents

    Ji, Huamin; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1997-01-01

    A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support.

  17. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  18. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors. PMID:17609216

  19. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/. PMID:26987123

  20. DNA binding studies of Vinca alkaloids: experimental and computational evidence.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Prateek; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Barthwal, Ritu; Jayaram, B; Kumar, Surat

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence studies on the indole alkaloids vinblastine sulfate, vincristine sulfate, vincamine and catharanthine have demonstrated the DNA binding ability of these molecules. The binding mode of these molecules in the minor groove of DNA is non-specific. A new parameter of the purine-pyrimidine base sequence specificty was observed in order to define the non-specific DNA binding of ligands. Catharanthine had shown 'same' pattern of 'Pu-Py' specificity while evaluating its DNA binding profile. The proton resonances of a DNA decamer duplex were assigned. The models of the drug:DNA complexes were analyzed for DNA binding features. The effect of temperature on the DNA binding was also evaluated. PMID:22545401

  1. Solubilization and characterization of high-affinity [3H]serotonin binding sites from bovine cortical membranes.

    PubMed Central

    VandenBerg, S R; Allgren, R L; Todd, R D; Ciaranello, R D

    1983-01-01

    High-affinity [3H]serotonin binding activity has been solubilized from bovine cerebral cortical membranes by using Triton X-100, Tween-80, and octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. This mixture of detergents solubilizes the high-affinity [3H]serotonin binding activity present in crude membrane preparations with retention of 75-90% specific binding. The detergent mixture was chosen because it can easily be removed from the solubilized fraction by dialysis and polystyrene bead adsorption, thus permitting further purification and isolation of the binding sites. Saturation analysis reveals multiple components of high-affinity [3H]serotonin binding. In crude bovine cortical membranes, at least two binding components are present. A higher-affinity binding component, as defined from curvilinear Scatchard plots, has a Kd for [3H]serotonin of 1-3 nM, whereas a lower-affinity component has a Kd of 10-20 nM. In the solubilized preparation, only a single class of binding sites is apparent, with a Kd of 50-100 nM. Removal of detergents by dialysis and polystyrene bead adsorption results in restoration of the curvilinear Scatchard plot with apparent Kds similar to those observed in crude membrane preparations and with increased Bmax values for each component. [3H]Serotonin binding activity in the solubilized preparation is stable to Sephacryl S-300 column chromatography and to glycerol gradient sedimentation. Saturation analysis of the peak binding fractions from both these procedures once again yields curvilinear Scatchard plots, indicating that the multiple high-affinity binding components are preserved and migrate together. The molecular weight, Stokes radius, and frictional coefficient of the binding site(s) have been calculated. After detergent removal the solubilized material shows many of the characteristics usually attributed to S1 receptors, such as high affinity for [3H]serotonin and its analogs and low affinity for serotonin antagonists. PMID:6574495

  2. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites. PMID:6826722

  3. Human kidney amiloride-binding protein: cDNA structure and functional expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barbry, P.; Chassande, O.; Champigny, G.; Lingueglia, E.; Frelin, C.; Lazdunski, M. ); Champe, M.; Munemitsu, S.; Ullrich, A. ); Maes, P.; Tartar, A. Institut Pasteur de Lille )

    1990-10-01

    Phenamil, an analog of amiloride, is a potent blocker of the epithelial Na{sup plus} channel. It has been used to purify the porcine kidney amiloride-binding protein. Synthetic oligonucleotides derived from partial sequences have been used to screen a human kidney cDNA library and to isolate the cDNA encoding the human amiloride-binding protein. The primary structure was deduced from the DNA sequence analysis. The protein is 713 residues long, with a 19-amino acid signal peptide. The mRNA was expressed in 293-S and NIH 3T3 cells, yielding a glycoprotein (i) that binds amiloride and amiloride analogs with affinities similar to the amiloride receptor associated with the apical Na{sup plus} channel in pig kidney membranes and (ii) that is immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies raised against pig kidney amiloride-binding protein.

  4. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  5. Structure and Energetic Contributions of a Designed Modular Peptide-Binding Protein with Picomolar Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Simon; Tremmel, Dirk; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Reichen, Christian; Mittl, Peer R E; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-16

    Natural armadillo repeat proteins (nArmRP) like importin-α or β-catenin bind their target peptides such that each repeat interacts with a dipeptide unit within the stretched target peptide. However, this modularity is imperfect and also restricted to short peptide stretches of usually four to six consecutive amino acids. Here we report the development and characterization of a regularized and truly modular peptide-specific binding protein, based on designed armadillo repeat proteins (dArmRP), binding to peptides of alternating lysine and arginine residues (KR)n. dArmRP were obtained from nArmRP through cycles of extensive protein engineering, which rendered them more uniform. This regularity is reflected in the consistent binding of dArmRP to (KR)-peptides, where affinities depend on the lengths of target peptides and the number of internal repeats in a very systematic manner, thus confirming the modularity of the interaction. This exponential dependency between affinity and recognition length suggests that each module adds a constant increment of binding energy to sequence-specific recognition. This relationship was confirmed by comprehensive mutagenesis studies that also reveal the importance of individual peptide side chains. The 1.83 Å resolution crystal structure of a dArmRP with five identical internal repeats in complex with the cognate (KR)5 peptide proves a modular binding mode, where each dipeptide is recognized by one internal repeat. The confirmation of this true modularity over longer peptide stretches lays the ground for the design of binders with different specificities and tailored affinities by the assembly of dipeptide-specific modules based on armadillo repeats. PMID:26878586

  6. Screening the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules using a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric approach.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Sarah J; Han, Min Su; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2007-09-15

    We have developed a novel competition assay that uses a gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based, high-throughput colorimetric approach to screen the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules. This assay hinges on the observation that the melting behavior of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates is sensitive to the concentration of the DNA-binding molecule in solution. When short, oligomeric hairpin DNA sequences were added to a reaction solution consisting of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates and DNA-binding molecules, these molecules may either bind to the Au NP aggregate interconnects or the hairpin stems based on their relative affinity for each. This relative affinity can be measured as a change in the melting temperature (Tm) of the DNA-modified Au NP aggregates in solution. As a proof of concept, we evaluated the selectivity of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindone (an AT-specific binder), ethidium bromide (a nonspecific binder), and chromomycin A (a GC-specific binder) for six sequences of hairpin DNA having different numbers of AT pairs in a five-base pair variable stem region. Our assay accurately and easily confirmed the known trends in selectivity for the DNA binders in question without the use of complicated instrumentation. This novel assay will be useful in assessing large libraries of potential drug candidates that work by binding DNA to form a drug/DNA complex. PMID:17696406

  7. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  8. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  9. Insights into the conformational equilibria of maltose-binding protein by analysis of high affinity mutants.

    PubMed

    Telmer, Patrick G; Shilton, Brian H

    2003-09-01

    The affinity of maltose-binding protein (MBP) for maltose and related carbohydrates was greatly increased by removal of groups in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft. The wild-type protein has a KD of 1200 nM for maltose; mutation of residues Met-321 and Gln-325, both to alanine, resulted in a KD for maltose of 70 nM; deletion of 4 residues, Glu-172, Asn-173, Lys-175, and Tyr-176, which are part of a poorly ordered loop, results in a KD for maltose of 110 nM. Combining the mutations yields an increased affinity for maltodextrins and a KD of 6 nM for maltotriose. Comparison of ligand binding by the mutants, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, indicates that decreases in the off-rate are responsible for the increased affinity. Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that the mutations do not significantly affect the solution conformation of MBP in either the presence or absence of maltose. The crystal structures of selected mutants showed that the mutations do not cause significant structural changes in either the closed or open conformation of MBP. These studies show that interactions in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft, which we term the "balancing interface," are responsible for modulating the affinity of MBP for its ligand. Our results are consistent with a model in which the ligand-bound protein alternates between the closed and open conformations, and removal of interactions in the balancing interface decreases the stability of the open conformation, without affecting the closed conformation. PMID:12794084

  10. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  11. BclxL Changes Conformation upon Binding to Wild-type but Not Mutant p53 DNA Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hagn, Franz; Klein, Christian; Demmer, Oliver; Marchenko, Natasha; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-01

    p53 can induce apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization by interaction of its DNA binding region with the anti-apoptotic proteins BclxL and Bcl2. However, little is known about the action of p53 at the mitochondria in molecular detail. By using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization we characterized the binding of wild-type and mutant p53 DNA binding domains to BclxL and show that the wild-type p53 DNA binding domain leads to structural changes in the BH3 binding region of BclxL, whereas mutants fail to induce such effects due to reduced affinity. This was probed by induced chemical shift and residual dipolar coupling data. These data imply that p53 partly achieves its pro-apoptotic function at the mitochondria by facilitating interaction between BclxL and BH3-only proteins in an allosteric mode of action. Furthermore, we characterize for the first time the binding behavior of Pifithrin-μ, a specific small molecule inhibitor of the p53-BclxL interaction, and present a structural model of the protein-ligand complex. A rather unusual behavior is revealed whereby Pifithrin-μ binds to both sides of the protein-protein complex. These data should facilitate the rational design of more potent specific BclxL-p53 inhibitors. PMID:19955567

  12. BclxL changes conformation upon binding to wild-type but not mutant p53 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Hagn, Franz; Klein, Christian; Demmer, Oliver; Marchenko, Natasha; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-29

    p53 can induce apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization by interaction of its DNA binding region with the anti-apoptotic proteins BclxL and Bcl2. However, little is known about the action of p53 at the mitochondria in molecular detail. By using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization we characterized the binding of wild-type and mutant p53 DNA binding domains to BclxL and show that the wild-type p53 DNA binding domain leads to structural changes in the BH3 binding region of BclxL, whereas mutants fail to induce such effects due to reduced affinity. This was probed by induced chemical shift and residual dipolar coupling data. These data imply that p53 partly achieves its pro-apoptotic function at the mitochondria by facilitating interaction between BclxL and BH3-only proteins in an allosteric mode of action. Furthermore, we characterize for the first time the binding behavior of Pifithrin-mu, a specific small molecule inhibitor of the p53-BclxL interaction, and present a structural model of the protein-ligand complex. A rather unusual behavior is revealed whereby Pifithrin-mu binds to both sides of the protein-protein complex. These data should facilitate the rational design of more potent specific BclxL-p53 inhibitors. PMID:19955567

  13. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  14. An efficient strategy to enhance binding affinity and specificity of a known isozyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jee, Joo-Eun; Lim, Jaehong; Ong, Yong Siang; Oon, Jessica; Gao, Liqian; Choi, Hak Soo; Lee, Su Seong

    2016-07-12

    The binding profile of a known inhibitor, benzenesulfonamide, against a family of carbonic anhydrase isozymes was efficiently enhanced via high-throughput screening of customized combinatorial one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries modified with the inhibitor molecule. The screening of the conjugate libraries recognized subtle variations in the microenvironments of the target enzyme and thus facilitated the identification of short peptide sequences that bind selectively to a close proximity of the active site. The identified peptide portions contributed significantly to the overall binding of the conjugate peptides with greatly enhanced affinity as well as improved specificity towards the target isozyme. The interactions between the inhibitors and the isozymes were validated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), pull-down assay and enzymatic activity measurement. This high-throughput approach proved useful and efficient to enhance the binding profile of known inhibitors and may apply to developing effective inhibitors for a wide range of isozyme families. PMID:27339902

  15. Notch ligand delta-like1: X-ray crystal structure and binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Nadia J; Church, Nicole L; Griffin, Michael D W; Luo, Cindy S; Adams, Timothy E; Burgess, Antony W

    2015-05-15

    The Notch pathway is a fundamental signalling system in most multicellular animals. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the extracellular domain of the Notch ligand delta-like ligand-1 (Dll-1). The structure incorporates the N-terminal C2 domain, receptor-binding DSL domain and the first six (of eight) EGF (epidermal growth factor)-like repeats, which form a highly extended conformation, confirmed by analytical ultracentrifugation. Comparison of our structure with a fragment of Jagged1 ligand allows us to dissect the similarities and differences between the ligand families. Differences in the C2 domains of Dll-1 and Jagged1 suggest their lipid-binding properties are likely to differ. A conserved hydrophobic patch on the surface of both Dll-1 and Jagged1 provides a likely receptor-interaction site that is common to both ligands. We also explore the binding affinity of Dll-1 for a fragment of Notch1 using different techniques. Apparent binding affinities vary when different techniques are used, explaining discrepancies in the literature. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, we perform for the first time binding analyses where both receptor and ligand are in solution, which confirms a Kd of 10 μM for this interaction. PMID:25715738

  16. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding.

    PubMed

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-10-21

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications. PMID:25171730

  17. Bioinspired assemblies of plant cell wall polymers unravel the affinity properties of carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Paës, Gabriel; von Schantz, Laura; Ohlin, Mats

    2015-09-01

    Lignocellulose-acting enzymes play a central role in the biorefinery of plant biomass to make fuels, chemicals and materials. These enzymes are often appended to carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that promote substrate targeting. When used in plant materials, which are complex assemblies of polymers, the binding properties of CBMs can be difficult to understand and predict, thus limiting the efficiency of enzymes. In order to gain more information on the binding properties of CBMs, some bioinspired model assemblies that contain some of the polymers and covalent interactions found in the plant cell walls have been designed. The mobility of three engineered CBMs has been investigated by FRAP in these assemblies, while varying the parameters related to the polymer concentration, the physical state of assemblies and the oligomerization state of CBMs. The features controlling the mobility of the CBMs in the assemblies have been quantified and hierarchized. We demonstrate that the parameters can have additional or opposite effects on mobility, depending on the CBM tested. We also find evidence of a relationship between the mobility of CBMs and their binding strength. Overall, bioinspired assemblies are able to reveal the unique features of affinity of CBMs. In particular, the results show that oligomerization of CBMs and the presence of ferulic acid motifs in the assemblies play an important role in the binding affinity of CBMs. Thus we propose that these features should be finely tuned when CBMs are used in plant cell walls to optimise bioprocesses. PMID:26189625

  18. Pyridine and p-Nitrophenyl Oxime Esters with Possible Photochemotherapeutic Activity: Synthesis, DNA Photocleavage and DNA Binding Studies.

    PubMed

    Pasolli, Milena; Dafnopoulos, Konstantinos; Andreou, Nicolaos-Panagiotis; Gritzapis, Panagiotis S; Koffa, Maria; Koumbis, Alexandros E; Psomas, George; Fylaktakidou, Konstantina C

    2016-01-01

    Compared to standard treatments for various diseases, photochemotherapy and photo-dynamic therapy are less invasive approaches, in which DNA photocleavers represent promising tools for novel "on demand" chemotherapeutics. A series of p-nitrobenzoyl and p-pyridoyl ester conjugated aldoximes, amidoximes and ethanone oximes were subjected to UV irradiation at 312 nm with supercoiled circular plasmid DNA. The compounds which possessed appropriate properties were additionally subjected to UVA irradiation at 365 nm. The ability of most of the compounds to photocleave DNA was high at 312 nm, whereas higher concentrations were required at 365 nm as a result of their lower UV absorption. The affinity of selected compounds to calf-thymus (CT) DNA was studied by UV spectroscopy, viscosity experiments and competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) revealing that all compounds interacted with CT DNA. The fluorescence emission spectra of the pre-treated EB-DNA exhibited a moderate to significant quenching in the presence of the compounds indicating the binding of the compounds to CT DNA via intercalation as concluded also by DNA-viscosity experiments. For the oxime esters the DNA photocleavage and affinity studies aimed to clarify the role of the oxime nature (aldoxime, ketoxime, amidoxime) and the role of the pyridine and p-nitrophenyl moieties both as oxime substituents and ester conjugates. PMID:27376258

  19. Statin-exposed vascular smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with decreased binding affinity for LDL.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Tannock, Lisa R; Wight, Thomas N; Chait, Alan

    2003-11-01

    Retention of LDL in the artery intima is mediated by extracellular matrix proteoglycans and plays an important role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Compared with quiescent cells, proliferating smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with elongated glycosaminoglycan side chains, which have an increased binding affinity to LDL. Because 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) decrease smooth muscle cell proliferation, we hypothesized that statin exposure would decrease both the size and LDL binding affinity of vascular proteoglycans. Monkey aortic smooth muscle cells grown in culture were exposed to simvastatin (10 and 100 microM) and cerivastatin (0.1 and 1 microM), and newly secreted proteoglycans were quantified and characterized. Both simvastatin and cerivastatin caused a concentration-dependent reduction in cell growth and reduced 35SO4 incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, on both an absolute and a per cell basis. Interestingly, statin exposure increased the apparent molecular weight and hydrodynamic size of secreted proteoglycans. However, proteoglycans secreted from statin-exposed cells demonstrated a reduction in binding affinity to LDL. Thus, statins may induce atheroprotective changes in vascular proteoglycans and lower LDL retention in the vessel wall. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby statins may benefit atherosclerosis in a manner unrelated to serum LDL lowering. PMID:12923222

  20. Assessment of Binding Affinity between Drugs and Human Serum Albumin Using Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Mahdieh; Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Losic, Dusan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report an innovative approach aiming to assess the binding affinity between drug molecules and human serum albumin by combining nanoporous anodic alumina rugate filters (NAA-RFs) modified with human serum albumin (HSA) and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). NAA-RFs are photonic crystal structures produced by sinusoidal pulse anodization of aluminum that present two characteristic optical parameters, the characteristic reflection peak (λPeak), and the effective optical thickness of the film (OTeff), which can be readily used as sensing parameters. A design of experiments strategy and an ANOVA analysis are used to establish the effect of the anodization parameters (i.e., anodization period and anodization offset) on the sensitivity of HSA-modified NAA-RFs toward indomethacin, a model drug. To this end, two sensing parameters are used, that is, shifts in the characteristic reflection peak (ΔλPeak) and changes in the effective optical thickness of the film (ΔOTeff). Subsequently, optimized NAA-RFs are used as sensing platforms to determine the binding affinity between a set of drugs (i.e., indomethacin, coumarin, sulfadymethoxine, warfarin, and salicylic acid) and HSA molecules. Our results verify that the combination of HSA-modified NAA-RFs with RIfS can be used as a portable, low-cost, and simple system for establishing the binding affinity between drugs and plasma proteins, which is a critical factor to develop efficient medicines for treating a broad range of diseases and medical conditions. PMID:27128744

  1. Free energy calculations to estimate ligand-binding affinities in structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Rami; Reddy, C Ravikumar; Rathore, R S; Erion, Mark D; Aparoy, P; Reddy, R Nageswara; Reddanna, P

    2014-01-01

    Post-genomic era has led to the discovery of several new targets posing challenges for structure-based drug design efforts to identify lead compounds. Multiple computational methodologies exist to predict the high ranking hit/lead compounds. Among them, free energy methods provide the most accurate estimate of predicted binding affinity. Pathway-based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP), Thermodynamic Integration (TI) and Slow Growth (SG) as well as less rigorous end-point methods such as Linear interaction energy (LIE), Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann./Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) and λ-dynamics have been applied to a variety of biologically relevant problems. The recent advances in free energy methods and their applications including the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity for some of the important drug targets have been elaborated. Results using a recently developed Quantum Mechanics (QM)/Molecular Mechanics (MM) based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method, which has the potential to provide a very accurate estimation of binding affinities to date has been discussed. A case study for the optimization of inhibitors for the fructose 1,6- bisphosphatase inhibitors has been described. PMID:23947646

  2. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water. PMID:11128445

  3. Proteomic analysis of human O {sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Niture, Suryakant K.; Doneanu, Catalin E.; Velu, Chinavenmeni S.; Bailey, Nathan I.; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S. . E-mail: Kalkunte.srivenugopal@ttuhsc.edu

    2005-12-02

    Recent evidence suggests that human O {sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein that protects the genome against mutagens and accords tumor resistance to many anticancer alkylating agents, may have other roles besides repair. Therefore, we isolated MGMT-interacting proteins from extracts of HT29 human colon cancer cells using affinity chromatography on MGMT-Sepharose. Specific proteins bound to this column were identified by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and/or Western blotting. These procedures identified >60 MGMT-interacting proteins with diverse functions including those involved in DNA replication and repair (MCM2, PCNA, ORC1, DNA polymerase {delta}, MSH-2, and DNA-dependent protein kinase), cell cycle progression (CDK1, cyclin B, CDK2, CDC7, CDC10, 14-3-3 protein, and p21{sup waf1/cip1}), RNA processing and translation (poly(A)-binding protein, nucleolin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, A2/B1, and elongation factor-1{alpha}), several histones (H4, H3.4, and H2A.1), and topoisomerase I. The heat shock proteins, HSP-90{alpha} and {beta}, also bound strongly with MGMT. The DNA repair activity of MGMT was greatly enhanced in the presence of interacting proteins or histones. These data, for the first time, suggest that human MGMT is likely to have additional functions, possibly, in sensing and integrating the DNA damage/repair-related signals with replication, cell cycle progression, and genomic stability.

  4. Biochemical characterization of high-affinity 3H-opioid binding. Further evidence for Mu1 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.L.; Recht, L.D.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In saturation studies with (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine, unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (1 nM) inhibited the high-affinity binding component far more potently than the lower-affinity one. Similarly, morphine (1 nM) inhibited the higher-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin to a greater extent than its lower-affinity binding component, consistent with a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and enkephalins. Treatment of tissue with either trypsin (1 microgram/ml) or N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) effectively eliminated the high-affinity binding component of a series of /sup 3/H-opiates and opioid peptides. Competition studies following both treatments were consistent with a common high-affinity binding site. Both treatments also eliminated the ability of low morphine concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin binding and of low D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding. Protection experiments examining N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding showed significant protection (p less than 0.002) by both unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin and morphine (both at 1 nM). When studied together, both naloxonazine and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding to a similar extent. Equally important, tissue previously treated with naloxonazine was far less sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide than was untreated control tissue, consistent with the possibility that both treatments affected the same site. Together, these results support the concept of a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and opioid peptides.

  5. Helicase binding to DnaI exposes a cryptic DNA-binding site during helicase loading in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Charikleia; Schaeffer, Patrick M.; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Soultanas, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis DnaI, DnaB and DnaD proteins load the replicative ring helicase DnaC onto DNA during priming of DNA replication. Here we show that DnaI consists of a C-terminal domain (Cd) with ATPase and DNA-binding activities and an N-terminal domain (Nd) that interacts with the replicative ring helicase. A Zn2+-binding module mediates the interaction with the helicase and C67, C70 and H84 are involved in the coordination of the Zn2+. DnaI binds ATP and exhibits ATPase activity that is not stimulated by ssDNA, because the DNA-binding site on Cd is masked by Nd. The ATPase activity resides on the Cd domain and when detached from the Nd domain, it becomes sensitive to stimulation by ssDNA because its cryptic DNA-binding site is exposed. Therefore, Nd acts as a molecular ‘switch’ regulating access to the ssDNA binding site on Cd, in response to binding of the helicase. DnaI is sufficient to load the replicative helicase from a complex with six DnaI molecules, so there is no requirement for a dual helicase loader system. PMID:17003052

  6. Helicase binding to DnaI exposes a cryptic DNA-binding site during helicase loading in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Charikleia; Schaeffer, Patrick M; Dixon, Nicholas E; Soultanas, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis DnaI, DnaB and DnaD proteins load the replicative ring helicase DnaC onto DNA during priming of DNA replication. Here we show that DnaI consists of a C-terminal domain (Cd) with ATPase and DNA-binding activities and an N-terminal domain (Nd) that interacts with the replicative ring helicase. A Zn2+-binding module mediates the interaction with the helicase and C67, C70 and H84 are involved in the coordination of the Zn2+. DnaI binds ATP and exhibits ATPase activity that is not stimulated by ssDNA, because the DNA-binding site on Cd is masked by Nd. The ATPase activity resides on the Cd domain and when detached from the Nd domain, it becomes sensitive to stimulation by ssDNA because its cryptic DNA-binding site is exposed. Therefore, Nd acts as a molecular 'switch' regulating access to the ssDNA binding site on Cd, in response to binding of the helicase. DnaI is sufficient to load the replicative helicase from a complex with six DnaI molecules, so there is no requirement for a dual helicase loader system. PMID:17003052

  7. A thermodynamic signature for drug-DNA binding mode.

    PubMed

    Chaires, Jonathan B

    2006-09-01

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, acting as chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. Two common binding modes for these small molecules are intercalation or groove-binding. Intercalation results from insertion of a planar aromatic substituent between DNA base pairs, with concomitant unwinding and lengthening of the DNA helix. Groove binding, in contrast, does not perturb the duplex structure to any great extent. Groove-binders are typically crescent-shaped, and fit snugly into the minor groove with little distortion of the DNA structure. Recent calorimetric studies have determined the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the DNA binding of representative DNA binding compounds. Analysis of such thermodynamic data culled from the literature reveals distinctive thermodynamic signatures for groove-binding and intercalating compounds. Plots of the binding enthalpy (DeltaH) against binding entropy (-TDeltaS) for 26 drug-DNA interactions reveal that groove-binding interactions are clustered in a region of the graph with favorable entropy contributions to the free energy, while intercalators are clustered in a region with unfavorable entropy but favorable enthalpy contributions. Groove-binding is predominantly entropically driven, while intercalation in enthalpically driven. The molecular basis of the contrasting thermodynamic signatures for the two binding modes is by no means clear, but the pattern should be of use in categorizing new DNA binding agents. PMID:16730635

  8. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  9. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  10. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids: NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectra.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-07-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of enlarging the database of metal ion binding to HS and obtaining a good insight into Cu binding to the functional groups of FA and HA by using the NICA-Donnan model to unravel the intrinsic and conditional affinity spectra. Results showed that Cu binding to HS increased with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. The amount of Cu bound to the HAs was larger than the amount bound to JGFA. Milne's generic parameters did not provide satisfactory predictions for the present soil HS samples, while material-specific NICA-Donnan model parameters described and predicted Cu binding to the HS well. Both the 'low' and 'high' concentration fitting procedures indicated a substantial bidentate structure of the Cu complexes with HS. By means of CAS underlying NICA isotherm, which was scarcely used, the nature of the binding at different solution conditions for a given sample and the differences in binding mode were illustrated. It was indicated that carboxylic group played an indispensable role in Cu binding to HS in that the carboxylic CAS had stronger conditional affinity than the phenolic distribution due to its large degree of proton dissociation. The fact was especially true for JGFA and JLHA which contain much larger amount of carboxylic groups, and the occupation of phenolic sites by Cu was negligible. Comparable amounts of carboxylic and phenolic groups on PAHA and JGHA, increased the occupation of phenolic type sites by Cu. The binding strength of PAHA-Cu and JGHA-Cu was stronger than that of JGFA-Cu and JLHA-Cu. The presence of phenolic groups increased the chance of forming more stable complexes, such as the salicylate-Cu or catechol-Cu type structures. PMID:27061366

  11. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  12. Comparison of the binding of the therapeutically active nucleosides to DNA molecules with different level of lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglova, E. B.; Gladkovskaya, N. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recently we have shown that DNA molecules extracted from epididymis of the Wistar male rats exposed to low doses of gamma radiation interact with some pyrimidine nucleosides. The bindign affinities of NUC to control DNA molecules are unessential. Comparing the UV melting curves for the various DNA sammples we show that observed differences are related to conformational chagnes in the DNA double helix. The samples of the damaged DNA have been obtained by partial denaturation of the calf thymus DNA in the salt-free aqueous solutions. The level of DNA damages in the model DNA smplase depends on the DNA concentration. It was shown that damages in the DNA molecules lead to changes of the melting curves of DNA-NUC mixtures that are similar to those for the DNA samples extracted from irradiated tissues. ALso it has been found that the binding mechanisms to cytosine arabinoside and 6-azacytosine to DNA molecuels having modifeid secondary structures are different.

  13. Investigation of DNA binding, DNA photocleavage, topoisomerase I inhibition and antioxidant activities of water soluble titanium(IV) phthalocyanine compounds.

    PubMed

    Özel, Arzu; Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya

    2016-04-01

    The binding mode of water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted titanium(IV) phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and thermal denaturation studies in this work. The results of DNA binding constants (Kb) and the changes in the thermal denaturation profile of DNA with the addition of Pc compounds indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 are able to bind to CT-DNA with different binding affinities. DNA photocleavage studies of Pc compounds were performed in the absence and presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ascorbic acid (AA) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) using the agarose gel electrophoresis method at irradiation 650nm. According to the results of electrophoresis studies, Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 cleaved of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway. The Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds were examined for topoisomerase I inhibition by measuring the relaxation of supercoiled pBR322 DNA. The all of Pc compounds inhibited topoisomerase I at 20μM concentration. A series of antioxidant assays, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, superoxide radical scavenging (SOD) assay and metal chelating effect assay were performed for Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds. The results of antioxidant assays indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities, moderate 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl activities and metal chelating effect activities. All the experimental studies showed that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds bind to CT-DNA via minor groove binding, cleave of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway, inhibit topoisomerase I and have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities. Thanks to these properties the Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds are suitable agents for photo dynamic therapy. PMID:26882290

  14. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  15. Binding affinity prediction for protein-ligand complexes based on β contacts and B factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Li, Jinyan

    2013-11-25

    Accurate determination of protein-ligand binding affinity is a fundamental problem in biochemistry useful for many applications including drug design and protein-ligand docking. A number of scoring functions have been proposed for the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity. However, accurate prediction is still a challenging problem because poor performance is often seen in the evaluation under the leave-one-cluster-out cross-validation (LCOCV). We introduce a new scoring function named B2BScore to improve the prediction performance. B2BScore integrates two physicochemical properties for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction. One is the property of β contacts. A β contact between two atoms requires no other atoms to interrupt the atomic contact and assumes that the two atoms should have enough direct contact area. The other is the property of B factor to capture the atomic mobility in the dynamic protein-ligand binding process. Tested on the PDBBind2009 data set, B2BScore shows superior prediction performance to existing methods on independent test data as well as under the LCOCV evaluation framework. In particular, B2BScore achieves a significant LCOCV improvement across 26 protein clusters-a big increase of the averaged Pearson's correlation coefficients from 0.418 to 0.518 and a significant decrease of standard deviation of the coefficients from 0.352 to 0.196. We also identified several important and intuitive contact descriptors of protein-ligand binding through the random forest learning in B2BScore. Some of these descriptors are closely related to contacts between carbon atoms without covalent-bond oxygen/nitrogen, preferred contacts of metal ions, interfacial backbone atoms from proteins, or π rings. Some others are negative descriptors relating to those contacts with nitrogen atoms without covalent-bond hydrogens or nonpreferred contacts of metal ions. These descriptors can be directly used to guide protein-ligand docking. PMID:24191692

  16. Radiotracers for Cardiac Sympathetic Innervation: Transport Kinetics and Binding Affinities for the Human Norepinephrine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, David M.; Chen, Wei; Jung, Yong-Woon; Jang, Keun Sam; Gu, Guie; Cozzi, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most radiotracers for imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation are substrates of the norepinephrine transporter (NET). The goal of this study was to characterize the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of several sympathetic nerve radiotracers, including [11C]-(−)-meta-hydroxyephedrine, [11C]-(−)-epinephrine, and a series of [11C]-labeled phenethylguanidines under development in our laboratory. For comparison, the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of some [3H]-labeled biogenic amines were also determined. Methods Transport kinetics studies were performed using rat C6 glioma cells stably transfected with the human norepinephrine transporter (C6-hNET cells). For each radiolabeled NET substrate, saturation transport assays with C6-hNET cells measured the Michaelis-Menten transport constants Km and Vmax for NET transport. Competitive inhibition binding assays with homogenized C6-hNET cells and [3H]mazindol provided estimates of binding affinities (KI) for NET. Results Km, Vmax and KI values were determined for each NET substrate with a high degree of reproducibility. Interestingly, C6-hNET transport rates for ‘tracer concentrations’ of substrate, given by the ratio Vmax/Km, were found to be highly correlated with neuronal transport rates measured previously in isolated rat hearts (r2 = 0.96). This suggests that the transport constants Km and Vmax measured using the C6-hNET cells accurately reflect in vivo transport kinetics. Conclusion The results of these studies show how structural changes in NET substrates influence NET binding and transport constants, providing valuable insights that can be used in the design of new tracers with more optimal kinetics for quantifying regional sympathetic nerve density. PMID:23306137

  17. Role of zinc in the structure and function of ssDNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.E.; Giedroc, D.P.; Keating, K.M.; Williams, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Gene 32 protein (g32P), the ssDNA binding protein required for replication, recombination and translational control in the phage T4 life cycle contains 1 g at Zn per mol bound in a tetrahedral complex to -S/sup -/ ligands. Chemical modification and spectroscopic evidence suggest binding to Cys 77, His 81, Cys 87 and Cys 90. The Zn-binding domain is at the N-terminal end of AA residues 72 to 116 which contains 6 of the 8 Tyr residues in g32P, shown by /sup 1/H-NMR to be involved in deoxynucleotide binding. Limited proteolysis of g32P with trypsin removes residues 1-21 and 254-301 leaving a trypsin-resistant core, g32P. The latter retains high affinity for a single site nucleotide lattice, but has lost cooperative binding to DNA. Removal of Zn from native g32P renders the molecule susceptible to proteolysis and the core is hydrolyzed to small peptides. Rebinding of Zn restores the core stability. Apo g32P binds 3 orders of magnitude less tightly to ssDNA and cannot melt polyd(AT) at 150 mM NaCl. Loss of binding affinity is primarily due to loss of cooperative protein-protein interactions accompanying Zn removal. Thus, both the N-terminal domain and the Zn-binding domain are required for cooperative binding to DNA. G5P from fd and ssB from E. coli do not contain Zn, but small basic proteins, products of the gag gene of retroviruses, e.g., p10 from MuLV, p15 from HTLVI and p15 from HTLV-III contain tandem repeats of a -C-X/sub 2/-C-X/sub 4/-H-X/sub 4/-C- sequence similar to the Zn-binding sequence found in g32P.

  18. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC. PMID:26456755

  19. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC. PMID:26456755

  20. Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor binding site specificities

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Qureshi, Aaron M.; He, Fangxue S.; Estep, Preston W.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes involved in myriad cellular processes through sequence-specific interactions with DNA. In order to predict DNA regulatory elements and the TFs targeting them with greater accuracy, detailed knowledge of the binding preferences of TFs is needed. Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology permits rapid, high-throughput characterization of the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins1. Here, we present a novel, maximally compact, synthetic DNA sequence design that represents all possible DNA sequence variants of a given length k (i.e., all “k-mers”) on a single, universal microarray. We constructed such all k-mer microarrays covering all 10 base pair (bp) binding sites by converting high-density single-stranded oligonucleotide arrays to double-stranded DNA arrays. Using these microarrays, we comprehensively determined the binding specificities over a full range of affinities for five TFs of diverse structural classes from yeast, worm, mouse, and human. Importantly, the unbiased coverage of all k-mers permits an interrogation of binding site preferences, including nucleotide interdependencies, at unprecedented resolution. PMID:16998473

  1. Analytical methods to determine the comparative DNA binding studies of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Rajasekaran, Marichamy; Rajagopal, Gurusamy; Athappan, Periakaruppan

    2012-11-01

    DNA interaction studies of two mononuclear [1:1(1); 1:2(2)] copper(II) complexes of curcumin have been studied. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been explored by physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption spectral titrations of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 3 nm with the DNA binding affinity of Kb, 5.21 × 104 M-1 that are higher than that obtained for 2 (red-shift, 2 nm; Kb, 1.73 × 104 M-1) reveal that the binding occurs in grooves as a result of the interaction is via exterior phosphates. The CD spectra of these Cu(II) complexes show a red shift of 3-10 nm in the positive band with increase in intensities. This spectral change of induced CD due to the hydrophobic interaction of copper complexes with DNA is the characteristic of B to A conformational change. The EB displacement assay also reveals the same trend as observed in UV-Vis spectral titration. The addition of complexes 1 and 2 to the DNA bound ethidium bromide (EB) solutions causes an obvious reduction in emission intensities indicating that these complexes competitively bind to DNA with EB. The positive shift of both the Epc and E0' accompanied by reduction of peak currents in differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), upon adding different concentrations of DNA to the metal complexes, are obviously in favor of strong binding to DNA. The super coiled plasmid pUC18 DNA cleavage ability of Cu(II) complexes in the presence of reducing agent reveals the single strand DNA cleavage (ssDNA) is observed. The hydroxyl radical (HOrad ) and the singlet oxygen are believed to be the reactive species responsible for the cleavage.

  2. Sensitivity of binding of high-affinity dopamine receptor radioligands to increased synaptic dopamine.

    PubMed

    Gatley, S J; Gifford, A N; Carroll, F I; Volkow, N D

    2000-12-15

    PET and SPECT studies have documented that D2 radioligands of moderate affinity, but not radioligands of high affinity, are sensitive to pharmacological challenges that alter synaptic dopamine levels. The objective of this work was to determine whether the brain kinetics of high-affinity radioligands for dopamine D1 ([(3)H]SCH 23390) and D2 ([(123)I]epidepride) receptors were altered by a prolonged elevation of synaptic dopamine induced by the potent cocaine analog RTI-55. Mice were injected intravenously with radioligands either 30 min after or 4 h before intraperitoneal administration of RTI-55 (2 mg/kg). In separate experiments, the pharmacological effects of RTI-55 were assessed biochemically by measuring uptake of dopamine in synaptosomes prepared from RTI-treated mice and behaviorally by monitoring locomotor activity. Consistent with the expected elevation of synaptic dopamine, RTI-55 induced a long-lasting decrement in dopamine uptake measured ex vivo, and a prolonged increase in locomotor activity. RTI-55 injected prior to the radioligands induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase in striatal concentration of [(123)I]epidepride at 15 min, relative to saline-treated controls, but there were no differences between the two groups at later time-points. For [(3)H]SCH 23390, both initial striatal uptake and subsequent clearance were slightly increased by preadministration of RTI-55. Administration of RTI-55 4 h after the radioligands (i.e., when it was presumed that a state of near equilibrium binding of the radioligands had been reached), was associated with a significant reduction of striatal radioactivity for both radiotracers. Our results are consistent with increased competition between dopamine and radioligand for binding to both D1 and D2 receptors after treatment with RTI-55. We suggest that the magnitude of the competition is reduced by failure of the receptor binding of high-affinity radioligands to rapidly attain equilibrium. PMID:11044896

  3. The yeast telomere length regulator TEL2 encodes a protein that binds to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kota, R S; Runge, K W

    1998-01-01

    TEL2 is required for telomere length regulation and viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the mechanism by which Tel2p regulates telomere length, the majority (65%) of the TEL2 ORF was fused to the 3'-end of the gene for maltose binding protein, expressed in bacteria and the purified protein used in DNA binding studies. Rap1p, the major yeast telomere binding protein, recognizes a 13 bp duplex site 5'-GGTGTGTGGGTGT-3' in yeast telomeric DNA with high affinity. Gel shift experiments revealed that the MBP-Tel2p fusion binds the double-stranded yeast telomeric Rap1p site in a sequence-specific manner. Analysis of mutated sites showed that MBP-Tel2p could bind 5'-GTGTGTGG-3' within this 13 bp site. Methylation interference analysis revealed that Tel2p contacts the 5'-terminal guanine in the major groove. MBP-Tel2p did not bind duplex telomeric DNA repeats from vertebrates, Tetrahymena or Oxytricha. These results suggest that Tel2p is a DNA binding protein that recognizes yeast telomeric DNA. PMID:9490802

  4. Binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon, a high affinity mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Mariana; Tóth, Fanni; Schütz, Johannes; Otvös, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The highly potent micro -opioid receptor agonist 14-methoxymetopon (4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-5beta,17-dimethylmorphinan-6-one) was prepared in tritium labelled form by a catalytic dehalogenation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 15.9 Ci/mmol. Opioid binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon were determined using radioligand binding assay in rat brain membranes. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon specifically labelled a single class of opioid sites with affinity in low subnanomolar range (Ki = 0.43 nm) and maximal number of binding sites of 314 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [3H]14-methoxymetopon was inhibited by ligands selective for the micro -opioid receptor with high potency, while selective kappa-opioids and delta-opioids were weaker inhibitors. 14-Methoxymetopon increased guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding with an EC50 of 70.9 nm, thus, providing evidence for the agonist character of this ligand. The increase of [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by naloxone and selective micro -opioid antagonists, indicating a micro -opioid receptor-mediated action. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon is one of the few nonpeptide mu-opioid receptor agonists available in radiolabelled form up to now. Due to its high affinity and selectivity, high stability and extremely low nonspecific binding (<10%), this radioligand would be an important and useful tool in probing mu-opioid receptor mechanisms, as well as to promote a further understanding of the opioid system at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:12887410

  5. POT1-TPP1 Binding and Unfolding of Telomere DNA Discriminates against Structural Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Michael R; Rajavel, Malligarjunan; Hernandez-Sanchez, Wilnelly; de la Fuente, Maria; Biendarra, Sherri M; Harris, Michael E; Taylor, Derek J

    2016-07-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that reside at the ends of linear chromosomes and help maintain genomic integrity. Protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) and TPP1 are telomere-specific proteins that bind as a heterodimer to single-stranded telomere DNA to prevent illicit DNA damage responses and to enhance telomerase-mediated telomere extension. Telomere DNA is guanosine rich and, as such, can form highly stable secondary structures including G-quadruplexes. G-quadruplex DNA folds into different topologies that are determined by several factors including monovalent ion composition and the precise sequence and length of the DNA. Here, we explore the influence of DNA secondary structure on POT1-TPP1 binding. Equilibrium binding assays reveal that the POT1-TPP1 complex binds G-quadruplex structures formed in buffers containing Na(+) with an affinity that is fivefold higher than for G-quadruplex structures formed in the presence of K(+). However, the binding of the second heterodimer is insensitive to DNA secondary structure, presumably due to unfolding resulting from binding of the first POT1-TPP1. We further show that the rate constant for POT1-TPP1-induced unfolding of DNA secondary structure is substantially faster for G-quadruplex topologies formed in the presence of Na(+) ions. When bound to DNA, POT1-TPP1 forms complexes with similar CD spectra and enhances telomerase activity for all DNA substrates tested, regardless of the substrate secondary structure or solution monovalent ion composition. Together, these data indicate that binding of POT1-TPP1 unfolds telomere secondary structure to assist loading of additional heterodimers and to ensure efficient promotion of telomerase-mediated extension. PMID:27173378

  6. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  7. The Smc5-Smc6 heterodimer associates with DNA through several independent binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Marc-André; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; D’Amours, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The Smc5-6 complex is required for the maintenance of genome integrity through its functions in DNA repair and chromosome biogenesis. However, the specific mode of action of Smc5 and Smc6 in these processes remains largely unknown. We previously showed that individual components of the Smc5-Smc6 complex bind strongly to DNA as monomers, despite the absence of a canonical DNA-binding domain (DBD) in these proteins. How heterodimerization of Smc5-6 affects its binding to DNA, and which parts of the SMC molecules confer DNA-binding activity is not known at present. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized the functional domains of the Smc5-6 heterodimer and identify two DBDs in each SMC molecule. The first DBD is located within the SMC hinge region and its adjacent coiled-coil arms, while the second is found in the conserved ATPase head domain. These DBDs can independently recapitulate the substrate preference of the full-length Smc5 and Smc6 proteins. We also show that heterodimerization of full-length proteins specifically increases the affinity of the resulting complex for double-stranded DNA substrates. Collectively, our findings provide critical insights into the structural requirements for effective binding of the Smc5-6 complex to DNA repair substrates in vitro and in live cells. PMID:25984708

  8. Metal binding affinity and structural properties of calmodulin-like protein 14 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Rosario; La Verde, Valentina; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola; Astegno, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin, plants possess many calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that are predicted to have specific roles in the cell. Herein, we described the biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana CML14. We applied isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the energetics of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to CML14, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, together with intrinsic and ANS-based fluorescence, to evaluate the structural effects of metal binding and metal-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and limited proteolysis were used to characterize protein thermal and local stability. Our data demonstrate that CML14 binds one Ca(2+) ion with micromolar affinity (Kd ∼ 12 µM) and the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) decreases the Ca(2+) affinity by ∼5-fold. Although binding of Ca(2+) to CML14 increases protein stability, it does not result in a more hydrophobic protein surface and does not induce the large conformational rearrangement typical of Ca(2+) sensors, but causes only localized structural changes in the unique functional EF-hand. Our data, together with a molecular modelling prediction, provide interesting insights into the biochemical properties of Arabidopsis CML14 and may be useful to direct additional studies aimed at understanding its physiological role. PMID:27124620

  9. Relative penicillin G resistance in Neisseria meningitidis and reduced affinity of penicillin-binding protein 3.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelman, P M; Campos, J; Chaffin, D O; Serfass, D A; Smith, A L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1988-01-01

    We examined clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis relatively resistant to penicillin G (mean MIC, 0.3 micrograms/ml; range, 0.1 to 0.7 micrograms/ml), which were isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid for resistance mechanisms, by using susceptible isolates (mean MIC, less than or equal to 0.06 micrograms/ml) for comparison. The resistant strains did not produce detectable beta-lactamase activity, otherwise modify penicillin G, or bind less total penicillin. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 of the six resistant isolates tested uniformly bound less penicillin G in comparison to the same PBP of four susceptible isolates. Reflecting the reduced binding affinity of PBP 3 of the two resistant strains tested, the amount of 3H-labeled penicillin G required for half-maximal binding was increased in comparison with that of PBP 3 of the two susceptible isolates. We conclude that the mechanism of resistance in these meningococci relatively resistant to penicillin G was decreased affinity of PBP 3. Images PMID:3134848

  10. ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY ULTRAFAST AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY USING IMMOBILIZED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Rangan; Yoo, Michelle J.; Briscoe, Chad J.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was explored for use as a stationary phase and ligand in affinity microcolumns for the ultrafast extraction of free drug fractions and the use of this information for the analysis of drug-protein binding. Warfarin, imipramine, and ibuprofen were used as model analytes in this study. It was found that greater than 95% extraction of all these drugs could be achieved in as little as 250 ms on HSA microcolumns. The retained drug fraction was then eluted from the same column under isocratic conditions, giving elution in less than 40 s when working at 4.5 mL/min. The chromatographic behavior of this system gave a good fit with that predicted by computer simulations based on a reversible, saturable model for the binding of an injected drug with immobilized HSA. The free fractions measured by this method were found to be comparable to those determined by ultrafiltration, and equilibrium constants estimated by this approach gave good agreement with literature values. Advantages of this method include its speed and the relatively low cost of microcolumns that contain HSA. The ability of HSA to bind many types of drugs also creates the possibility of using the same affinity microcolumn to study and measure the free fractions for a variety of pharmaceutical agents. These properties make this technique appealing for use in drug binding studies and in the high-throughput screening of new drug candidates. PMID:20227701

  11. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  12. High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Applications in Drug-Protein Binding Studies and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya R; Bi, Cong; Suresh, D; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins and other agents in serum is of interest in personalized medicine because this process can affect the dosage and action of drugs. The extent of this binding may also vary with a given disease state. These interactions may involve serum proteins, such as human serum albumin or α1-acid glycoprotein, or other agents, such as lipoproteins. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tool that has received increasing interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review discusses the general principles of HPAC and the various approaches that have been used in this technique to examine drug-protein binding and in work related to personalized medicine. These approaches include frontal analysis and zonal elution, as well as peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, and chromatographic immunoassays. The operation of each method is described and examples of applications for these techniques are provided. The type of information that can be obtained by these methods is also discussed, as related to the analysis of drug-protein binding and the study of clinical or pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26827600

  13. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-01

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. PMID:25981289

  14. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  15. Eosinophil cationic protein high-affinity binding to bacteria-wall lipopolysaccharides and peptidoglycans.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Marc; Navarro, Susanna; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2008-03-18

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil-secreted RNase involved in the immune host defense, with a cytotoxic activity against a wide range of pathogens. The protein displays antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The protein can destabilize lipid bilayers, although the action at the membrane level can only partially account for its bactericidal activity. We have now shown that ECP can bind with high affinity to the bacteria-wall components. We have analyzed its specific association to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), its lipid A component, and peptidoglycans (PGNs). ECP high-affinity binding capacity to LPSs and lipid A has been analyzed by a fluorescent displacement assay, and the corresponding dissociation constants were calculated using the protein labeled with a fluorophor. The protein also binds in vivo to bacteria cells. Ultrastructural analysis of cell bacteria wall and morphology have been visualized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein damages the bacteria surface and induces the cell population aggregation on E. coli cultures. Although both bacteria strain cells retain their shape and no cell lysis is patent, the protein can induce in E. coli the outer membrane detachment. ECP also activates the cytoplasmic membrane depolarization in both strains. Moreover, the depolarization activity on E. coli does not require any pretreatment to overcome the outer membrane barrier. The protein binding to the bacteria-wall surface would represent a first encounter step key in its antimicrobial mechanism of action. PMID:18293932

  16. Familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein B. Identification of a new mutation that decreases LDL receptor binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Pullinger, C R; Hennessy, L K; Chatterton, J E; Liu, W; Love, J A; Mendel, C M; Frost, P H; Malloy, M J; Schumaker, V N; Kane, J P

    1995-03-01

    Detection of new ligand-defective mutations of apolipoprotein B (apoB) will enable identification of sequences involved in binding to the LDL receptor. Genomic DNA from patients attending a lipid clinic was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel mutations in the putative LDL receptor-binding domain of apoB-100. A 46-yr-old woman of Celtic and Native American ancestry with primary hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol [TC] 343 mg/dl; LDL cholesterol [LDL-C] 241 mg/dl) and pronounced peripheral vascular disease was found to be heterozygous for a novel Arg3531-->Cys mutation, caused by a C-->T transition at nucleotide 10800. One unrelated 59-yr-old man of Italian ancestry was found with the same mutation after screening 1,560 individuals. He had coronary heart disease, a TC of 310 mg/dl, and an LDL-C of 212 mg/dl. A total of eight individuals were found with the defect in the families of the two patients. They had an age- and sex-adjusted TC of 240 +/- 14 mg/dl and LDL-C of 169 +/- 10 mg/dl. This compares with eight unaffected family members with age- and sex-adjusted TC of 185 +/- 12 mg/dl and LDL-C of 124 +/- 12 mg/dl. In a dual-label fibroblast binding assay, LDL from the eight subjects with the mutation had an affinity for the LDL receptor that was 63% that of control LDL. LDL from eight unaffected family members had an affinity of 91%. By way of comparison, LDL from six patients heterozygous for the Arg3500-->Gln mutation had an affinity of 36%. The percentage mass ratio of the defective Cys3531 LDL to normal LDL was 59:41, as determined using the mAb MB19 and dynamic laser light scattering. Thus, the defective LDL had accumulated in the plasma of these patients. Using this mass ratio, it was calculated that the defective Cys3531 LDL particles bound with 27% of normal affinity. Deduced haplotypes using 10 apoB gene markers showed the Arg3531-->Cys alleles to be different in the two kindreds and indicates that the mutations arose

  17. Single-Molecule Studies of Unlabeled Full-Length p53 Protein Binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Philippa; Lee, Kidan; Ciccarella, Pietro; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Kim, Ki-Bum; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-10

    p53 is an antitumor protein that plays an important role in apoptosis, preserving genomic stability and preventing angiogenesis, and it has been implicated in a large number of human cancers. For this reason it is an interesting target for both fundamental studies, such as the mechanism of interaction with DNA, and applications in biosensing. Here, we report a comprehensive study of label-free, full length p53 (flp53) and its interaction with engineered double-stranded DNA in vitro, at the single-molecule level, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and solid-state nanopore sensing. AFM data show that dimeric and tetrameric p53 bind to the DNA in a sequence-specific manner, confirming previously reported relative binding affinities. The statistical significance is tested using both the Grubbs test and stochastic simulations. For the first time, ultralow noise solid-state nanopore sensors are employed for the successful differentiation between bare DNA and p53/DNA complexes. Furthermore, translocation statistics reflect the binding affinities of different DNA sequences, in accordance with AFM data. Our results thus highlight the potential of solid-state nanopore sensors for single-molecule biosensing, especially when labeling is either not possible or at least not a viable option. PMID:26855037

  18. DNA sequence preferences of several AT-selective minor groove binding ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Daya, A; Brown, P M; Fox, K R

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the interaction of distamycin, netropsin, Hoechst 33258 and berenil, which are AT-selective minor groove-binding ligands, with synthetic DNA fragments containing different arrangements of AT base pairs by DNase I footprinting. For fragments which contain multiple blocks of (A/T)4 quantitative DNase I footprinting reveals that AATT and AAAA are much better binding sites than TTAA and TATA. Hoechst 33258 shows that greatest discrimination between these sites with a 50-fold difference in affinity between AATT and TATA. Alone amongst these ligands, Hoechst 33258 binds to AATT better than AAAA. These differences in binding to the various AT-tracts are interpreted in terms of variations in DNA minor groove width and suggest that TpA steps within an AT-tract decrease the affinity of these ligands. The behaviour of each site also depends on the flanking sequences; adjacent pyrimidine-purine steps cause a decrease in affinity. The precise ranking order for the various binding sites is not the same for each ligand. Images PMID:7567447

  19. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  20. Predicting binding affinities of diverse pharmaceutical chemicals to human serum plasma proteins using QSPR modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Basant, N; Gupta, S; Singh, K P

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the plasma protein binding (PPB) affinity of chemicals is of paramount significance in the drug development process. In this study, ensemble machine learning-based QSPR models have been established for a four-category classification and PPB affinity prediction of diverse compounds using a large PPB dataset of 930 compounds and in accordance with the OECD guidelines. The structural diversity of the chemicals was tested by the Tanimoto similarity index. The external predictive power of the developed QSPR models was evaluated through internal and external validations. In the QSPR models, XLogP was the most important descriptor. In the test data, the classification QSPR models rendered an accuracy of >93%, while the regression QSPR models yielded r(2) of >0.920 between the measured and predicted PPB affinities, with the root mean squared error <9.77. Values of statistical coefficients derived for the test data were above their threshold limits, thus put a high confidence in this analysis. The QSPR models in this study performed better than any of the previous studies. The results suggest that the developed QSPR models are reliable for predicting the PPB affinity of structurally diverse chemicals. They can be useful for initial screening of candidate molecules in the drug development process. PMID:26854728

  1. Determination of protein binding affinities within hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs).

    PubMed

    EL-Sharif, Hazim F; Hawkins, Daniel M; Stevenson, Derek; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs) were prepared for several proteins (haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase) using a family of acrylamide-based monomers. Protein affinity towards the HydroMIPs was investigated under equilibrium conditions and over a range of concentrations using specific binding with Hill slope saturation profiles. We report HydroMIP binding affinities, in terms of equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) within the micro-molar range (25 ± 4 μM, 44 ± 3 μM, 17 ± 2 μM for haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase respectively within a polyacrylamide-based MIP). The extent of non-specific binding or cross-selectivity for non-target proteins has also been assessed. It is concluded that both selectivity and affinity for both cognate and non-cognate proteins towards the MIPs were dependent on the concentration and the complementarity of their structures and size. This is tentatively attributed to the formation of protein complexes during both the polymerisation and rebinding stages at high protein concentrations. We have used atomic force spectroscopy to characterize molecular interactions in the MIP cavities using protein-modified AFM tips. Attractive and repulsive force curves were obtained for the MIP and NIP (non-imprinted polymer) surfaces (under protein loaded or unloaded states). Our force data suggest that we have produced selective cavities for the template protein in the MIPs and we have been able to quantify the extent of non-specific protein binding on, for example, a non-imprinted polymer (NIP) control surface. PMID:24950144

  2. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  3. New beginnings for matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors: identification of high-affinity zinc-binding groups.

    PubMed

    Puerta, David T; Lewis, Jana A; Cohen, Seth M

    2004-07-14

    In an effort to identify promising non-hydroxamate inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), several new zinc-binding groups (ZBGs) based on pyrone, pyrothione, hydroxypyridinone, and hydroxypyridinethione chelators have been examined. Structural studies with tris(pyrazolyl)borate model complexes show that these ligands bind to the MMP active site zinc(II) ion in a bidentate fashion, similar to that found with hydroxamate-based inhibitors. Fluorescence- and colorimetric-based enzyme assays have been used to determine the IC50 values for these ZBGs against MMP-3; mixed O,S-donor ligands were found to be remarkably potent, with IC50 values as much as 700-fold lower than that found for acetohydroxamic acid. Inhibitory activity was found to parallel metal binding affinity as determined in titrations with model complexes. These results demonstrate that MPIs based on new ZBGs are feasible and may indeed improve the overall performance of inhibitors designed against these important medicinal targets. PMID:15237990

  4. NMR Solution Structure and DNA Binding Model of the DNA Binding Domain of Competence Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Carey A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Richele J.; Perego, Marta; Cavanagh, John

    2010-01-01

    Competence protein A (ComA) is a response regulator protein involved in the development of genetic competence in the Gram-positive spore forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, as well as the regulation of the production of degradative enzymes and antibiotic synthesis. ComA belongs to the NarL family of proteins which are characterized by a C-terminal transcriptional activator domain that consists of a bundle of four helices, where the second and third helices (α8 and α9) form a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of ComA (ComAC) has been determined. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and NMR protein-DNA titration experiments allowed for the analysis of the interaction of ComAC with its target DNA sequences. Combining the solution structure and biochemical data, a model of ComAC bound to the ComA recognition sequences on the srfA promoter has been developed. The model shows that for DNA binding, ComA uses the conserved helix-turn-helix motif present in other NarL family members. However, the model also reveals that ComA may use a slightly different part of the helix-turn-helix motif and there appears to be some associated domain re-orientation. These observations suggest a basis for DNA binding specificity within the NarL family. PMID:20302877

  5. Gbp1p, a Protein with RNA Recognition Motifs, Binds Single-Stranded Telomeric DNA and Changes Its Binding Specificity upon Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stephen D.; Lew, Jodi E.; Berman, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Gbp1p is a putative telomere-binding protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that contains two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) which are commonly found in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Previously we demonstrated that Gbp1p binds single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) containing the Chlamydomonas telomeric sequence but not the RNA containing the cognate sequence. Here we show that at lower protein concentrations Gbp1 can also bind an RNA containing the cognate sequence. We found that mutation of the two RRM motifs of Gbp1p to match the highly conserved region of hnRNP RRMs did not alter the affinity of Gbp1p for either RNA or DNA. The ability of Gbp1p to associate with either of these two nucleic acids is governed by the dimerization state of the protein. Monomeric Gbp1p associates with either ssDNA or RNA, showing a small binding preference for RNA. Dimeric Gbp1p has a strong preference for binding ssDNA and shows little affinity for RNA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a protein that qualitatively shifts its nucleic acid binding preference upon dimerization. The biological implications of a telomere-binding protein that is regulated by dimerization are discussed. PMID:9858616

  6. Binding of 2,7-diaminomitosene to DNA: model for the precovalent recognition of DNA by activated mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G S; He, Q Y; Behr-Ventura, D; Tomasz, M

    1995-02-28

    Mitomycin C (MC), mitomycin A, porfiromycin, BMY-25067, and BMY-25287, antitumor antibiotics collectively termed "mitosanes", were found to have no appreciable binding affinity to various natural and synthetic DNAs, as tested by UV spectrophotometry and equilibrium dialysis. Further tests of DNA binding applied to MC including thermal melting measurements, displacement of ethidium fluorescence, and unwinding of closed circular DNA were similarly negative. In contrast, 2,7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), a major end product of the reductive activation of MC, binds to the same series of DNAs by all of these criteria. In the presence of DNA its UV absorbance at the 313 nm maximum decreased and underwent a slight red shift. This effect was used for determining DNA binding constants (Kb) by the spectrophotometric titration method. At pH 6.0 the Kbs of three natural DNAs with varying GC content, as well as poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT), and poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), were all in the range of (1.2-5.3) x 10(4) (M nucleotide)-1, with no apparent specificity of binding. Poly(dG-m5dC).poly(dG-m5dC) displayed a slightly higher Kb ((7.5-8.4) x 10(4)). Binding of other, closely related mitosenes was tested to calf thymus DNA by equilibrium dialysis. Neither the presence of a 1-OH substituent, removal of the 10-carbamoyl group, nor methylation of the 2-amino group modifies the binding affinity of the mitosenes significantly. The 1-phosphate substituent abolishes binding. The binding of 2,7-DAM to DNA increased with decreasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. It was determined that 2,7-DAM is protonated at the 2-amino group with a pKa = 7.55, and this correlated well with the observed pH dependence of the binding, indicating that the binding affinity has a strong electrostatic component. This was confirmed by the finding that the extrapolated Kb to 1 M Na+ concentration diminishes to only 10% of the value of Kb at 0.01 M Na+ concentration. Viscosity tests showed conclusively that 2,7-DAM

  7. Thermodynamic Characterization of Binding Oxytricha nova Single Strand Telomere DNA with the Alpha Protein N-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, Pawel; Horvath, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    The Oxytricha nova telomere binding protein alpha subunit binds single strand DNA and participates in a nucleoprotein complex that protects the very ends of chromosomes. To understand how the N-terminal, DNA binding domain of alpha interacts with DNA we measured the stoichiometry, enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), and dissociation constant (KD-DNA) for binding telomere DNA fragments at different temperatures and salt concentrations using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). About 85% of the total free energy of binding corresponded with non-electrostatic interactions for all DNAs. Telomere DNA fragments d(T2G4), d(T4G4), d(G3T4G4), and d(G4T4G4) each formed monovalent protein complexes. In the case of d(T4G4T4G4), which has two tandemly repeated d(TTTTTGGGG) telomere motifs, two binding sites were observed. The high-affinity “A site” has a dissociation constant, KD-DNA(A)=13(±4) nM, while the low-affinity “B site” is characterized by KD-DNA(B)=5600(±600) nM at 25 °C. Nucleotide substitution variants verified that the A site corresponds principally with the 3′-terminal portion of d(T4G4T4G4). The relative contributions of entropy (ΔS) and enthalpy (ΔH) for binding reactions were DNA length-dependent as was heat capacity (ΔCp). These trends with respect to DNA length likely reflect structural transitions in the DNA molecule that are coupled with DNA–protein association. Results presented here are important for understanding early intermediates and subsequent stages in the assembly of the full telomere nucleoprotein complex and how binding events can prepare the telomere DNA for extension by telomerase, a critical event in telomere biology. PMID:16678852

  8. Accurate electron affinity of Pb and isotope shifts of binding energies of Pb(.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-08-28

    Lead (Pb) was the last element of the group IVA whose electron affinity had a low accuracy around 10 meV before the present work. This was due to the generic threshold photodetachment measurement that cannot extent well below 0.5 eV due to the light source limitation. In the present work, the electron affinity of Pb was determined to be 2877.33(13) cm(-1) or 0.356 743(16) eV for the isotope m = 208. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 500 with respect to the previous laser photodetachment electron spectroscopy. Moreover, remarkable isotope shifts of the binding energy of Pb(-) 6p(3) (4)S3/2 - Pb 6p(2) (3)P2 were observed for m = 206, 207, and 208. PMID:27586918

  9. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  10. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  11. Enhancement of binding kinetics on affinity substrates by laser point heating induced transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the time response and detection limit of affinity-binding based biosensors is an area of active research. For diffusion limited reactions, introducing active mass transport is an effective strategy to reduce the equilibration time and improve surface binding. Here, a laser is focused on the ceiling of a microchamber to generate point heating, which introduces natural advection and thermophoresis to promote mass transport to the reactive floor. We first used the COMSOL simulation to study how the kinetics of ligand binding is influenced by the optothermal effect. Afterwards, binding of biotinylated nanoparticles to NeutrAvidin-treated substrates is quantitatively measured with and without laser heating. It is discovered that laser induced point heating reduces the reaction half-life locally, and the reduction improves with the natural advection velocity. In addition, non-uniform ligand binding on the substrate is induced by the laser with predictable binding patterns. This optothermal strategy holds promise to improve the time-response and sensitivity of biosensors and microarrays. PMID:26898559

  12. Carbohydrate affinity for the glucose-galactose binding protein is regulated by allosteric domain motions.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Gabriel; Castaño, David; Diercks, Tammo; Millet, Oscar

    2012-12-01

    Protein function, structure, and dynamics are intricately correlated, but studies on structure-activity relationships are still only rarely complemented by a detailed analysis of dynamics related to function (functional dynamics). Here, we have applied NMR to investigate the functional dynamics in two homologous periplasmic sugar binding proteins with bidomain composition: Escherichia coli glucose/galactose (GGBP) and ribose (RBP) binding proteins. In contrast to their structural and functional similarity, we observe a remarkable difference in functional dynamics: For RBP, the absence of segmental motions allows only for isolated structural adaptations upon carbohydrate binding in line with an induced fit mechanism; on the other hand, GGBP shows extensive segmental mobility in both apo and holo states, enabling selection of the most favorable conformation upon carbohydrate binding in line with a population shift mechanism. Collective segmental motions are controlled by the hinge composition: by swapping two identified key residues between RBP and GGBP we also interchange their segmental hinge mobility, and the doubly mutated GGBP* no longer experiences changes in conformational entropy upon ligand binding while the complementary RBP* shows the segmental dynamics observed in wild-type GGBP. Most importantly, the segmental interdomain dynamics always increase the apparent substrate affinity and thus, are functional, underscoring the allosteric control that the hinge region exerts on ligand binding. PMID:23148479

  13. Spermine Attenuates the Action of the DNA Intercalator, Actinomycin D, on DNA Binding and the Inhibition of Transcription and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion. PMID:23144800

  14. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCOSTA, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding. PMID:23802200

  15. Affinity, stoichiometry and cooperativity of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) binding to nucleosomal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teif, Vladimir B.; Kepper, Nick; Yserentant, Klaus; Wedemann, Gero; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) participates in establishing and maintaining heterochromatin via its histone-modification-dependent chromatin interactions. In recent papers HP1 binding to nucleosomal arrays was measured in vitro and interpreted in terms of nearest-neighbour cooperative binding. This mode of chromatin interaction could lead to the spreading of HP1 along the nucleosome chain. Here, we reanalysed previous data by representing the nucleosome chain as a 1D binding lattice and showed how the experimental HP1 binding isotherms can be explained by a simpler model without cooperative interactions between neighboring HP1 dimers. Based on these calculations and spatial models of dinucleosomes and nucleosome chains, we propose that binding stoichiometry depends on the nucleosome repeat length (NRL) rather than protein interactions between HP1 dimers. According to our calculations, more open nucleosome arrays with long DNA linkers are characterized by a larger number of binding sites in comparison to chains with a short NRL. Furthermore, we demonstrate by Monte Carlo simulations that the NRL dependent folding of the nucleosome chain can induce allosteric changes of HP1 binding sites. Thus, HP1 chromatin interactions can be modulated by the change of binding stoichiometry and the type of binding to condensed (methylated) and non-condensed (unmethylated) nucleosome arrays in the absence of direct interactions between HP1 dimers.

  16. Crystal Structure and DNA Binding of the Homeodomain of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Nanog

    SciTech Connect

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2010-02-08

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  17. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407