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Sample records for affinity fluorescent znii

  1. Midrange affinity fluorescent Zn(II) sensors of the Zinpyr family: syntheses, characterization, and biological imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Elizabeth M; Jaworski, Jacek; Racine, Maryann E; Sheng, Morgan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2006-11-27

    The syntheses and photophysical characterization of ZP9, 2-{2-chloro-6-hydroxy-3-oxo-5-[(2-{[pyridin-2-ylmethyl-(1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}phenylamino)methyl]-3H-xanthen-9-yl}benzoic acid, and ZP10, 2-{2-chloro-6-hydroxy-5-[(2-{[(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethyl)pyridin-2-ylmethylamino]methyl}phenylamino)methyl]-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl}benzoic acid, two asymmetrically derivatized fluorescein-based dyes, are described. These sensors each contain an aniline-based ligand moiety functionalized with a pyridyl-amine-pyrrole group and have dissociation constants for Zn(II) in the sub-micromolar (ZP9) and low-micromolar (ZP10) range, which we define as "midrange". They give approximately 12- (ZP9) and approximately 7-fold (ZP10) fluorescence turn-on immediately following Zn(II) addition at neutral pH and exhibit improved selectivity for Zn(II) compared to the di-(2-picolyl)amine-based Zinpyr (ZP) sensors. Confocal microscopy studies indicate that such asymmetrical fluorescein-based probes are cell permeable and Zn(II) responsive in vivo.

  2. Synthesis, fluorescence study and biological evaluation of three Zn(II) complexes with Paeonol Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-dong; Yang, Zheng-yin; Qi, Gao-fei

    2009-10-01

    The synthesis of three Paeonol Schiff base ligand and their Zn(II) complexes are reported. The complexes were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and molar conductivity. The experiment results show the three Zn(II) complexes can emit bright fluorescence at room temperature in DMF solution and solid state. The fluorescence quantum yields ( Φ) of three Schiff base ligands and their Zn(II) complexes were calculated using quinine sulfate as the reference with a known ΦR of 0.546 in 1.0N sulfuric acid. Furthermore, in order to develop these Zn(II) complexes' biological value, the antioxidant activities against hydroxyl radicals (OH rad ) were evaluated. The results show the three complexes possess excellent ability to scavenge hydroxyl radicals.

  3. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  4. Femtomolar Zn(II) affinity in a peptide-based ligand designed to model thiolate-rich metalloprotein active sites.

    PubMed

    Petros, Amy K; Reddi, Amit R; Kennedy, Michelle L; Hyslop, Alison G; Gibney, Brian R

    2006-12-11

    Metal-ligand interactions are critical components of metalloprotein assembly, folding, stability, electrochemistry, and catalytic function. Research over the past 3 decades on the interaction of metals with peptide and protein ligands has progressed from the characterization of amino acid-metal and polypeptide-metal complexes to the design of folded protein scaffolds containing multiple metal cofactors. De novo metalloprotein design has emerged as a valuable tool both for the modular synthesis of these complex metalloproteins and for revealing the fundamental tenets of metalloprotein structure-function relationships. Our research has focused on using the coordination chemistry of de novo designed metalloproteins to probe the interactions of metal cofactors with protein ligands relevant to biological phenomena. Herein, we present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Fe(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and[4Fe-4S]2(+/+) binding to IGA, a 16 amino acid peptide ligand containing four cysteine residues, H2N-KLCEGG-CIGCGAC-GGW-CONH2. These studies were conducted to delineate the inherent metal-ion preferences of this unfolded tetrathiolate peptide ligand as well as to evaluate the role of the solution pH on metal-peptide complex speciation. The [4Fe-4S]2(+/+)-IGA complex is both an excellent peptide-based synthetic analogue for natural ferredoxins and is flexible enough to accommodate mononuclear metal-ion binding. Incorporation of a single ferrous ion provides the FeII-IGA complex, a spectroscopic model of a reduced rubredoxin active site that possesses limited stability in aqueous buffers. As expected based on the Irving-Williams series and hard-soft acid-base theory, the Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes of IGA are significantly more stable than the Fe(II) complex. Direct proton competition experiments, coupled with determinations of the conditional dissociation constants over a range of pH values, fully define the thermodynamic stabilities and speciation of each MII-IGA complex. The

  5. High-sensitivity determination of Zn(II) and Cu(II) in vitro by fluorescence polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Feliccia, Vincent; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that free Cu(II) may play a role in syndromes such as Crohn's and Wilson's diseases, as well as being a pollutant toxic at low levels to shellfish and sheep. Similarly, Zn(II) has been implicated in some neural damage in the brain resulting from epilepsy and ischemia. Several high sensitivity methods exist for determining these ions in solution, including GFAAS, ICP-MS, ICP-ES, and electrochemical techniques. However, these techniques are generally slow and costly, require pretreatment of the sample, require complex instruments and skilled personnel, and are incapable of imaging at the cellular and subcellular level. To address these shortcomings we developed fluorescence polarization (anisotropy) biosensing methods for these ions which are very sensitivity, highly selective, require simple instrumentation and little pretreatment, and are inexpensive. Thus free Cu(II) or Zn(II) can be determined at picomolar levels by changes in fluorescence polarization, lifetime, or wavelength ratio using these methods; these techniques may be adapted to microscopy.

  6. Dicynamide bridged two new zig-zag 1-D Zn(II) coordination polymers of pyrimidine derived Schiff base ligands: Synthesis, crystal structures and fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Saugata

    2015-07-01

    Two new zigzag 1-D polymeric Zn(II) coordination polymers {[Zn(L1)(μ1,5-dca)](H2O)}n (1), {[Zn(L2)(μ1,5-dca)](ClO4)}n (2) of two potentially tridentate NNO-, NNN-, donor Schiff base ligands [2-(2-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol] (L1), [1-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)-2-(dipyridin-2ylmethylene)hydrazine] (L2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR and 1H NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The dicyanamide ions act as linkers (μ1,5 mode) in the formation of these coordination polymers. Both the complexes 1 and 2 have same distorted square pyramidal geometry around the Zn(II) centres. The weak forces like π⋯π, Csbnd H⋯π, anion⋯π interactions lead to various supramolecular architectures. Complex 1 shows high chelation enhanced fluorescence compared to that of 2. The fluorescence spectral changes observed high selectivity towards Zn(II) over other metal ions such as Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II).

  7. A highly selective quinoline-based fluorescent sensor for Zn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Kang, Juhye; Kim, Kyung Beom; Song, Eun Joo; Kim, Cheal

    2014-01-01

    A quinoline-based simple receptor (bis(2-quinolinylmethyl)benzylamine = 1) as a Zn2+ selective fluorescent chemosensor showed a large fluorescent enhancement with a blue shift in the presence of Zn2+ which is attributed to a chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect with inhibition of a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process of 1. In particular, this receptor could clearly distinguish Zn2+ from Cd2+. The binding mode of 1 and Zn2+ was found to be a 1:1 and confirmed by Job plot, 1H NMR titration and ESI-mass spectrometry analysis.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, and Fluorescence Properties of Mixed Molecular Multilayer Films of BODIPY and Zn(II) Tetraphenylporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Topka, Michael R; Dinolfo, Peter H

    2015-04-22

    A new azido functionalized 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) has been synthesized to achieve spectral complementarity to a Zn(II) tetraphenylethynyl porphyrin (ZnTPEP). Mixed multilayer films were assembled on glass and quartz up to 10 bilayers thick in a layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication process using copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to couple these two dyes together with a tris-azido linker. By varying the amount of BODIPY in the CuAAC reaction solutions for the azido linker layers, we achieve tunable doping of BODIPY within the porphyrin films. We are able to demonstrate linear film growth and determine thickness by X-ray reflectivity (XRR). XRR data indicated that lower BODIPY loading leads to higher porphyrin content and slightly thicker films. Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra of the mixed multilayer films show efficient quenching of the BODIPY singlet and enhanced ZnTPEP emission, suggesting efficient energy transfer (EnT). The ease of fabrication and tunability of these films may serve as potential light harvesting arrays for molecular-based solar cells.

  9. Two-photon fluorescent probes of biological Zn(II) derived from 7-hydroxyquinoline.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Shi, Jing; Li, Yi-Ming; Wang, Feng-Liang; Wu, Xu; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Liu, Lei

    2009-10-01

    A new fluorescent probe for monitoring Zn(2+) was synthesized based on the structure of 7-hydroxyquinoline. Compared with 8-substituted quinolines, the new probe exhibited higher selectivity for Zn(2+) over Cd(2+). Its fluorescence enhancement (14-fold) and nanomolar range sensitivity (K(d) = 0.117 nM) were favorable toward biological applications. Experiments also showed that a cell-permeable derivative of the new probe was potentially useful for two-photon imaging in living cells.

  10. High kinetic stability of Zn(II) coordinated by the tris(histidine) unit of carbonic anhydrase towards solvolytic dissociation studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Solvolytic dissociation rate constants (kd) of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and its metallovariants (M-CAs, M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) were estimated by a ligand substitution reaction, which was monitored by affinity capillary electrophoresis to selectively detect the undissociated CAs in the reaction mixture. Using EDTA as the competing ligand for Zn-CA, the dissociation followed the unimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN1) mechanism with kd=1.0×10(-7)s(-1) (pH7.4, 25°C). The corresponding solvolysis half-life (t1/2) was 80days, showing the exceptionally high kinetic stability of t Zn-CA, in contrast to the highly labile [Zn(II)(H2O)6](2+), where the water exchange rate (kex) is high. This behavior is attributed to the tetrahedral coordination geometry supported by the tris(histidine) unit (His3) of CA. In the case of Co-CA, it showed a somewhat larger kd value (5.7×10(-7)s(-1), pH7.4, 25°C) even though it shares the same tetrahedral coordination environment with Zn-CA, suggesting that the d(7) electronic configuration of Co(II) in the transition state of the dissociation is stabilized by the ligand field. Among M-CAs, only Ni-CA showed a bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction path in its reaction with EDTA, implying that the large coordination number (6) of Ni(II) in Ni-CA allows EDTA to form an EDTA-Ni-CA intermediate. Overall, kd values roughly correlated with kex values among M-CAs, with the kd value of Zn-CA deviating strongly from the trend and highlighting the exceptionally high kinetic stabilization of Zn-CA by the His3 unit. PMID:27235274

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels.

  12. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels. PMID:26538363

  13. A spectrofluorimetric method for cysteine and glutathione using the fluorescence system of Zn(II)-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, W S; Zhang, H S

    2001-10-01

    The addition of thiol compounds to the fluorescence system of Zn(II)-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid complex (Zn(II)-HQS) in H3BO3-Na2B4O7 buffer (pH 8.50) solution led to immediate fluorescence inhibition, which was proportional to their amounts. Based on this finding, a novel spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of cysteine (Cys) and reduced glutathione (GSH) has been developed. The detection limits were 17 ng ml(-1) and 0.6 microg ml(-1), respectively. Most amino acids had no interference at high concentrations. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of Cys in protein hydrolysate and cystine electrolyte, and GSH in human blood serum with recoveries of 95.6-104.5%.

  14. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  15. Screening for oligonucleotide binding affinity by a convenient fluorescence competition assay.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J G; Liu, X; Balasubramanian, S

    1999-09-01

    A competitive homogeneous quenched fluorescence assay system is described for the high throughput screening of DNA conjugates that bind to single-stranded DNA. Fluorescence signal is generated by competitive binding of the sample molecule to a target strand labelled with a quencher probe, which is otherwise hybridised to a complementary strand containing a fluorescent probe. Thus fluorescence generated is related to the affinity of the sample. Competitive analysis of a number of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates gave data that correlated well with the corresponding UV melting data. The assay will be useful for screening of large numbers of potential single-stranded binding molecules.

  16. Nanoscale {LnIII(24)ZnII(6)} Triangular Metalloring with Magnetic Refrigerant, Slow Magnetic Relaxation, and Fluorescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhao, Lang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chao; Yuan, Sen-Wen; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-12-01

    The self-assembly of Ln(ClO4)3 · 6H2O and Zn(OAc)2 · 2H2O with pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid (HL) results in the formation of three novel nanosized {LnIII(24)ZnII(6)} triangular metallorings, [Gd24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(H2O)14](ClO4)7(OAc) · 2CH3OH · 26H2O (1), [Tb24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(CH3O)2(CH3OH)2(H2O)10](ClO4)5(OH) · 6CH3OH · 12H2O (2), and (H3O)[Dy24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(H2O)14](ClO4)7(OAc)2 · 4CH3OH · 22H2O (3), having the largest nuclearity among any known Ln/Zn clusters. Magnetic and luminescent studies reveal the special prowess for each lanthanide complex. Magnetic studies reveal that 1 exhibits a significant cryogenic magnetocaloric effect with a maximum -ΔSm (isothermal magnetic entropy change) value of 30.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2.5 K and 7 T and that a slow magnetization relaxation is observed for the dysprosium analogue. In addition, the solid-state photophysical properties of 2 display strong characteristic Tb(III) photoluminescent emission in the visible region, suggesting that Tb(III)-based luminescence is sensitized by the effective energy transfer from the ligand HL to the metal centers. PMID:26600284

  17. Bodilisant—A Novel Fluorescent, Highly Affine Histamine H3 Receptor Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (Ki hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R. PMID:24900647

  18. Fluorescent boronic acid polymer grafted on silica particles for affinity separation of saccharides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhifeng; Uddin, Khan Mohammad Ahsan; Kamra, Tripta; Schnadt, Joachim; Ye, Lei

    2014-02-12

    Boronic acid affinity gels are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols, and are finding applications both in biotech industry and in biomedical research areas. To increase the efficacy of boronate affinity separation, it is interesting to introduce repeating boronic acid units in flexible polymer chains attached on solid materials. In this work, we synthesize polymer brushes containing boronic acid repeating units on silica gels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A fluorescent boronic acid monomer is first prepared from an azide-tagged fluorogenic boronic acid and an alkyne-containing acrylate by Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (the CuAAC click chemistry). The boronic acid monomer is then grafted to the surface of silica gel modified with an ATRP initiator. The obtained composite material contains boronic acid polymer brushes on surface and shows favorable saccharide binding capability under physiological pH conditions, and displays interesting fluorescence intensity change upon binding fructose and glucose. In addition to saccharide binding, the flexible polymer brushes on silica also enable fast separation of a model glycoprotein based on selective boronate affinity interaction. The synthetic approach and the composite functional material developed in this work should open new opportunities for high efficiency detection, separation, and analysis of not only simple saccharides, but also glycopeptides and large glycoproteins. PMID:24444898

  19. Fluorescent Boronic Acid Polymer Grafted on Silica Particles for Affinity Separation of Saccharides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boronic acid affinity gels are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols, and are finding applications both in biotech industry and in biomedical research areas. To increase the efficacy of boronate affinity separation, it is interesting to introduce repeating boronic acid units in flexible polymer chains attached on solid materials. In this work, we synthesize polymer brushes containing boronic acid repeating units on silica gels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A fluorescent boronic acid monomer is first prepared from an azide-tagged fluorogenic boronic acid and an alkyne-containing acrylate by Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (the CuAAC click chemistry). The boronic acid monomer is then grafted to the surface of silica gel modified with an ATRP initiator. The obtained composite material contains boronic acid polymer brushes on surface and shows favorable saccharide binding capability under physiological pH conditions, and displays interesting fluorescence intensity change upon binding fructose and glucose. In addition to saccharide binding, the flexible polymer brushes on silica also enable fast separation of a model glycoprotein based on selective boronate affinity interaction. The synthetic approach and the composite functional material developed in this work should open new opportunities for high efficiency detection, separation, and analysis of not only simple saccharides, but also glycopeptides and large glycoproteins. PMID:24444898

  20. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  1. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. PMID:27436096

  2. Determining the ice-binding planes of antifreeze proteins by fluorescence-based ice plane affinity.

    PubMed

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms.

  3. Determining the Ice-binding Planes of Antifreeze Proteins by Fluorescence-based Ice Plane Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms. PMID:24457629

  4. Fluoro-Jade B: a high affinity fluorescent marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmued, L C; Hopkins, K J

    2000-08-25

    Fluoro-Jade B, like its predecessor Fluoro-Jade, is an anionic fluorescein derivative useful for the histological staining of neurons undergoing degeneration. However, Fluoro-Jade B has an even greater specific affinity for degenerating neurons. This notion is supported by the conspicuous staining of degenerating neuronal elements with minimal background staining. This improved signal-to-noise ratio means that fine neuronal processes including distal dendrites, axons and axon terminals can be more readily detected and documented. Although the staining time and dye concentration are reduced, the method is as rapid, simple and reliable as the original Fluoro-Jade technique. Like Fluoro-Jade, Fluoro-Jade B is compatible with a number of other labeling procedures including immunofluorescent and fluorescent Nissl techniques.

  5. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, K; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 10(7) M(-1)) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  6. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  7. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M−1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies. PMID:27032526

  8. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  9. Affinity binding-guided fluorescent nanobiosensor for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors via distance modulation between the fluorophore and metallic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaodong; Hei, Tingting; Cai, Yanan; Gao, Qunqun; Zhang, Qi

    2012-03-20

    The magnitude of fluorescence enhancement was found to depend strongly on the distance between fluorophores and metal nanostructures in metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). However, the precise placement of the particle in front of the molecule with nanometer accuracy and distance control is a great challenge. We describe a method using acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to modulate the distance between a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) and the fluorophore 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one) (DDAO). We found that DDAO is a reversible mixed type-I AChE inhibitor. DDAO binds to the peripheral anionic site and penetrates into the active gorge site of AChE via inhibition kinetics test and molecular docking study. The affinity ligand DDAO bound to AChE which was immobilized onto AuNPs, and its fluorescence was sharply enhanced due to MEF. The fluorescence was reduced by distance variations between the AuNP and DDAO, which resulted from other inhibitors competitively binding with AChE and partly or completely displacing DDAO. Experimental results show that changes in fluorescence intensity are related to the concentration of inhibitors present in the solution. In addition, the nanobiosensor has high sensitivity, with detection limits as low as 0.4 μM for paraoxon and 10 nM for tacrine, and also exhibits different reduction efficiencies for the two types of inhibitor. Thus, instead of an inhibition test, a new type of affinity binding-guided fluorescent nanobiosensor was fabricated to detect AChE inhibitors, determine AChE inhibitor binding mode, and screen more potent AChE inhibitors. The proposed strategy may be applied to other proteins or protein domains via changes in the affinity ligand.

  10. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  11. Development of BODIPY FL Vindoline as a Novel and High-Affinity Pregnane X Receptor Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics and endobiotics by regulating the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. The unique structure of PXR allows it to bind many drugs and drug leads, possibly causing undesired drug–drug interactions. Therefore, it is crucial to evaluate whether chemicals or drugs bind to PXR. Fluorescence-based assays are preferred because of their sensitivity and nonradioactive nature. On the basis of our previously characterized 4 (BODIPY FL vinblastine), a high-affinity PXR probe, we developed 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) and showed that it is a novel and potent PXR fluorescent probe with Kd of 256 nM in a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) binding assay with PXR. By using 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) in the PXR TR-FRET assay, we obtained a more than 7-fold signal-to-background ratio and high signal stability (signal was stable for at least 120 min, and Z′-factor > 0.85 from 30 to 240 min). The assay can tolerate DMSO up to 2%. This assay has been used to evaluate a panel of PXR ligands for their PXR-binding affinities. The performance of 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) in the PXR TR-FRET assay makes it an ideal PXR fluorescent probe, and the newly developed PXR TR-FRET assay with 20 (BODIPY FL vindoline) as a fluorescent probe is suitable for high-throughput screening to identify PXR-binding ligands. PMID:25133934

  12. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-15

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure.

  13. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-15

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure. PMID:25721777

  14. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: Naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-01

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27 ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure.

  15. A fluorescence nanosensor for glycoproteins with activity based on the molecularly imprinted spatial structure of the target and boronate affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Wei; Li, Ping; Xiao, Haibin; Wang, Hui; Tang, Bo

    2014-11-10

    Glycoproteins are closely associated with the occurrence of diverse diseases, and they have been used as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in clinical diagnostics. Currently, mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful tool for glycoprotein analysis, but it is almost impossible to directly identify glycoproteins without the preparation and pretreatment of samples. Furthermore, biological samples, especially proteins, are damaged by this process. Herein, we describe a novel fluorescence nanosensor based on a molecularly imprinted spatial structure and boronate affinity that is well-suited for monitoring glycoproteins selectively. Results showed that the recognition performance of the nanosensor for glycoproteins was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Moreover, the nanosensor was successfully applied to the detection of HRP in biological fluids. This study provides a facile and efficient fluorescence tool for glycoprotein detection in clinical diagnostics.

  16. Fluorescent actin analogs with a high affinity for profilin in vitro exhibit an enhanced gradient of assembly in living cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Constitutive centripetal transport of the actin-based cytoskeleton has been detected in cells spreading on a substrate, locomoting fibroblasts and keratocytes, and non-locomoting serum-deprived fibroblasts. These results suggest a gradient of actin assembly, highest in the cortex at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and lowest in the non-cortical perinuclear cytoplasm. We predicted that such a gradient would be maintained in part by phosphoinositide-regulated actin binding proteins because the intracellular free Ca2+ and pH are low and spatially constant in serum-deprived cells. The cytoplasm-membrane interface presents one surface where the assembly of actin is differentially regulated relative to the non-cortical cytoplasm. Several models, based on in vitro biochemistry, propose that phosphoinositide-regulated actin binding proteins are involved in local actin assembly. To test these models in living cells using imaging techniques, we prepared a new fluorescent analog of actin that bound profilin, a protein that interacts with phosphoinositides and actin-monomers in a mutually exclusive manner, with an order of magnitude greater affinity (Kd = 3.6 microM) than cys-374-labeled actin (Kd > 30 microM), yet retained the ability to inhibit DNase I. Hence, we were able to directly compare the distribution and activity of a biochemical mutant of actin with an analog possessing closer to wild-type activity. Three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy of the fluorescent analog of actin with a high affinity for profilin revealed that it incorporated into cortical cytoplasmic fibers and was also distributed diffusely in the non- cortical cytoplasm consistent with a bias of actin assembly near the surface of the cell. Fluorescence ratio imaging revealed that serum- deprived and migrating fibroblasts concentrated the new actin analog into fibers up to four-fold in the periphery and leading edge of these cells, respectively, relative to a soluble fluorescent dextran volume marker

  17. Synthesis of a Targeted Biarsenical Cy3-Cy5 Affinity Probe for Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Na; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-11-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent probes capable of the targeted labeling of tagged proteins are of significant interest due to their ability to enable in situ imaging of protein complexes within native biomolecular assemblies. Here we describe the synthesis of a fluorescent probe (AsCy3Cy5), and demonstrate the targeted labeling and super-resolution imaging of a tagged protein within a supramolecular protein complex.

  18. Zinc(II)-selective ratiometric fluorescent sensors based on inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Henary, Maged M; Wu, Yonggang; Fahrni, Christoph J

    2004-06-21

    To develop a zinc(II)-selective emission ratiometric probe suitable for biological applications, we explored the cation-induced inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) with a series of 2-(2'-benzenesulfonamidophenyl)benzimidazole derivatives. In the absence of Zn(II) at neutral pH, the fluorophores undergo ESIPT to yield a highly Stokes' shifted emission from the proton-transfer tautomer. Coordination of Zn(II) inhibits the ESIPT process and yields a significant hypsochromic shift of the fluorescence emission maximum. Whereas the paramagnetic metal cations Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Mn(II) result in fluorescence quenching, the emission response is not altered by millimolar concentrations of Ca(II) or Mg(II), rendering the sensors selective for Zn(II) among all biologically important metal cations. Due to the modular architecture of the fluorophore, the Zn(II) binding affinity can be readily tuned by implementing simple structural modifications. The synthesized probes are suitable to gauge free Zn(II) concentrations in the micromolar to picomolar range under physiological conditions.

  19. Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinase Activity in Living Neurons Was Examined by a Genetically Encoded Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer/Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging-based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Thomas; von Kries, Jens Peter; Li, Xiaoyu; Zempel, Hans; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases of the microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK)/Par-1 family play important roles in the establishment of cellular polarity, cell cycle control, and intracellular signal transduction. Disturbance of their function is linked to cancer and brain diseases, e.g. lissencephaly and Alzheimer disease. To understand the biological role of MARK family kinases, we searched for specific inhibitors and a biosensor for MARK activity. A screen of the ChemBioNet library containing ∼18,000 substances yielded several compounds with inhibitory activity in the low micromolar range and capable of inhibiting MARK activity in cultured cells and primary neurons, as judged by MARK-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated proteins and its consequences for microtubule integrity. Four of the compounds share a 9-oxo-9H-acridin-10-yl structure as a basis that will serve as a lead for optimization of inhibition efficiency. To test these inhibitors, we developed a cellular biosensor for MARK activity based on a MARK target sequence attached to the 14-3-3 scaffold protein and linked to enhanced cyan or teal and yellow fluorescent protein as FRET donor and acceptor pairs. Transfection of the teal/yellow fluorescent protein sensor into neurons and imaging by fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed that MARK was particularly active in the axons and growth cones of differentiating neurons. PMID:21984823

  20. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets. PMID:25715324

  1. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets.

  2. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  3. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  4. Zn(II) ions substantially perturb Cu(II) ion coordination in amyloid-β at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Silva, K Ishara; Saxena, Sunil

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions with amyloid-β (Aβ) plays an important role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. We describe the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure metal-binding competition between Cu(II) and Zn(II) in amyloid-β at physiological pH. Continuous wave ESR measurements show that the affinity of Cu(II) toward Aβ(1-16) is significantly higher than that of Zn(II) at physiological pH. Importantly, of the two known Cu(II) coordination modes in Aβ, component I and component II, Zn(II) displaces Cu(II) only from component I. Our results indicate that at excess amounts of Zn(II) component II becomes the most dominant coordination mode. This observation is important as Aβ aggregates in the brain contain a high Zn(II) ion concentration. In order to determine details of the metal ion competition, electron spin echo envelope modulation experiments were carried out on Aβ variants that were systematically (15)N labeled. In the presence of Zn(II), most peptides use His 14 as an equatorial ligand to bind Cu(II) ions. Interestingly, Zn(II) ions completely substitute Cu(II) ions that are simultaneously coordinated to His 6 and His 13. Furthermore, in the presence of Zn(II), the proportion of Cu(II) ions that are simultaneously coordinated to His 13 and His 14 is increased. On the basis of our results we suggest that His 13 plays a critical role in modulating the morphology of Aβ aggregates.

  5. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  6. Interference between eplerenone and digoxin in fluorescence polarization immunoassay, microparticle enzyme immunoassay, and affinity column-mediated immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Iguchi, Ken; Kanada, Yasutaka; Kato, Ryuji; Ijiri, Yoshio; Nishihara, Masami; Murakami, Sumiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Tamai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Digitalis-like immunoreactive substances have crossreactivity with antidigoxin antibodies and the interference between digoxin and spironolactone/canrenone has been reported. The structure of eplerenone is similar to that of spironolactone/canrenone. Therefore, we hypothesized that eplerenone might also interfere with the measurement of digoxin by immunoassay. We performed three types of assays (fluorescence polarization immunoassay [FPIA], microparticle enzyme immunoassay [MEIA], and affinity column-mediated immunoassay [ACMIA]) to determine crossreactions between eplerenone and antidigoxin antibodies. Furthermore, we used FPIA, MEIA, and ACMIA to measure the apparent digoxin concentration in mixed solutions of eplerenone (1-100 μg/mL) and digoxin (1-3 ng/mL). In the crossreaction tests, eplerenone was detected as digoxin by FPIA and ACMIA. By FPIA, a known concentration of 1 μg/mL of eplerenone was measured as 0.33 ± 0.11 ng/mL of digoxin (crossreaction rate, 0.03%). By ACMIA, a known concentration of 10 μg/mL of eplerenone was measured as 0.13 ± 0.05 ng/mL of digoxin (crossreaction rate, 0.001%). No crossreaction between eplerenone and digoxin was determined by MEIA. In the interference of eplerenone coadministered with digoxin, the apparent concentration of digoxin was increased in FPIA, but decreased in MEIA and ACMIA. The results suggest that eplerenone crossreacts with antidigoxin antibodies in FPIA, MEIA, and ACMIA, but that the interference of eplerenone might be smaller than that of spironolactone/canrenone. PMID:20625353

  7. Thiazole orange as the fluorescent intercalator in a high resolution fid assay for determining DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Tse, W C

    2001-09-01

    The viability of using thiazole orange as an alternative to ethidium bromide in a fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay is explored by profiling the DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity of netropsin. Utilizing a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all possible four base-pair sequences, the method provides a high resolution profile of the DNA binding properties of small molecules in a high throughput format.

  8. Development of new peptide-based receptor of fluorescent probe with femtomolar affinity for Cu(+) and detection of Cu(+) in Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwan Ho; Oh, Eun-Taex; Park, Heon Joo; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-11-15

    Developing fluorescent probes for monitoring intracellular Cu(+) is important for human health and disease, whereas a few types of their receptors showing a limited range of binding affinities for Cu(+) have been reported. In the present study, we first report a novel peptide receptor of a fluorescent probe for the detection of Cu(+). Dansyl-labeled tripeptide probe (Dns-LLC) formed a 1:1 complex with Cu(+) and showed a turn-on fluorescent response to Cu(+) in aqueous buffered solutions. The dissociation constant of Dns-LLC for Cu(+) was determined to be 12 fM, showing that Dns-LLC had more potent binding affinity for Cu(+) than those of previously reported chemical probes for Cu(+). The binding mode study showed that the thiol group of the peptide receptor plays a critical role in potent binding with Cu(+) and the sulfonamide and amide groups of the probe might cooperate to form a complex with Cu(+). Dns-LLC detected Cu(+) selectively by a turn-on response among various biologically relevant metal ions, including Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The selectivity of the peptide-based probe for Cu(+) was strongly dependent on the position of the cysteine residue in the peptide receptor part. The fluorescent peptide-based probe penetrated the living RKO cells and successfully detected Cu(+) in the Golgi apparatus in live cells by a turn-on response. Given the growing interest in imaging Cu(+) in live cells, a novel peptide receptor of Cu(+) will offer the potential for developing a variety of fluorescent probes for Cu(+) in the field of copper biochemistry.

  9. Development of new peptide-based receptor of fluorescent probe with femtomolar affinity for Cu(+) and detection of Cu(+) in Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwan Ho; Oh, Eun-Taex; Park, Heon Joo; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-11-15

    Developing fluorescent probes for monitoring intracellular Cu(+) is important for human health and disease, whereas a few types of their receptors showing a limited range of binding affinities for Cu(+) have been reported. In the present study, we first report a novel peptide receptor of a fluorescent probe for the detection of Cu(+). Dansyl-labeled tripeptide probe (Dns-LLC) formed a 1:1 complex with Cu(+) and showed a turn-on fluorescent response to Cu(+) in aqueous buffered solutions. The dissociation constant of Dns-LLC for Cu(+) was determined to be 12 fM, showing that Dns-LLC had more potent binding affinity for Cu(+) than those of previously reported chemical probes for Cu(+). The binding mode study showed that the thiol group of the peptide receptor plays a critical role in potent binding with Cu(+) and the sulfonamide and amide groups of the probe might cooperate to form a complex with Cu(+). Dns-LLC detected Cu(+) selectively by a turn-on response among various biologically relevant metal ions, including Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The selectivity of the peptide-based probe for Cu(+) was strongly dependent on the position of the cysteine residue in the peptide receptor part. The fluorescent peptide-based probe penetrated the living RKO cells and successfully detected Cu(+) in the Golgi apparatus in live cells by a turn-on response. Given the growing interest in imaging Cu(+) in live cells, a novel peptide receptor of Cu(+) will offer the potential for developing a variety of fluorescent probes for Cu(+) in the field of copper biochemistry. PMID:27208475

  10. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies on the Schiff base ligand derived from condensation of 2-furaldehyde and 3,3'-diaminobenzidene, L and its complexes with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II): Comparative DNA binding studies of L and its Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Khan, Asad U.; Khan, Shahper N.

    2011-01-01

    The Schiff base ligand, N,N'-bis-(2-furancarboxaldimine)-3,3'-diaminobenzidene (L) obtained by condensation of 2-furaldehyde and 3,3'-diaminobenzidene, was used to synthesize the mononuclear complexes of the type, [M(L)](NO 3) 2 [M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)]. The newly synthesized ligand, (L) and its complexes have been characterized on the basis of the results of the elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements and spectroscopic studies viz, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass, UV-vis and EPR. EPR, UV-vis and magnetic moment data revealed a square planar geometry for the complexes with distortion in Cu(II) complex and conductivity data show a 1:2 electrolytic nature of the complexes. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies support that Schiff base ligand, L and its Cu(II) and Zn(II) complex exhibit significant binding to calf thymus DNA. The highest binding affinity in case of L may be due to the more open structure as compared to the metal coordinated complexes.

  11. CrAsH: A Biarsenical Multi-use Affinity Probe with low non-specific fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Haishi; Chen, Baowei; Squier, Thomas C.; Mayer, M ULJANA.

    2006-05-18

    A biarsenical fluorescent probe 5-carboxy-4?,5?-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein (CrAsH) was conveniently synthesized from 5-carboxyfluorescein. This probe shows highly selective binding to tetracysteine tags and low hydrophobic non-specific binding in vitro. It provides a potential application for protein labeling and cell imaging.

  12. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a new Schiff base-derived model compound: naked eye detection and spectral deciphering of the mechanism of sensory action.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Paul, Bijan Kumar; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-11-01

    A new Schiff base compound 2-((benzylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2BIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, FT-IR and mass spectroscopic techniques. The significantly low fluorescence yield of the compound has been rationalized in connection with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Subsequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals a promising prospect for the title compound to function as a fluorosensor for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement. While perturbation of the PET process in 2BIMN1O has been argued to be the responsible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound are its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 0.82 and 0.35 μM respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure. Also the spectral modulation of 2BIMN1O in the presence of the transition metal ions paves the way for the construction of a calibration curve in the context of its fluorescence signaling potential. PMID:23979689

  13. Determination of individual proton affinities of ofloxacin from its UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and charge-transfer spectra: effect of inclusion in beta-cyclodextrin on the proton affinities.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Bankim Chandra; Deb, Nipamanjari; Mukherjee, Asok K

    2010-08-01

    Individual proton affinities of the four dissociable functional groups of (+/-)-9-fluoro-2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-10-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-7-oxo-7H-pyrido[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazine-6-carboxylic acid (commonly called "ofloxacin" and to be denoted henceforth as OflH), have been determined from the pH-dependent variation of the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra of the compound itself and of its charge transfer complexes (CT) with p-bromanil and p-chloranil (in aqueous medium containing 0.1% ethanol, v/v). To utilize the CT spectra for determination of the proton affinity of the anilinic N, the CT absorption band of the ofloxacin-p-bromanil complex has been studied by changing the pH of the medium. Further, the effect of inclusion on the proton affinities of the four dissociable groups of OflH has been studied in presence of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). Two pK(a) values corresponding to anilinic and tertiary N atoms change, whereas those corresponding to phenolic -OH and aromatic -COOH groups remain unchanged by the addition of beta-CD, a fact that indicates partial inclusion of the ofloxacin molecule in beta-CD. Formation constant and related thermodynamic parameters for the OflH(2)(+).beta-CD inclusion complex in aqueous solution have been determined from absorption intensities. A general relation between pK(a) values of guests having proton-releasing functional groups and formation constants of the inclusion complexes of the protonated and deprotonated forms with a host molecule has been utilized for determination of the formation constant of the OflH(3)(+2).beta-CD complex from the pK(a) values of OflH(3)(+2) in the presence and absence of beta-CD, along with the formation constant of the OflH(2)(+).beta-CD complex. Results of the present study reveal that the N-methylpiperazinyl moiety of ofloxacin is included in beta-CD, and the remaining part of the guest molecule remains outside. Also, in molecular interaction with quinone-type electron acceptors

  14. Determination of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in high-sugar-content traditional Turkish foods by affinity column cleanup and LC fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, Hamide Z; Cimen, Dilek; Gilbert, John

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of an affinity column cleanup procedure followed by LC with fluorescence detection was established for the determination of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in high-sugar-content traditional Turkish foods. Traditional foods, such as baklava (finely layered pastry filled with nuts and steeped in syrup), halvah (containing sesame paste and pistachios), cevizli sucuk (a confection made of grape juice boiled and dried on strings of nuts), Turkish delight (containing hazelnuts, pistachios, or walnuts), and pişmaniye (candy made of sugar, butter, and flour), were tested, and the performance of the method was established with spiked samples. To examine the robustness of the methodology, baklava was prepared from raw materials and spiked at the initial stage of dry ingredients and through subsequent stages of preparation of dough, after cooking, and after addition of syrup and nuts. For all products, the analytical method required grinding the composite foodstuff under liquid nitrogen to form a fine powder, which was then thoroughly mixed before subsampling. After vortex extraction into methanol-water (aflatoxins) and aqueous sodium bicarbonate (ochratoxin A), the sample was filtered, diluted with phosphate-buffered saline, and then passed through either an aflatoxin or ochratoxin A affinity column before HPLC analysis with fluorescence detection (using post-column bromination for the aflatoxins). In all the traditional Turkish products, the recovery of aflatoxin B1 ranged from 77 to 98%, and LODs were <0.1 microg/kg. For ochratoxin A, the recoveries were from 88 to 93% and LODs were similarly <0.1 microLg/kg. Despite the complex nature of these traditional Turkish foods, which frequently contain products from sugar caramelization, there was no evidence of any interfering co-extractives, and the method has proved to be robust enough to be used for food control purposes. PMID:19714981

  15. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  16. Structural elucidation of estrus urinary lipocalin protein (EULP) and evaluating binding affinity with pheromones using molecular docking and fluorescence study

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Durairaj; Muthukumar, Subramanian; Saibaba, Ganesan; Siva, Durairaj; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader; Gulyás, Balázs; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of pheromones bound with carrier proteins belonging to lipocalin superfamily is known to prolong chemo-signal communication between individuals belonging to the same species. Members of lipocalin family (MLF) proteins have three structurally conserved motifs for delivery of hydrophobic molecules to the specific recognizer. However, computational analyses are critically required to validate and emphasize the sequence and structural annotation of MLF. This study focused to elucidate the evolution, structural documentation, stability and binding efficiency of estrus urinary lipocalin protein (EULP) with endogenous pheromones adopting in-silico and fluorescence study. The results revealed that: (i) EULP perhaps originated from fatty acid binding protein (FABP) revealed in evolutionary analysis; (ii) Dynamic simulation study shows that EULP is highly stable at below 0.45 Å of root mean square deviation (RMSD); (iii) Docking evaluation shows that EULP has higher binding energy with farnesol and 2-iso-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) than 2-naphthol; and (iv) Competitive binding and quenching assay revealed that purified EULP has good binding interaction with farnesol. Both, In-silico and experimental studies showed that EULP is an efficient binding partner to pheromones. The present study provides impetus to create a point mutation for increasing longevity of EULP to develop pheromone trap for rodent pest management. PMID:27782155

  17. Estimation of interaction between oriented immobilized green fluorescent protein and its antibody by high performance affinity chromatography and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Lingjian; Gao, Xiaokang; Chen, Hongwei; Zhao, Xinfeng; Bian, Liujiao; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2015-07-01

    Although green fluorescence protein (GFP) and its antibody are widely used to track a protein or a cell in life sciences, the binding behavior between them remains unclear. In this work, diazo coupling method that synthesized a new stationary GFP was oriented immobilized on the surface of macro-porous silica gel by a phase. The stationary phase was utilized to confirm the validation of injection amount-dependent analysis in exploring protein-protein interaction that use GFP antibody as a probe. GFP antibody was proved to have one type of binding site on immobilized GFP. The number of binding site and association constant were calculated to be (6.41 ± 0.76) × 10(-10) M and (1.39 ± 0.12) × 10(9) M(-1). Further analysis by molecular docking showed that the binding of GFP to its antibody is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. These results indicated that injection amount-dependent analysis is capable of exploring the protein-protein interactions with the advantages of ligand and time saving. It is a valuable methodology for the ligands, which are expensive or difficult to obtain. PMID:25727342

  18. The effects of affinity-purified anti-DNA antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on the fluorescent antinuclear antibody assay using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Kawamura, Masahide; Mineo, Midori; Shinohara, Tadashi; Kataharada, Koji; Okada, Makoto; Takada, Kunio; Miyawaki, Shoji; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of anti-dsDNA antibodies on the titer and the nuclear staining pattern(s) in a fluorescent antinuclear antibody (FANA) assay using HEp-2 cells. Anti-dsDNA derived from 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was individually affinity-purified. The anti-dsDNA titer of the purified anti-dsDNA solution was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) or by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the FANA assay, the anti-dsDNA solution was diluted in a stepwise manner and its titer was expressed by the endpoint dilution. The nuclear staining pattern in the anti-dsDNA solution was examined at the 1:5 and 1:20 dilutions and at the endpoint dilution. The anti-dsDNA titers of the affinity-purified anti-dsDNA solution were high enough (13 to 126 IU/ml) to be measured by RIA. However, the antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers of this solution were relatively low: 1:20 to 1:320. In the study of nuclear staining the peripheral pattern was observed in nine of the 14 cases at a 1:5 dilution. However, at the endpoint dilution, all cases exhibited the homogeneous pattern. These findings indicate that in the FANA assay using HEp-2 cells, 1) although serum samples show high anti-dsDNA titers by RIA or by ELISA, the antibodies' direct contribution to ANA titers is limited, and 2) when samples reveal a homogeneous staining pattern at the endpoint dilution, this suggests the presence of anti-dsDNA.

  19. Revised stability constant, spectroscopic properties and binding mode of Zn(II) to FluoZin-3, the most common zinc probe in life sciences.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, I; Krężel, A; Goch, W; Zhukov, I; Paczkowska, I; Bal, W

    2016-08-01

    2-[2-[2-[2-[bis(carboxylatomethyl)amino]-5-methoxyphenoxy]ethoxy]-4-(2,7-difluoro-3-oxido-6-oxo-4a,9a-dihydroxanthen-9-yl)anilino]acetate (FluoZin-3) is used very broadly in life sciences as intra- and extracellular Zn(II) sensor selective for Zn(II) over Co(II), Ca(II) and Mg(II) ions at their physiological concentrations. It has been used for determination of relative and absolute levels of exchangeable Zn(II) in cells and extracellular fluids. Despite its popularity, the knowledge of its acid/base and Zn(II) coordination abilities and of its spectroscopic properties remained very limited. Also the published conditional dissociation constant ((C)Kd) values at pH7.4 are slightly discrepant, (15nM or 8.9nM). In this work we determined the (C)Kd for Zn(II) complexation by FluoZin-3 at pH7.4 with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as competitor using two independent methods: fluorimetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For the first time, we investigated FluoZin-3 alone and complexed with Zn(II) in the wide range of pH, determining the total of eight pKa values from fluorescence spectra and from various regions of UV-Vis spectra. The validated values of (C)Kd (9.1±0.4nM; -log (C)Kd=8.04) and of the absolute (pH-independent) stability constant log βZnL (8.16±0.05) were provided by fluorescence spectroscopy experiments performed at 1μM concentrations. Our experiments demonstrated that both of aminocarboxylate moieties of FluoZin-3 bind the Zn(II) ion synergistically. PMID:27216451

  20. Photoluminescence properties of new Zn(II) complexes with 8-hydroxyquinoline ligands: Dependence on volume and electronic effect of substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yanping; Lu, Jiguo; Hu, Sheng; Zhang, Liming; Zhao, Fenghua; Huang, Huarong; Huang, Baohua; Zhang, Li

    2015-03-01

    A series of 2-arylethenyl-8-hydroxyquinoline ligands (A1-A4) with a trimethoxyphenyl, naphthyl, 2-fluoro-4-bromophenyl and anthracenyl group and their corresponding Zn(II) complexes (B1-B4) were synthesized and characterized by means of 1H NMR, ESI-MS, FT-IR and elemental analysis. A1 and A4 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The aggregation behavior of zinc salt and ligands in solution was investigated by several techniques, containing 1H NMR, UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL). The electronic nature and volume of arylethenyl substituents affect the absorption wavelength, the emission color, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence quantum yield and thermostability of Zn(II) complexes. The experiments corroborated that the properties of Zinc(II) complexes can be tuned by introducing different functional substituents.

  1. Rational synthesis of an exceptionally stable Zn(II) metal-organic framework for the highly selective and sensitive detection of picric acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingli; Ding, Meili; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Bing; Jiang, Hai-Long

    2016-04-28

    Based on an organic ligand involving both carboxylate and tetrazole groups, a chemically stable Zn(II) metal-organic framework has been rationally synthesized and behaves as a fluorescence chemosensor for the highly selective and sensitive detection of picric acid, an extremely hazardous and strong explosive. PMID:27046028

  2. Enhancing the Photostability of Arylvinylenebipyridyl Compounds as Fluorescent Indicators for Intracellular Zinc(II) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Younes, Ali H.; Allen, John R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Arylvinylenebipyridyl (AVB) ligands are bright, zinc(II)-sensitive fluoroionophores. The applicability of AVBs as fluorescent indicators for imaging cellular zinc(II), however, is limited by low photostability, partially attributable to the photoisomerization of the vinylene functionality. Two configurationally immobilized (i.e., “locked”) AVB analogues are prepared in this work. The zinc(II)-sensitive photophysical properties and zinc(II) affinities of both AVBs and their locked analogues are characterized in organic and aqueous media. The zinc(II) sensitivity of the emission is attributed to the zinc(II)-dependent energies of the charge transfer excited states of these compounds. The configurationally locked ligands have improved photostability, while maintaining the brightness and zinc(II) sensibility of their AVB progenitors. The feasibility of the “locked” AVB analogues with improved photostability for imaging intracellular Zn(II) of eukaryotic cells using laser confocal fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated. PMID:25942357

  3. Rapid screening method for quinolone residues in livestock and fishery products using immobilised metal chelate affinity chromatographic clean-up and liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Gotoh, M; Matsuoka, T

    2011-09-01

    An efficient LC method was developed for screening the presence of quinolones (QLs)--comprising fluoroquinolones (FQs) and acidic quinolones (AQs)--residues in various livestock and fishery products. Targeted analytes were for nine FQs of marbofloxacin (MAR), ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR), ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), danofloxacin (DAN), orbifloxacin (ORB), difloxacin (DIF) and sarafloxacin (SAR), and three AQs of oxolinic acid (OXA), nalidixic acid (NAL) and flumequine (FMQ). Samples comprised ten different food products covering five matrices: muscle (cattle, swine and chicken), liver (chicken), raw fish (shrimp and salmon), egg (chicken), and processed food (ham, sausage and fish sausage). This method involved a simple extraction with (1:1) acetonitrile-methanol, a highly selective clean-up with an immobilised metal chelate affinity column charged with Fe(3+), a fast isocratic LC analysis using a short column (20 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) with a mobile phase of (15:85:0.1) methanol/water/formic acid, and fluorescence detection (excitation/emission wavelengths of 295 nm/455 nm for FQs (495 nm for MAR), and 320 nm/365 nm for AQs). Among FQs, pairs of NOR/OFL, ORB/DIF and ENR/DAN were incompletely resolved. A confirmatory LC run with a Mg(2+) containing methanolic mobile phase was also proposed for the samples suspected of being positive. The optimised method gave satisfactory recoveries of 88.5% (56.1-108.6%) and 78.7% (44.1-99.5%) for intra- and inter-day assays with relative standard deviations of 7.2% (0.7-18.4%) and 6.8% (1.4-16.6%), respectively. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.8 µg kg(-1) (DAN) to 6.5 µg kg(-1) (SAR). This method was successfully employed to analyse 113 real samples and two positive samples were found: fish sausage (CIP 990 µg kg(-1)) and shrimp (ENR 20 µg kg(-1)).

  4. Rapid screening method for quinolone residues in livestock and fishery products using immobilised metal chelate affinity chromatographic clean-up and liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Gotoh, M; Matsuoka, T

    2011-09-01

    An efficient LC method was developed for screening the presence of quinolones (QLs)--comprising fluoroquinolones (FQs) and acidic quinolones (AQs)--residues in various livestock and fishery products. Targeted analytes were for nine FQs of marbofloxacin (MAR), ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR), ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), danofloxacin (DAN), orbifloxacin (ORB), difloxacin (DIF) and sarafloxacin (SAR), and three AQs of oxolinic acid (OXA), nalidixic acid (NAL) and flumequine (FMQ). Samples comprised ten different food products covering five matrices: muscle (cattle, swine and chicken), liver (chicken), raw fish (shrimp and salmon), egg (chicken), and processed food (ham, sausage and fish sausage). This method involved a simple extraction with (1:1) acetonitrile-methanol, a highly selective clean-up with an immobilised metal chelate affinity column charged with Fe(3+), a fast isocratic LC analysis using a short column (20 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) with a mobile phase of (15:85:0.1) methanol/water/formic acid, and fluorescence detection (excitation/emission wavelengths of 295 nm/455 nm for FQs (495 nm for MAR), and 320 nm/365 nm for AQs). Among FQs, pairs of NOR/OFL, ORB/DIF and ENR/DAN were incompletely resolved. A confirmatory LC run with a Mg(2+) containing methanolic mobile phase was also proposed for the samples suspected of being positive. The optimised method gave satisfactory recoveries of 88.5% (56.1-108.6%) and 78.7% (44.1-99.5%) for intra- and inter-day assays with relative standard deviations of 7.2% (0.7-18.4%) and 6.8% (1.4-16.6%), respectively. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.8 µg kg(-1) (DAN) to 6.5 µg kg(-1) (SAR). This method was successfully employed to analyse 113 real samples and two positive samples were found: fish sausage (CIP 990 µg kg(-1)) and shrimp (ENR 20 µg kg(-1)). PMID:21749230

  5. Zn(II) adsorption from synthetic solution and kaolin wastewater onto vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Cláudio Pereira; Fernandes, Raphael Bragança Alves; de Lima Ribeiro, Kamilla; de Souza Nascimento, Bruna; de Barros, Priscila Martins

    2009-03-15

    The adsorption of Zn(II) from both synthetic solution and kaolin industry wastewater by cattle manure vermicompost was studied. The adsorption process was dependent on the various operating variables, viz., solution pH, particle size of the vermicompost, mass of vermicompost/volume of the Zn(II) solution ratio, contact time and temperature. The optimum conditions for Zn adsorption were pH 6.0, particle size of < or = 250 microm, 1 g per 10 mL adsorbent dose, contact time of 4h and temperature of 25 degrees C. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms fit well in the experimental data and their constants were evaluated, with R(2) values from 0.95 to 0.99. In synthetic solution, the maximum adsorption capacity of the vermicompost for Zn(2+) ions was 20.48 mg g(-1) at 25 degrees C when the vermicompost dose was 1 g 10 mL(-1) and the initial adjusted pH was 2. The batch adsorption studies of Zn(II) on vermicompost using kaolin wastewater have shown the maximum adsorption capacity was 2.49 mg g(-1) at pH 2 (natural pH of the wastewater). The small values of the constant related to the energy of adsorption (from 0.07 to 0.163 L mg(-1)) indicated that Zn(2+) ions were binded strongly to vermicompost. The values of the separation factor, R(L), which has been used to predict affinity between adsorbate and adsorbent were between 0 and 1, indicating that sorption was very favorable for Zn(II) in synthetic solution and kaolin wastewater. The thermodynamic parameter, the Gibbs free energy, was calculated for each system and the negative values obtained confirm that the adsorption processes are spontaneous. The DeltaG degrees values were -19.656 kJ mol(-1) and -16.849 kJ mol(-1) for Zn(II) adsorption on vermicompost in synthetic solution at pH 6 and 2, respectively, and -13.275 kJ mol(-1) in kaolin wastewater at pH 2.

  6. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  7. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of Alexa Fluor 680-bombesin[7-14]NH2 peptide conjugate, a high-affinity fluorescent probe with high selectivity for the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lixin; Yu, Ping; Veerendra, Bhadrasetty; Rold, Tammy L; Retzloff, Lauren; Prasanphanich, Adam; Sieckman, Gary; Hoffman, Timothy J; Volkert, Wynn A; Smith, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors are overexpressed on several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. Bombesin (BBN), a 14-amino acid peptide that is an analogue of human GRP, binds to GRP receptors with very high affinity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a new fluorescent probe based on BBN having high tumor uptake and optimal pharmacokinetics for specific targeting and optical imaging of human breast cancer tissue. In this study, solid-phase peptide synthesis was used to produce H(2)N-glycylglycylglycine-BBN[7-14]NH(2) peptide with the following general sequence: H(2)N-G-G-G-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH(2)). This conjugate was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectra. The fluorescent probe Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) conjugate was prepared by reaction of Alexa Fluor 680 succinimidyl ester to H(2)N-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in dimethylformamide (DMF). In vitro competitive binding assays, using (125)I-Tyr(4)-BBN as the radiolabeling gold standard, demonstrated an inhibitory concentration 50% value of 7.7 +/- 1.4 nM in human T-47D breast cancer cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in human T-47D breast cancer cells indicated specific uptake, internalization, and receptor blocking of the fluorescent bioprobe in vitro. In vivo investigations in SCID mice bearing xenografted T-47D breast cancer lesions demonstrated the ability of this new conjugate to specifically target tumor tissue with high selectivity and affinity.

  8. Phosphate binding by a novel Zn(II) complex featuring a trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane ligand. Effective anion recognition in water.

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Oscar; Gentili, Matteo; Bartoli, Francesco; Bencini, Andrea; Conti, Luca; Giorgi, Claudia; Roelens, Stefano

    2015-02-14

    In this work we have investigated the binding properties of a new synthetic receptor for phosphate anions that combines metal ion coordination with electrostatic and H-bonding interactions. The described receptor is obtained by assembling an iminodiacetic (IDA) fragment, as a Zn(II) binding site, with a polyamine macrocyclic portion containing two trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DAC) units and a pyrrole ring, as a cationic binding site, into an adaptive structure appropriately spanning the length of di- and tridentate phosphates. Potentiometric measurements together with (1)H and (31)P NMR investigation showed that, in a wide pH range including values of physiological interest, the Zn(II) complex of the receptor binds di- and triphosphates, such as ADP, ATP, pyrophosphate (PP) and triphosphate (TP), far better than monophosphate (MP), and that TP is poorly bound by methyliminodiacetate (MIDA) as a model for the Zn(II) binding site. Besides the excellent selectivity over other phosphates, the affinity for TP is the largest reported to date for Zn(II) complexes in water.

  9. Multiple Metal Binding Domains Enhance the Zn(II) Selectivity of the Divalent Metal Ion Transporter AztA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Reyes-Caballero, H.; Li, C.; Scott, R.A.; Giedroc, D.P.

    2009-06-03

    Transition metal-transporting P{sub 1B}-type CPx ATPases play crucial roles in mediating metal homeostasis and resistance in all cells. The degree to which N-terminal metal binding domains (MBDs) confer metal specificity to the transporter is unclear. We show that the two MBDs of the Zn/Cd/Pb effluxing pump Anabaena AztA are functionally nonequivalent, but only with respect to zinc resistance. Inactivation of the a-MBD largely abrogates resistance to high intracellular Zn(II) levels, whereas inactivation of the b-MBD is not as deleterious. In contrast, inactivation of either the a- or b-MBD has little measurable impact on Cd(II) and Pb(II) resistance. The membrane proximal b-MBD binds Zn(II) with a higher affinity than the distal N-terminal a-MBD. Facile Zn(II)-specific intermolecular transfer from the a-MBD to the higher-affinity b-MBD is readily observed by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectroscopy. Unlike Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) form saturated 1:1 S{sub 4} or S{sub 3}(O/N) complexes with AztA{sup aHbH}, where a single metal ion bridges the two MBDs. We propose that the tandem MBDs enhance Zn(II)-specific transport, while stabilizing a non-native inter-MBD Cd/Pb cross-linked structure that is a poor substrate and/or regulator for the transporter.

  10. High affinity receptor labeling based on basic leucine zipper domain peptides conjugated with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye: Visualization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor endocytosis in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ayako; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Okabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to visualize receptor trafficking in living neurons are important, but currently available methods are limited in their labeling efficiency, specificity and reliability. Here we report a method for receptor labeling with a basic leucine zipper domain peptide (ZIP) and a binding cassette specific to ZIP. Receptors are tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette at their extracellular domain. Tagged receptors expressed in cultured cells were labeled with exogenously applied fluorescently labeled ZIP with low background and high affinity. To test if ZIP labeling is useful in monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, we next conjugated ZIP with a pH-sensitive dye RhP-M (ZIP-RhP-M). ZIP binding to its binding cassette was pH-resistant and RhP-M fluorescence dramatically increased in acidic environment. Thus AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) labeled by ZIP-RhP-M can report receptor endocytosis and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Application of ZIP-RhP-M to cultured hippocampal neurons expressing AMPARs tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette resulted in appearance of fluorescent puncta in PSD-95-positive large spines, suggesting local endocytosis and acidification of AMPARs in individual mature spines. This spine pool of AMPARs in acidic environment was distinct from the early endosomes labeled by transferrin uptake. These results suggest that receptor labeling by ZIP-RhP-M is a useful technique for monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'.

  11. Adsorption behavior of Zn(II) on calcinated Chinese loess.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaowu; Li, Zhenze; Chen, Yunmin

    2009-01-30

    Chinese loess has proven to be effective in removing Zn(II) from aqueous solutions, but the resultant adsorbent-water slurry is difficult to separate. In this paper, the crude loess was calcinated to improve the separation efficiency of slurries in terms of sedimentary rate by increasing the particle sizes of the adsorbent. The sorption capacities of different sorbents, including crude loess, calcinated loess, de-organic crude loess and acid-treated calcinated loess, were obtained and sequenced. The adsorption capacity of the calcinated loess towards Zn(II) was found to be as high as 113.6 mg g(-1). The adsorption isotherms and kinetics of calcinated loess were best-fit with the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second order kinetics, respectively. The thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous with a high preference for Zn(II) removal. The adsorption of Zn(II) on calcinated loess implies an ion exchange of the solute with calcite and goethite due to the observed FT-IR and XRD patterns as well as the predicted mean free energies (-11.58 to -9.28 kJ mol(-1) by D-R model). The byproduct of adsorption can be purified and refreshed by using a 0.01 M HCl solution.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, DNA- and HSA-binding studies of a dinuclear Schiff base Zn(II) complex derived from 2-hydroxynaphtaldehyde and 2-picolylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Zahra; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Sahihi, Mehdi; Moghadam, Majid; Tangestaninejad, Sharam; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj

    2015-09-01

    A tridentate Schiff base ligand NNO donor (HL: 1-((E)-((pyridin-2-yl)methylimino)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol was synthesized from condensation of 2-hydroxynaphtaldehyde and 2-picolylamine. Zinc complex, Zn2L2(NO3)2, was prepared from reaction of Zn(NO3)2 and HL at ambient temperature. The ligand and complex were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and elemental analysis (CHN). Furthermore, the structure of dinuclear Zn(II) complex was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The complex, Zn2L2(NO3)2, is centrosymmetric dimer in which deprotonated phenolates bridge the two Zn(II) atoms and link the two halves of the dimer. In the structure, Zinc(II) ions have a highly distorted six-coordinate structure bonded to two oxygen atoms from a bidentate nitrate group, the pyridine nitrogen, an amine nitrogen and phenolate oxygens. The interaction of dinuclear Zn(II) complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) and HSA was investigated under physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking methods. The estimated binding constants for the DNA-complex and HSA-complex were (3.60 ± 0.18) × 104 M-1 and (1.35 ± 0.24) × 104 M-1, respectively. The distance between dinuclear Zn(II) complex and HSA was obtained based on the Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer. Molecular docking studies revealed the binding of dinuclear Zn(II) complex to the major groove of FS-DNA and IIA site of protein by formation of hydrogen bond, π-cation and hydrophobic interactions.

  13. Demonstration of a second ligand for the low affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (CD23) using recombinant CD23 reconstituted into fluorescent liposomes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant full-length human CD23 has been incorporated into fluorescent liposomes to demonstrate the existence of a ligand for CD23 that is different from the previously known ligand, immunoglobulin E (IgE). The novel ligand for CD23 is expressed on subsets of normal T cells and B cells as well as on some myeloma cell lines. The interaction of full-length CD23 with its ligand is specifically inhibited by anti-CD23 monoclonal antibodies and by IgE, and it is Ca2+ dependent. Moreover, tunicamycin treatment of a CD23-binding cell line, RPMI 8226, significantly reduced the binding of CD23 incorporated into fluorescent liposomes, and a sugar, fucose-1-phosphate, was found to inhibit CD23-liposome binding to RPMI 8226 cells, suggesting the contribution of sugar structures on the CD23 ligand. In addition, CD23- transfected COS cells were shown to form specific conjugates with the cell line RPMI 8226. These data demonstrate that CD23 interacts with a ligand, which is different from IgE, and that CD23 can be considered as a new surface adhesion molecule involved in cell-cell interactions. PMID:1386872

  14. Selective inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 by Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Choo, Hyunah; Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2015-07-01

    We report herein that Zn(II) selectively inhibits the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 over PHD2, and does not compete with Fe(II). Independent of the oligomer formation induced by Zn(II), inhibition of the activity of PHD3 by Zn(II) involves Cys42 and Cys52 residues distantly located from the active site. PMID:26051901

  15. Monoligand Zn(II) Complexes:  Ab Initio Benchmark Calculations and Comparison with Density Functional Theory Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Valdés, Haydee; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2008-02-01

    A systematic theoretical study on several models of Zn(II) complexes has been carried out employing both ab initio correlated wave function and density functional methods. The performance of five different functionals namely PW91, PBE, B3LYP, MPWLYP1M, and TPSS in the prediction of metal-ligand bond distances, binding energies, and proton affinities has been assessed comparing the results to those obtained with the MP2 and CCSD(T) wave function methodologies. Several basis sets ranging from double-ζ up to quintuple-ζ quality have been used, including the recently developed all-electron correlation consistent basis sets for zinc. It is shown that all the tested functionals overestimate both the metal-ligand bond distances and the binding energies, being that the B3LYP and TPSS functionals are the ones that perform the best. An analysis of the metal-ligand interaction energy shows that induction and charge-transfer effects play a prominent role in the bonding of these systems, even for those complexes with the less polarizable ligands. This finding highlights the importance of a correct description of the polarization of the monomers' charge densities by any theoretical method which aims to be applied to the study of Zn(II) complexes.

  16. Study on β-cyclodextrin inclusion of Zn(II) aromatic complex and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lixiu; He, Jiang; Fu, Junkai; Zhang, Jinlong

    2010-02-01

    A new β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) inclusion compound Zn(2H1NA) 2·2β-CD (2H1NA = 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid) was prepared. The structure was characterized by 1H NMR, IR, the fluorescence spectra, thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTA) and elementary analysis. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the formation of the supramolecular system (2H1NA:Zn(II):β-CD) was studied and discussed by spectrofluorimetry. The results showed that the naphthalene rings of the Zn(II) aromatic complex Zn(2H1NA) 2 were encapsulated within the β-CD's cavity to form a 2:1 stoichiometry host-guest compound. The inclusion constant calculated was 1.27 × 10 4 (L/mol) 2. A spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of 2H1NA in bulk aqueous solution in the presence of β-CD was developed based on the great enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of 2H1NA. The linear relationship was obtained in the range of 9.00 × 10 -7 to 2.50 × 10 -5 mol/L and the detection limit was 8.00 × 10 -7 mol/L. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine 2H1NA in waste water with recoveries of 97-104%.

  17. Study on beta-cyclodextrin inclusion of Zn(II) aromatic complex and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lixiu; He, Jiang; Fu, Junkai; Zhang, Jinlong

    2010-02-01

    A new beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) inclusion compound Zn(2H1NA)(2)x 2beta-CD (2H1NA=2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid) was prepared. The structure was characterized by (1)H NMR, IR, the fluorescence spectra, thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTA) and elementary analysis. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the formation of the supramolecular system (2H1NA:Zn(II):beta-CD) was studied and discussed by spectrofluorimetry. The results showed that the naphthalene rings of the Zn(II) aromatic complex Zn(2H1NA)(2) were encapsulated within the beta-CD's cavity to form a 2:1 stoichiometry host-guest compound. The inclusion constant calculated was 1.27 x 10(4)(L/mol)(2). A spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of 2H1NA in bulk aqueous solution in the presence of beta-CD was developed based on the great enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of 2H1NA. The linear relationship was obtained in the range of 9.00 x 10(-7) to 2.50 x 10(-5)mol/L and the detection limit was 8.00 x 10(-7)mol/L. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine 2H1NA in waste water with recoveries of 97-104%.

  18. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  19. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  20. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  1. NMR, DFT and luminescence studies of the complexation of Zn(II) with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Luísa Ramos, M; Justino, Licínia L G; Branco, Adriana; Duarte, Cláudia M G; Abreu, Paulo E; Fonseca, Sofia M; Burrows, Hugh D

    2011-11-28

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C) magnetic resonance spectroscopy, DFT calculations and luminescence techniques have been used to study 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate (8-HQS) and its complexes with Zn(ii), in aqueous solution. The study combines the high sensitivity of luminescence techniques, the selectivity of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy with the structural details accessible through DFT calculations, and aims to obtain a detailed understanding of the complexation between the Zn(2+) ion and 8-HQS. In addition to a complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR signals of 8-HQS, a full speciation study has been performed. Over the concentration region studied, Zn(2+) metal ion forms only one significant complex species with 8-HQS in aqueous solution in the pH range 6-8. Job's method shows that this species has a 1:2 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry. The geometry around the metal centre, according to structural optimization using DFT calculations, is suggested to be square bipyramidal, with two coordinated water molecules mutually trans, and the remaining positions occupied by the donor groups of the two coordinated 8-HQS ligands. On binding to Zn(ii), 8-HQS shows a marked fluorescence compared with the weakly-luminescent free ligand. In addition, as previously noted, there are marked changes in the absorption spectra, which support the use of 8-HQS as a sensitive fluorescent sensor to detect Zn(2+) metal ion in surface waters, biological fluids, etc. Based on results of the structural studies, suggestions are made of ways for enhancing fluorescence sensitivity.

  2. Calcium ion gradients modulate the zinc affinity and antibacterial activity of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Hayden, Joshua A; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-31

    Calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein produced and released by neutrophils that inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering essential metal nutrients in the extracellular space. In this work, spectroscopic and thermodynamic metal-binding studies are presented to delineate the zinc-binding properties of CP. Unique optical absorption and EPR spectroscopic signatures for the interfacial His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of human calprotectin are identified by using Co(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Zinc competition titrations employing chromophoric Zn(II) indicators provide a 2:1 Zn(II):CP stoichiometry, confirm that the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of CP coordinate Zn(II), and reveal that the Zn(II) affinity of both sites is calcium-dependent. The calcium-insensitive Zn(II) competitor ZP4 affords dissociation constants of K(d1) = 133 ± 58 pM and K(d2) = 185 ± 219 nM for CP in the absence of Ca(II). These values decrease to K(d1) ≤ 10 pM and K(d2) ≤ 240 pM in the presence of excess Ca(II). The K(d1) and K(d2) values are assigned to the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites, respectively. In vitro antibacterial activity assays indicate that the metal-binding sites and Ca(II)-replete conditions are required for CP to inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Taken together, these data provide a working model whereby calprotectin responds to physiological Ca(II) gradients to become a potent Zn(II) chelator in the extracellular space. PMID:23082970

  3. Zn(II) complex-based potentiometric sensors for selective determination of nitrate anion.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar; Kaur, Ravneet; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2007-02-12

    Polymeric membranes containing new Zn(II) complexes as anion carriers were prepared for determination of nitrate anion present in water samples. Two Zn(II) complexes coordinated by neutral tetradentate ligands, N,N'-ethylene-bis(N-methyl-(S)-alanine methylamide) and N,N'-ethylene-bis(N-methyl-(S)-alanine dimethylamide), worked well as anion-selective carriers, while common phthalocyanine Zn(II) complex rarely responded to any anions. The combination of these new Zn(II) complexes with dioctylsebacate as a plasticizer particularly offered high sensing selectivity for nitrate anion. They exhibited near-Nernstian slopes in the wide linear concentration range of 5.0 x 10(-5) to 1.0 x 10(-1) M, and operated well in the wide pH range from 4 to 11 with the response time of less than 25s. The potentiometric selectivity coefficients were evaluated using the fixed interference method, indicating that the two Zn(II) complexes exhibited better selectivity for nitrate anion with respect to a wide variety of inorganic anions. Although chloride anion worked as an interfering species at a concentration higher than 1.0 x 10(-3) M, the new Zn(II) complex-based sensors were applicable in determination of the nitrate anion after adding silver sulfate to remove the chloride anion.

  4. Zn(II) and Hg(II) binding to a designed peptide that accommodates different coordination geometries.

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla; Larsen, Flemming H; Stachura, Monika; Thulstrup, Peter W; Hemmingsen, Lars; Jancsó, Attila

    2015-07-28

    Designed metal ion binding peptides offer a variety of applications in both basic science as model systems of more complex metalloproteins, and in biotechnology, e.g. in bioremediation of toxic metal ions, biomining or as artificial enzymes. In this work a peptide (HS: Ac-SCHGDQGSDCSI-NH2) has been specifically designed for binding of both Zn(II) and Hg(II), i.e. metal ions with different preferences in terms of coordination number, coordination geometry, and to some extent ligand composition. It is demonstrated that HS accommodates both metal ions, and the first coordination sphere, metal ion exchange between peptides, and speciation are characterized as a function of pH using UV-absorption-, synchrotron radiation CD-, (1)H-NMR-, and PAC-spectroscopy as well as potentiometry. Hg(II) binds to the peptide with very high affinity in a {HgS2} coordination geometry, bringing together the two cysteinates close to each end of the peptide in a loop structure. Despite the high affinity, Hg(II) is kinetically labile, exchanging between peptides on the subsecond timescale, as indicated by line broadening in (1)H-NMR. The Zn(II)-HS system displays more complex speciation, involving monomeric species with coordinating cysteinates, histidine, and a solvent water molecule, as well as HS-Zn(II)-HS complexes. In summary, the HS peptide displays conformational flexibility, contains many typical metal ion binding groups, and is able to accommodate metal ions with different structural and ligand preferences with high affinity. As such, the HS peptide may be a scaffold offering binding of a variety of metal ions, and potentially serve for metal ion sequestration in biotechnological applications.

  5. Competitive adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from their binary and ternary acidic systems using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibin; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Jingting; Wang, Baolin; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-10-15

    The adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions in binary and ternary component systems by tourmaline was investigated. Kinetic data were accurately fitted to pseudo-second order and internal diffusion models, which indicated that the adsorption of heavy metals occurred on the interior surface of the sorbent and internal diffusion was the controlling mechanism during heavy metal ion adsorption but was not the only rate-controlling step. Additionally, tourmaline had a very good adsorption capacity for Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) in multi-component aqueous solutions at strongly acidic pH values (in contrast to industrial wastewater pH values). This good adsorption capacity is attributed to the fact that tourmaline can automatically adjust the pH values of acidic (except pH 2.0 and 3.0), neutral or alkaline aqueous solutions to 6.0. Adsorption isotherms and separation factors showed that tourmaline displays a high selectivity toward one metal in a two-component or a three-component system with an affinity order of Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II). Thermodynamic parameters indicated that heavy metal adsorption was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic. Therefore, tourmaline should be explored as a material for removing pollutants from the strongly acidic wastewater. PMID:23851318

  6. Competitive adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from their binary and ternary acidic systems using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibin; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Jingting; Wang, Baolin; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-10-15

    The adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions in binary and ternary component systems by tourmaline was investigated. Kinetic data were accurately fitted to pseudo-second order and internal diffusion models, which indicated that the adsorption of heavy metals occurred on the interior surface of the sorbent and internal diffusion was the controlling mechanism during heavy metal ion adsorption but was not the only rate-controlling step. Additionally, tourmaline had a very good adsorption capacity for Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) in multi-component aqueous solutions at strongly acidic pH values (in contrast to industrial wastewater pH values). This good adsorption capacity is attributed to the fact that tourmaline can automatically adjust the pH values of acidic (except pH 2.0 and 3.0), neutral or alkaline aqueous solutions to 6.0. Adsorption isotherms and separation factors showed that tourmaline displays a high selectivity toward one metal in a two-component or a three-component system with an affinity order of Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II). Thermodynamic parameters indicated that heavy metal adsorption was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic. Therefore, tourmaline should be explored as a material for removing pollutants from the strongly acidic wastewater.

  7. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  8. Site-specific control of N7-metal coordination in DNA by a fluorescent purine derivative.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Anaëlle; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2012-01-01

    A synthetic strategy that utilizes O6-protected 8-bromoguanosine gives broad access to C8-guanine derivatives with phenyl, pyridine, thiophene, and furan substituents. The resulting 8-substituted 2'-deoxyguanosines are push-pull fluorophores that can exhibit environmentally sensitive quantum yields (Φ=0.001-0.72) due to excited-state proton-transfer reactions with bulk solvent. Changes in nucleoside fluorescence were used to characterize metal-binding affinity and specificity of 8-substituted 2'-deoxyguanosines. One derivative, 8-(2-pyridyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (2PyG), exhibits selective binding of Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Zn(II) through a bidentate effect provided by the N7 position of guanine and the 2-pyridyl nitrogen atom. Upon incorporation into DNA, 2-pyridine-modified guanine residues selectively bind to Cu(II) and Ni(II) with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) that range from 25 to 850 nM; the affinities depend on the folded state of the oligonucleotide (duplex>G-quadruplex) as well as the identity of the metal ion (Cu>Ni≫Cd). These binding affinities are approximately 10 to 1 000 times higher than for unmodified metal binding sites in DNA, thereby providing site-specific control of metal localization in alternatively folded nucleic acids. Temperature-dependent circular-dichroism studies reveal metal-dependent stabilization of duplexes, but destabilization of G-quadruplex structures upon adding Cu(II) to 2PyG-modified oligonucleotides. These results demonstrate how the addition of a single pyridine group to the C8 position of guanine provides a powerful new tool for studying the effects of N7 metalation on the structure, stability, and electronic properties of nucleic acids.

  9. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  10. Six Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers assembled from a similar binuclear building unit: tunable structures and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyan; Rong, Lulu; Hu, Guoli; Jin, Suo; Jia, Wei-Guo; Liu, Ji; Yuan, Guozan

    2015-04-21

    Six Zn(ii) and Cd(ii) coordination polymers were constructed by treating a 2-substituted 8-hydroxyquinolinate ligand containing a pyridyl group with zinc or cadmium salts, and characterized by a variety of techniques. Interestingly, based on a similar binuclear Zn(ii) or Cd(ii) building unit, the supramolecular structures of the six coordination polymers () exhibit an unprecedented structural diversification due to the different choices of metal salts. and represent a novel 2D framework containing 1D infinite right- and left-handed helical chains. and are 2D coordination frameworks based on binuclear Cd(ii) building units. For and , the L ligands can bridge binuclear building units forming a 1D infinite chain. Interestingly, the adjacent Cd2O2 planes of the 1D chain in are in parallel with each other, while the dihedral angle between the two Zn2O2 planes in is 83.43°. Photoluminescence properties revealed that the six coordination polymers exhibit redshifted emission maximum compared with the free ligand HL, which can be ascribed to an increased conformational rigidity and the fabrication of coplanar binuclear building units M2L2 in . Coordination polymers also display distinct fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields because of their different metal centers and supramolecular structures.

  11. Crystal structures and thermodynamics/kinetics of Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tian; Yue, Ke-Fen; Zhao, Yi-xing; Chen, San-Ping; Zhou, Chun-sheng; Yan, Ni

    2016-07-01

    Solvothermal reactions of Zn(II) acetates and four V-shaped carboxylates ligands in the presence of 1,4-Bis(2-methyl-imidazol-1-yl)butane afforded four interesting Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical chains, namely, {[Zn(bib)(atibdc)]·2H2O}n (1), {[Zn(bib)(atbip)]·H2O}n (2), [Zn(bib)(2,2‧-tda)]}n (3) and {[Zn(bib)(5-tbipa)]·EtOH}n (4), (H2atibdc=5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid, H2atbip=5-amino-2,4,6-tribromoisophthalic acid, 2,2‧-H2tad=2,2‧-thiodiacetic acid, 5-H2tbipa=5-tert-butyl-isophthalic acid). 1 reveals a 3D chiral framework with three kinds of helical chains along a, b and c axis. 2 shows a 2D step-type chiral framework with right-handed helical chains. 3 displays a wavelike 2D layer network possessing alternate left- and right-handed helical chains. 4 presents a four-connected 3D framework with zigzag and meso-helical chains. The different spacers and substituent group of carboxylic acid ligands may lead to the diverse network structures of 1-4. The fluorescent properties of complexes 1-4 were studied. In addition, the thermal decompositions properties of 1-4 were investigated by simultaneous TG/DTG-DSC technique. The apparent activation energy E and the pre-exponential factor (A) of skeleton collapse for the complexes 1-4 are calculated by the integral Kissinger's method and Ozawa-Doyle's method. The activation energy E (E1=209.658 kJ·mol-1, E2=250.037 kJ mol-1, E3=225.300 kJ mol-1, E4=186.529 kJ·mol-1) demonstrates that the reaction rate of the melting decomposition is slow. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH‡, ΔG‡ and ΔS‡) at the peak temperatures of the DTG curves were also calculated. ΔG‡>0 indicates that the skeleton collapse is not spontaneous. ΔHd>0 suggests that the skeleton collapse is endothermic, corresponding to the intense endothermic peak of the DSC curve. The structural stability could be illustrated from the point of thermodynamics and kinetics. Their thermal decompositions properties of 1-4 were

  12. Synthesis, characterization and antiglaucoma activity of a novel proton transfer compound and a mixed-ligand Zn(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Yenikaya, Cengiz; Sari, Musa; Bülbül, Metin; Ilkimen, Halil; Celik, Hülya; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2010-01-15

    A novel proton transfer compound, pyridin-2-ylmethanaminium 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamoylbenzoate (1), and a mixed-ligand Zn(II) complex, bis(2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamoylbenzoate)(2-aminomethylpyridine)aquazinc(II) monohydrate (2), have been synthesized from the same free ligands, which are 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamoylbenzoic acid (Hsba) and 2-aminomethylpyridine (amp). They have been characterized by elemental, spectral ((1)H NMR, IR and UV-vis.) and thermal analyses. Additionally, magnetic measurement and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique were applied to compound 2. In the complex, Zn(II) ion exhibits a distorted octahedral configuration coordinated by O1 and O1(i) atoms of two mono dentante sba anions and N1, N2, N2(i) atoms of bidentante amp anion and a water molecule (O1w). The free ligands Hsba and amp, and the products 1 and 2, and acetazolamide (AAZ) as the control compound, were also evaluated for their in vitro inhibitor effects on human Carbonic Anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I and hCA II) purified from erythrocyte cell by affinity chromatography for their hydratase and esterase activities. The IC(50) values of products 1 and 2 for hydratase activity are 0.26 and 0.13microM for hCA I and 0.30 and 0.15microM for hCA II, respectively. The IC(50) values of the same inhibitors for esterase activity are 0.32 and 0.045microM for hCA I and 0.29 and 0.23microM for hCA II, respectively. In relation to esterase activities, the inhibition equilibrium constants (K(i)) were also determined and found 0.25 and 0.058microM on hCA I and 0.22 and 0.24microM on hCA II for 1 and 2, respectively. The comparison of the inhibition studies of newly synthesized compounds 1 and 2 to parent compounds Hsba and amp and to AAZ indicated that 1 and 2 have effective inhibitory activity on hCA I and II, and might be used potential inhibitors. PMID:20006931

  13. Characterization of the Zn(II) binding properties of the human Wilms' tumor suppressor protein C-terminal zinc finger peptide.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ka Lam; Bakman, Inna; Marts, Amy R; Batir, Yuksel; Dowd, Terry L; Tierney, David L; Gibney, Brian R

    2014-06-16

    Zinc finger proteins that bind Zn(II) using a Cys2His2 coordination motif within a ββα protein fold are the most abundant DNA binding transcription factor domains in eukaryotic systems. These classic zinc fingers are typically unfolded in the apo state and spontaneously fold into their functional ββα folds upon incorporation of Zn(II). These metal-induced protein folding events obscure the free energy cost of protein folding by coupling the protein folding and metal-ion binding thermodynamics. Herein, we determine the formation constant of a Cys2His2/ββα zinc finger domain, the C-terminal finger of the Wilms' tumor suppressor protein (WT1-4), for the purposes of determining its free energy cost of protein folding. Measurements of individual conditional dissociation constants, Kd values, at pH values from 5 to 9 were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy by direct or competition titration. Potentiometric titrations of apo-WT1-4 followed by NMR spectroscopy provided the intrinsic pKa values of the Cys2His2 residues, and corresponding potentiometric titrations of Zn(II)-WT1-4 followed by fluorescence spectroscopy yielded the effective pKa(eff) values of the Cys2His2 ligands bound to Zn(II). The Kd, pKa, and pKa(eff) values were combined in a minimal, complete equilibrium model to yield the pH-independent formation constant value for Zn(II)-WT1-4, Kf(ML) value of 7.5 × 10(12) M(-1), with a limiting Kd value of 133 fM. This shows that Zn(II) binding to the Cys2His2 site in WT1-4 provides at least -17.6 kcal/mol in driving force to fold the protein scaffold. A comparison of the conditional dissociation constants of Zn(II)-WT1-4 to those from the model peptide Zn(II)-GGG-Cys2His2 over the pH range 5.0 to 9.0 and a comparison of their pH-independent Kf(ML) values demonstrates that the free energy cost of protein folding in WT1-4 is less than +2.1 kcal/mol. These results validate our GGG model system for determining the cost of protein folding in natural zinc

  14. Characterization of the Zn(II) binding properties of the human Wilms' tumor suppressor protein C-terminal zinc finger peptide.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ka Lam; Bakman, Inna; Marts, Amy R; Batir, Yuksel; Dowd, Terry L; Tierney, David L; Gibney, Brian R

    2014-06-16

    Zinc finger proteins that bind Zn(II) using a Cys2His2 coordination motif within a ββα protein fold are the most abundant DNA binding transcription factor domains in eukaryotic systems. These classic zinc fingers are typically unfolded in the apo state and spontaneously fold into their functional ββα folds upon incorporation of Zn(II). These metal-induced protein folding events obscure the free energy cost of protein folding by coupling the protein folding and metal-ion binding thermodynamics. Herein, we determine the formation constant of a Cys2His2/ββα zinc finger domain, the C-terminal finger of the Wilms' tumor suppressor protein (WT1-4), for the purposes of determining its free energy cost of protein folding. Measurements of individual conditional dissociation constants, Kd values, at pH values from 5 to 9 were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy by direct or competition titration. Potentiometric titrations of apo-WT1-4 followed by NMR spectroscopy provided the intrinsic pKa values of the Cys2His2 residues, and corresponding potentiometric titrations of Zn(II)-WT1-4 followed by fluorescence spectroscopy yielded the effective pKa(eff) values of the Cys2His2 ligands bound to Zn(II). The Kd, pKa, and pKa(eff) values were combined in a minimal, complete equilibrium model to yield the pH-independent formation constant value for Zn(II)-WT1-4, Kf(ML) value of 7.5 × 10(12) M(-1), with a limiting Kd value of 133 fM. This shows that Zn(II) binding to the Cys2His2 site in WT1-4 provides at least -17.6 kcal/mol in driving force to fold the protein scaffold. A comparison of the conditional dissociation constants of Zn(II)-WT1-4 to those from the model peptide Zn(II)-GGG-Cys2His2 over the pH range 5.0 to 9.0 and a comparison of their pH-independent Kf(ML) values demonstrates that the free energy cost of protein folding in WT1-4 is less than +2.1 kcal/mol. These results validate our GGG model system for determining the cost of protein folding in natural zinc

  15. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  16. Adsorption of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) on hexagonal templated zirconia obtained thorough a sol-gel process: the effects of nanostructure on adsorption features.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Robson F; do Nascimento, Ana A S; Bezerra, Cícero W B

    2004-09-01

    Using zirconium tetrabutoxide, diaminedecane, and diamineoctane as precursors, a templated hexagonal zirconia matrix is synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption capacity of such a matrix toward Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions is studied. The adsorption affinity of the synthesized hexagonal templated zirconia toward the cations is Cu(II)>Zn(II) >Ni(II)>Co(II). It is also verified that the adsorption of the cations follows a Langmuir and not a Freundlich isotherm. All obtained isotherms are of type I, according to the IUPAC classification. The observed adsorption affinity sequence can be explained by taking into account the velocity constant for the substitution of water molecules into the cation coordination spheres, as well as the Irving-Williams series.

  17. Adsorption of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) on hexagonal templated zirconia obtained thorough a sol-gel process: the effects of nanostructure on adsorption features.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Robson F; do Nascimento, Ana A S; Bezerra, Cícero W B

    2004-09-01

    Using zirconium tetrabutoxide, diaminedecane, and diamineoctane as precursors, a templated hexagonal zirconia matrix is synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption capacity of such a matrix toward Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions is studied. The adsorption affinity of the synthesized hexagonal templated zirconia toward the cations is Cu(II)>Zn(II) >Ni(II)>Co(II). It is also verified that the adsorption of the cations follows a Langmuir and not a Freundlich isotherm. All obtained isotherms are of type I, according to the IUPAC classification. The observed adsorption affinity sequence can be explained by taking into account the velocity constant for the substitution of water molecules into the cation coordination spheres, as well as the Irving-Williams series. PMID:15276032

  18. A saponification-triggered gelation of ester-based Zn(II) complex through conformational transformations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Dubey, Mrigendra; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2014-09-11

    Novel saponification-triggered gelation in an ester-based bis-salen Zn(II) complex (1) is described. Strategic structural modifications induced by NaOH in 1 tune the dipolar-/π-interactions leading to J-aggregation and the creation of an inorganic gel material (IGM), which has been established by photophysical, DFT and rheological studies.

  19. Cu(II) and Zn(II) adsorption capacity of three different clay liner materials.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Parolo, M E; Pettinari, G; Francisca, F M

    2014-12-15

    Sorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on three natural clays meeting the international requirements for use as liners was evaluated by means of batch tests. The purpose of this research was to determine the retention capacities of the clays for metal cations commonly present in urban solid waste leachates. The pH and ionic strength conditions were set at values frequently found in real leachates. The changes observed in the XRD patterns and FTIR spectra upon adsorption can be considered an evidence of clay-metal electrostatic interaction. The Langmuir model was found to best describe the sorption processes, offering maximum sorption capacities from 8.16 to 56.89 mg/g for Cu(II) and from 49.59 to 103.83 mg/g for Zn(II). All samples remove more Zn(II) than Cu(II), which may be related to the different geometry of the hydrated Cu(II) cation. The total amount of metal sorption was strongly influenced by the total specific surface area, the presence of carbonates and the smectite content of the clays. In addition to their known quality as physical barriers, the adsorbed amounts obtained indicate the suitability of the tested clays to contribute to the retardation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) transport through clay liners.

  20. The Zn(II) nanocomplex: Sonochemical synthesis, characterization, DNA- and BSA-binding, cell imaging, and cytotoxicity against the human carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Shakeri, Marjan; Adeli-Sardou, Mahboubeh

    2016-05-01

    The focus of this article is preparation of a new kind of nanomaterial, the Zn(II) nanocomplex, to decrease growth of human carcinoma cell lines. The Zn(II) nanocomplex coordinated by phendione, [Zn(phendione)3](PF6)2 (where phendione is 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione), has been synthesized by sonochemical method and characterized by FT-IR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interaction of the complex and nanocomplex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) has been investigated under physiological conditions by a series of experimental methods (fluorescence titration, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry (CV), competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide, and SEM). Results have indicated that the complex binds to FS-DNA by two biding modes, viz., electrostatic and partial insertion phendione between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. The quenching constants (Ksv), binding constants (Kbin), and number of binding sites (n) at different temperatures, as well as thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(o), ΔS(o) and ΔG(o)) have been calculated for the BSA-complex system. Protein binding studies show that the complex and nanocomplex could bind with BSA. Results of synchronous fluorescence of BSA show that addition of the complex affect the microenvironment of both tyrosine and tryptophan residues during the binding process. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complex and nanocomplex against the human carcinoma cell lines (MCF-7 and A-549) was evaluated by MTT assay. Results indicate that the complex and nanocomplex have greater cytotoxicity activity against MCF-7 with IC50 values of 0.2 and 0.9 mg/L, respectively. Results of the microscopic analyses of the cancer cells confirm results of cytotoxicity.

  1. BIOCHEMISTRY OF MOBILE ZINC AND NITRIC OXIDE REVEALED BY FLUORESCENT SENSORS

    PubMed Central

    Pluth, Michael D.; Tomat, Elisa; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically mobile zinc and nitric oxide (NO) are two prominent examples of inorganic compounds involved in numerous signaling pathways in living systems. In the past decade, a synergy of regulation, signaling, and translocation of these two species has emerged in several areas of human physiology, providing additional incentive for developing adequate detection systems for Zn(II) ions and NO in biological specimens. Fluorescent probes for both of these bioinorganic analytes provide excellent tools for their detection, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We review the most widely used fluorescent sensors for biological zinc and nitric oxide, together with promising new developments and unmet needs of contemporary Zn(II) and NO biological imaging. The interplay between zinc and nitric oxide in the nervous, cardiovascular, and immune systems is highlighted to illustrate the contributions of selective fluorescent probes to the study of these two important bioinorganic analytes. PMID:21675918

  2. Characterization of the internal calcium(II) binding sites in dissolved insulin hexamer using europium(III) fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Alameda, G K; Evelhoch, J L; Sudmeier, J L; Birge, R R

    1985-03-26

    The fluorescence of Eu(III) is used to study the nature of the Ca(II) binding sites in the central cavity of the two-zinc(II) insulin hexamer. The dependence of the Eu(III) fluorescence lifetime upon Eu(III) stoichiometry indicates that there are three identical Eu(III) binding sites present in the two-zinc(II) insulin hexamer in solution. Addition of excess Ca(II) causes a decrease in the Eu(III) fluorescence intensity, confirming that Ca(II) competes for the observed Eu(III) sites. The solvent dependence of the Eu(III) fluorescence lifetime (H2O vs. D2O) indicates that four OH groups are coordinated to each Eu(III) in the hexamer. Substitution of Co(II) for Zn(II) causes a decrease in the Eu(III) fluorescence lifetime. Calculations based on Förster energy-transfer theory predict that the Co(II) [or Zn(II) in vivo] and Eu(III) [or Ca(II) in vivo] binding sites are separated by 9.6 +/- 0.5 A. Variation of the metal stoichiometries indicates that all three Eu(III) [or Ca(II) in vivo] sites are equidistant from the Zn(II) sites. We conclude that these sites are identical with the three central Zn(II) sites present in insulin hexamer crystals soaked in excess Zn(II) [Emdin, S. O., Dodson, G., Cutfield, J. M., & Cutfield, S. M. (1980) Diabetologia 19, 174-182] and suggest that these central sites are occupied by Ca(II) in vivo.

  3. Zn(II)- and Cu(II)-induced non-fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-beta (1-42) peptide are transformed to amyloid fibrils, both spontaneously and under the influence of metal chelators.

    PubMed

    Tõugu, Vello; Karafin, Ann; Zovo, Kairit; Chung, Roger S; Howells, Claire; West, Adrian K; Palumaa, Peep

    2009-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides is a central phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease. Zn(II) and Cu(II) have profound effects on Abeta aggregation; however, their impact on amyloidogenesis is unclear. Here we show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) inhibit Abeta(42) fibrillization and initiate formation of non-fibrillar Abeta(42) aggregates, and that the inhibitory effect of Zn(II) (IC(50) = 1.8 micromol/L) is three times stronger than that of Cu(II). Medium and high-affinity metal chelators including metallothioneins prevented metal-induced Abeta(42) aggregation. Moreover, their addition to preformed aggregates initiated fast Abeta(42) fibrillization. Upon prolonged incubation the metal-induced aggregates also transformed spontaneously into fibrils, that appear to represent the most stable state of Abeta(42). H13A and H14A mutations in Abeta(42) reduced the inhibitory effect of metal ions, whereas an H6A mutation had no significant impact. We suggest that metal binding by H13 and H14 prevents the formation of a cross-beta core structure within region 10-23 of the amyloid fibril. Cu(II)-Abeta(42) aggregates were neurotoxic to neurons in vitro only in the presence of ascorbate, whereas monomers and Zn(II)-Abeta(42) aggregates were non-toxic. Disturbed metal homeostasis in the vicinity of zinc-enriched neurons might pre-dispose formation of metal-induced Abeta aggregates, subsequent fibrillization of which can lead to amyloid formation. The molecular background underlying metal-chelating therapies for Alzheimer's disease is discussed in this light. PMID:19619132

  4. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  5. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. PMID:26397162

  6. Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordinastion polymers based on amino-tetrazole and phenylcarboxylate: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong-Sheng; Sui, Yan; Chen, Weng-Tong; Huang, Jian-Gen; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Huang, Chang-Cang

    2012-12-15

    Two Zn(II) and Cd(II) compounds with the in-situ generated ligand of 5-amino-tetrazolate (atz{sup -}) were prepared from the hydrothermal reactions of the corresponding Cd or Zn(II) salts with phenylcarboxylate, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and TGA. The results of X-ray crystallographic analysis reveal that compound [Zn{sub 2}(BZA)(atz){sub 2}(OH)]{sub n} (1) (BZA=benzoic acid) presents a two-dimensional (2D) 'hcb' topological network constructed from the ZnN{sub 2}O{sub 2} tetrahedra. In compound [Cd{sub 6}(atz){sub 6}(PTA){sub 3}]{sub n} (2) (PTA=terephthalic acid), the identical [Cd{sub 3}(atz){sub 3})]{sup 3+}{sub n} clusters are connected by atz ligands to generate a 2D cationic layer, and the neighboring cationic layers are pillared by PTA giving birth to 3D network. After simplifying, the complicated 3D network of 2 can be presented as an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. The formations of the structures show a good example that using the combination of the in-situ generated ligand and other coligand synthetic strategy can construct interesting topological structures. The thermal stabilities and fluorescent properties of the complexes have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two d{sup 10} metal complexes have been synthesized by employing mixed-ligand synthetic approach. Complex 1 presents a 2D 'hcb' topological network. Complex 2 shows an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coligand synthetic strategy was applied to obtain new MOFs with useful properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes were constructed from the mixed-ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topologically, compound 2 presented an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two compounds may be excellent candidates for potential photoactive material.

  7. Synthesis, structure, and photoluminescence of ZnII and CdII coordination complexes constructed by structurally related 5,6-substituted pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Wu; Tao, Ying; Hu, Tong-Liang

    2012-08-01

    Aiming at exploring the effect of substituting groups of three structurally related ligands, 5,6-diethyl-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2L1), 5,6-diphenyl-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2L2), and dibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2L3), seven new coordination polymers constructed from these three substituted dicarboxylate ligands, {[Zn(L1)(H2O)3]·2H2O}∞ (1), {[Cd2(L2ʹ)4(H2O)]·3H2O}∞ (2), [Zn(L2)(CH3OH)]∞ (3), {[Zn(L2)(H2O)2]·H2O}∞ (4), {[Zn(L2ʹ)]·H2O}∞ (5), [Zn2(L3)(DMF)4]∞(6), [Zn(L3)(2,2ʹ-bipy)(H2O)]∞(7), have been prepared and structurally characterized. 1 is a 1D chain structure in which ZnII ion is six-coordinated with octahedron geometry. 2 is also a 1D chain structure in which there are two crystallographically independent CdII ions in the asymmetric unit and exist transformative L2ʹ ligands in the resulting complex. 3 and 4 both possess 2D layer network with the same (4, 82) topology, while the two complexes take different coordination modes during the forming of the compounds. 5 has a 1D chain structure based on the transformative L2ʹ ligand in which ZnII ion is five-coordinated with bipyramidal geometry. 6 and 7 both have 1D chain structure constructed from L3 ligand. Thereinto, ZnII ion in 6 is five-coordinated by three oxygen atoms from two individual L3 ligands and two oxygen atoms from two DMF molecules. While in 7 there are also five coordination sites occupied by two carboxylate oxygen atoms from two L3 ligands. In addition, the compounds are characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra. The luminescent properties of the compounds are also discussed and exhibit strong fluorescent emissions in the solid state.

  8. Mapping Protein–Protein Interactions of the Resistance-Related Bacterial Zeta Toxin–Epsilon Antitoxin Complex (ε2ζ2) with High Affinity Peptide Ligands Using Fluorescence Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bachiller, María Isabel; Brzozowska, Iwona; Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin systems constitute a native survival strategy of pathogenic bacteria and thus are potential targets of antibiotic drugs. Here, we target the Zeta–Epsilon toxin–antitoxin system, which is responsible for the stable maintenance of certain multiresistance plasmids in Gram-positive bacteria. Peptide ligands were designed on the basis of the ε2ζ2 complex. Three α helices of Zeta forming the protein–protein interaction (PPI) site were selected and peptides were designed conserving the residues interacting with Epsilon antitoxin while substituting residues binding intramolecularly to other parts of Zeta. Designed peptides were synthesized with an N-terminal fluoresceinyl-carboxy-residue for binding assays and provided active ligands, which were used to define the hot spots of the ε2ζ2 complex. Further shortening and modification of the binding peptides provided ligands with affinities <100 nM, allowing us to determine the most relevant PPIs and implement a robust competition binding assay. PMID:27438853

  9. Affinity driven social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  10. Adsorption of enrofloxacin in presence of Zn(II) on a calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Graouer-Bacart, Mareen; Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    As a result of their consumption, excretion, disposal and persistence, antibiotics enter the soil environment and may be transported to surface and ground waters. During their transfer through soils, retention processes play a key role in their mobility. Antibiotics often coexist with heavy metals in soils due to agricultural practices and other sources of inputs. In this context, this study deals with the co-adsorption of Zn(II) and enrofloxacin (ENR), a widely-used veterinary antibiotic, on a calcareous soil using batch retention experiments and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. To improve our understanding of the interaction of this emerging organic contaminant with metal cations at the water-soil interface, the ternary system containing ENR, Zn(II) and a selected calcareous soil was investigated over a pH range between 7 and 10, at different solid-solution contact times and ENR concentrations. The presence of Zn(II) slightly influenced the retention of the antibiotic, leading to an increase of the adsorbed ENR amounts. The distribution coefficient Kd value increased from 0.66 Lg(-1) for single ENR adsorption to 1.04 Lg(-1) in presence of Zn(II) at a 1/2 ENR/Zn(II) ratio. The combination of adsorption isotherm data, solution speciation diagrams and XANES spectra evidenced a small proportion of Zn(II)-ENR complexes at soil pH leading to the slight increase of ENR adsorption in presence of zinc. These results suggest that it is necessary to consider the interaction between ENR and metal cations when assessing the mobility of ENR in soils. PMID:26408826

  11. Adsorption of enrofloxacin in presence of Zn(II) on a calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Graouer-Bacart, Mareen; Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    As a result of their consumption, excretion, disposal and persistence, antibiotics enter the soil environment and may be transported to surface and ground waters. During their transfer through soils, retention processes play a key role in their mobility. Antibiotics often coexist with heavy metals in soils due to agricultural practices and other sources of inputs. In this context, this study deals with the co-adsorption of Zn(II) and enrofloxacin (ENR), a widely-used veterinary antibiotic, on a calcareous soil using batch retention experiments and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. To improve our understanding of the interaction of this emerging organic contaminant with metal cations at the water-soil interface, the ternary system containing ENR, Zn(II) and a selected calcareous soil was investigated over a pH range between 7 and 10, at different solid-solution contact times and ENR concentrations. The presence of Zn(II) slightly influenced the retention of the antibiotic, leading to an increase of the adsorbed ENR amounts. The distribution coefficient Kd value increased from 0.66 Lg(-1) for single ENR adsorption to 1.04 Lg(-1) in presence of Zn(II) at a 1/2 ENR/Zn(II) ratio. The combination of adsorption isotherm data, solution speciation diagrams and XANES spectra evidenced a small proportion of Zn(II)-ENR complexes at soil pH leading to the slight increase of ENR adsorption in presence of zinc. These results suggest that it is necessary to consider the interaction between ENR and metal cations when assessing the mobility of ENR in soils.

  12. Cosorption of Zn(II) and 2-, 3-, or 4-aminopyridine by montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ikhsan, Jaslin; Angove, Michael J; Johnson, Bruce B; Wells, John D

    2005-04-15

    Data from acid-base titrations at 25 degrees C of Zn(NO(3))(2) and 2-, 3-, or 4-aminopyridine in 10 mM KNO(3) as background electrolyte suggested that soluble complexes ZnL(2+) and Zn(OH)L(+) form, where L represents aminopyridine. Zinc-hydroxyaminopyridine complexes have not been reported previously. The cosorption of Zn(II) with each of the aminopyridines to K-saturated Wyoming (SWy-K) and Texas (STx-K), and Ca-enriched Texas (STx-Ca) montmorillonites was measured at 25 degrees C, with 10 mM KNO(3) or 3.3 mM Ca(NO(3))(2) as background electrolyte. Comparison with previous data for sorption of Zn(II) and the aminopyridines separately and surface complexation modeling of the cosorption data showed that under acid conditions competition between Zn(2+) and aminopyridinium ions for the permanent negatively charged sites of montmorillonite results in suppression of the uptake of each sorbate by the other, but only when a large excess of the competing sorbate is present. Under alkaline conditions the sorption of Zn(II) was not affected by the presence of even a large excess of aminopyridine, but the sorption of 4-aminopyridine in particular was slightly enhanced when a large excess of Zn(II) was present. The enhancement was attributed to the formation of metal-bridged ternary surface complexes at the variable-charge sites on the edges of the montmorillonite crystals.

  13. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  14. Visualizing the kinetic power stroke that drives proton-coupled Zn(II) transport

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Chai, Jin; Cheng, Jie; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Chance, Mark R.; Fu, Dax

    2014-01-01

    The proton gradient is a principal energy source for respiration-dependent active transport, but the structural mechanisms of proton-coupled transport processes are poorly understood. YiiP is a proton-coupled zinc transporter found in the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, and the transport-site of YiiP receives protons from water molecules that gain access to its hydrophobic environment and transduces the energy of an inward proton gradient to drive Zn(II) efflux1,2. This membrane protein is a well characterized member3-7 of the protein family of cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) that occurs at all phylogenetic levels8-10. X-ray mediated hydroxyl radical labeling of YiiP and mass spectrometric analysis showed that Zn(II) binding triggered a highly localized, all-or-none change of water accessibility to the transport-site and an adjacent hydrophobic gate. Millisecond time-resolved dynamics revealed a concerted and reciprocal pattern of accessibility changes along a transmembrane helix, suggesting a rigid-body helical reorientation linked to Zn(II) binding that triggers the closing of the hydrophobic gate. The gated water access to the transport-site enables a stationary proton gradient to facilitate the conversion of zinc binding energy to the kinetic power stroke of a vectorial zinc transport. The kinetic details provide energetic insights into a proton-coupled active transport reaction. PMID:25043033

  15. New hybrid materials as Zn(II) sorbents in water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian

    2010-09-15

    Mesoporous silicas have been chemically modified with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole (MTTZ) obtaining hybrid materials denominated MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS. These materials were employed as Zn(II) sorbents from aqueous media at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, presence of other metals) has been studied using batch and column techniques. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used to determinate Zn(II) concentration in the filtrate or in the eluted solution after the adsorption process. The results indicate that under pH 8, the maximum adsorption value was 0.94 {+-} 0.01 and 0.72 {+-} 0.01 mmol Zn(II)/g for MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS, respectively. In tap water samples, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically MSU-2 and HMS with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole and to use the resulting modified mesoporous silica as an effective adsorbent for Zn(II) in aqueous media.

  16. Adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), and As(V) on bacterially produced metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-07-01

    The adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II) and As(V) onto bacterially produced metal sulfide (BPMS) material was investigated using a batch equilibrium method. It was found that the sulfide material had adsorptive properties comparable with those of other adsorbents with respect to the specific uptake of a range of metals and, the levels to which dissolved metal concentrations in solution can be reduced. The percentage of adsorption increased with increasing pH and adsorbent dose, but decreased with increasing initial dissolved metal concentration. The pH of the solution was the most important parameter controlling adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and As(V) by BPMS. The adsorption data were successfully modeled using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Desorption experiments showed that the reversibility of adsorption was low, suggesting high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. The mechanism of adsorption for the divalent metals was thought to be the formation of strong, inner-sphere complexes involving surface hydroxyl groups. However, the mechanism for the adsorption of As(V) by BPMS appears to be distinct from that of surface hydroxyl exchange. These results have important implications to the management of metal sulfide sludge produced by bacterial sulfate reduction.

  17. Fluorogen-Activating-Proteins as Universal Affinity Biosensors for Immunodetection

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Eugenio; Vasilev, Kalin V.; Jarvik, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorogen-activating-proteins (FAPs) are a novel platform of fluorescence biosensors utilized for protein discovery. The technology currently demands molecular manipulation methods that limit its application and adaptability. Here, we highlight an alternative approach based on universal affinity reagents for protein detection. The affinity reagents were engineered as bi-partite fusion proteins, where the specificity moiety is derived from IgG-binding proteins –Protein-A or Protein-G – and the signaling element is a FAP. In this manner, primary antibodies provide the antigenic selectivity against a desired protein in biological samples, while FAP affinity reagents target the constant region (Fc) of antibodies and provide the biosensor component of detection. Fluorescence results using various techniques indicate minimal background and high target specificity for exogenous and endogenous proteins in mammalian cells. Additionally, FAP-based affinity reagents provide enhanced properties of detection previously absent using conventional affinity systems. Distinct features explored in this report include: (1) unfixed signal wavelengths (excitation and emission) determined by the particular fluorogen chosen, (2) real-time user controlled fluorescence on-set and off-set, (3) signal wavelength substitution while performing live analysis, and (4) enhanced resistance to photobleaching. PMID:24122476

  18. Removal of Pb(II) and Zn(II) from Aqueous Solutions by Raw Crab Shell: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Han, Jie; Guo, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Removals of Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions from water using crab (Clistocoeloma sinensis) shell particles as biosorbent have been compared in this study. Uptake equilibriums for two ions well described by Langmuir isotherm revealed that crab shell possessed higher uptake capacity for Pb(II) (709 mg/g) than that for Zn(II) (117 mg/g). Kinetics data for the uptake of the two metals were successfully modeled using the pseudo-second-order model, where the initial uptake rate of Pb(II) was much faster than that of Zn(II). Dubinin-Radushkevick modeling and thermodynamic parameters hinted at different uptake mechanisms of Pb(II) and Zn(II) removal by crab shell, attested by FTIR, XRD, FESEM analysis. Pb(II) ion was removed mainly through the chemical reaction, while the uptake of Zn(II) ion onto crab shell was attributed to the chelation and coordination interactions. The polluted river water and laboratory wastewater both satisfied the standards for drinking and irrigation/fishery water, respectively, after being treated with crab shell particles.

  19. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  20. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  1. Adsorption of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) on modified jute fibres.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S R; Pai, Roshan S

    2005-09-01

    The potential of a lignocellulosic fibre, jute, was assessed for adsorption of heavy metal ions like Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) from their aqueous solutions. The fibre was also used as adsorbent after chemically modifying it by two different techniques viz, loading of a dye with specific structure, C.I. Reactive Orange 13, and oxidising with hydrogen peroxide. Both the modified jute fibres gave higher metal ion adsorption. Thus, the dye loaded jute fibres showed metal ion uptake values of 8.4, 5.26 and 5.95 mg/g for Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II), respectively, while the corresponding values for oxidised jute fibres were 7.73, 5.57 and 8.02 mg/g, as against 4.23, 3.37 and 3.55 mg/g for unmodified jute fibres. Adsorption isotherm models indicated best fit for Langmuir model for the modified jute fibres. The adsorption values decreased with lowering of pH. The desorption efficiency, regenerative and reuse capacity of these adsorbents were also assessed for three successive adsorption-desorption cycles. The adsorptive capacity was retained only when the caustic soda regeneration is carried out as an intermediate step after desorption. Possible mechanism has been given.

  2. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  3. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Biological Activity Studies of Ni(II) and Zn(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Palakuri; Laxma Reddy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from tridentate 3-formyl chromone Schiff bases such as 3-((2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL1), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino)benzoic acid (HL2), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL3), and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL4). All the complexes were characterized in the light of elemental analysis, molar conductance, FTIR, UV-VIS, magnetic, thermal, powder XRD, and SEM studies. The conductance and spectroscopic data suggested that, the ligands act as neutral and monobasic tridentate ligands and form octahedral complexes with general formula [M(L1–4)2]·nH2O (M = Ni(II) and Zn(II)). Metal complexes exhibited pronounced activity against tested bacteria and fungi strains compared to the ligands. In addition metal complexes displayed good antioxidant and moderate nematicidal activities. The cytotoxicity of ligands and their metal complexes have been evaluated by MTT assay. The DNA cleavage activity of the metal complexes was performed using agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of oxidant H2O2. All metal complexes showed significant nuclease activity in the presence of H2O2. PMID:24948904

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization, thermal and photoluminescence properties of Zn(II) and Cd(II)-azido/thiocyanato complexes with thiazolylazo dye and 1,2-bis(diphenylphoshino)ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamgar, B. A.; Sawant, V. A.; Bharate, B. G.; Chavan, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    A series of complexes of the type [M( L)(dppe)X 2]; where M = Zn(II) or Cd(II); L = 4-(2'-thiazolylazo)chlorobenzene ( L1), 4-(2'-thiazolylazo)bromobenzene ( L2) and 4-(2'-thiazolylazo) iodobenzene ( L3); dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane; X = N 3- or NCS - have been prepared and characterized on the basis of their microanalysis, molar conductance, thermal, IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectral studies. IR spectra show that the ligand L is coordinated to the metal atom in bidentate manner via azo nitrogen and thiazole nitrogen. An octahedral structure is proposed for all the complexes. The thermal behavior of the complexes revealed that the thiocyanato complexes are thermally more stable than the azido complexes. All the complexes exhibit blue-green emission with high quantum yield as the result of the fluorescence from the intraligand emission excited state.

  5. A comparative study for the ion exchange of Fe(III) and Zn(II) on zeolite NaY.

    PubMed

    Ostroski, Indianara C; Barros, Maria A S D; Silva, Edson A; Dantas, João H; Arroyo, Pedro A; Lima, Oswaldo C M

    2009-01-30

    The uptake capacity of Fe(III) and Zn(II) ions in NaY zeolite was investigated. Experiments were carried out in a fixed bed column at 30 degrees C, pH 3.5 and 4.5 for Fe(III) and Zn(II), respectively, and an average particle size of 0.180 mm. In order to minimize the diffusional resistances the influence of flow rate on the breakthrough curves at feed concentrations of 1.56 meq/L for Fe(III) and 0.844 meq/L for Zn(II) was investigated. Flow rate of the minimal resistance in the bed according to mass transfer parameter were 2.0 mL/min for iron and 8.0 mL/min for zinc ions. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models have been used to represent the column equilibrium data. The iron dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Langmuir equation and this mathematical model described well the experimental breakthrough curves for feed concentrations from 0.1 up to 3.5 meq/L. The zinc dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Freundlich equation. This equilibrium model was applied to mathematical model. Experimental breakthrough curves could be predicted. Experiments were also carried out in a batch reactor to investigate the kinetics adsorption of the ions Fe(III) and Zn(II). Langmuir kinetic model fit well both experimental data.

  6. Removal of Zn(II) from electroplating effluent using yeast biofilm formed on gravels: batch and column studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Present study deals with the removal of Zn(II) ions from effluent using yeast biofilm formed on gravels. Methods The biofilm forming ability of Candida rugosa and Cryptococcus laurentii was evaluated using XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay and monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Copious amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by yeast species was quantified and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Results Yeast biofilm formed on gravels by C. rugosa and C. laurentii showed 88% and 74.2% removal of Zn(II) ions respectively in batch mode. In column mode, removal of Zn(II) ions from real effluent was found to be 95.29% by C. rugosa biofilm formed on gravels. Conclusion The results of the present study showed that there is a scope to develop a cost effective method for the efficient removal of Zn(II) from effluent using gravels coated with yeast biofilm. PMID:24397917

  7. The pH dependent Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding behavior of an analog methanobactin peptide.

    PubMed

    Sesham, Ramakrishna; Choi, Dongwon; Balaji, Anupama; Cheruku, Sahithi; Ravichetti, Chiranjeevi; Alsharani, Aisha A; Nasani, Mahesbabu; Angel, Laurence A

    2013-01-01

    The pH dependent reactivity of an analog methanobactin peptide (amb) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Gly3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 (Mw = 694.79 Da) was investigated for its binding ability for a series of biologically active metal ions using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. Cu(II), Zn(II) and, to a lesser extent, Ni(II) were observed to form complexes with amb from 1 : 1 molar equivalent amb:metal(II) solutions at pH > 6, indicating the deprotonation of the imidazole N of His (pKa = 6.0) must occur to allow the initial anchoring of the metal(II) ion. The amb-metal(II) complexes were observed as both positive and negative ions, although the Zn(II) complexes preferred forming an overall negative ion complex which is consistent with the two thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 being involved in Zn(II) coordination. The Cu(II) addition, however, always resulted in a Cys-Cys disulfide bridge in both Cu-free amb and Cu-bound amb, which excluded thiolate coordination to Cu(II). Collision cross- section measurements showed the Zn(II) and Cu(II) negative ion complexes were smaller than the positive ion complexes, suggesting Zn(II) binds most compactly via the imidazole N of His and the thiolate groups of Cys, whereas Cu(II) binds most compactly via the imidazole N of His and two deprotonated N of two amide groups on the peptide backbone. The lowest energy structures from the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory showed the functional groups of His5, Cys2 and Cys6 coordinated to Zn(II), whereas the His1 and the amide nitrogens of Cys2 and Gly3 coordinated to Cu(II), producing an overall negative charged complex. The positive ion complexes of Zn(II) and Cu(II) were both shown to coordinate via the two imidazole nitrogens of His1 and His5 and either the oxygen of the backbone carbonyl of Cys6 or the oxygen of the C-terminal, respectively. PMID:24378464

  8. Recent advances in affinity capillary electrophoresis for binding studies.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; El Deeb, Sami; AlGarabli, Noura; AlAstal, Raghda; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The present review covers recent advances and important applications of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). It provides an overview about various ACE types, including ACE-MS, the multiple injection mode, the use of microchips and field-amplified sample injection-ACE. The most common scenarios of the studied affinity interactions are protein-drug, protein-metal ion, protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-carbohydrate, carbohydrate-drug, peptide-peptide, DNA-drug and antigen-antibody. Approaches for the improvements of ACE in term of precision, rinsing protocols and sensitivity are discussed. The combined use of computer simulation programs to support data evaluation is presented. In conclusion, the performance of ACE is compared with other techniques such as equilibrium dialysis, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, high-performance affinity chromatography as well as surface plasmon resonance, ultraviolet, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, MS and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:25534793

  9. Harnessing a ratiometric fluorescence output from a sensor array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Palacios, Manuel A; Zyryanov, Grigory; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Ratiometric fluorescence-based sensors are widely sought after because they can effectively convert even relatively small changes in optical output into a strong and easy-to-read signal. However, ratiometric sensor molecules are usually difficult to make. We present a proof-of-principle experiment that shows that efficient ratiometric sensing may be achieved by an array of two chromophores, one providing an on-to-off response and the second yielding an off-to-on response in a complementary fashion. In the case that both chromophores emit light of different color, the result is a switching of colors that may be utilized in the same way as from a true ratiometric probe. The chromophore array comprises two sensor elements: i) a polyurethane membrane with embedded N-anthracen-9-yl-methyl-N-7-nitrobenzoxa-[1,2,5]diazo-4-yl-N',N'-dimethylethylenediamine hydrochloride and ii) a membrane with N,N-dimethyl-N'-(9-methylanthracenyl)ethylenediamine. A combination of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) allows for green-to-blue emission switching in the presence of Zn(II) ions. The sensing experiments carried out with different Zn(II) salts at controlled pH revealed that the degree of color switching in the individual sensor elements depends on both the presence of Zn(II) ions and the counter anion. These results suggest that sensing of both cations and anions may perhaps be extended to different cation-anion pairs. PMID:18688830

  10. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  11. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  12. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  13. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  14. A strategy to enhance the binding affinity of fluorophore-aptamer pairs for RNA tagging with neomycin conjugation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jongho; Lee, Kyung Hyun; Rao, Jianghong

    2012-10-14

    Fluorogenic sulforhodamine-neomycin conjugates have been designed and synthesized for RNA tagging. Conjugates were fluorescently activated by binding to RNA aptamers and exhibited greater than 250-400 fold enhancement in binding affinity relative to corresponding unconjugated fluorophores.

  15. Antifungal Activity of Ag(I) and Zn(II) Complexes of Sulfacetamide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2000-01-01

    Reaction of sulfacetamide with arylsulfonyl isocyanates afforded a series of derivatives which were used as ligands (as conjugate bases) for the preparation of metal complexes containing Ag(I) and Zn(II). The newly synthesized complexes, unlike the free ligands, act as effective antifungal agents against Aspergillus and Candida spp., some of them showing activities comparable to ketoconazole, with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range of 0.3 – 0.5 μg/mL. The mechanism of antifungal action of these complexes seems to be not connected with the inhibition of lanosterol-14-α-demethylase, since the levels of sterols assessed in the fungi cultures were equal in the absence or in the presence of the tested compounds. Probably the new complexes act as inhibitors of phosphomannose isomerase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of yeast cell walls. PMID:18475922

  16. Phenoxy-bridged binuclear Zn(II) complex holding salen ligand: Synthesis and structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Al-Resayes, Saud I.

    2016-03-01

    A novel binuclear phenoxo-bridged zinc complex obtained from the interaction of ligand, 2,2-(1E,1E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diyl)bis(azanylylidene) bis(methanylylidene)diphenol with zinc chloride is reported. The synthesized and isolated zinc complex has been characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C- NMR, ESI-MS, TGA/DTA and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The phenoxo-bridge in this binuclear Zn(II) complex is due to the phenolic oxygen of the salen liagnd. The complex crystallizes in monoclinic P-1 space group, and different geometry has been assigned for both zinc ions in the complex.

  17. Crystal Structure of A Plant Dual-Affinity Nitrate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ji; Bankston, John R.; Payandeh, Jian; Hinds, Thomas R.; Zagotta, William N.; Zheng, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is a primary nutrient for plant growth, but its levels in soil can fluctuate by several orders of magnitude. Previous studies have identified Arabidopsis NRT1.1 as a dual-affinity nitrate transporter, which can take up nitrate over a wide range of concentrations. The mode of action of NRT1.1 is controlled by phosphorylation of a key residue, Thr101. Yet how this posttranslational modification switches the transporter between two affinity states remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of unphosphorylated NRT1.1, which reveals an unexpected homodimer in the inward-facing conformation. In this low-affinity state, the Thr101 phosphorylation site is embedded in a pocket immediately adjacent to the dimer interface, linking the phosphorylation status of the transporter to its oligomeric state. Using a cell-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, we show that functional NRT1.1 indeed dimerizes in the cell membrane and the phosphomimetic mutation of Thr101 converts the protein into a monophasic high affinity transporter by structurally decoupling the dimer. Together with analyses of the substrate transport tunnel, our results establish a phosphorylation-controlled dimerization switch that allows NRT1.1 to uptake nitrate with two distinct affinity modes. PMID:24572362

  18. Sol-gel encapsulation of binary Zn(II) compounds in silica nanoparticles. Structure-activity correlations in hybrid materials targeting Zn(II) antibacterial use.

    PubMed

    Halevas, E; Nday, C M; Kaprara, E; Psycharis, V; Raptopoulou, C P; Jackson, G E; Litsardakis, G; Salifoglou, A

    2015-10-01

    In the emerging issue of enhanced multi-resistant properties in infectious pathogens, new nanomaterials with optimally efficient antibacterial activity and lower toxicity than other species attract considerable research interest. In an effort to develop such efficient antibacterials, we a) synthesized acid-catalyzed silica-gel matrices, b) evaluated the suitability of these matrices as potential carrier materials for controlled release of ZnSO4 and a new Zn(II) binary complex with a suitably designed well-defined Schiff base, and c) investigated structural and textural properties of the nanomaterials. Physicochemical characterization of the (empty-loaded) silica-nanoparticles led to an optimized material configuration linked to the delivery of the encapsulated antibacterial zinc load. Entrapment and drug release studies showed the competence of hybrid nanoparticles with respect to the a) zinc loading capacity, b) congruence with zinc physicochemical attributes, and c) release profile of their zinc load. The material antimicrobial properties were demonstrated against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus) and negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Xanthomonas campestris) bacteria using modified agar diffusion methods. ZnSO4 showed less extensive antimicrobial behavior compared to Zn(II)-Schiff, implying that the Zn(II)-bound ligand enhances zinc antimicrobial properties. All zinc-loaded nanoparticles were less antimicrobially active than zinc compounds alone, as encapsulation controls their release, thereby attenuating their antimicrobial activity. To this end, as the amount of loaded zinc increases, the antimicrobial behavior of the nano-agent improves. Collectively, for the first time, sol-gel zinc-loaded silica-nanoparticles were shown to exhibit well-defined antimicrobial activity, justifying due attention to further development of antibacterial nanotechnology.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of VO(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based azo-linked Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, C.; Sheela, C. D.; Tharmaraj, P.; Johnson Raja, S.

    2012-12-01

    Azo-Schiff-base complexes of VO(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, mass spectra, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurement, electron spin resonance (EPR), CV, fluorescence, NLO and SEM. The conductance data indicate the nonelectrolytic nature of the complexes, except VO(II) complex which is electrolytic in nature. On the basis of electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility octahedral geometry has been proposed for the complexes. The EPR spectra of copper and oxovanadium complexes in DMSO at 300 and 77 K were recorded and its salient features are reported. The redox behavior of the copper(II) complex was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica typhi, Bacillus subtilis and Candida strains was studied and compared with that of free ligand by well-diffusion technique. The azo Schiff base exhibited fluorescence properties originating from intraligand (π-π∗) transitions and metal-mediated enhancement is observed on complexation and so the synthesized complexes can serve as potential photoactive materials as indicated from their characteristic fluorescence properties. On the basis of the optimized structures, the second-order nonlinear optical properties (NLO) are calculated by using second-harmonic generation (SHG) and also the surface morphology of the complexes was studied by SEM.

  20. Relationship between Ni(II) and Zn(II) Coordination and Nucleotide Binding by the Helicobacter pylori [NiFe]-Hydrogenase and Urease Maturation Factor HypB*

    PubMed Central

    Sydor, Andrew M.; Lebrette, Hugo; Ariyakumaran, Rishikesh; Cavazza, Christine; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires two nickel-containing enzymes, urease and [NiFe]-hydrogenase, for efficient colonization of the human gastric mucosa. These enzymes possess complex metallocenters that are assembled by teams of proteins in multistep pathways. One essential accessory protein is the GTPase HypB, which is required for Ni(II) delivery to [NiFe]-hydrogenase and participates in urease maturation. Ni(II) or Zn(II) binding to a site embedded in the GTPase domain of HypB modulates the enzymatic activity, suggesting a mechanism of regulation. In this study, biochemical and structural analyses of H. pylori HypB (HpHypB) revealed an intricate link between nucleotide and metal binding. HpHypB nickel coordination, stoichiometry, and affinity were modulated by GTP and GDP, an effect not observed for zinc, and biochemical evidence suggests that His-107 coordination to nickel toggles on and off in a nucleotide-dependent manner. These results are consistent with the crystal structure of HpHypB loaded with Ni(II), GDP, and Pi, which reveals a nickel site distinct from that of zinc-loaded Methanocaldococcus jannaschii HypB as well as subtle changes to the protein structure. Furthermore, Cys-142, a metal ligand from the Switch II GTPase motif, was identified as a key component of the signal transduction between metal binding and the enzymatic activity. Finally, potassium accelerated the enzymatic activity of HpHypB but had no effect on the other biochemical properties of the protein. Altogether, this molecular level information about HpHypB provides insight into its cellular function and illuminates a possible mechanism of metal ion discrimination. PMID:24338018

  1. Cesium cation affinities and basicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Jean-François; Maria, Pierre-Charles; Massi, Lionel; Mayeux, Charly; Burk, Peeter; Tammiku-Taul, Jaana

    2007-11-01

    This review focuses on the quantitative data related to cesium cation interaction with neutral or negatively charged ligands. The techniques used for measuring the cesium cation affinity (enthalpies, CCA), and cesium cation basicities (Gibbs free energies, CCB) are briefly described. The quantum chemical calculations methods that were specifically designed for the determination of cesium cation adduct structures and the energetic aspects of the interaction are discussed. The experimental results, obtained essentially from mass spectrometry techniques, and complemented by thermochemical data, are tabulated and commented. In particular, the correlations between cesium cation affinities and lithium cation affinities for the various kinds of ligands (rare gases, polyatomic neutral molecules, among them aromatic compounds and negative ions) serve as a basis for the interpretation of the diverse electrostatic modes of interaction. A brief account of some recent analytical applications of ion/molecule reactions with Cs+, as well as other cationization approaches by Cs+, is given.

  2. Chiroptical properties, binding affinity, and photostability of a conjugated zinc porphyrin dimer complexed with left-handed Z-DNA and right-handed B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Kyu; Reed, Aisha; Balaz, Milan

    2014-01-14

    We have studied the UV-vis absorption and chiroptical properties, binding affinity and photostability of a conjugated positively charged butadiyne-linked Zn(ii) porphyrin dimer bound to DNA sequence poly(dG-dC)2. Right-handed B-DNA, spermine-induced Z-DNA and Co(iii)-induced Z-DNA have been explored. Resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra showed formation of porphyrin aggregates in the presence of all DNA forms with the largest aggregates formed with B-DNA. The porphyrin dimer gave rise to induced bisignate circular dichroism (CD) signals in the presence of the left-handed Z-DNA conformations. On the other hand, the dimer stayed nearly chiroptically silent when complexed with the B-form of poly(dG-dC)2. Our results indicated that the conjugated Zn(ii) porphyrin dimer can be used as a sensor for the chiroptical detection of Z-DNA in the visible (400-500 nm) and near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (700-800 nm). The helicity of DNA had little effect on the dimer binding affinities. The photostability of the porphyrin dimer complexed with any form of DNA was higher than that of the free molecule. The porphyrin dimer bound to Z-DNA exhibited slower photobleaching than the B-DNA dimer complex.

  3. Batch and fixed-bed column studies for biosorption of Zn(II) ions onto pongamia oil cake (Pongamia pinnata) from biodiesel oil extraction.

    PubMed

    Shanmugaprakash, M; Sivakumar, V

    2015-12-01

    The present work, analyzes the potential of defatted pongamia oil cake (DPOC) for the biosorption of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions in the both batch and column mode. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal pH, effect of adsorbent dosage, initial Zn(II) ions concentration and contact time. The biosorption equilibrium and kinetics data for Zn(II) ions onto the DPOC were studied in detail, using several models, among all it was found to be that, Freundlich and the second-order model explained the equilibrium data well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters had shown that the biosorption of Zn(II) ions was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Batch desorption studies showed that the maximum Zn(II) recovery occurred, using 0.1 M EDTA. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and the Thomas model was successfully employed to evaluate the model parameters in the column mode. The results indicated that the DPOC can be applied as an effective and eco-friendly biosorbent for the removal of Zn(II) ions in polluted wastewater.

  4. Batch and fixed-bed column studies for biosorption of Zn(II) ions onto pongamia oil cake (Pongamia pinnata) from biodiesel oil extraction.

    PubMed

    Shanmugaprakash, M; Sivakumar, V

    2015-12-01

    The present work, analyzes the potential of defatted pongamia oil cake (DPOC) for the biosorption of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions in the both batch and column mode. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal pH, effect of adsorbent dosage, initial Zn(II) ions concentration and contact time. The biosorption equilibrium and kinetics data for Zn(II) ions onto the DPOC were studied in detail, using several models, among all it was found to be that, Freundlich and the second-order model explained the equilibrium data well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters had shown that the biosorption of Zn(II) ions was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Batch desorption studies showed that the maximum Zn(II) recovery occurred, using 0.1 M EDTA. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and the Thomas model was successfully employed to evaluate the model parameters in the column mode. The results indicated that the DPOC can be applied as an effective and eco-friendly biosorbent for the removal of Zn(II) ions in polluted wastewater. PMID:26366934

  5. Characterization of sophorolipid biosurfactant produced by Cryptococcus sp. VITGBN2 and its application on Zn(II) removal from electroplating wastewater.

    PubMed

    Basak, Geetanjali; Das, Nilanjana

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed at elucidating the role of biosurfactant produced by yeast for the removal of Zn(II) ions from electroplating wastewater. The yeast species isolated from CETP, Vellore, Tamilnadu was identified as Cryptococcus sp.VITGBN2, based on molecular techniques, and was found to be potent producer of biosurfactant in mineral salt media containing vegetable oil as additional carbon source. Chemical structure of the purified biosurfactant was identified as acidic diacetate sophorolipid through GC-MS analysis. Interaction of Zn(II) ions with biosurfactant was monitored using FT-IR, SEM and EDS analysis. Zn (II) removal at 100 mg l(-1) concentration was 84.8% compared were other synthetic surfactants (Tween 80 and sodium dodecyl sulphate), yeast mediated biosurfactant showed enhanced Zn (II) removal in batch mode. The role of biosurfactant on Zn(II) removal was evaluated in column mode packed with biosurfactant entrapped in sodium alginate beads. At a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1) and bed height of 12 cm, immobilized biosurfactant showed 94.34% Zn(II) removal from electroplating wastewater. The present study confirmed that Zn(II) removal was biosurfactant mediated. This is the first report establishing the involvement of yeast mediated biosurfactant in Zn(II) removal from wastewater.

  6. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  7. Enhanced removal of ethylbenzene from gas streams in biotrickling filters by Tween-20 and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yang, Chunping; Cheng, Yan; Huang, Jian; Yang, Haining; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li; He, Shanying

    2014-12-01

    The effects of Tween-20 and Zn(II) on ethylbenzene removal were evaluated using two biotrickling filters (BTFs), BTF1 and BTF2. Only BTF1 was fed with Tween-20 and Zn(II). Results show that ethylbenzene removal decreased from 94% to 69% for BTF1 and from 74% to 54% for BTF2 with increased organic loading from 64.8 to 189.0 g ethylbenzene/(m³·hr) at EBRT of 40 sec. The effect of EBRT (60-15 sec) at a constant ethylbenzene inlet concentration was more significant than that of EBRT (30-10 sec) at a constant organic loading. Biomass accumulation rate within packing media was reduced significantly.

  8. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  9. Adsorption and desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) on Ca- alginate immobilized activated rice bran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kamalia, N. Z.; Kusumawati, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran has been used for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of the pH, kinetics model, adsorption isotherm and desorption on the adsorption performance was investigated. Activated rice bran was immobilized by the entrapment in alginate beads. The adsorption strength of Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran was compared to Ca-alginate and non-immobilized activated rice bran. The concentrations of adsorbed ions were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The result showed that pH of 4.0 and the contact time of 120 min are the optimum condition for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II). The adsorption kinetic of Zn(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model with adsorption rate constant 4.9 x 10-2 and 3.14 g.mg-1.min-1, respectively. The both adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm with adsorption capacity of 2.03 and 2.42 mg.g-1 of adsorbent, respectively. The strength of Zn adsorption on Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran (86.63%) was more effective compared to Ca-alginate beads (60.96%) and activated rice bran (43.85%). The strength of Cu adsorption was 80.00%, 61.50% and 22.10%, respectively. The desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) showed that recovery percentage of the adsorption was 76.56% and 57.80% with the condition of using HCl 0.1 M as desorption agent for 1 hour.

  10. Synthesis, magnetism and spectral studies of six defective dicubane tetranuclear {M4O6} (M = Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II)) and three trinuclear Cd(II) complexes with polydentate Schiff base ligands.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Dong-Yan; Suo, Jing-Jing; Gu, Wen; Tian, Jin-Lei; Liu, Xin; Yan, Shi-Ping

    2016-06-21

    A series of Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with polytopic Schiff base ligands have been synthesized. The single-crystal X-ray crystallography results show that tetranuclear complexes have common face-shared defective dicubane cores, whereas trinuclear Cd(II) complexes are almost linear entities. Synthesis methods (solvent evaporation and hydrothermal synthesis), reaction conditions (pH, solvents and dosage) and coligands (azide, methanol, chloride and acetate) play vital roles in determining the final structure of the complexes and therefore their magnetic properties. In complexes , the terminal and central M(2+) ions are connected through mixed bridges, μ-phenoxido/μ1,1,1-X and μ-Oalphatic/μ1,1,1-X, while central two M(2+) ions are linked by double bridges, μ1,1,1-X (X = azido and methoxido groups for and respectively). For complex , two central Ni(II) ions are connected through two μ1,1,1-N3(-) which is relatively less reported. For complexes , there are two kinds of Cd(II), the centre Cd(II) ions are eight-coordinated with triangle dodecahedral geometries, while the two side Cd(II) ions are six-coordinated with trigonal prism geometries using chlorides or acetates as terminal ligands. Magnetic susceptibility measurements (χM) for compounds have been performed, and they reveal predominant ferromagnetic exchange interactions in Co(II) and Ni(II) tetramers. The photoluminescence studies show that the Zn(II) complex and three Cd(II) complexes have strong fluorescence, and the lifetimes are measured to be in the 10(2) nanosecond timescale. PMID:27230103

  11. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  12. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  13. EDTA functionalized silica for removal of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Barakat, M A; Daza, Y A; Woodcock, H L; Kuhn, J N

    2013-10-15

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) functionalized silica adsorbent has been synthesized using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxylsilane (APTES) as a bridging link between silanol groups (SiOH) of silica and carboxylic group of EDTA. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis confirmed the grafting of EDTA onto the silica. The synthesized EDTA-silica was investigated as an adsorbent for removal of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of solution pH, initial solution concentration, and contact time were studied. The removal of metal ions increased with the increase in solution pH, contact time and concentration. The maximum equilibrium time was found to be 45min for all three metal ions. Kinetics studies revealed that the adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) onto EDTA-silica followed the pseudo-second order kinetics and film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion mechanism were involved. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) was 79.36, 74.07 and 67.56mg g(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic results reveal that the removal of metals onto EDTA-silica was endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  14. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago.

  15. The meloxicam complexes of Co(II) and Zn(II): Synthesis, crystal structures, photocleavage and in vitro DNA-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanatkar, Tahereh Hosseinzadeh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Simpson, Jim; Jannesari, Zahra

    2013-10-01

    Two neutral mononuclear complexes of Co(II) and Zn(II) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam (H2mel, 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(5-methyl-2-thiazolyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxammide-1,1-dioxide), [Co(Hmel)2(EtOH)2] (1), and [Zn(Hmel)2(EtOH)2] (2), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy and their solid-state structures were studied by single-crystal diffraction. The complexes have a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal atom. The experimental data indicate that the meloxicam acts as a deprotonated bidentate ligand (through the amide oxygen and the nitrogen atom of the thiazolyl ring) in the complexes, and a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the amide N-H function and the enolate O atom stabilizes the ZZZ conformation of meloxicam ligands. Absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been used to investigate the binding of the complexes with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA). Additionally, the photocleavage studies have been also used to investigate the binding of the complexes with plasmid DNA. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was monitored by a blue shift and hyperchromism in the UV-Vis spectra attributed to an electrostatic binding mode. A competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that they bind to DNA in strong competition with EB. The experimental results show that the complexes can cleave pUC57 plasmid DNA.

  16. Synthesis and luminescence properties of polymeric complexes of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Al(III) with 8-hydroxyquinoline side group-containing polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Baojiao; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Yanyan

    2013-01-01

    Three kinds of metalloquinolate-containing polystyrene were prepared via a polymer reaction and a coordination reaction. 5-Chloromethyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (CHQ) was first prepared through the chloromethylation reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) with 1,4-bichloromethoxy-butane as chloromethylation reagent. A polymer reaction, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction, was carried out between polystyrene (PS) and CHQ in the presence of Lewis catalyst, and HQ was bonded onto the side chains of PS, obtaining 8-hydroxyquinoline-functionalized Polystyrene, HQ-PS. And then, by using one-pot method with two-stage procedures, the coordination reaction of HQ-PS and small molecule HQ with metal ions including Al(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions, was allowed to be carried out, and three polymeric metalloquinolates, AlQ3-PS, ZnQ2-PS and CuQ2-PS, were successfully prepared, respectively. In the chemical structures of these polymeric metalloquinolates, metalloquinolates were chemically attached onto the side chains of PS. HQ-PS and three polymeric metalloquinolates were fully characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR and TGA. The luminescence properties of the three polymeric metalloquinolates were mainly investigated by UV/Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra in solutions and in solid film states. When excited by the ray at about 365 nm, the three polymeric metalloquinolates have blue-green luminescence, and the main emission peaks in the DMF solutions are located at 490, 482 and 502 nm for AlQ3-PS, ZnQ2-PS and CuQ2-PS, respectively. As compared with their emissions in solutions, the emissions in solid film states are red-shifted to some extent, and the main emission peaks are located at 500, 488 and 510 nm for AlQ3-PS, ZnQ2-PS and CuQ2-PS, respectively. Besides, these polymeric metalloquinolates have higher thermal stability than PS as polymeric skeleton.

  17. Fluorescence Analysis of Sulfonamide Binding to Carbonic Anhydrase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sheila C.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2006-01-01

    A practical laboratory experiment is described that illustrates the application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer to the study of protein-ligand binding. The affinities of wild-type and mutant human carbonic anhydrase II for dansylamide were determined by monitoring the increase in ligand fluorescence that occurs due to energy transfer…

  18. Bioinspired fluorescent dipeptide nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and real-time monitoring of drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    Peptide nanostructures are biodegradable and are suitable for many biomedical applications. However, to be useful imaging probes, the limited intrinsic optical properties of peptides must be overcome. Here we show the formation of tryptophan–phenylalanine dipeptide nanoparticles (DNPs) that can shift the peptide's intrinsic fluorescent signal from the ultraviolet to the visible range. The visible emission signal allows the DNPs to act as imaging and sensing probes. The peptide design is inspired by the red shift seen in the yellow fluorescent protein that results from π–π stacking and by the enhanced fluorescence intensity seen in the green fluorescent protein mutant, BFPms1, which results from the structure rigidification by Zn(II). We show that DNPs are photostable, biocompatible and have a narrow emission bandwidth and visible fluorescence properties. DNPs functionalized with the MUC1 aptamer and doxorubicin can target cancer cells and can be used to image and monitor drug release in real time.

  19. Bioinspired fluorescent dipeptide nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and real-time monitoring of drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    Peptide nanostructures are biodegradable and are suitable for many biomedical applications. However, to be useful imaging probes, the limited intrinsic optical properties of peptides must be overcome. Here we show the formation of tryptophan-phenylalanine dipeptide nanoparticles (DNPs) that can shift the peptide's intrinsic fluorescent signal from the ultraviolet to the visible range. The visible emission signal allows the DNPs to act as imaging and sensing probes. The peptide design is inspired by the red shift seen in the yellow fluorescent protein that results from π-π stacking and by the enhanced fluorescence intensity seen in the green fluorescent protein mutant, BFPms1, which results from the structure rigidification by Zn(II). We show that DNPs are photostable, biocompatible and have a narrow emission bandwidth and visible fluorescence properties. DNPs functionalized with the MUC1 aptamer and doxorubicin can target cancer cells and can be used to image and monitor drug release in real time.

  20. Synthesis and spectral characterization of Zn(II) microsphere series for antimicrobial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay K.; Pandey, Sarvesh K.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    Microsphere series have been synthesized by reacting zinc(II) acetate dihydrate with Schiff bases derived from 2-hydrazino-5-[substituted phenyl]-1,3,4-thiadiazole/oxadiazole/triazole with salicylaldehyde. Elemental analysis suggests that the complexes have 1:2 and 1:1 stoichiometry of the type [Zn(L)2(H2O)2] and [Zn(L‧)(H2O)2]; LH = Schiff bases derived from 2-hydrazino-5-[substituted phenyl]-1,3,4-thia/oxadiazole with salicylaldehyde; L‧H2 = Schiff bases derived from 3-(substituted phenyl)-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1,2,4-triazole and salicylaldehyde and were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral data. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that synthesized materials have microsphere like structure and there EDX analysis comparably matches with elemental analysis. For the antimicrobial application Schiff bases and their zinc(II) complexes were screened for four bacteria e.g. Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus pyogenes and four fungi e.g. Cyrtomium falcatum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium and Curvularia pallescence by the reported method. Schiff base and Zn(II) compounds showed significant antimicrobial activities. However, activities increase upon chelation. Thermal analysis (TGA) data of compound (10) showed its stability up to 300 °C.

  1. Structural Investigation of Zn(II) Insertion in Bayerite, an Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Suraj Shiv Charan; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Forano, Claude; Rees, Gregory J; Prevot, Vanessa; Hanna, John V; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-19

    Bayerite was treated under hydrothermal conditions (120, 130, 140, and 150 °C) to prepare a series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with an ideal composition of ZnAl4(OH)12(SO4)0.5·nH2O (ZnAl4-LDHs). These products were investigated by both bulk techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis) and atomic-level techniques ((1)H and (27)Al solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy) to gain a detailed insight into the structure of ZnAl4-LDHs and sample composition. Four structural models (one stoichiometric and three different defect models) were investigated by Rietveld refinement of the PXRD data. These were assessed using the information obtained from other characterization techniques, which favored the ideal (nondefect) structural model for ZnAl4-LDH, as, for example, (27)Al magic-angle spinning NMR showed that excess Al was present as amorphous bayerite (Al(OH)3) and pseudoboehmite (AlOOH). Moreover, no evidence of cation mixing, that is, partial substitution of Zn(II) onto any of four Al sites, was observed. Altogether this study highlights the challenges involved to synthesize pure ZnAl4-LDHs and the necessity to use complementary techniques such as PXRD, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR for the characterization of the local and extended structure of ZnAl4-LDHs. PMID:27598036

  2. Structural Investigation of Zn(II) Insertion in Bayerite, an Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Suraj Shiv Charan; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Forano, Claude; Rees, Gregory J; Prevot, Vanessa; Hanna, John V; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-19

    Bayerite was treated under hydrothermal conditions (120, 130, 140, and 150 °C) to prepare a series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with an ideal composition of ZnAl4(OH)12(SO4)0.5·nH2O (ZnAl4-LDHs). These products were investigated by both bulk techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis) and atomic-level techniques ((1)H and (27)Al solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy) to gain a detailed insight into the structure of ZnAl4-LDHs and sample composition. Four structural models (one stoichiometric and three different defect models) were investigated by Rietveld refinement of the PXRD data. These were assessed using the information obtained from other characterization techniques, which favored the ideal (nondefect) structural model for ZnAl4-LDH, as, for example, (27)Al magic-angle spinning NMR showed that excess Al was present as amorphous bayerite (Al(OH)3) and pseudoboehmite (AlOOH). Moreover, no evidence of cation mixing, that is, partial substitution of Zn(II) onto any of four Al sites, was observed. Altogether this study highlights the challenges involved to synthesize pure ZnAl4-LDHs and the necessity to use complementary techniques such as PXRD, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR for the characterization of the local and extended structure of ZnAl4-LDHs.

  3. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  4. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  5. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  6. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  7. An easy assembled fluorescent sensor for dicarboxylates and acidic amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-bo; Yip, Yuk-Wang; Lee, Albert W M

    2011-01-01

    Summary Two mesitylene based neutral receptors 1 and 2 bearing two thiourea binding sites were constructed as fluorescent probes for sensing dicarboxylates. Their binding affinities toward dicarboxylates, aspartate and glutamate have been investigated in acetonitrile solution by fluorescence titration experiments. Both fluorescent sensors exhibited some ability to discriminate the antipodal forms of aspartate and glutamate. PMID:21286397

  8. Fluorous-assisted metal chelate affinity extraction technique for analysis of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Ena; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a fluorous affinity-based extraction method for measurement of protein kinase activity. In this method, a fluorescent peptide substrate was phosphorylated by a protein kinase, and the obtained phosphopeptide was selectively captured with Fe(III)-immobilized perfluoroalkyliminodiacetic acid reagent via a metal chelate affinity technique. Next, the captured phosphopeptide was selectively extracted into a fluorous solvent mixture, tetradecafluorohexane and 1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluoro-1-n-octanol (3:1, v/v), using the specificity of fluorous affinity (fluorophilicity). In contrast, the remained substrate peptide in the aqueous (non-fluorous) phase was easily measured fluorimetrically. Finally, the enzyme activity could be assayed by measuring the decrease in fluorescence. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated by applying the method for measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) using its substrate peptide (kemptide) pre-labeled with carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA).

  9. Chloroform-soluble schiff-base Zn(II) or Cd(II) complexes from a dynamic combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Epstein, D M; Choudhary, S; Churchill, M R; Keil, K M; Eliseev, A V; Morrow, J R

    2001-03-26

    A dynamic combinatorial library of metal ion Schiff-base complexes have been studied for the extraction of Zn(II) or Cd(II) from aqueous solution into chloroform. Library components consist of different aminophenols and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde. Extraction of both Zn(II) and Cd(II) into chloroform was observed from aqueous solutions containing 0.0500 mM M(NO3)2, 0.100 M aminophenol, 0.100 M 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, 0.100 M NaCl, and 5.00 mM buffer at pH 8.5. Extraction was dependent on pH but not on counterions including Cl-, Br-, or NO3-. Studies showed that equilibrium was attained between the Schiff-base complexes across the two-phase chloroform-water system after 24 h of stirring. Analysis of the extracted species by use of 1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as solubility studies on characterized complexes suggested that the major extracted species is the neutral bis-Schiff-base metal ion complex. In libraries containing mixtures of two different aminophenols and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, an enhanced extent of extraction of Zn(II) into chloroform is observed. Studies suggest that a Zn(II) complex, which is likely the mixed Schiff-base complex, has superior extraction properties compared to simple libraries with a single aminophenol component. The structures of two bis-Schiff-base complexes of Zn(II) and one of Cd(II) have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The geometries of the two Zn(II) complexes, which differ only by a methyl substituent on the Schiff-base ligand, are markedly different, supporting the use of combinatorial methods in coordination chemistry. Zn(SB14)2 crystallized as the sesquihydrate (C24H18N4O2Zn.1.5 H2O) in the space group C2/c, with cell dimensions a = 23.219(15) A, b = 11.299(7) A, c = 16.822(11) A, beta = 102.91(5) degrees, V = 4302(5) A3, and Z = 8. Zn(SB15)2 crystallized as a 1:1 methanol solvate (C26H22N4O2Zn.CH3OH) in the space group P2(1)/c with cell dimensions a = 13.981(5) A, b = 7.978(3) A, c = 22.568(8) A

  10. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  11. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of novel Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes with saccharin and nicotinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, S.; Bulut, İ.; Naumov, P.; Biçer, E.; Çakır, O.

    2001-01-01

    Four novel mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) with saccharin and nicotinamide were synthesised and characterised on the basis of elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopic study, UV-Vis spectrometric and magnetic susceptibility data. The structure of the Cu (II) complex is completely different from those of the Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes. From the frequencies of the saccharinato CO and SO 2 modes, it has been proven that the saccharinato ligands in the structure of the Cu complex are coordinated to the metal ion ([Cu(NA) 2(Sac) 2(H 2O)], where NA — nicotinamide, Sac — saccharinato ligand or ion), whilst in the Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes are uncoordinated and exist as ions ([M(NA) 2(H 2O) 4](Sac) 2).

  12. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  13. A Methodology for Simultaneous Fluorogenic Derivatization and Boronate Affinity Enrichment of 3-Nitrotyrosine Containing Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dremina, Elena S.; Li, Xiaobao; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Sharov, Victor S.; Stobaugh, John F.; Schöneich, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We synthesized and characterized a new tagging reagent, (3R,4S)-1-(4-(aminomethyl)phenylsulfonyl)pyrrolidine-3,4-diol (APPD), for the selective fluorogenic derivatization of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) residues in peptides (after reduction to 3-aminotyrosine) and affinity enrichment. The synthetic 3-NT-containing peptide, FSAY(3-NO2)LER, was employed as a model for method validation. Further, this derivatization protocol was successfully tested for analysis of 3-NT-containing proteins exposed to peroxynitrite in the total protein lysate of cultured C2C12 cells. The quantitation of 3-NT content in samples was achieved through either fluorescence spectrometry or boronate affinity chromatography with detection by specific fluorescence (excitation and emission wavelengths of 360 and 510 nm, respectively); the respective limits of detection were 95 and 68 nM (19 and 13 pmol total amount) of 3-NT. Importantly, the derivatized peptides show a strong retention on a synthetic boronate affinity column, containing sulfonamide-phenylboronic acid, under mild chromatographic conditions, affording a route to separate the derivatized peptides from large amounts (milligrams) of non-derivatized peptides, and to enrich them for fluorescent detection and MS identification. Tandem MS analysis identified chemical structures of peptide 3-NT fluorescent derivatives and revealed that the fluorescent derivatives undergo efficient backbone fragmentations, permitting sequence-specific identification of protein nitration at low concentrations of 3-NT in complex protein mixtures. PMID:21855526

  14. A methodology for simultaneous fluorogenic derivatization and boronate affinity enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dremina, Elena S; Li, Xiaobao; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Sharov, Victor S; Stobaugh, John F; Schöneich, Christian

    2011-11-15

    We synthesized and characterized a new tagging reagent, (3R,4S)-1-(4-(aminomethyl)phenylsulfonyl)pyrrolidine-3,4-diol (APPD), for the selective fluorogenic derivatization of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) residues in peptides (after reduction to 3-aminotyrosine) and affinity enrichment. The synthetic 3-NT-containing peptide, FSAY(3-NO(2))LER, was employed as a model for method validation. Furthermore, this derivatization protocol was successfully tested for analysis of 3-NT-containing proteins exposed to peroxynitrite in the total protein lysate of cultured C2C12 cells. The quantitation of 3-NT content in samples was achieved through either fluorescence spectrometry or boronate affinity chromatography with detection by specific fluorescence (excitation and emission wavelengths of 360 and 510 nm, respectively); the respective limits of detection were 95 and 68 nM (19 and 13 pmol total amount) of 3-NT. Importantly, the derivatized peptides show a strong retention on a synthetic boronate affinity column, containing sulfonamide-phenylboronic acid, under mild chromatographic conditions, affording a route to separate the derivatized peptides from large amounts (milligrams) of nonderivatized peptides and to enrich them for fluorescent detection and mass spectrometry (MS) identification. Tandem MS analysis identified chemical structures of peptide 3-NT fluorescent derivatives and revealed that the fluorescent derivatives undergo efficient backbone fragmentations, permitting sequence-specific identification of protein nitration at low concentrations of 3-NT in complex protein mixtures. PMID:21855526

  15. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  16. Engineering antibody affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Webster, D M; Roberts, S; Cheetham, J C; Griest, R; Rees, A R

    1988-01-01

    A combination of ab initio calculations, "knowledge-based prediction", molecular graphics and site-directed mutagenesis has enabled us to probe the molecular details of antibody:antigen recognition and binding and to alter the affinity and specificity of an antibody for its antigen. The significance of electrostatic hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic/hydrophobic patch matching and van der Waals interactions as well as CDR:CDR interactions are discussed in relation to the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the anti-lysozyme antibody Gloop2. The ability to generate reconstructed antibodies, chimeric antibodies, catalytic antibodies and the use of modelled antibodies for the design of drugs is discussed. PMID:3209295

  17. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  18. Specific light exposure of galactosylated Zn(II) phthalocyanines for selective PDT effects on breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, V. N.; Kril, A.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved non-invasive and curative procedure for different oncological and non-oncological applications. PDT is still under development due to several limitations which lead to partially successful photodynamic response. The crucial steps in PDT procedure are binding of the photosensitizer to outer cell membrane, its penetration and subcellular localization which envisage the target sites of reactive oxygen species generated during irradiation. Since the surrounding normal cells are also exposed to the photosensitizer and the ambient daylight can be harmful for healthy tissues after therapeutic light application, the challenging task in PDT research is to optimize the procedure in a way to reach tumor cell selectivity. The present study outlines the influence of a light exposure pre-treatment (prior therapeutic light) with specific wavelengths (365 nm and 635 nm) on the uptake, the localization and further re-localization of galactose-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanines into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The in vitro photodynamic effect towards tumor cells was studied in comparison to the normal cell line Balb/c 3T3 (clone 31) after pre-irradiation with UV light (365 nm) and red LED (635 nm). The results suggest that the galactose functional groups of Zn(II) phthalocyanine and the harmless UV light at 365 nm favor the selective PDT response.

  19. A Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein regulates the sirodesmin PL biosynthetic gene cluster in Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen M.; Gardiner, Donald M.; Keller, Nancy P.; Howlett, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    A gene, sirZ, encoding a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein is present in a cluster of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) toxin, sirodesmin PL in the ascomycete plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. RNA-mediated silencing of sirZ gives rise to transformants that produce only residual amounts of sirodesmin PL and display a decrease in the transcription of several sirodesmin PL biosynthetic genes. This indicates that SirZ is a major regulator of this gene cluster. Proteins similar to SirZ are encoded in the gliotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster of Aspergillus fumigatus (gliZ) and in an ETP-like cluster in Penicillium lilacinoechinulatum (PlgliZ). Despite its high level of sequence similarity to gliZ, PlgliZ is unable to complement the gliotoxin-deficiency of a mutant of gliZ in A. fumigatus. Putative binding sites for these regulatory proteins in the promoters of genes in these clusters were predicted using bioinformatic analysis. These sites are similar to those commonly bound by other proteins with Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding domains. PMID:18023597

  20. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  1. Thermodynamics of binding of a sulfonamide inhibitor to metal-mutated carbonic anhydrase as studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-01

    By affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE), the thermodynamic binding constants of a sulfonamide (SA) inhibitor to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and metal mutated variants (M-CAs) were evaluated. 1-(4-Aminosulfonylphenylazo)-2-naphthol-6,8-disulfonate was used as the SA in the electrophoretic buffer for ACE. The Scatchard analysis of the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of native CA on the SA concentration provided the binding constant to be Kb=(2.29±0.05)×10(6) M(-1) (at pH8.4, 25°C). On the other hand, apoCA showed far smaller value [Kb=(3.76±0.14)×10(2) M(-1)], suggesting that the coordination of SA to the Zn(II) center controlled the binding thermodynamics. The ACE of M-CAs showed the same behaviors as native CA but with different Kb values. For example, Co-CA adopting the same tetrahedral coordination geometry as native CA exhibited the largest Kb value [(2.55±0.05)×10(6) M(-1)] among the M-CAs. In contrast, Mn- and Ni-CA, which adopted the octahedral coordination geometry, had Kb values that were about two orders of magnitude lower. Because the hydrophobic cavity of CA around the active center pre-organized the orientation of SA, thereby fixing the ligating NH(-) moiety to the apex of the tetrahedron supported by three basal His3 of CA, metals such as Zn and Co at the center of M-CA gave the most stable CA-SA complex. However, pre-organization was not favored for octahedral geometry. Thus, pre-organization of SA was the key to facilitating the tetrahedral coordination geometry of the Zn(II) active center of CA.

  2. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  3. Non-affine deformations in polymer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qi; Basu, Anindita; Janmey, Paul A.; Yodh, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Most theories of soft matter elasticity assume that the local strain in a sample after deformation is identical everywhere and equal to the macroscopic strain, or equivalently that the deformation is affine. We discuss the elasticity of hydrogels of crosslinked polymers with special attention to affine and non-affine theories of elasticity. Experimental procedures to measure non-affine deformations are also described. Entropic theories, which account for gel elasticity based on stretching out individual polymer chains, predict affine deformations. In contrast, simulations of network deformation that result in bending of the stiff constituent filaments generally predict non-affine behavior. Results from experiments show significant non-affine deformation in hydrogels even when they are formed by flexible polymers for which bending would appear to be negligible compared to stretching. However, this finding is not necessarily an experimental proof of the non-affine model for elasticity. We emphasize the insights gained from experiments using confocal rheoscope and show that, in addition to filament bending, sample micro-inhomogeneity can be a significant alternative source of non-affine deformation. PMID:23002395

  4. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  5. Myo1e binds anionic phospholipids with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Feeser, Elizabeth A; Ignacio, Cherry Mae G; Krendel, Mira; Ostap, E Michael

    2010-11-01

    Myo1e is a single-headed motor protein that has been shown to play roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis in HeLa cells and podocyte function in the kidney. The myo1e C-terminal tail domain includes a basic region that is required for localization to clathrin-coated vesicles and contains a putative pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain that has been shown to play a role in phospholipid binding in other myosin-I proteins. We used sedimentation assays, stopped-flow fluorescence, and fluorescence microscopy to determine the membrane binding affinities, kinetics, and in vivo localization of fluorescently labeled recombinant myo1e-tail constructs. We found that the myo1e tail binds tightly to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing physiological concentrations of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) or phosphatidylserine. The rate of myo1e attachment to LUVs nears the diffusion limit while the calculated rate of detachment from LUVs is slow (k(diss) ≤ 0.4 s(-1)). Mutation of conserved residues in the myo1e PH domain has little effect on lipid binding in vitro or membrane localization in vivo. Soluble inositol phosphate headgroups, such as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, can compete with PtdIns(4,5)P(2) for binding, but the apparent affinity for the soluble inositol phosphate is substantially lower than that for PtdIns(4,5)P(2). These results suggest that myo1e binds lipids through nonspecific electrostatic interactions rather than a stereospecific protein-phosphoinositide interaction. PMID:20860408

  6. Tuning the structures of three coordination polymers incorporating ZnII and 2,2‧-dichloro-4,4‧-azodibenzoic acid via selective auxiliary ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Ping; Ming, Mei

    2015-11-01

    By tuning the auxiliary ligands in the assembling reaction, three ZnII coordination polymers of [Zn(Cl-adc) (phen) (H2O)](DMF) (1), [Zn(Cl-adc) (DMA)](DMA) (2), and [Zn(Cl-adc) (dip)](DMF)0.5 (3) (Cl-H2adc = 2,2‧-dichloro-4,4‧-azodibenzoic acid, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, dip = 1,3-di(imidazole)propane) have been successfully synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction study, elemental analysis, IR spectra, TGA analyses, solid-state fluorescent property, and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that 1 and 2 displays a 1D polymeric chain and 2D sql layered net with the presence of chelated phen and terminal DMA ligands, respectively. By incorporating dip linker, 3 exhibits a 2D + 2D → 3D entangled network, with each 2D net portraying wavelike sql layered structure. Their structural divergences should be properly attributed to fact that, the structural topologies can be well regulated by using three auxiliary ligands incorparating different coordination function.

  7. Co-sequestration of Zn(II) and phosphate by γ-Al2O3: From macroscopic to microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuemei; Tan, Xiaoli; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-30

    Little information is available concerning co-sorbing oxyanion and metal contaminants in the environment, yet in most metal-contaminated areas, co-contamination by phosphate is common. In this study, the mutual effects of phosphate and Zn(II) on their interaction with γ-Al2O3 are investigated by batch experiments and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique. The results show that the co-sorption of phosphate on γ-Al2O3 modifies both the extent of Zn(II) sorption and the local atomic structures of sorbed Zn(II) ions. Multiple mechanisms are involved in Zn(II) retention in the presence of phosphate, including electrostatic interaction, binary and ternary surface complexation, and the formation of Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes. At pH 6.5, type III ternary surface complexation occurs concurrently with binary Zn-alumina surface complexation at low phosphate concentrations, whereas the formation of type III ternary surface complexes is promoted as the phosphate concentration increases. With further increasing phosphate concentration, Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes are formed. At pH 8.0, Zn dominantly forms type III ternary surface complexes in the presence of phosphate. The results of this study indicate the variability of Zn complexation on oxide surface and the importance of combining macroscopic observations with XAFS capable of determining metal complex formation mechanism for ternary system. PMID:25956644

  8. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  9. The future of fluorescence sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Alexander P

    2005-09-01

    The rapid progress in sensor and biosensor array technologies needs a general strategy in the design of fluorescence reporters. Such reporters should provide a high density of sensor elements, allow analysis of targets of different affinities, and be internally calibrated, reproducible and have a rapid readout. Several criteria are introduced here for the comparative evaluation of fluorescence-sensing techniques. It is shown that only the two-band wavelength ratiometric sensing with a single reporter dye exhibiting rapid reversible excited-state reaction can satisfy all these criteria and is a prospective candidate for further development. PMID:15967523

  10. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  11. Zn(II) and Cu(II) adsorption and retention onto iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles: effects of particle aggregation and salinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron oxyhydroxides are commonly found in natural aqueous systems as nanoscale particles, where they can act as effective sorbents for dissolved metals due to their natural surface reactivity, small size and high surface area. These properties make nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides a relevant option for the remediation of water supplies contaminated with dissolved metals. However, natural geochemical processes, such as changes in ionic strength, pH, and temperature, can cause these particles to aggregate, thus affecting their sorption capabilities and remediation potential. Other environmental parameters such as increasing salinity may also impact metal retention, e.g. when particles are transported from freshwater to seawater. Results After using synthetic iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates in batch Zn(II) adsorption experiments, the addition of increasing concentrations of chloride (from 0.1 M to 0.6 M) appears to initially reduce Zn(II) retention, likely due to the desorption of outer-sphere zinc surface complexes and subsequent formation of aqueous Zn-Cl complexes, before then promoting Zn(II) retention, possibly through the formation of ternary surface complexes (supported by EXAFS spectroscopy) which stabilize zinc on the surface of the nanoparticles/aggregates. In batch Cu(II) adsorption experiments, Cu(II) retention reaches a maximum at 0.4 M chloride. Copper-chloride surface complexes are not indicated by EXAFS spectroscopy, but there is an increase in the formation of stable aqueous copper-chloride complexes as chloride concentration rises (with CuCl+ becoming dominant in solution at ~0.5 M chloride) that would potentially inhibit further sorption or encourage desorption. Instead, the presence of bidentate edge-sharing and monodentate corner-sharing complexes is supported by EXAFS spectroscopy. Increasing chloride concentration has more of an impact on zinc retention than the mechanism of nanoparticle aggregation, whereas

  12. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  13. An Optical Biosensor from Green Fluorescent Escherichia coli for the Evaluation of Single and Combined Heavy Metal Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Asmat; Surif, Salmijah; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence-based fiber optic toxicity biosensor based on genetically modified Escherichia coli (E. coli) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was developed for the evaluation of the toxicity of several hazardous heavy metal ions. The toxic metals include Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III). The optimum fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths of the optical biosensor were 400 ± 2 nm and 485 ± 2 nm, respectively. Based on the toxicity observed under optimal conditions, the detection limits of Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III) that can be detected using the toxicity biosensor were at 0.04, 0.32, 0.46, 2.80, 100, 250, 400, 720 and 2600 μg/L, respectively. The repeatability and reproducibility of the proposed biosensor were 3.5%–4.8% RSD (relative standard deviation) and 3.6%–5.1% RSD (n = 8), respectively. The biosensor response was stable for at least five weeks, and demonstrated higher sensitivity towards metal toxicity evaluation when compared to a conventional Microtox assay. PMID:26029952

  14. An optical biosensor from green fluorescent Escherichia coli for the evaluation of single and combined heavy metal toxicities.

    PubMed

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Asmat; Surif, Salmijah; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-05-28

    A fluorescence-based fiber optic toxicity biosensor based on genetically modified Escherichia coli (E. coli) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was developed for the evaluation of the toxicity of several hazardous heavy metal ions. The toxic metals include Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III). The optimum fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths of the optical biosensor were 400 ± 2 nm and 485 ± 2 nm, respectively. Based on the toxicity observed under optimal conditions, the detection limits of Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III) that can be detected using the toxicity biosensor were at 0.04, 0.32, 0.46, 2.80, 100, 250, 400, 720 and 2600 μg/L, respectively. The repeatability and reproducibility of the proposed biosensor were 3.5%-4.8% RSD (relative standard deviation) and 3.6%-5.1% RSD (n = 8), respectively. The biosensor response was stable for at least five weeks, and demonstrated higher sensitivity towards metal toxicity evaluation when compared to a conventional Microtox assay.

  15. Pb(II)-promoted amide cleavage: mechanistic comparison to a Zn(II) analogue.

    PubMed

    Elton, Eric S; Zhang, Tingting; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2013-10-01

    Two new Pb(II) complexes of the amide-appended nitrogen/sulfur epppa (N-((2-ethylthio)ethyl)-N-((6-pivaloylamido-2-pyridyl)methyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amine) chelate ligand, [(epppa)Pb(NO3)2] (4-NO3) and [(epppa)Pb(ClO4)2] (4-ClO4), were prepared and characterized. In the solid state, 4-NO3 exhibits κ(5)-epppa chelate ligand coordination as well as the coordination of two bidentate nitrate ions. In acetonitrile, 4-NO3 is a 1:1 electrolyte with a coordinated NO3(-), whereas 4-ClO4 is a 1:2 electrolyte. Treatment of 4-ClO4 with 1 equiv Me4NOH·5H2O in CH3CN:CH3OH (3:5) results in amide methanolysis in a reaction that is akin to that previously reported for the Zn(II) analogue [(epppa)Zn](ClO4)2 (3-ClO4). (1)H NMR kinetic studies of the amide methanolysis reactions of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4 as a function of temperature revealed free energies of activation of 21.3 and 24.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The amide methanolysis reactions of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4 differ in terms of the effect of the concentration of methanol (saturation kinetics for 4-ClO4; second-order behavior for 3-ClO4), the observation of a small solvent kinetic isotope effect (SKIE) only for the reaction of the Zn(II)-containing 3-ClO4, and the properties of an initial intermediate isolated from each reaction upon treatment with Me4NOH·5H2O. These experimental results, combined with computational studies of the amide methanolysis reaction pathways of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4, indicate that the Zn(II)-containing 3-ClO4 initially undergoes amide deprotonation upon treatment with Me4NOH·5H2O. Subsequent amide protonation from coordinated methanol yields a structure containing a coordinated neutral amide and methoxide anion from which amide cleavage can then proceed. The rate-determining step in this pathway is either amide protonation or protonation of the leaving group. The Pb(II)-containing 4-ClO4 instead directly forms a neutral amide-containing, epppa-ligated Pb(II)-OH/Pb(II)-OCH3 equilibrium mixture upon treatment

  16. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  17. Petasis-Ugi ligands: New affinity tools for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Íris L; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-09-15

    Affinity chromatography is a widespread technique for the enrichment and isolation of biologics, which relies on the selective and reversible interaction between affinity ligands and target molecules. Small synthetic affinity ligands are valuable alternatives due to their robustness, low cost and fast ligand development. This work reports, for the first time, the use of a sequential Petasis-Ugi multicomponent reaction to generate rationally designed solid-phase combinatorial libraries of small synthetic ligands, which can be screened for the selection of new affinity adsorbents towards biological targets. As a proof of concept, the Petasis-Ugi reaction was here employed in the discovery of affinity ligands suitable for phosphopeptide enrichment. A combinatorial library of 84 ligands was designed, synthesized on a chromatographic solid support and screened in situ for the specific binding of phosphopeptides binding human BRCA1C-terminal domains. The success of the reaction on the chromatographic matrix was confirmed by both inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Three lead ligands were identified due to their superior performance in terms of binding capacity and selectivity towards the phosphorylated moiety on peptides, which showed the feasibility of the Petasis-Ugi reaction for affinity ligand development. PMID:27469904

  18. Preparation, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Activities of Bimetallic Complexes of Sarcosine with Zn(II) and Sn(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Arafat, Yasir; Ali, Saqib; Shahzadi, Saira; Shahid, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Heterobimetallic complexes of Zn(II) and Sn(IV) with sarcosine have been synthesized at room temperature under stirring conditions by the reaction of sarcosine and zinc acetate in 2 : 1 molar ratio followed by the stepwise addition of CS2 and organotin(IV) halides, where R = Me, n-Bu, and Ph. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR (1H, 13C) spectroscopy. IR data showed that the ligand acts in a bidentate manner. NMR data revealed the four coordinate geometry in solution state. In vitro antimicrobial activities data showed that complexes (3) and (4) were effective against bacterial and fungal strains with few exceptions. PMID:24235910

  19. Synthesis and characterization of polymeric azido Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes based on 3-hydroxypyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Franz A.; Berger, Christian; Domian, Elisabeth; Fischer, Roland C.; Massoud, Salah S.

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of two new complexes catena-[Ni(3-O-py)(3-HO-py)2(μ1,3-N3)(H2O)] (1) and catena-[Zn(μ-3-O-py)(μ1,1-N3)] (2), where 3-HO-py = 3-hydroxypyridine, are reported. The complexes were characterized by the elemental microanalyses, IR, and X-ray crystallography and by UV-Vis spectroscopy for complex 1. Single crystal X-ray crystallography revealed the polymeric nature of the complexes: 1 as 1D with a single EE azide bridging, and 2 as 2D with μ(O,O‧,N) bridging of the deprotonated 3-O-py anions and di-EO azide groups, respectively. In 1 the neutral and deprotonated 3-hydroxypyridine molecules act only as N-terminal ligands. The emission spectral properties of the Zn(II) complex were investigated.

  20. Recovery and concentration of metal ions. 4: Uphill transport of Zn(II) in a multimembrane hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Wodzki, R.; Sionkowski, G.; Pozniak, G.

    1999-02-01

    A study has been made on the uphill transport of zinc cations across a multimembrane hybrid system (MHS) composed of two ion-exchange membranes (IEM) separated by a bulk liquid membrane (BLM). The fluxes of the Zn(II)/H countertransport were investigated as dependent on the composition and structure of ion-exchange polymer membranes (i), the solvent of a liquid membrane (II), the feed and strip membrane area ratio (iii), and the pH of the feed solution (iv). The IEMs of various ionogenic groups (sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, quaternized amine) and of various structure (clustered, gelatinous, porous) were examined in the MHS containing the BLM with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier of Zn(II) cations. It has been found that the Zn(II) fluxes are dependent on the properties of both the BLM and polymer membranes, i.e., on the BLM solvent viscosity (i), the nature and concentration of the IEM ion-exchange sites (ii), and the IEM thickness (iii). The best results were obtained when using hexane as the BLM solvent and the Nafion-117 membrane (perfluorinated polymer, sulfonic acid groups) as the cation-exchange membrane (CEM). The influence of the area ratio (feed-to-strip interface) has been checked for A{sub f}/A{sub g} equal to 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. It was found that the asymmetry of the system leads mainly to some changes in the accumulation of transported species in a liquid membrane phase.

  1. Cleavage of an RNA analog by Zn(II) macrocyclic catalysts appended with a methyl or an acridine group.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Clifford S; Mathews, Ryan A; Morrow, Janet R

    2007-06-01

    Two macrocycles (1 and 2) are prepared that incorporate pendent groups in macrocycle 3 (3=1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane) with the goal of studying the effect of these pendent groups on metal ion complexation, solution chemistry and catalysis. Zn(1) contains a macrocyclic ligand with a pendent acridine group and Zn(2) has an appended methyl group. Water ligand pK(a) values for Zn(1) (6.7) and Zn(2) (7.3) are lower than that of Zn(3) (7.7). Zn(II) complexes of 1 and 2 are studied as catalysts for the cleavage of 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenylphosphate (HpPNP), an RNA analog. Zn(2) has a lower catalytic activity over the pH range 7-10 for cleavage of HpPNP compared to the parent macrocyclic complex, Zn(3). In contrast, Zn(1) has a threefold larger rate constant at pH 7.0 compared to Zn(2), attributed to the presence of a catalytic species which has a protonated acridine amino group. The binding constant of 1.5mM at pH 8.0 for formation of the Zn(2)-uridine adduct is similar to that for Zn(3), suggesting that N-alkylation of the macrocyclic ligand does not interfere with binding of the Zn(II) complex to uridine groups. Binding of cytidine to Zn(2) was not detectable under similar conditions up to 25mM nucleoside. Binding experiments under similar conditions could not be carried out for adenosine or guanosine due to their low solubility.

  2. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  3. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  4. Complex formation equilibria of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with triethylenetetramine and its mono- and di-acetyl metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nurchi, Valeria M; Crisponi, Guido; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Cooper, Garth J S

    2013-05-01

    Triethylenetetramine (TETA) dihydrochloride, or trientine, is a therapeutic molecule that has long been used as a copper-chelating agent for the second-line treatment of patients with Wilson's disease. More recently, it has also been employed as an experimental therapeutic molecule in diabetes where it improves cardiac structure in patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy and left-ventricular hypertrophy. TETA is metabolized by acetylation, which leads to the formation of two main metabolites in humans and other mammals, monoacetyl-TETA (MAT) and diacetyl-TETA (DAT). These metabolites have been identified in the plasma and urine of healthy and diabetic subjects treated with TETA, and could themselves play a role in TETA-mediated copper chelation and restoration of physiological copper regulation in diabetes. In this regard, a potentiometric and spectrophotometric study of Cu(II)-complex formation equilibria of TETA, MAT and DAT is presented here, to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the stoichiometries of the complexes formed and of their relative stability constants. A potentiometric study has also been conducted on the corresponding Zn(II) complexes, to evaluate any possible interference with TETA-mediated Cu(II) binding by this second physiological transition-metal ion, which is present in similar concentrations in human plasma and which also binds to TETA. An ESI-MS study of these systems has both confirmed the complex formation mechanisms established from the potentiometric and spectrophotometric results, and in addition provided direct information on the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in solution. These data when taken together show that the 1 : 1 complexes formed with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have different degrees of protonation. The stability of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with the three ligands, evaluated by the parameters pCu and pZn, decreases with the introduction of the acetyl groups. Nevertheless the stability of Cu(II) complexes with MAT is

  5. Zinspy Sensors with Enhanced Dynamic Range for Imaging Neuronal Cell Zinc Uptake and Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Ryu, Jubin W.; Jaworski, Jacek; Feazell, Rodney P.; Sheng, Morgan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Thiophene moieties were incorporated into previously described Zinspy (ZS) fluorescent Zn(II) sensor motifs (Nolan, E. M.; Lippard, S. J. Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 8310–8317) to provide enhanced fluorescence properties, low-micromolar dissociation constants for Zn(II), and improved Zn(II) selectivity. Halogenation of the xanthenone and benzoate moieties of the fluorescein platform systematically modulates the excitation and emission profiles, pH-dependent fluorescence, Zn(II) affinity, and Zn(II) complexation rates, offering a general strategy for tuning multiple properties of xanthenone-based metal ion sensors. Extensive biological studies in cultured cells and primary neuronal cultures demonstrate 2-{6-hydroxy-3-oxo-4,5-bis[(pyridin-2-ylmethylthiophen-2-ylmethylamino)methyl]-3H-xanthen-9-yl}benzoic acid (ZS5) to be a versatile imaging tool for detecting Zn(II) in vivo. ZS5 localizes to the mitochondria of HeLa cells and allows visualization of glutamate-mediated Zn(II) uptake in dendrites and Zn(II) release resulting from nitrosative stress in neurons. PMID:17132019

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of Escherichia coli with cationic ammonium Zn(II) phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Deisy M G C; Venkatramaiah, N; Gomes, Maria C; Almeida, Adelaide; Faustino, Maria A F; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Cunha, Ângela; Tomé, João P C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was the development of a family of novel water soluble Zinc(II) phthalocyanines (Pc) for the photodynamic inactivation of Gram-negative bacteria. Pc derivatives 1a, 2a and 3a containing trimethylammonium groups with varied number and nature of the groups at peripheral positions were synthesized by cyclotetramerization of dimethyl amino substituted phthalonitriles in the presence of zinc powder, using 1-chloronaphthalene as a solvent, followed by cationization using dimethyl sulfate. The solubility, singlet oxygen generation ((1)O2) and stability/photostability of each Pc were evaluated as well as the affinity to bacterial cells and their photosensitizing potential against a recombinant bioluminescent Escherichia coli strain, used as a biological model for Gram negative bacteria. The efficiency of photodynamic inactivation was assessed under white and red light at an irradiance of 150 mW cm(-2). All Pc were soluble in phosphate buffer saline and in dimethyl sulfoxide and demonstrated good stability/photostability. The photochemical parameters reveal that Pc 2a and 3a are more efficient singlet oxygen producers than Pc 1a, for which singlet oxygen generation could not be demonstrated. Pc 2a and 3a caused photosensitization in E. coli. The inactivation factors attained with red light were, however, generally higher than those with white light. Under red light Pc 3a and 2a caused, respectively, 5.6 and 4.9 log reduction in the bioluminescence of the E. coli while, with white light, the corresponding inactivation factors were 2.5 and 0.5 log. The order of the PDI efficiency (3a > 2a ⋙ 1a) was determined by the combined effect of solubility, singlet oxygen generation ability and affinity to bacterial cells. Ammonium phthalocyanines with eight charges or containing halogen atoms such as chlorine, when irradiated with red light can, therefore, be regarded as promising photosensitizers for the inactivation of Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  8. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  9. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  10. Designing Chaotic Systems by Piecewise Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Li, Qingdu; Yang, Xiao-Song

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of homoclinic orbits in a class of three-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, two chaotic generators are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  11. High-affinity Manganese Coordination by Human Calprotectin is Calcium-dependent and Requires the Histidine-rich Site Formed at the Dimer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Joshua A.; Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Cunden, Lisa S.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Calprotectin (CP) is a transition metal-chelating antimicrobial protein of the calcium-binding S100 family that is produced and released by neutrophils. It inhibits the growth of various pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering the transition metal ions manganese and zinc. In this work, we investigate the manganese-binding properties of calprotectin. We demonstrate that the unusual His4 motif (site 2) formed at the S100A8/S100A9 dimer interface is the site of high-affinity Mn(II) coordination. We identify a low-temperature Mn(II) spectroscopic signal for this site consistent with an octahedral Mn(II) coordination sphere with simulated zero-field splitting parameters D = 270 MHz and E/D = 0.33 (E = 81 MHz). This analysis, combined with studies of mutant proteins, suggests that four histidine residues (H17 and H27 of S100A8; H91 and H95 of S100A9) coordinate Mn(II) in addition to two as-yet unidentified ligands. The His3Asp motif (site 1), which is also formed at the S100A8/S100A9 dimer interface, does not provide a high-affinity Mn(II) binding site. Calcium binding to the EF-hand domains of CP increases the Mn(II) affinity of the His4 site from the low-micromolar to the mid-nanomolar range. Metal-ion selectivity studies demonstrate that CP prefers to coordinate Zn(II) over Mn(II). Nevertheless, the specificity of Mn(II) for the His4 site provides CP with the propensity to form mixed Zn:Mn:CP complexes where one Zn(II) ion occupies site 1 and one Mn(II) ion occupies site 2. These studies support the notion that CP responds to physiological calcium ion gradients to become a high-affinity transition metal ion chelator in the extracellular space where it inhibits microbial growth. PMID:23276281

  12. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  13. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  14. Fluorescent ligands to investigate GPCR binding properties and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Martin; Faklaris, Orestis; Falco, Amadine; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Mouillac, Bernard; Durroux, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescent ligands for GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) have been synthesized for a long time but their use was usually restricted to receptor localization in the cell by fluorescent imaging microscopy. During the last two decades, the emergence of new fluorescence-based strategies and the concomitant development of fluorescent measurement apparatus have dramatically widened the use of fluorescent ligands. Among the various strategies, TR (time-resolved)-FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) approaches exhibit an interesting potential to study GPCR interactions with various partners. We have derived various sets of ligands that target different GPCRs with fluorophores, which are compatible with TR-FRET strategies. Fluorescent ligands labelled either with a fluorescent donor (such as europium or terbium cryptate) or with a fluorescent acceptor (such as fluorescein, dy647 or Alexa Fluor® 647), for example, kept high affinities for their cognate receptors. These ligands turn out to be interesting tools to develop FRET-based binding assays. We also used these fluorescent ligands to analyse GPCR oligomerization by measuring FRET between ligands bound to receptor dimers. In contrast with FRET strategies, on the basis of receptor labelling, the ligand-based approach we developed is fully compatible with the study of wild-type receptors and therefore with receptors expressed in native tissues. Therefore, by using fluorescent analogues of oxytocin, we demonstrated the existence of oxytocin receptor dimers in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

  15. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis. PMID:8455155

  16. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ALDH2 catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Magnesium ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements have monitored the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to elucidate the extent of...

  17. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements monitor the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to study ...

  18. Distinct tubulin dynamics in cancer cells explored using a highly tubulin-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cuige; Zuo, Yinglin; Liang, Baoxia; Yue, Hong; Yue, Xin; Wen, Gesi; Wang, Ruimin; Quan, Junmin; Du, Jun; Bu, Xianzhang

    2015-09-01

    A highly specific fluorescent probe (OC9) was discovered exhibiting tubulin-specific affinity fluorescence, which allowed selective labeling of cellular tubulin in microtubules. Moreover, distinct tubulin dynamics in various cellular bio-settings such as drug resistant or epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cancer cells were directly observed for the first time via OC9 staining.

  19. Subcomponent self-assembly of a 4 nm M4 L6 tetrahedron with Zn(II) vertices and perylene bisimide dye edges.

    PubMed

    Frischmann, Peter D; Kunz, Valentin; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Würthner, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Formation of a tetrahedron with >4 nm perylene bisimide (PBI) dye edges and Zn(II) vertices in a one-pot 22 component self-assembly reaction is reported. The luminescent polyhedron equilibrates to a Zn2 L3 helicate and disassembles upon dilution. Insights into the subcomponent self-assembly of extended PBI ligands help to refine design rules for constructing large photofunctional metallosupramolecular hosts.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  1. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  2. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Rakha, T. H.; Metwally, H. M.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  3. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-((thiophen-2-ylmethylene)amino)benzamide: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, DFT and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B S

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of general composition M(L)X₂ and M(L)₂X₂ (M=Ni(II), Zn(II), X=Cl(-1), OAc(-1)) with Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminobenzamide with thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by (1)H NMR, UV-VIS, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The effect of these complexes on proliferation of human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were studied and compared with those of free ligand.

  4. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-((thiophen-2-ylmethylene)amino)benzamide: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, DFT and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of general composition M(L)X2 and M(L)2X2 (M = Ni(II), Zn(II), X = Cl-1, OAc-1) with Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminobenzamide with thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by 1H NMR, UV-VIS, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The effect of these complexes on proliferation of human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were studied and compared with those of free ligand.

  5. Fluorescent Bisphosphonate and Carboxyphosphonate Probes: A Versatile Imaging Toolkit for Applications in Bone Biology and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuting; Błażewska, Katarzyna M; Kadina, Anastasia P; Kashemirov, Boris A; Duan, Xuchen; Triffitt, James T; Dunford, James E; Russell, R Graham G; Ebetino, Frank H; Roelofs, Anke J; Coxon, Fraser P; Lundy, Mark W; McKenna, Charles E

    2016-02-17

    A bone imaging toolkit of 21 fluorescent probes with variable spectroscopic properties, bone mineral binding affinities, and antiprenylation activities has been created, including a novel linking strategy. The linking chemistry allows attachment of a diverse selection of dyes fluorescent in the visible to near-infrared range to any of the three clinically important heterocyclic bisphosphonate bone drugs (risedronate, zoledronate, and minodronate or their analogues). The resultant suite of conjugates offers multiple options to "mix and match" parent drug structure, fluorescence emission wavelength, relative bone affinity, and presence or absence of antiprenylation activity, for bone-related imaging applications.

  6. Fluorescent Bisphosphonate and Carboxyphosphonate Probes: A Versatile Imaging Toolkit for Applications in Bone Biology and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuting; Błażewska, Katarzyna M; Kadina, Anastasia P; Kashemirov, Boris A; Duan, Xuchen; Triffitt, James T; Dunford, James E; Russell, R Graham G; Ebetino, Frank H; Roelofs, Anke J; Coxon, Fraser P; Lundy, Mark W; McKenna, Charles E

    2016-02-17

    A bone imaging toolkit of 21 fluorescent probes with variable spectroscopic properties, bone mineral binding affinities, and antiprenylation activities has been created, including a novel linking strategy. The linking chemistry allows attachment of a diverse selection of dyes fluorescent in the visible to near-infrared range to any of the three clinically important heterocyclic bisphosphonate bone drugs (risedronate, zoledronate, and minodronate or their analogues). The resultant suite of conjugates offers multiple options to "mix and match" parent drug structure, fluorescence emission wavelength, relative bone affinity, and presence or absence of antiprenylation activity, for bone-related imaging applications. PMID:26646666

  7. Analysis of Aged Human Serum Albumin Affinity for Doxazosin.

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Mariola; Równicka-Zubik, Joanna; Pożycka, Jadwiga; Pawelczak, Bartosz; Sulkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes of human serum albumin (HSA) caused by old age and coexisting diseases result in differences in the binding of doxazosin (DOX). DOX is a postsynaptic α1- adrenoreceptor antagonist used for treatment of hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. In elderly people suffering from various renal or hepatic diseases the significant portion of N-form of human serum albumin (normal) is converted to A-form (aged). The differences in binding of doxazosin to N- and Aform of albumin are an important factor, which may determines therapeutic dosage and toxicity of the test drug. To indicate these differences, the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy was used. The association constant (Ka) obtained from fluorescence quenching demonstrated that doxazosin has higher affinity for AHSA than for HSA. In order to describe the cooperativity in binding process, the values of the Hill's coefficient has been analysed. For DOX-HSA system (λex 295 nm) Hill's coefficient is close to 1 and it indicates that there is a single class of binding sites. For DOX-HSA (λex 275 nm) and DOX-AHSA (λex 275 nm and λex 295 nm) systems we observed positive cooperativity (nH>1). A greater red shift of fluorescence emission maximum of AHSA than HSA in the presence of DOX was observed. This suggests that the binding of DOX to AHSA was accompanied by a stronger increase in polarity around the fluorophores in comparison to HSA. The binding interaction between DOX and HSA has been also studied by molecular docking simulation.

  8. Two Zn(II) coordination complexes assembled by trithiocyanuric acid and two different N-donor auxiliary ligands.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao Xiao; Guo, Ya Mei

    2014-08-01

    The dipyridyl-type building blocks 4-amino-3,5-bis(pyridin-3-yl)-1,2,4-triazole (3-bpt) and 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) have been used to assemble with Zn(II) in the presence of trithiocyanuric acid (ttcH3) to afford two coordination compounds, namely bis[4-amino-3,5-bis(pyridin-3-yl)-1,2,4-triazole-κN(3)]bis(trithiocyanurato-κ(2)N,S)zinc(II), [Zn(C3H2N3S3)2(C12H10N6)2]·2H2O, (1), and catena-poly[[[bis(trithiocyanurato-κ(2)N,S)zinc(II)]-μ-4,4'-bipyridine-κ(2)N:N'] 4,4'-bipyridine monosolvate], {[Zn2(C3H2N3S3)4(C10H8N2)3]·C10H8N2}n, (2). Single-crystal X-ray analysis indicates that complex (1) is a mononuclear structure, while complex (2) presents a one-dimensional chain coordination motif. In both complexes, the central Zn(II) cation adopts an octahedral geometry, coordinated by four N- and two S-donor atoms. Notably, trithiocyanurate (ttcH2(-)) adopts the same bidentate chelating coordination mode in each complex and exists in the thione tautomeric form. The 3-bpt co-ligand in (1) adopts a monodentate coordination mode and serves as a terminal pendant ligand, whereas the 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) ligand in (2) adopts a bidentate-bridging coordination mode. The different coordination characters of the different N-donor auxiliary ligands lead to structural diversity for complexes (1) and (2). Further analysis indicates that the resultant three-dimensional supramolecular networks for (1) and (2) arise through intermolecular N-H...S and N-H...N hydrogen bonds. Both complexes have been further characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analyses.

  9. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  10. BC(50): a generalized, unifying affinity descriptor.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Alberto; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Assessing binding affinities is an unavoidable step that we come across any time interactions between binding species are investigated. A quantitative evaluation of binding affinities relies on the determination of binding constants but, whilst the binding constant fully defines the affinity of a reagent for a ligand when only one complex species is formed, the same is not true when the interacting partners form more than one complex of different stoichiometry, because all complexes contribute to the overall binding affinity. Unfortunately, this situation is the rule rather than the exception in chemical systems, but a generally accepted solution for this issue has not yet been settled. In this Personal Account, we describe the evolution, from the initial idea to a fully developed stage, of a binding descriptor that has been developed with the aim of filling this gap, thereby providing scientists in all fields of chemistry with a unifying tool for the assessment of binding affinities based on the knowledge of the binding constants in systems that involve any number of complex species.

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  12. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  13. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  14. New coumarin-based fluorescent melatonin ligands. Design, synthesis and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Fernández-Sáez, Nerea; Barco, Gema; García-Orue, Itxaso; Sugden, David; Rivara, Silvia; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2015-10-20

    The design and synthesis of a series of new fluorescent coumarin-containing melatonin analogues is presented. The combination of high-binding affinities for human melatonergic receptors (h-MT₁R and h-MT₂R) and fluorescent properties, derived from the inclusion of melatonin pharmacophoric elements in the coumarin scaffold, yielded suitable candidates for the development of MT₁R and MT₂R fluorescent probes for imaging in biological media.

  15. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same time,…

  16. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  17. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-01-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  18. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-06-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  19. Indole-7-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone as a flexidentate ligand toward ZnII, CdII, PdII and PtII ions: cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing properties of the PtII complex.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abeer A; Khaledi, Hamid; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Karimian, Hamed

    2014-03-14

    A new thiosemicarbazone (LH2) derived from indole-7-carbaldehyde was synthesized and reacted with Zn(II), Cd(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) salts. The reactions with zinc and cadmium salts in 2 : 1 (ligand-metal) molar ratio afforded complexes of the type MX2(LH2)2, (X = Cl, Br or OAc), in which the thiosemicarbazone acts as a neutral S-monodentate ligand. In the presence of potassium hydroxide, the reaction of LH2 with ZnBr2 resulted in deprotonation of the thiosemicarbazone at the hydrazine and indole nitrogens to form Zn(L)(CH3OH). The reaction of LH2 with K2PdCl4 in the presence of triethylamine, afforded Pd(L)(LH2) which contains two thiosemicarbazone ligands: one being dianionic N,N,S-tridentate while the other one is neutral S-monodentate. When PdCl2(PPh3)2 was used as the Pd(II) ion source, Pd(L)(PPh3) was obtained. In a similar manner, the analogous platinum complex, Pt(L)(PPh3), was synthesized. The thiosemicarbazone in the latter two complexes behaves in a dianionic N,N,S-tridentate fashion. The platinum complex was found to have significant cytotoxicity toward four cancer cells lines, namely MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, HT-29, and HCT-116 but not toward the normal liver WRL-68 cell line. The apoptosis-inducing properties of the Pt complex was explored through fluorescence microscopy visualization, DNA fragmentation analysis and propidium iodide flow cytometry.

  20. Five new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers constructed by 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures, network topologies and luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xian-Rong; Yuan, Hong-Yan; Feng, Yun-Long

    2012-07-01

    Five Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers, [Zn2(BOABA)(bpp)(OH)]·0.5H2O (1), [Cd3(BOABA)2(bpp)2(H2O)6]·2H2O (2), [Cd3(BOABA)2(2,2'-bipy)3(H2O)4]·5.5H2O (3), [CdNa(BOABA)(H2O)]2·H2O (4) and [Cd2(BOABA)(bimb)Cl(H2O)2]·H2O (5) (H3BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid, bpp=1,3-bi(4-pyridyl)propane, 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine, bimb=1,4-bis(imidazol-1'-yl)butane), have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG analyses. 1 is an uninodal 4-connected 2D square grid network based on binuclear zinc clusters. 2 is 2D wavelike layer structure and further linked by hydrogen bonds into the final 3D (5,6,6)-connected topology network. 3 is 3-connected 2D topology network and the 2,2'-bipy ligands decorate in two different types. 4 is a (4,8)-connected 2D topology network with heterocaryotic {Cd2Na2} clusters and BOABA3- ligands. 5 can be rationalized as a (3,10)-connected 3D topology network with tetranuclear {Cd4Cl2} clusters and BOABA3- ligands. Meanwhile, photoluminescence studies revealed that these five coordination polymers display strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature.

  1. European and international collaboration in affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    In affinity proteomics, specific protein-binding molecules (a.k.a. binders), principally antibodies, are applied as reagents in proteome analysis. In recent years, advances in binder technologies have created the potential for an unprecedented view on protein expression and distribution patterns in plasma, cells and tissues and increasingly on protein function. Particular strengths of affinity proteomics methods include detecting proteins in their natural environments of cell or tissue, high sensitivity and selectivity for detection of low abundance proteins and exploiting binding actions such as functional interference in living cells. To maximise the use and impact of affinity reagents, it will be essential to create comprehensive, standardised binder collections. With this in mind, the EU FP7 programme AFFINOMICS (http://www.affinomics.org), together with the preceding EU programmes ProteomeBinders and AffinityProteome, aims to extend affinity proteomics research by generating a large-scale resource of validated protein-binding molecules for characterisation of the human proteome. Activity is directed at producing binders to about 1000 protein targets, primarily in signal transduction and cancer, by establishing a high throughput, coordinated production pipeline. An important aspect of AFFINOMICS is the development of highly efficient recombinant selection methods, based on phage, cell and ribosome display, capable of producing high quality binders at greater throughput and lower cost than hitherto. The programme also involves development of innovative and sensitive technologies for specific detection of target proteins and their interactions, and deployment of binders in proteomics studies of clinical relevance. The need for such binder generation programmes is now recognised internationally, with parallel initiatives in the USA for cancer (NCI) and transcription factors (NIH) and within the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). The papers in this volume of New

  2. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  3. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. > The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. > Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. > f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy theories to

  4. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  5. Regulation of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1) expression by cisplatin and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng Dong; Long, Yan; Chen, Helen H W; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay in cancer chemotherapy for many human malignancies. Drug resistance is an important obstacle to achieving the maximal therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Understanding how platinum drugs enter cells is of great importance in improving therapeutic efficacy. It has been demonstrated that human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is involved in transporting cisplatin into cells to elicit cytotoxic effects, although other mechanisms may exist. In this communication, we demonstrate that cisplatin transcriptionally induces the expression of hCtr1 in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Cisplatin functions as a competitor for hCtr1-mediated copper transport, resulting in reduced cellular copper levels and leading to upregulated expression of Sp1, which is a positive regulator for hCtr1 expression. Thus, regulation of hCtr1 expression by cisplatin is an integral part of the copper homeostasis regulation system. We also demonstrate that Ag(I) and Zn(II), which are known to suppress hCtr1-mediated copper transport, can also induce hCtr1/Sp1 expression. In contrast, Cd(II), another inhibitor of copper transport, downregulates hCtr1 expression by suppressing Sp1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate diverse mechanisms of regulating copper metabolism by these heavy metals.

  6. Affine Invariant Character Recognition by Progressive Removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamura, Masakazu; Horimatsu, Akira; Niwa, Ryo; Kise, Koichi; Uchida, Seiichi; Omachi, Shinichiro

    Recognizing characters in scene images suffering from perspective distortion is a challenge. Although there are some methods to overcome this difficulty, they are time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a set of affine invariant features and a new recognition scheme called “progressive removing” that can help reduce the processing time. Progressive removing gradually removes less feasible categories and skew angles by using multiple classifiers. We observed that progressive removing and the use of the affine invariant features reduced the processing time by about 60% in comparison to a trivial one without decreasing the recognition rate.

  7. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  8. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  9. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  10. Ethylenediamine-modified graphene oxide covalently functionalized with a tetracarboxylic Zn(ii) phthalocyanine hybrid for enhanced nonlinear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongle; He, Chunying; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Yachen; Dong, Yongli; Zhao, Cheng; Chen, Zhimin; Wu, Yiqun; Song, Weina

    2016-07-01

    Tetracarboxylic Zn(ii) phthalocyanine-amino functionalized graphene oxide (ZnPcC4-NGO) hybrid materials have been prepared by a covalent functionalization method. The characterizations indicate that the amino-functionalization of GO has an important influence on the structure and photophysical properties of the ZnPcC4-NGO hybrid. The ZnPcC4-NGO hybrid exhibits enhanced photo-induced electron transfer or energy transfer (PET/ET), compared to the ZnPcC4 covalent functionalized GO (ZnPcC4-GO), owing to the presence of the extended sp(2) carbon configurations, along with the partial reduction of the NGO nanosheets and the introduction of electron-donating ethylenediamine. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the hybrids were investigated using the Z-scan technique at 532 nm with 4 ns laser pulses. The results show that the efficient covalent functionalization and partial reduction of NGO cause the ZnPcC4-NGO hybrid to possess evidently larger NLO properties than the individual NGO, ZnPcC4 and the ZnPcC4-GO hybrid. The enhanced NLO performance can be attributed to the increased excited state absorption from the extended sp(2) carbon configurations of the NGO moiety, reverse saturable absorption arising from ZnPcC4 moiety, and the contribution of the efficient PET/ET process between the ZnPcC4 and NGO moieties in the hybrid. PMID:27296527

  11. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and cytotoxic properties of thiosemicarbazide Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathan Kumar, S.; Rajesh, J.; Anitha, K.; Dhahagani, K.; Marappan, M.; Indra Gandhi, N.; Rajagopal, G.

    2015-05-01

    Synthesis of new complexes of Ni(II) (1) and Zn(II) (2) with [1-(2-hydroxy-3,5-diiodobenzylidene)-4-phenylthiosemicarbazide] have been reported. The composition of these two complexes 1 and 2 is discussed on the basis of IR, 1H NMR and UV spectral data along with their X-ray crystallographic data. The crystal structure of these two complexes has revealed that the free ligand (L) is deprotonated twice at the oxygen and sulfur atoms and they are coordinated with the complexes through phenoxide-O, azomethine-N and thiolate-S atoms. The single-crystal X-ray structures of complex (1) exhibits a square planar structure, while complex (2) reveals trigonal bipyramidal distorted square based pyramidal structure. Anticancer activity of ligand and the complexes 1-2 are evaluated in human adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells. The preliminary bioassay indicates that the free ligand and the complexes 1-2 exhibit inhibitory activity against the human adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines.

  12. High-affinity lead binding proteins in rat kidney cytosol mediate cell-free nuclear translocation of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, P.; Lucier, G.W.; Fowler, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PbII binding characteristics of the previously reported PbII binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol were investigated further. Saturation and Scatchard analysis of /sup 203/Pb binding in whole cytosol and in 40% saturated ammonium sulfate precipitated fractions disclosed a class of relatively high-affinity sites with an apparent Kd of approximately 50 nM and binding capacities of approximately 41 and 9 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. Two /sup 203/Pb binding proteins with approximate molecular masses of 63K and 11.5K daltons and a high molecular weight component (greater than 200K) were isolated by Sepharose-6B column chromatography. The time course of association of /sup 203/Pb with cytosol and the 63K protein showed maximum binding at 18 hr which was stable up to 25 hr at 4 degrees C. The approximate half-time dissociation rate (T 1/2) of specifically bound /sup 203/Pb to the 63K protein was 100 min at 4 degrees C whereas the 11.5K protein showed little dissociation of specifically bound ligand at this temperature. Saturation analysis of the three isolated proteins disclosed low capacity, high-affinity sites with similar apparent Kd values to the cytosol assay. Sucrose density gradient analysis of kidney cytosol showed approximate sedimentation coefficients of 2S, 4.6S and 7S for the 11.5K, 63K and the high molecular weight proteins, respectively. Competitive binding studies with cytosol demonstrated displacement of /sup 203/Pb by PbII, CdII and ZnII ions but not CaII ions.

  13. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  14. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  15. Two bradykinin binding sites with picomolar affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, D.C.; Vavrek, R.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and related peptides exert a wide range of effects on several organ systems. We have attempted to sort out these effects by studying the binding interaction of (/sup 3/H)BK at the membrane level with in vitro receptor binding techniques. High specific activity (/sup 3/H)BK and an enzyme inhibitor cocktail has enabled us to label two BK binding sites with different affinity and peptide specificity in several guinea-pig tissues. In the guinea-pig ileum the high-affinity site has an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (/sup 3/H)BK of 13 pM and a maximal number of binding sites of 8.3 pmol/g of tissue wet weight. The low-affinity guinea-pig ileum site displays a Kd of 910 pM, a maximum number of binding sites of 14 pmol/g of tissue wet weight and shows a greater selectivity for BK analogs over Lysyl-BK analogs. Two similar sites can also be discriminated in kidney and heart. The potencies of a series of BK analogs at the high-affinity guinea-pig ileum site correlate well with their potencies in contracting ileal smooth muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)BK in the guinea-pig ileum is inhibited by physiological concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations.

  16. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite II: Insights into the surface structure and composition of pure, Al- and Si-bearing ferrihydrite from Zn(II) sorption experiments and Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Levard, Clément; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Gordon E.

    2013-10-01

    Naturally occurring ferrihydrite often contains impurities such as Al and Si, which can impact its chemical reactivity with respect to metal(loid) adsorption and (in)organic or microbially induced reductive dissolution. However, the surface composition of impure ferrihydrites is not well constrained, and this hinders our understanding of the factors controlling the surface reactivity of these nanophases. In this study, we conducted Zn(II) adsorption experiments combined with Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements on pure ferrihydrite (Fh) and Al- or Si-bearing ferrihydrites containing 10 and 20 mol% Al or Si (referred to as 10AlFh, 20AlFh and 10SiFh, 20SiFh) to evaluate Zn(II) uptake in relation to Zn(II) speciation at their surfaces. Overall, Zn(II) uptake at the surface of AlFh is similar to that of pure Fh, and based on Zn K-edge EXAFS data, Zn(II) speciation at the surface of Fh and AlFh also appears similar. Binuclear bidentate IVZn-VIFe complexes (at ∼3.46 Å (2C[1]) and ∼3.25 Å (2C[2])) were identified at low Zn(II) surface coverages from Zn K-edge EXAFS fits. With increasing Zn(II) surface coverage, the number of second-neighbor Fe ions decreased, which was interpreted as indicating the formation of IVZn polymers at the ferrihydrite surface, and a deviation from Langmuir uptake behavior. Zn(II) uptake at the surface of SiFh samples was more significant than at Fh and AlFh surfaces, and was attributed to the formation of outer-sphere complexes (on average 24% of sorbed Zn). Although similar Zn-Fe/Zn distances were obtained for the Zn-sorbed SiFh samples, the number of Fe second neighbors was lower in comparison with Fh. The decrease in second-neighbor Fe is most pronounced for sample 20SiFh, suggesting that the amount of reactive surface Fe sites diminishes with increasing Si content. Although our EXAFS results shown here do not provide evidence for the existence of Zn-Al or Zn-Si complexes, their presence is not excluded for Zn-sorbed Al

  17. Entropic Enhancement of Protein-DNA Affinity by Oxygen-to-Sulfur Substitution in DNA Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Nguyen, Dan; Anderson, Kurtis M; White, Mark A; Gorenstein, David G; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Dithioation of DNA phosphate is known to enhance binding affinities, at least for some proteins. We mechanistically characterized this phenomenon for the Antennapedia homeodomain-DNA complex by integrated use of fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray crystallography. By fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that this affinity enhancement is entropy driven. By NMR, we investigated the ionic hydrogen bonds and internal motions of lysine side-chain NH3(+) groups involved in ion pairs with DNA. By x-ray crystallography, we compared the structures of the complexes with and without dithioation of the phosphate. Our NMR and x-ray data show that the lysine side chain in contact with the DNA phosphate becomes more dynamic upon dithioation. Our thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic investigations collectively suggest that the affinity enhancement by the oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in DNA phosphate is largely due to an entropic gain arising from mobilization of the intermolecular ion pair at the protein-DNA interface. PMID:26331260

  18. Entropic Enhancement of Protein-DNA Affinity by Oxygen-to-Sulfur Substitution in DNA Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Nguyen, Dan; Anderson, Kurtis M.; White, Mark A.; Gorenstein, David G.; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Dithioation of DNA phosphate is known to enhance binding affinities, at least for some proteins. We mechanistically characterized this phenomenon for the Antennapedia homeodomain-DNA complex by integrated use of fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray crystallography. By fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that this affinity enhancement is entropy driven. By NMR, we investigated the ionic hydrogen bonds and internal motions of lysine side-chain NH3+ groups involved in ion pairs with DNA. By x-ray crystallography, we compared the structures of the complexes with and without dithioation of the phosphate. Our NMR and x-ray data show that the lysine side chain in contact with the DNA phosphate becomes more dynamic upon dithioation. Our thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic investigations collectively suggest that the affinity enhancement by the oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in DNA phosphate is largely due to an entropic gain arising from mobilization of the intermolecular ion pair at the protein-DNA interface. PMID:26331260

  19. Binding affinities of CRBPI and CRBPII for 9-cis-retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Bright, Frank V.; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular retinol binding-protein I (CRBPI) and cellular retinol binding-protein II (CRBPII) serve as intracellular retinoid chaperones that bind retinol and retinal with high affinity and facilitate substrate delivery to select enzymes that catalyze retinoic acid (RA) and retinyl ester biosynthesis. Recently, 9-cis-RA has been identified in vivo in the pancreas, where it contributes to regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In vitro, 9-cis-RA activates RXR (retinoid×receptors), which serve as therapeutic targets for treating cancer and metabolic diseases. Binding affinities and structure–function relationships have been well characterized for CRBPI and CRBPII with all-trans-retinoids, but not for 9-cis-retinoids. This study extended current knowledge by establishing binding affinities for CRBPI and CRBPII with 9-cis-retinoids. Methods We have determined apparent dissociation constants, Kd′, through monitoring binding of 9-cis-retinol, 9-cis-retinal, and 9-cis-RA with CRBPI and CRBPII by fluorescence spectroscopy, and analyzing the data with non-linear regression. We compared these data to the data we obtained for all-trans- and 13-cis-retinoids under identical conditions. Results CRBPI and CRBPII, respectively, bind 9-cis-retinol ( Kd′, 11 nM and 68 nM) and 9-cis-retinal ( Kd′, 8 nM and 5 nM) with high affinity. No significant 9-cis-RA binding was observed with CRBPI or CRBPII. Conclusions CRBPI and CRBPII bind 9-cis-retinol and 9-cis-retinal with high affinities, albeit with affinities somewhat lower than for all-trans-retinol and all-trans-retinal. General significance These data provide further insight into structure–binding relationships of cellular retinol binding-proteins and are consistent with a model of 9-cis-RA biosynthesis that involves chaperoned delivery of 9-cis-retinoids to enzymes that recognize retinoid binding-proteins. PMID:21382444

  20. [Development of Zn(2+) selective fluorescent probes for biological applications].

    PubMed

    Hagimori, Masayori

    2013-01-01

    Zn(2+) is an essential element for life and is known to play important roles in biological processes including gene expression, apoptosis, enzyme regulation, immune system and neurotransmission. To investigate physiological roles of free or chelatable Zn(2+) in living cells, Zn(2+)-selective fluorescent probes are valuable tools. A variety of fluorescent probes based on quinoline, BF2 chelated dipyrromethene, fluorescein, etc. has been developed recently. In principle, such tools can provide useful information about zinc biology. However, most of the fluorescent probes presented so far possess a fluorescent core and a separate part for binding to Zn(2+) within the molecule, so that the molecular weight is usually large and the molecules are hydrophobic. As a result, the applications of such molecules in biological systems often face difficulties. Therefore, we need to develop a new class of fluorescent probes for Zn(2+) with improved molecular characteristics. If the initial core structure is small enough, the fluorescent probes may still be molecular weight below 500 with desirable physico-chemical properties, even after the modifications. In this review, we described novel low-molecular-weight fluorescent probes for Zn(2+) based on pyridine-pyridone. Small modification of pyridine-pyridone core structure brought about a marked improvement such as aqueous solubility, affinity toward Zn(2+), and fluorescence ON/OFF switching. Fluorescence images of Zn(2+) in cells showed that the pyridine-pyridone probe can be used in biological applications.

  1. A fluorescence study of tetraphenylporphyrinatozinc(II)/imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin-Wang; Hu, Shu-Guang; Li, Tao; Fan, Li-Fen; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2003-09-01

    The fluorescence spectra of porphyrinatozinc(II)/iron(III) systems which consisted of tetraphenylporphyrinatozinc(II) and three kinds of imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) have been studied. An efficient fluorescence quenching of tetraphenylporphyrinatozinc(II) in the system was observed. Addition of a stronger organic base, such as piperdine, to the system can displace imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) and the fluorescence of the system restored partly. All these indicate the formation of porphyrinatozinc(II)/iron(III) supramolecular complex and coordination bonding formed by the coordination of imidazolyl group in imidazolyl-linked porphyrinatoiron(III) to Zn(II) in tetraphenyl-porphyrinatozinc(II) is the driving force of the supramolecular self-assembly. The association constants of the supramolecular complexes were calculated from the fluorescence spectroscopic titration data, and the differences among the association constants of the supramolecular complexes are discussed on the basis of the conformations which are dependent on the length of alkoxy chain linking imidazolyl group to porphyrinatoiron(III).

  2. Chemiluminescently labeled aptamers as the affinity probe for interaction analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yi; Deng, Qin-Pei; Zhang, De-Wen; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Aptamers are nucleic acid oligonucleotides, which can recognize targets with high affinity and specificity. Fluorescently labeled aptamers have been used as affinity probes in CE for interaction analysis. In this study, a method of labeling aptamers chemiluminescently with isoluminol isothiocyanate (ILITC) through covalent bonds was proposed and realized. The ILITC-labeled aptamers were characterized by HPLC-MS and purified by HPLC. After desalination, the ILITC-labeled aptamers were employed as the affinity probe for interaction analysis in CE coupled with chemiluminescence detection (CE-CL) by interface of end column reaction mode, the apparatus of which was home-designed and setup. CE-CL experiment conditions, including buffer pH, concentrations of horseradish peroxidase and H(2)O(2), were optimized first. The system of thrombin and its 29-mer aptamer was chosen as the model. Binding parameters, namely the dissociation constant (K(d)) and the binding site number (n), were calculated. The K(d) obtained was 124.0+/-6.9 nM in agreement with the reported values. Thus, interaction analysis method based on chemiluminescently labeled aptamers as the affinity probe in CE-CL has been established. This method can be widely applied due to the ease and universality of the labeling method, simplicity of CE-CL apparatus and combination with aptamers for a wide range of targets.

  3. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  4. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  5. Potential toxicity and affinity of triphenylmethane dye malachite green to lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Li, Xiu-Nan; Diao, Jian-Xiong; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Li; Ma, Lin; Yang, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Li; Sun, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Malachite green is a triphenylmethane dye that is used extensively in many industrial and aquacultural processes, generating environmental concerns and health problems to human being. In this contribution, the complexation between lysozyme and malachite green was verified by means of computer-aided molecular modeling, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) approaches. The precise binding patch of malachite green in lysozyme has been identified from molecular modeling and ANS displacement, Trp-62, Trp-63, and Trp-108 residues of lysozyme were earmarked to possess high-affinity for this dye, the principal forces in the lysozyme-malachite green adduct are hydrophobic and π-π interactions. Steady state fluorescence proclaimed the complex of malachite green with lysozyme yields quenching through static type, which substantiates time-resolved fluorescence measurements that lysozyme-malachite green conjugation formation has an affinity of 10(3)M(-1). Moreover, via molecular modeling and also CD data, we can safely arrive at a conclusion that the polypeptide chain of lysozyme partially destabilized upon complexation with malachite green. The data emerged here will help to further understand the toxicological action of malachite green in human body.

  6. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sulatskaya, Anna I; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Belousov, Mikhail V; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Zhouravleva, Galina A; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered.

  7. Batch affinity adsorption of His-tagged proteins with EDTA-based chitosan.

    PubMed

    Hua, Weiwei; Lou, Yimin; Xu, Weiyuan; Cheng, Zhixian; Gong, Xingwen; Huang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Affinity adsorption purification of hexahistidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins using EDTA-chitosan-based adsorption was designed and carried out. Chitosan was elaborated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the resulting polymer was characterized by FTIR, TGA, and TEM. Different metals including Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were immobilized with EDTA-chitosan, and their capability to the specific adsorption of His-tagged proteins were then investigated. The results showed that Ni(2+)-EDTA-chitosan and Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan had high affinity toward the His-tagged proteins, thus isolating them from protein mixture. The target fluorescent-labeled hexahistidine protein remained its fluorescent characteristic throughout the purification procedure when Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan was used as a sorbent, wherein the real-time monitor was performed to examine the immigration of fluorescent-labeled His-tagged protein. Comparatively, Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan showed more specific binding ability for the target protein, but with less binding capacity. It was further proved that this purification system could be recovered and reused at least for 5 times and could run on large scales. The presented M(2+)-EDTA-chitosan system, with the capability to specifically bind His-tagged proteins, make the purification of His-tagged proteins easy to handle, leaving out fussy preliminary treatment, and with the possibility of continuous processing and a reduction in operational cost in relation to the costs of conventional processes.

  8. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sulatskaya, Anna I.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Belousov, Mikhail V.; Bondarev, Stanislav A.; Zhouravleva, Galina A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  9. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sulatskaya, Anna I; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Belousov, Mikhail V; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Zhouravleva, Galina A; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  10. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  11. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  12. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  13. Diverse Zn(II) MOFs assembled from V-shaped asymmetric multicarboxylate and N-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Run-Ping; Yang, Jin-Xia; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Yuan-Gen

    2016-02-01

    By reacting an asymmetry semi-rigid V-shaped linker H3L (H3L = 3-(3-carboxyphenoxy) phthalic acid) and Zn(NO3)2·6H2O under different N-donor ligands in different solvents, four new Zn-based coordination polymers, [Zn(HL)(2,2‧-bpy)(H2O)]n(1), [Zn(HL)(4,4‧-bpy)]n·n(DMA) (2), [Zn3(L)2(phen)3(H2O)]n·n(H2O) (3) and [Zn(HL)(phen)(H2O)]2(4) (2,2‧-bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine; 4,4‧-bpy = 4,4‧-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide) have been obtained. All of these compounds have been clearly identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 exhibits one-dimensional (1D) chain structure constructed from uninuclear Zn(II) motif, which further extends into 2D supramolecular architecture via intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen bonds. Structural analysis reveals that the structure of 2 and 3 can be described as a 2D hcb topology network with the point symbol of {63}. Compound 4 shows a 0D binuclear motif while its 3D packing network has a large potential solvent voids. The results of this research demonstrate that the solvent and the secondary ligands could co-regulate different structural coordination polymers with interesting properties. In addition, the thermal stabilities and solid-state luminescence properties of compounds 1-4 have also been investigated.

  14. Comparative Raman study of four plant metallothionein isoforms: Insights into their Zn(II) clusters and protein conformations.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Mireia; Tinti, Anna; Bofill, Roger; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Silvia; Torreggiani, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Four Metallothioneins (MTs) from soybean (Glycine max) were heterologously synthesized and comparatively analysed by Raman spectroscopy. The participation of protein donor groups (S-thiol and N-imidazol) in Zn(II) chelation, as well as the presence of secondary structure elements was comparatively analysed. Metal clusters with different geometry can be hypothesised for the four GmMTs: a cubane-like or an adamantane-like metal cluster in Zn-GmMT1, and dinuclear Zn-S clusters in Zn-GmMT2, Zn-GmMT3 and Zn-GmMT4. The latter have also a similar average Cys/Zn content, whereas a lower ratio is present in Zn-GmMT1. This is possible thanks to the involvement in metal coordination of a greater number of bridging Cys, as well as of some carboxylate groups. As regards secondary structure elements, a large content of β-turn segments is present in all four Zn-GmMTs, especially for isoforms 1 and 4. β-strands give a contribution to the folding of three GmMTs isoforms, and the highest percentage was found in Zn-GmMT2 (~45%). Conversely, the α-helix content is negligible in all the GmMTs except in Zn-GmMT3, where this peculiar feature coincides with the possible involvement of the two His residues in metal coordination. Conversely, His is predominantly free and present as tautomer I in Zn-GmMT4. In conclusion, this work illustrates the attractive potential of Raman spectroscopy, combined with other techniques, to be a very informative tool for evidencing structural differences among in vivo synthesized metal-MT complexes.

  15. Diverse Zn(II) MOFs assembled from V-shaped asymmetric multicarboxylate and N-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Run-Ping; Yang, Jin-Xia; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Yuan-Gen

    2016-02-01

    By reacting an asymmetry semi-rigid V-shaped linker H3L (H3L = 3-(3-carboxyphenoxy) phthalic acid) and Zn(NO3)2·6H2O under different N-donor ligands in different solvents, four new Zn-based coordination polymers, [Zn(HL)(2,2‧-bpy)(H2O)]n(1), [Zn(HL)(4,4‧-bpy)]n·n(DMA) (2), [Zn3(L)2(phen)3(H2O)]n·n(H2O) (3) and [Zn(HL)(phen)(H2O)]2(4) (2,2‧-bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine; 4,4‧-bpy = 4,4‧-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide) have been obtained. All of these compounds have been clearly identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 exhibits one-dimensional (1D) chain structure constructed from uninuclear Zn(II) motif, which further extends into 2D supramolecular architecture via intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen bonds. Structural analysis reveals that the structure of 2 and 3 can be described as a 2D hcb topology network with the point symbol of {63}. Compound 4 shows a 0D binuclear motif while its 3D packing network has a large potential solvent voids. The results of this research demonstrate that the solvent and the secondary ligands could co-regulate different structural coordination polymers with interesting properties. In addition, the thermal stabilities and solid-state luminescence properties of compounds 1-4 have also been investigated.

  16. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  17. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity. PMID:26583259

  18. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Mohd F. Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-24

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m{sup 2}/g and 0.17 cm{sup 2}/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  19. Two-dimensional Zn(II) and one-dimensional Co(II) coordination polymers based on benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate and pyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Juan; Han, Chang-Bao; Wang, Yu-Ling

    2016-02-01

    Coordination polymers constructed from metal ions and organic ligands have attracted considerable attention owing to their diverse structural topologies and potential applications. Ligands containing carboxylate groups are among the most extensively studied because of their versatile coordination modes. Reactions of benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (H2BDC) and pyridine (py) with Zn(II) or Co(II) yielded two new coordination polymers, namely, poly[(μ4-benzene-1,4-dicarboxylato-κ(4)O:O':O'':O''')(pyridine-κN)zinc(II)], [Zn(C8H4O2)(C5H5N)]n, (I), and catena-poly[aqua(μ3-benzene-1,4-dicarboxylato-κ(3)O:O':O'')bis(pyridine-κN)cobalt(II)], [Co(C8H4O2)(C5H5N)2(H2O)]n, (II). In compound (I), the Zn(II) cation is five-coordinated by four carboxylate O atoms from four BDC(2-) ligands and one pyridine N atom in a distorted square-pyramidal coordination geometry. Four carboxylate groups bridge two Zn(II) ions to form centrosymmetric paddle-wheel-like Zn2(μ2-COO)4 units, which are linked by the benzene rings of the BDC(2-) ligands to generate a two-dimensional layered structure. The two-dimensional layer is extended into a three-dimensional supramolecular structure with the help of π-π stacking interactions between the aromatic rings. Compound (II) has a one-dimensional double-chain structure based on Co2(μ2-COO)2 units. The Co(II) cations are bridged by BDC(2-) ligands and are octahedrally coordinated by three carboxylate O atoms from three BDC(2-) ligands, one water O atom and two pyridine N atoms. Interchain O-H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions link these chains to form a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. PMID:26846498

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and biological activities of N4O2 Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Amin, Kr. Mohammad Yusuf; Lateef, Abdul

    The Schiff base ligand, bis(indoline-2-one)triethylenetetramine (L) obtained from condensation of triethylenetetramine and isatin was used to synthesize the complexes of type, [ML]Cl2 [M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)]. L was characterized on the basis of the results of elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectroscopic studies. The stoichiometry, bonding and stereochemistries of complexes were ascertained on the basis of results of elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility values, molar conductance and various spectroscopic studies. EPR, UV-vis and magnetic moments revealed an octahedral geometry for complexes. L and its Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity. Analgesic activity of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes was also tested in rats by tail flick method. Both complexes were found to possess good antibacterial and moderate analgesic activity.

  1. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to <1% at 10

  2. Smooth big bounce from affine quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Hervé; Dapor, Andrea; Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Małkiewicz, Przemysław

    2014-04-01

    We examine the possibility of dealing with gravitational singularities on a quantum level through the use of coherent state or wavelet quantization instead of canonical quantization. We consider the Robertson-Walker metric coupled to a perfect fluid. It is the simplest model of a gravitational collapse, and the results obtained here may serve as a useful starting point for more complex investigations in the future. We follow a quantization procedure based on affine coherent states or wavelets built from the unitary irreducible representation of the affine group of the real line with positive dilation. The main issue of our approach is the appearance of a quantum centrifugal potential allowing for regularization of the singularity, essential self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian, and unambiguous quantum dynamical evolution.

  3. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  4. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Béhar, Ghislaine; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized. PMID:25647098

  5. Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a tool for assessing mosaic disease severity in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin; Eghan, Moses J; Asare-Bediako, Elvis; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K

    2012-01-01

    Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence was used in agronomical assessment (disease severity and average yield per plant). Because cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is of economic importance, improved cultivars with various levels of affinity for cassava mosaic disease were investigated. Fluorescence data correlated with cassava mosaic disease severity levels and with the average yield per plant.

  6. Permeability of self-affine rough fractures

    PubMed

    Drazer; Koplik

    2000-12-01

    The permeability of two-dimensional fractures with self-affine fractal roughness is studied via analytic arguments and numerical simulations. The limit where the roughness amplitude is small compared with average fracture aperture is analyzed by a perturbation method, while in the opposite case of narrow aperture, we use heuristic arguments based on lubrication theory. Numerical simulations, using the lattice Boltzmann method, are used to examine the complete range of aperture sizes, and confirm the analytic arguments. PMID:11138092

  7. Evaluation of Chemical Fluorescent Dyes as a Protein Conjugation Partner for Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Stasevich, Timothy J.; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab) fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph) and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac). These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye∶protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green), Cy3 (red), and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red). PMID:25184362

  8. Thermal Studies of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) Complexes of Some N-Alkyl-N-Phenyl-Dithiocarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes of N-ethyl-N-phenyl and N-butyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamates have been studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The products of the decomposition, at two different temperatures, were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that while the zinc and cadmium complexes undergo decomposition to form metal sulphides, and further undergo oxidation forming metal oxides as final products, the mercury complexes gave unstable volatiles as the final product. PMID:22949811

  9. Regioselective 1,4-conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to nitrodienes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Zn(II) salts.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Ramesh C; Dieter, R Karl

    2014-03-01

    Grignard reagents undergo facile regioselective 1,4-conjugate addition to nitrodienes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Zn(II) salts with excellent yields. A wide range of ligands such as alkyl, aryl, heteroaryl, allyl, vinyl, 1-alkynyl, and alkoxy ligands were transferred, while a thiolate ligand afforded 1,6-regioselectivity. The reactions were successfully carried out on δ-alkyl- or aryl-substituted α,β,γ,δ-diunsaturated nitrodiene substrates. Regioselectivity is minimally influenced by temperature or choice of solvent. PMID:24552443

  10. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  11. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field.

  12. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field. PMID:16792079

  13. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  14. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  15. Trematode hemoglobins show exceptionally high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Kiger, L; Rashid, A K; Griffon, N; Haque, M; Moens, L; Gibson, Q H; Poyart, C; Marden, M C

    1998-08-01

    Ligand binding studies were made with hemoglobin (Hb) isolated from trematode species Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gc), Paramphistomum epiclitum (Pe), Explanatum explanatum (Ee), parasitic worms of water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, and Isoparorchis hypselobagri (Ih) parasitic in the catfish Wallago attu. The kinetics of oxygen and carbon monoxide binding show very fast association rates. Whereas oxygen can be displaced on a millisecond time scale from human Hb at 25 degrees C, the dissociation of oxygen from trematode Hb may require a few seconds to over 20 s (for Hb Pe). Carbon monoxide dissociation is faster, however, than for other monomeric hemoglobins or myoglobins. Trematode hemoglobins also show a reduced rate of autoxidation; the oxy form is not readily oxidized by potassium ferricyanide, indicating that only the deoxy form reacts rapidly with this oxidizing agent. Unlike most vertebrate Hbs, the trematodes have a tyrosine residue at position E7 instead of the usual distal histidine. As for Hb Ascaris, which also displays a high oxygen affinity, the trematodes have a tyrosine in position B10; two H-bonds to the oxygen molecule are thought to be responsible for the very high oxygen affinity. The trematode hemoglobins display a combination of high association rates and very low dissociation rates, resulting in some of the highest oxygen affinities ever observed.

  16. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  17. An affinity-directed protein missile system for targeted proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Luke J.; Macartney, Thomas; Bozatzi, Polyxeni; Hornberger, Annika; Rojas-Fernandez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) protein serves to recruit the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF1α) protein under normoxia to the CUL2 E3 ubiquitin ligase for its ubiquitylation and degradation through the proteasome. In this report, we modify VHL to engineer an affinity-directed protein missile (AdPROM) system to direct specific endogenous target proteins for proteolysis in mammalian cells. The proteolytic AdPROM construct harbours a cameloid anti-green fluorescence protein (aGFP) nanobody that is fused to VHL for either constitutive or tetracycline-inducible expression. For target proteins, we exploit CRISPR/Cas9 to rapidly generate human kidney HEK293 and U2OS osteosarcoma homozygous knock-in cells harbouring GFP tags at the VPS34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34) and protein associated with SMAD1 (PAWS1, aka FAM83G) loci, respectively. Using these cells, we demonstrate that the expression of the VHL-aGFP AdPROM system results in near-complete degradation of the endogenous GFP-VPS34 and PAWS1-GFP proteins through the proteasome. Additionally, we show that Tet-inducible destruction of GFP-VPS34 results in the degradation of its associated partner, UVRAG, and reduction in levels of cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. PMID:27784791

  18. Mining the soluble chloroplast proteome by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Csaszar, Edina; Teige, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are fundamental organelles enabling plant photoautotrophy. Besides their outstanding physiological role in fixation of atmospheric CO2, they harbor many important metabolic processes such as biosynthesis of amino acids, vitamins or hormones. Technical advances in MS allowed the recent identification of most chloroplast proteins. However, for a deeper understanding of chloroplast function it is important to obtain a complete list of constituents, which is so far limited by the detection of low-abundant proteins. Therefore, we developed a two-step strategy for the enrichment of low-abundant soluble chloroplast proteins from Pisum sativum and their subsequent identification by MS. First, chloroplast protein extracts were depleted from the most abundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by SEC or heating. Further purification was carried out by affinity chromatography, using ligands specific for ATP- or metal-binding proteins. By these means, we were able to identify a total of 448 proteins including 43 putative novel chloroplast proteins. Additionally, the chloroplast localization of 13 selected proteins was confirmed using yellow fluorescent protein fusion analyses. The selected proteins included a phosphoglycerate mutase, a cysteine protease, a putative protein kinase and an EF-hand containing substrate carrier protein, which are expected to exhibit important metabolic or regulatory functions. PMID:21365755

  19. Aptamer stationary phase for protein capture in affinity capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Connor, Adam C; McGown, Linda B

    2006-04-14

    The thrombin-binding DNA aptamer was used with thrombin as a model system to investigate protein capture using aptamer stationary phases in affinity capillary chromatography. The aptamer was covalently attached to the inner surface of a bare fused-silica glass capillary to serve as the stationary phase. Proteins were loaded onto the capillary via an applied pressure. The capillary was then washed to remove unbound and non-specifically associated proteins. Finally, the bound protein was released and eluted using 20 mM Tris buffer containing 8 M urea, pH 7.3, at 50 degrees C. Eluate was collected after each step (load, wash and elute) and relative amounts of protein each were compared using fluorescence spectroscopy. The identity of the protein in the collections was confirmed using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The experiment was repeated for thrombin on a bare (unmodified) capillary and a capillary coated with a scrambled-sequence, non-G-quartet forming oligonucleotide that does not bind with thrombin. The results show that the aptamer stationary phase captures approximately three times as much thrombin as the control columns. The experiment was also repeated using human serum albumin (HSA) alone and in an equimolar mixture with thrombin. HSA was not retained on the aptamer capillary, nor did it affect the capture of thrombin from the mixture.

  20. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  1. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications.

  2. Fluorescent indicator dyes for calcium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Roger Y. (Inventor); Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new class of highly fluorescent indicator dyes that are specific for calcium ions. The new fluorescent indicator dyes combine a stilbene-type fluorophore with a tetracarboxylate parent Ca.sup.2+ chelating compound having the octacoordinate pattern of liganding groups characteristic of EGTA and BAPTA. Preferred forms contain extra heterocyclic bridges to reinforce the ethylenic bond of the stilbene and to reduce hydrophobicity. Compared to their widely used predecessor, quin2, the new dyes offer up to thirty-fold brighter fluorescence, major changes in wavelength (not just intensity) upon Ca.sup.2+ binding, slightly lower affinities for Ca.sup.2+, slightly longer wavelengths of excitation, and considerably improved selectivity for Ca.sup.2+ over other divalent cations. These properties, particularly the wavelength sensitivity to Ca.sup.2+, make the dyes useful indicators for many intracellular applications, especially in single cells, adherent cell layers, or bulk tissues. The present invention also discloses an improved method for synthesizing alpha-acyloxyalkyl bromides wherein the bromides so synthesized are free of contaminating bis(1-bromoalkyl)ether. The improved method is exemplified herein in the synthesis of acetoxymethyl bromide, a compound useful in preparing the acetoxymethyl esters disclosed herein as novel Ca.sup.2+ specific fluorescent indicators.

  3. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  4. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv. PMID:26041237

  5. The C2 domains of granuphilin are high-affinity sensors for plasma membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Lyakhova, Tatyana A; Knight, Jefferson D

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-targeting proteins are crucial components of many cell signaling pathways, including the secretion of insulin. Granuphilin, also known as synaptotagmin-like protein 4, functions in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane prior to exocytosis. Granuphilin docks to insulin secretory vesicles through interaction of its N-terminal domain with vesicular Rab proteins; however, the mechanisms of granuphilin plasma membrane targeting and release are less clear. Granuphilin contains two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, that interact with the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. The goal of this study was to determine membrane-binding mechanisms, affinities, and kinetics of both granuphilin C2 domains using fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that both C2A and C2B bind anionic lipids in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. The C2A domain binds liposomes containing a physiological mixture of lipids including 2% PI(4,5)P2 or PI(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity (apparent K(d, PIPx) of 2-5 nM), and binds nonspecifically with moderate affinity to anionic liposomes lacking phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIPx) lipids. The C2B domain binds with sub-micromolar affinity to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 but does not have a measurable affinity for background anionic lipids. Both domains can be competed away from their target lipids by the soluble PIPx analog inositol-(1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate (IP6), which is a positive regulator of insulin secretion. Potential roles of these interactions in the docking and release of granuphilin from the plasma membrane are discussed.

  6. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  7. Affinity of rosmarinic acid to human serum albumin and its effect on protein conformation stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Wang, Xiangchao; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-02-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural polyphenol contained in many aromatic plants with promising biological activities. The interaction between RA and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by multi-spectroscopic, electrochemistry, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence emission of HSA was quenched by RA through a combined static and dynamic quenching mechanism, but the static quenching was the major constituent. Fluorescence experiments suggested that RA was bound to HSA with moderately strong binding affinity through hydrophobic interaction. The probable binding location of RA was located near site I of HSA. Additionally, as shown by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, RA can result in conformational and structural alterations of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics studies were used to investigate the stability of the HSA and HSA-RA system. Altogether, the results can provide an important insight for the applications of RA in the food industry.

  8. Affinity of rosmarinic acid to human serum albumin and its effect on protein conformation stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Wang, Xiangchao; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-02-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural polyphenol contained in many aromatic plants with promising biological activities. The interaction between RA and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by multi-spectroscopic, electrochemistry, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence emission of HSA was quenched by RA through a combined static and dynamic quenching mechanism, but the static quenching was the major constituent. Fluorescence experiments suggested that RA was bound to HSA with moderately strong binding affinity through hydrophobic interaction. The probable binding location of RA was located near site I of HSA. Additionally, as shown by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, RA can result in conformational and structural alterations of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics studies were used to investigate the stability of the HSA and HSA-RA system. Altogether, the results can provide an important insight for the applications of RA in the food industry. PMID:26304336

  9. One-dimensional coordination polymers: Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-glycine and N-(2-pyridylmethyl)- L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobai; Ranford, John D.; Vittal, Jagadese J.

    2006-08-01

    The crystal structures of three Cu(II) and one Zn(II) complexes of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)- L-glycine (Hpgly) and N-(2-pyridylmethyl)- L-alanine (Hpala) have been described. They are [Cu(pgly)Cl] · H 2O ( 1), [Cu(pala)Cl] · H 2O ( 2), [Cu(pala)(CH 3COO)] · 0.75H 2O ( 3), and [Zn(pgly)(NO 3)] ( 4). All these compounds have 1D polymeric structures in the solid state. In 1 and 2, the chloride ions bridge [Cu(pgly)] and [Cu(pala)] fragments, respectively, to generate 1D polymers while the bridging acetate ligands are responsible for the formation of ΛΔΛΔ type spiral polymers in 3. The nitrate ion in 4 is only acting as a terminal ligand while the carboxylate oxygen atom of the pala ligand bridges the Zn(II) centers to form the zigzag coordination polymeric chain. The 1D coordination polymers in 1 and 2 have very similar arrangements although crystallized in different space groups, and host 1D water chains in their crystal lattices.

  10. Spray-dried chitosan microspheres containing 8-hydroxyquinoline -5 sulphonic acid as a new adsorbent for Cd(II) and Zn(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luciano; Laranjeira, Mauro C M; Gonçalves, Norberto S; Fávere, Valfredo T

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, a new chelating adsorbent was prepared from chitosan microspheres cross-linked with glutaraldehyde by spray drying using 8-hydroxyquinoline -5 sulphonic acid as chelant agent (CTS-SX-CL). Microspheres of the new adsorbent were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The effect of pH, contact time and concentration of metallic ions in solution were evaluated on the adsorption behavior of Cd(II) and Zn(II) by CTS-SX-CL. Adsorption was maximum for both Cd(II) and Zn(II) at pH 8.0. Adsorption kinetic curves were obtained and could be fit by the pseudo second-order adsorption model. An analysis of equilibrium adsorption data using the Langmuir isotherm model indicated that the maximum adsorption capacity of CTS-SX-CL was higher than that of CTS-CL for both ions investigated. The adsorption capacity increased 74% for Cd(II).

  11. A two-dimensional Zn(II) coordination polymer constructed by benzotriazole-5-carboxylate and 1,4,8,9-tetraazatriphenylene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rui-Yun; Luan, Guo-You; Han, Zheng-Bo

    2010-10-01

    Poly[[(μ(3)-benzotriazole-5-carboxylato-κ(4)N(1):N(3):O,O')(1,4,8,9-tetraazatriphenylene-κ(2)N(8),N(9))zinc(II)] 0.25-hydrate], {[Zn(C(7)H(3)N(3)O(2))(C(14)H(8)N(4))]·0.25H(2)O}(n), exhibits a two-dimensional layer structure in which the asymmetric unit contains one Zn(II) centre, one 1,4,8,9-tetraazatriphenylene (TATP) ligand, one benzotriazole-5-carboxylate (btca) ligand and 0.25 solvent water molecules. Each Zn(II) ion is six-coordinated and surrounded by four N atoms from two different btca ligands and one chelating TATP ligand, and by two O atoms from a third btca ligand, to furnish a distorted octahedral geometry. The infinite connection of the metal ions and ligands forms a two-dimensional wave-like (6,3) layer structure. Adjacent layers are connected by C-H...N hydrogen bonds. The solvent water molecules are located in partially occupied sites between parallel pairs of inversion-related TATP ligands that belong to two separate layers. PMID:20921604

  12. Time-Resolved Transient Optical Absorption Study of Bis(terpyridyl)oligothiophenes and Their Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers with Zn(II) Ion Couplers.

    PubMed

    Rais, David; Menšík, Miroslav; Štenclová-Bláhová, Pavla; Svoboda, Jan; Vohlídal, Jiří; Pfleger, Jiří

    2015-06-18

    α,ω-Bis(terpyridyl)oligothiophenes spontaneously assemble with Zn(II) ions giving conjugated constitutional dynamic polymers (dynamers) of the metallo-supramolecular class, which potentially might be utilized in optoelectronics. Their photophysical properties, which are of great importance in this field of application, are strongly influenced by the dynamic morphology. It was assessed in this study by using ultrafast pump-probe optical absorption spectroscopy. We identified and characterized relaxation processes running in photoexcited molecules of these oligomers and dynamers and show impacts of disturbed coplanarity of adjacent rings (twisting the thiophene-thiophene and thiophene-terpyridyl bonds by attached hexyl side groups) and Zn(II) ion couplers on these processes. Major effects are seen in the time constants of rotational relaxation, intersystem crossing, and de-excitation lifetimes. The photoexcited states formed on different repeating units within the same dynamer chain do not interact with each other even at very high excitation density. The method is presented that allows determining the equilibrium fraction of unbound oligothiophene species in a dynamer solution, from which otherwise hardly accessible values of the average degree of polymerization of constitutionally dynamic chains in solution can be estimated. PMID:25913085

  13. Quantum Chemical Studies on the Prediction of Structures, Charge Distributions and Vibrational Spectra of Some Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) Iodide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakci, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal complexes play an important role in coordination chemistry as well as in the formation of metal-based drugs. In order to obtain accurate results for studying these type of complexes quantum chemical studies are performed and especially density functional theory (DFT) has become a promising choice. This talk represents molecular structures, charge distributions and vibrational analysis of Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) iodide complexes of p-toluidine and m-toluidine by means of DFT. Stable structures of the ligands and the related complexes have been obtained in the gas phase at B3LYP/def2-TZVP level and calculations predict Ni(II) complexes as distorted polymeric octahedral whereas Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes as distorted tetrahedral geometries. Charge distribution analysis have been performed by means of Mulliken, NBO and APT methods and physically most meaningful method for our compounds is explained. Vibrational spectra of the title compounds are computed from the optimized geometries and theoretical frequencies are compared with the previously obtained experimental data. Since coordination occurs via nitrogen atoms of the free ligands, N-H stretching bands of the ligands are shifted towards lower wavenumbers in the complexes whereas NH_2 wagging and twisting vibrations are shifted towards higher wavenumbers.

  14. Versatile Tailoring of Paddle-Wheel Zn(II) Metal-Organic Frameworks through Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Transformations.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tapan K; Neogi, Subhadip; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2015-11-01

    A new tetracarboxylate ligand having short and long arms formed 2D layer Zn(II) coordination polymer 1 with paddle-wheel secondary building units under solvothermal conditions. The framework undergoes solvent-specific single crystal-to-single crystal (SC-SC) transmetalation to produce 1Cu . With a sterically encumbered dipyridyl linker, the same ligand forms non-interpenetrated, 3D, pillared-layer Zn(II) metal-organic framework (MOF) 2, which takes part in SC-SC linker-exchange reactions to produce three daughter frameworks. The parent MOF 2 shows preferential incorporation of the longest linker in competitive linker-exchange experiments. All the 3D MOFs undergo complete SC-SC transmetalation with Cu(II) , whereby metal exchange in different solvents and monitoring of X-ray structures revealed that bulky solvated metal ions lead to ordering of the shortest linker in the framework, which confirms that the solvated metal ions enter through the pores along the linker axis.

  15. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  16. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  17. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  18. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  19. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  20. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  1. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  2. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  3. Transmembrane peptides influence the affinity of sterols for phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Joel H; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2010-07-21

    Cholesterol is distributed unevenly between different cellular membrane compartments, and the cholesterol content increases from the inner bilayers toward the plasma membrane. It has been suggested that this cholesterol gradient is important in the sorting of transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol has also been to shown play an important role in lateral organization of eukaryotic cell membranes. In this study the aim was to determine how transmembrane proteins influence the lateral distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers. Insight into this can be obtained by studying how cholesterol interacts with bilayer membranes of different composition in the presence of designed peptides that mimic the transmembrane helices of proteins. For this purpose we developed an assay in which the partitioning of the fluorescent cholesterol analog CTL between LUVs and mbetaCD can be measured. Comparison of how cholesterol and CTL partitioning between mbetaCD and phospholipid bilayers with different composition suggests that CTL sensed changes in bilayer composition similarly as cholesterol. Therefore, the results obtained with CTL can be used to understand cholesterol distribution in lipid bilayers. The effect of WALP23 on CTL partitioning between DMPC bilayers and mbetaCD was measured. From the results it was clear that WALP23 increased both the order in the bilayers (as seen from CTL and DPH anisotropy) and the affinity of the sterol for the bilayer in a concentration dependent way. Although WALP23 also increased the order in DLPC and POPC bilayers the effects on CTL partitioning was much smaller with these lipids. This indicates that proteins have the largest effect on sterol interactions with phospholipids that have longer and saturated acyl chains. KALP23 did not significantly affect the acyl chain order in the phospholipid bilayers, and inclusion of KALP23 into DMPC bilayers slightly decreased CTL partitioning into the bilayer. This shows that transmembrane proteins can

  4. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  5. A Class of Multiresponsive Colorimetric and Fluorescent pH Probes via Three Different Reaction Mechanisms of Salen Complexes: A Selective and Accurate pH Measurement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinghui; Gou, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Shen, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiangge; Xiang, Haifeng

    2016-09-19

    We report a class of multiresponsive colorimetric and fluorescent pH probes based on three different reaction mechanisms including cation exchange, protonation, and hydrolysis reaction of K(I), Ca(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Al(III), and Pd(II) Salen complexes. Compared with traditional pure organic pH probes, these complex-based pH probes exhibited a much better selectivity due to the shielding function of the filled-in metal ion in the complex. Their pH sensing performances were affected by the ligand structure and the central metal ion. This work is the first report of "off-on-on'-off" colorimetric and fluorescent pH probes that possess three different reaction mechanisms and should inspire the design of multiple-responsive probes for important analytes in biological systems.

  6. Fluorescent reporter methods.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    The identification and cloning of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish marks the beginning of a new era of fluorescent reporters. In Caenorhabditis elegans, genetically encoded markers like the fluorescent proteins of the GFP family became the reporter of choice for gene expression studies and protein localization. The small size and transparency of the worm allows the visualization of in vivo dynamics, which increases the number of potential applications for fluorescent reporters tremendously. In combination with subcellular tags, GFP can be used to label subcellular structures like synapses allowing novel approaches to study developmental processes like synapse formation. Other fluorescent labels like small organic dyes, which are in widespread use in cell culture systems, are rarely used in C. elegans owing to difficulties in applying these labels through the impenetrable cuticle or eggshell of the animal. A notable exception is the use of lipophilic dyes, which are taken up by certain sensory neurons in the intact animal and can be introduced into the embryo after puncturing of the egg shell. This chapter covers the use of fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins in C. elegans. Emphasis is placed on microscopic techniques including wide field and confocal microscopy as well as time-lapse recordings. The use of fluorescent proteins as transgenic markers and image processing of fluorescence images are briefly discussed.

  7. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  8. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  9. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  10. Exploring Fluorous Affinity by Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Catani, Martina; Guzzinati, Roberta; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Terms such as "fluorous affinity" and "fluorophilicity" have been used to describe the unique partition and sorption properties often exhibited by highly fluorinated organic compounds, that is molecules rich in sp(3) carbon-fluorine bonds. In this work, we made use of a highly fluorinated stationary phase and a series of benzene derivatives to study the effect of one single perfluorinated carbon on the chromatographic behavior and adsorption properties of molecules. For this purpose, the adsorption equilibria of α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, toluene, and other alkylbenzenes have been studied by means of nonlinear chromatography in a variety of acetonitrile/water eluents. Our results reveal that one single perfluorinated carbon is already enough to induce a drastic change in the adsorption properties of molecules on the perfluorinated stationary phase. In particular, it has been found that adsorption is monolayer if the perfluoroalkyl carbon is present but that, when this unit is missing, molecules arrange as multilayer stack structures. These findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of fluorous affinity. PMID:26047527

  11. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  12. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  13. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  14. Application of silica fume as a new SP-extractor for trace determination of Zn(II) and Cd(II) in pharmaceutical and environmental samples by square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Salwa A.; Gaber, Ahmed A. Abdel; Rahim, Asmaa M. Abdel

    2015-04-01

    In this work, silica fume (SF) is used as a solid-phase extractor for extraction of Zn(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Characterization of SF is performed by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum experimental conditions for the two metal ions are investigated using batch and column techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity values are found to be 54.13 and 121.28 mg g-1 at the optimum pH 6.0 and 8.0 for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The equilibrium data are analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms by nonlinear regression analysis. Also, the kinetics analysis revealed that the overall adsorption process is successfully fitted with the pseudo-second-order model. The method is applied for determination of the target metal ions in pharmaceutical and environmental samples using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The limit of detection (LOD) values are 0.102 and 1.43 × 10-3 mg L-1 for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The percentage recovery values are 98.8-100.5 % which indicate the success of the proposed method for determination of Zn(II) and Cd(II) without interfering effects.

  15. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  16. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand.

  17. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand. PMID:27348073

  18. Characterization of a dockerin-based affinity tag: application for purification of a broad variety of target proteins.

    PubMed

    Demishtein, Alik; Karpol, Alon; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose, a major component of plant matter, is degraded by a cell surface multiprotein complex called the cellulosome produced by several anaerobic bacteria. This complex coordinates the assembly of different glycoside hydrolases, via a high-affinity Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between the enzyme-borne dockerin and the scaffoldin-borne cohesin modules. In this study, we characterized a new protein affinity tag, ΔDoc, a truncated version (48 residues) of the Clostridium thermocellum Cel48S dockerin. The truncated dockerin tag has a binding affinity (K(A)) of 7.7 × 10(8)M(-1), calculated by a competitive enzyme-linked assay system. In order to examine whether the tag can be used for general application in affinity chromatography, it was fused to a range of target proteins, including Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP), C. thermocellum β-glucosidase, Escherichia coli thioesterase/protease I (TEP1), and the antibody-binding ZZ-domain from Staphylococcus aureus protein A. The results of this study significantly extend initial studies performed using the Geobacillus stearothermophilus xylanase T-6 as a model system. In addition, the enzymatic activity of a C. thermocellum β-glucosidase, purified using this approach, was tested and found to be similar to that of a β-glucosidase preparation (without the ΔDoc tag) purified using the standard His-tag. The truncated dockerin derivative functioned as an effective affinity tag through specific interaction with a cognate cohesin, and highly purified target proteins were obtained in a single step directly from crude cell extracts. The relatively inexpensive beaded cellulose-based affinity column was reusable and maintained high capacity after each cycle. This study demonstrates that deletion into the first Ca(2+)-binding loop of the dockerin module results in an efficient and robust affinity tag that can be generally applied for protein purification. PMID:21038354

  19. Negative homotropic cooperativity and affinity heterogeneity: preparation of yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with maximal affinity homogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Gennis, L S

    1976-01-01

    A three-step procedure including affinity chromatography on NAD+-azobenzamidopropyl-Sepharose has been designed for the purification of yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12] with maximized specific activity and maximized homogeneity with respect to affinity for the coenzyme, NAD+.Binding isotherms allow the analysis of cooperativity patterns that disclose both the average ligand affinity in the system and the distribution of ligands among the sites, only for systems with complete affinity homogeneity. The presence of affinity heterogeneity, resulting from multiple oligomeric species differing only in their affinity for coenzyme, gives rise to isotherms which falsely manifest apparent negative cooperativity. A method for distinguishing negative homotropic cooperativity from affinity heterogeneity is suggested. PMID:186779

  20. Phosphate-affinity electrophoresis on a microchip for determination of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Aishan; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Maeda, Mizuo

    2009-10-01

    We describe microchip-based phosphate-affinity electrophoresis (microPAE) for separation of peptides aimed at determination of kinase activity. The microPAE exploits two recently published technologies: autonomous sample injection for PDMS microchips and a phosphate-specific affinity ligand, Phos-tag. We prepared a fluorescently labeled substrate peptide, specific to human c-Src, and its phosphorylated form. We synthesized a Phos-tag-poly(dimethylacrylamide) conjugate. The conjugate and the sample solutions were autonomously injected into a PDMS-glass hybrid microchip. The two solutions were contacted together in the microchannel. When the peptides were electrophoresed into the Phos-tag-poly(dimethylacrylamide) region, the phosphorylated peptide was specifically trapped, and separated from the nonphosphorylated peptide in 10 s. The results were quantified by the areas of the fluorescence peaks. The calibration plot obtained with standard samples showed an excellent linearity and a LOD of 0.9% phosphorylated peptide among the total peptides. For c-Src-reacted samples, the results from the microPAE were in good agreement with those from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The microPAE was also successful in the presence of inhibitors for c-Src. The measured 50% inhibitory concentration values for staurosporine, PP2, and SU6656 were in good agreement with the literature values. PMID:19784951

  1. Subunit affinities and stoichiometries of the human papillomavirus type 11 E1:E2:DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Chao, S F; Rocque, W J; Daniel, S; Czyzyk, L E; Phelps, W C; Alexander, K A

    1999-04-01

    The association between the papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins is an important regulatory interaction, imparting coordinated control of viral transcription and replication. Using fluorescence polarization, we have characterized the interactions between HPV-11 E1, HPV-11 E2, and DNA in solution at equilibrium. For these studies, two double-stranded fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotides were prepared. The first fluorescent oligonucleotide, designated Fl-E2BS and containing a single E2 binding-site palindrome (ACCGN6CGGT), was used to determine the affinity of E2 for its DNA binding site. HPV-11 E2 bound Fl-E2BS with an apparent Kd of 0.84 nM. Binding was saturable and consistent with a single class of noninteracting sites. The second oligonucleotide, designated Fl-E1E2BS, contained both E1 and E2 sites in sequence derived directly from the HPV-11 origin of replication. Under titration conditions identical to those used for Fl-E2BS, the E2 protein exhibited reduced affinity for Fl-E1E2BS (Kd > 100 nM). E1 binding to Fl-E1E2BS was of very low affinity. Addition of excess HPV-11 E1 to Fl-E1E2BS lowered the dissociation constant for the E2:Fl-E1E2BS interaction to 2 nM. This effect was not dependent upon ATP or magnesium ion. Fluorescence polarization and other data suggest formation of a complex containing six E1 molecules and a single dimer of E2 bound to a single Fl-E1E2BS oligonucleotide; E2 dissociation from the final complex did not occur. In summary, physical interaction between E1 and E2 increases the DNA binding affinity of each. The role of this energy coupling may be to promote origin-specific binding of both E1 and E2 to DNA.

  2. Design of peptoid analogue dimers and measure of their affinity for Grb2 SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Liu, W-Q; Lenoir, C; Salzmann, J; Gresh, N; Garbay, C

    2004-06-15

    This paper describes the design of the highest affinity ligands for Grb2 SH3 domains reported so far. These compounds were designed by combining N-alkyl amino acid incorporation in a proline-rich sequence with subsequent dimerization of the peptoid sequence based on structural data and molecular modeling. Optimization of the linker size is discussed, and the N-alkyl amino acid incorporation into both monomeric halves is reported. Because the affinity for Grb2 of the optimized compounds was too high to be measured using the fluorescent modifications that they induce on the Grb2 emission spectrum, a competition assay was developed. In this test, Grb2 is pulled down from a cellular extract by the initial VPPPVPPRRR peptide bound to Sepharose beads. In the presence of competitors, the test quantifies the amount of Grb2 displaced from the beads. It has enabled us to determine a K(i) value in the 10(-10) M range for the highest affinity Grb2 peptoid analogue dimer.

  3. Microarrays as Model Biosensor Platforms to Investigate the Structure and Affinity of Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer A.; Chushak, Yaroslav; Chávez, Jorge L.; Hagen, Joshua A.; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization of nucleic acid aptamer recognition elements selected free in solution onto the surface of biosensor platforms has proven challenging. This study investigated the binding of multiple aptamer/target pairs immobilized on a commercially available microarray as a model system mimicking biosensor applications. The results indicate a minimum distance (linker length) from the surface and thymine nucleobase linker provides reproducible binding across varying conditions. An indirect labeling method, where the target was labeled with a biotin followed by a brief Cy3-streptavidin incubation, provided a higher signal-to-noise ratio and over two orders of magnitude improvement in limit of detection, compared to direct Cy3-protein labeling. We also showed that the affinities of the aptamer/target interaction can change between direct and indirect labeling and conditions to optimize for the highest fluorescence intensity will increase the sensitivity of the assay but will not change the overall affinity. Additionally, some sequences which did not initially bind demonstrated binding when conditions were optimized. These results, in combination with studies demonstrating enhanced binding in nonselection buffers, provided insights into the structure and affinity of aptamers critical for biosensor applications and allowed for generalizations in starting conditions for researchers wishing to investigate aptamers on a microarray surface. PMID:27042344

  4. Factors that influence T box riboswitch efficacy and tRNA affinity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, C; Zhou, S; Bergmeier, S C; Hines, J V

    2015-09-01

    The T box riboswitch is an intriguing potential target for antibacterial drug discovery. Found primarily in Gram-positive bacteria, the riboswitch regulates gene expression by selectively responding to uncharged tRNA to control transcription readthrough. Polyamines and molecular crowding are known to specifically affect RNA function, but their effect on T box riboswitch efficacy and tRNA affinity have not been fully characterized. A fluorescence-monitored in vitro transcription assay was developed to readily quantify these molecular interactions and to provide a moderate-throughput functional assay for a comprehensive drug discovery screening cascade. The polyamine spermidine specifically enhanced T box riboswitch readthrough efficacy with an EC50 = 0.58 mM independent of tRNA binding. Molecular crowding, simulated by the addition of polyethylene glycol, had no effect on tRNA affinity for the riboswitch, but did reduce the efficacy of tRNA-induced readthrough. These results indicate that the T box riboswitch tRNA affinity and readthrough efficacy are intricately modulated by environmental factors. PMID:26220520

  5. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W

    2015-08-01

    The use of a method of coupling DNA was investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP (CAAT/enhancer binding protein) fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry used is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3' end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose that couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture, and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes, including E2A, c-Myc, and Myo-D, were also purified, but myogenin and NFκB were not. Therefore, this approach proved to be valuable for both affinity chromatography and the trapping approach. PMID:25935261

  6. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    The uses of a method of coupling DNA is investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry utilized is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA-binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3′ end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose which couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes including E2A, c-myc, and myo-D were also purified but myogenenin and NFκB were not. Therfore, this approach proved valuable for both affinity chromatography and for the trapping approach. PMID:25935261

  7. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  8. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  9. Engineering fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Nagai, Takeharu; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victora (GFP) and GFP-like proteins from Anthozoa species encode light-absorbing chromophores intrinsically within their respective protein sequences. Recent studies have made progress in obtaining bright variants of these proteins which develop chromophores quickly and efficiently, as well as novel fluorescent proteins that photoactivate or photoconvert, i.e., become fluorescent or change colors upon illumination at specific wavelengths. Also, monomeric versions of these proteins have been engineered for fusion protein applications. Simple GFP variants and circularly permuted GFP variants have been used to develop fluorescent probes that sense physiological signals such as membrane potential and concentrations of free calcium. Further molecular characterization of the structure and maturation of these proteins is in progress, aimed at providing information for rational design of variants with desired fluorescence properties.

  10. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  11. Affinity chromatography with an immobilized RNA enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Vioque, A; Altman, S

    1986-01-01

    M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of Escherichia coli RNase P, has been covalently linked at its 3' terminus to agarose beads. Unlike M1 RNA, which is active in solution in the absence of the protein component (C5) of RNase P, the RNA linked to the beads is active only in the presence of C5 protein. Affinity chromatography of crude extracts of E. coli on a column prepared from the beads to which the RNA has been crosslinked results in the purification of C5 protein in a single step. The protein has been purified in this manner from cells that contain a plasmid, pINIIIR20, which includes the gene that codes for C5 protein. A 6-fold amplification of the expression of C5 protein is found in these cells after induction as compared to cells that do not harbor the plasmid. Images PMID:3526344

  12. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  13. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  14. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  15. Evaluation system of negative electron affinity photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongguo; Chang, Benkang; Qian, Yunsheng; Wang, Guihua; Zong, Zhiyuan

    2001-10-01

    This article first describes the background of the research and manufacture of evaluation system of Negative Electron Affinity photocathode. This article designs a set of super high vacuum system for activating NEA photocathode on the base of activation theory, the process of design and debugging is given. The system is composed of three parts: super high vacuum system for GaAs material activation, multi-meter testing system, surface analysis system. The system is used for on-line evaluation of activating of NEA photocathode. The technical parameters and structure of the evaluation system of NEA photocathode are given in the paper. The system is finished and experiments are made. At last the picture of the system is given.

  16. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  17. Engineering GCaMP affinity and kinetics for improved tracking of neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan Richard

    Fluorescent calcium indicator proteins (FCIPs) are powerful tools for monitoring neural activity. However, they still have significant performance limitations compared with synthetic indicators based on the small-molecule chelator BAPTA. Because of high cooperativity originating from a calmodulin-based recombinant calcium sensor, a given GECI is only sensitive to a small part of a neuron's likely calcium concentration range, which can span a range of 0.1-10 microM. GECIs also have up to 100-fold slower reponse kinetics than BAPTA-based indicators. Overcoming limitations in range and kinetics is a key step toward monitoring spike times and firing rates in cell-type-specific brain circuits. We are engaged in structure-based design to vary the affinity and accelerate the response kinetics of a widely used GECI, GCaMP3. We have designed more than 50 novel variants by targeted mutation of GCaMP3's calmodulin (CaM) domain and its intraprobe peptide partner, RS20. In our cuvet characterizations of purified protein, we have attained a nearly 40-fold (0.16-6 microM) range of KD without impairing per-molecule brightness. In stopped-flow biochemical measurements, off-responses to sharp decreases in calcium are more than 10 times faster than any other published GECI. Most of the gap in off-response speed between G-CaMP3 and BAPTA-based indicators could be closed without perturbing KD. In Drosophila antennal nerve axons, sensory stimulation-evoked fluorescence responses were significantly enhanced in speed and amplitude in two novel GECIs. With our biophysical measurements, we discovered that the N-lobe of the bilobular CaM domain is required for the high-fluorescence state and the C-lobe contributes to high affinity Ca2+ binding. To account for our observations, we propose a molecular dynamics model of GCaMP3 with two kinetic pathways leading to a high-fluorescence state. First, small amounts of Ca 2+ activate a slow "C-like" pathway through sequential binding to the C

  18. Purification of glycolytic enzymes by using affinity-elution chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Scopes, R K

    1977-01-01

    1. A systematic procedure for the purification of enzymes by affinity-elution chromatography is described. Enzymes are adsorbed on a cation-exchanger, and eluted with ligands specific for the enzyme concerned. 2. All of the glycolytic and some related enzymes present in rabbit muscle can be purified by the affinity-elution technique. The pH range for adsorption and elution of each enzyme was found, and the effects of minor variations of conditions are described. 3. A description of experimental conditions suitable for affinity elution of each enzyme is given, together with special features relevant to each individual enzyme. 4. Theoretical considerations of affinity elution chromatography are discussed, including its limitations, advantages and disadvantages compared with affinity-adsorption chromatography. Possible developments are suggested to cover enzymes which because of their adsorption characteristics are not at present amenable to affinity-elution procedures. PMID:192194

  19. Antibody-based affinity cryo-EM grid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Li, Kunpeng; Jiang, Wen

    2016-05-01

    The Affinity Grid technique combines sample purification and cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) grid preparation into a single step. Several types of affinity surfaces, including functionalized lipids monolayers, streptavidin 2D crystals, and covalently functionalized carbon surfaces have been reported. More recently, we presented a new affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, which applies the traditional Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) technique to cryo-EM. This approach significantly simplifies the preparation of affinity grids and directly works with native macromolecular complexes without need of target modifications. With wide availability of high affinity and high specificity antibodies, the antibody-based affinity grid would enable cryo-EM studies of the native samples directly from cell cultures, targets of low abundance, and unstable or short-lived intermediate states.

  20. Prediction of Neutral Salt Elution Profiles for Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1981-04-01

    Neutral salts exhibit very marked differences as eluants of proteins from affinity columns. We observe: (i) that the relative potencies of neutral salts as eluants are independent of the protein or the affinity ligand in the systems studied, (ii) that the absolute salt concentration necessary to elute any given protein bound to the affinity matrix is proportional to the algebraic sum of a set of elution coefficients defined herein for the separate ions present in the solution, and (iii) that the proportionality between elution potency and elution coefficient is a function of the affinity of the protein for the immobilized ligand. Given the concentration of one neutral salt required for elution of a protein of interest from an affinity column, the elution capability of any neutral salt at any temperature can be quantitatively predicted for that protein. Accordingly, application and elution protocols for affinity chromatography can be designed to optimize the yield and fold purification of proteins.

  1. Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(I) complexes of cinnamic acid: FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of zinc, cadmium(II) and mercury(I) ions on the electronic structure of cinnamic acid (phenylacrylic acid) was studied. In this research many miscellaneous analytical methods, which complement one another, were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H, 13C NMR) and quantum mechanical calculations. The spectroscopic studies provide some knowledge on the distribution of the electronic charge in molecule, the delocalization energy of π-electrons and the reactivity of metal complexes. In the series of Zn(II) → Cd(II) → Hg(I) cinnamates: (1) systematic shifts of several bands in the experimental and theoretical IR and Raman spectra and (2) regular chemical shifts for protons 1H and 13C nuclei were observed.

  2. Isostructural 1D coordination polymers of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) with phenylpropynoic acid and DABCO as organic linkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, Rajendran; Varghese, Babu; Sankararaman, Sethuraman

    2014-11-01

    Using phenylpropynoic acid (PPA) and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) as organic spacers, isostructural coordination polymers of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) were synthesized by solvothermal method and structurally characterized using single crystal XRD, powder XRD, 13C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal XRD data revealed four PPA units coordinating with two metal ions forming a paddle wheel secondary building unit (SBU). The paddle wheel units are connected through coordination of DABCO nitrogen to the metal centers from the axial positions leading to the formation of the 1D coordination polymers along the c axis. Intermolecular π stacking and Csbnd H…π interactions between the adjacent polymer chains convert the 1D coordination polymer into an interesting 3D network with the Csbnd H…π bonds running along the crystallographic a and b axes. Thermal and nitrogen adsorption studies of these coordination polymers are reported.

  3. Inhibition of the HIF1α-p300 interaction by quinone- and indandione-mediated ejection of structural Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Jayatunga, Madura K P; Thompson, Sam; McKee, Tawnya C; Chan, Mun Chiang; Reece, Kelie M; Hardy, Adam P; Sekirnik, Rok; Seden, Peter T; Cook, Kristina M; McMahon, James B; Figg, William D; Schofield, Christopher J; Hamilton, Andrew D

    2015-04-13

    Protein-protein interactions between the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and the transcriptional coactivators p300/CBP are potential cancer targets due to their role in the hypoxic response. A natural product based screen led to the identification of indandione and benzoquinone derivatives that reduce the tight interaction between a HIF-1α fragment and the CH1 domain of p300. The indandione derivatives were shown to fragment to give ninhydrin, which was identified as the active species. Both the naphthoquinones and ninhydrin were observed to induce Zn(II) ejection from p300 and the catalytic domain of the histone demethylase KDM4A. Together with previous reports on the effects of related compounds on HIF-1α and other systems, the results suggest that care should be taken in interpreting biological results obtained with highly electrophilic/thiol modifying compounds. PMID:25023609

  4. Syntheses, structures and properties of Mn(II), Zn(II) and Ag(I) coordination polymers with 2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Sun, Peng-Peng; Ding, Jian-Gang; Li, Bao-Long; Li, Han-Yan

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly reaction of 2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)acetic acid (Htza) with Mn(II), Zn(II) and Ag(I) salts gave three coordination polymers [Mn(tza)2]n (1), [Zn(tza)2]n (2) and [Ag3(tza)2(ClO4)]n (3). 1 has a (3,6)-connected CdCl2-type two-dimensional network. 2 is a neutral two-dimensional (4,4) network. However 3 shows the complicated two-dimensional undulated network. 2 and 3 exhibit blue luminescent emissions maxima at 420 and 437 nm, respectively in the solid state at room temperature. The thermal stability of 1, 2 and 3 were observed. The diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy of 1, 2 and 3 were measured.

  5. Affinity chromatography for purification of two urokinases from human urine.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Akiba, K; Koike, M; Noguchi, T; Ezure, Y

    2000-05-26

    A new affinity chromatography (hydrophobic-mediated affinity chromatography), which was characterized by the matrix having both affinity site to urokinase and hydrophobic site, was established for the purification of urokinase from human urine. The hydrophobic affinity matrix (tentatively named PAS in the text) was prepared by immobilizing 6-aminocaproic acid on Sepharose CL-6B, followed by a coupling p-aminobenzamidine to a part of the hydrophobic site on the matrix. The PAS matrix was applied to the purification of urokinase from human urine, and high- and low-molecular weight pure urokinases were efficiently obtained in high yield by the present method. PMID:10892585

  6. Coverslip Cleaning and Functionalization for Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kudalkar, Emily M; Deng, Yi; Davis, Trisha N; Asbury, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy allows visualization of biological events at the single-molecule level by restricting excitation to a precise focal plane near the coverslip and eliminating out-of-focus fluorescence. The quality of TIRF imaging relies on a high signal-to-noise ratio and therefore it is imperative to prevent adherence of molecules to the glass coverslip. Nonspecific interactions can make it difficult to distinguish true binding events and may also interfere with accurate quantification of background noise. In addition, nonspecific binding of the fluorescently tagged protein will lower the effective working concentration, thereby altering values used to calculate affinity constants. To prevent spurious interactions, we thoroughly clean the surface of the coverslip and then functionalize the glass either by applying a layer of silane or by coating with a lipid bilayer. PMID:27140911

  7. [Isolation and purification of enhanced green fluorescent protein using chromatography].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qinghua; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Wang, Weili; Ji, Aiguo

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is a common biological marker. In this research, on the foundation of successful clone and expression of EGFP, a two-step chromatographic method was established to separate and purify EGFP, which includes the use of HisTrap HP immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and Sephadex G-10 HR size exclusion chromatography in sequence. Sephacryl S-300 HR size exclusion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were used to check out the purity of EGFP. At last, it was found that EGFP still had fluorescent activity using fluorescence spectrophotometric detection and Native-PAGE detection. This method can effectively separate the active EGFP. The purity of the obtained EGFP was more than 98%.

  8. Rapid Imaging of Latent Fingerprints Using Biocompatible Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jae; Jung, Hak-Sung; Lim, Joohyun; Ryu, Seung-Jin; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2016-08-16

    Fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) are synthesized through the Stöber method by incorporating silane-modified organic dye molecules. The modified fluorescent organic dye molecule is able to be prepared by allylation and hydrosilylation reactions. The optical properties of as-prepared FSNPs are shown the similar optical properties of PR254A (allylated Pigment Red 254) and have outstanding photostability. The polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is introduced onto the surface of FSNP to enhance the binding affinity of PVP-coated FSNP for latent fingerprints (LFPs) detection. The simple preparation and easy control of surface properties of FSNPs show potential as a fluorescent labeling material for enhanced latent fingerprint detection on hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in forensic science for individual identification. PMID:27452188

  9. Complexation equilibria and coordination aspects of Zn(II) complexes contain 2-aminobenzamide and some bioactive amino acid mixed ligands: pH-metric, spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Subbaraj, Paramasivam; Esakkidurai, Thirugnanasamy; Shobana, Sutha; Raji, Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Mixed ligand complexation of 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) as ligand [L] with Zn(II) in the presence of some bio-relevant amino acid constituents like glycine (gly), L-alanine (ala), L-valine (val) and L-phenylalanine (phe) as ligand [B] have been investigated using pH-metric measurements with a combined pH electrode at different temperatures (300, 310, 320 and 330 ± 0.1 K) in 50% (v/v) ethanol-water mixture containing I = 0.15 M NaClO(4) as supporting electrolyte. Computer assisted analysis of the experimental titration data showed the presence of ZnLB and ZnLB2 species as mixed ligand complexes in addition to various binary species. In ZnLB/ZnLB(2) species, both primary and secondary ligands act as bidentate to form a stable six, five membered chelate ring. The calculated stabilization parameter Deltalog K, log X, log X' and % R.S. values clearly show the mixed ligand complexes have higher stabilities than their binary. Thermodynamic parameters DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS have been derived from the temperature dependence of the stability constants. The complexation behavior of ZnLB species has been studied by means of electronic spectra. The percentage distribution of various binary and mixed ligand species of each type of the complexes in solution depending on pH and the ratio of Zn(II) to 2-aminobenzamide/amino acid of the systems.

  10. Five coordinate M(II)-diphenolate [M = Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)] Schiff base complexes exhibiting metal- and ligand-based redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Franks, Mark; Gadzhieva, Anastasia; Ghandhi, Laura; Murrell, David; Blake, Alexander J; Davies, E Stephen; Lewis, William; Moro, Fabrizio; McMaster, Jonathan; Schröder, Martin

    2013-01-18

    Five-coordinate Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes containing pentadentate N(3)O(2) Schiff base ligands [1A](2-) and [1B](2-) have been synthesized and characterized. X-ray crystallographic studies reveal five coordinate structures in which each metal ion is bound by two imine N-donors, two phenolate O-donors, and a single amine N-donor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies suggest that the N(3)O(2) coordination spheres of [Cu(1A)] and [Cu(1B)] are retained in CH(2)Cl(2) solution and solid-state superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometric studies confirm that [Ni(1A)] and [Ni(1B)] adopt high spin (S = 1) configurations. Each complex exhibits two reversible oxidation processes between +0.05 and +0.64 V vs [Fc](+)/[Fc]. The products of one- and two-electron oxidations have been studied by UV/vis spectroelectrochemistry and by EPR spectroscopy which confirm that each oxidation process for the Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes is ligand-based with sequential formation of mono- and bis-phenoxyl radical species. In contrast, the one-electron oxidation of the Ni(II) complexes generates Ni(III) products. This assignment is supported by spectroelectrochemical and EPR spectroscopic studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and the single crystal X-ray structure of [Ni(1A)][BF(4)] which contains Ni in a five-coordinate distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  11. Removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) by hematite nanoparticles: effect of sorbent concentration, pH, temperature, and exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Heather J; Engates, Karen E; Grover, Valerie A

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticles offer the potential to improve environmental treatment technologies due to their unique properties. Adsorption of metal ions (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Zn(II)) to nanohematite was examined as a function of sorbent concentration, pH, temperature, and exhaustion. Adsorption experiments were conducted with 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 g/L nanoparticles in a pH 8 solution and in spiked San Antonio tap water. The adsorption data showed the ability of nanohematite to remove Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn species from solution with adsorption increasing as the nanoparticle concentration increased. At 0.5 g/L nanohematite, 100 % Pb species adsorbed, 94 % Cd species adsorbed, 89 % Cu species adsorbed and 100 % Zn species adsorbed. Adsorption kinetics for all metals tested was described by a pseudo second-order rate equation with lead having the fastest rate of adsorption. The effect of temperature on adsorption showed that Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) underwent an endothermic reaction, while Zn(II) underwent an exothermic reaction. The nanoparticles were able to simultaneously remove multiple metals species (Zn, Cd, Pb, and Cu) from both a pH 8 solution and spiked San Antonio tap water. Exhaustion experiments showed that at pH 8, exhaustion did not occur for the nanoparticles but adsorption does decrease for Cd, Cu, and Zn species but not Pb species. The strong adsorption coupled with the ability to simultaneously remove multiple metal ions offers a potential remediation method for the removal of metals from water.

  12. Complexation equilibria and coordination aspects of Zn(II) complexes contain 2-aminobenzamide and some bioactive amino acid mixed ligands: pH-metric, spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Subbaraj, Paramasivam; Esakkidurai, Thirugnanasamy; Shobana, Sutha; Raji, Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Mixed ligand complexation of 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) as ligand [L] with Zn(II) in the presence of some bio-relevant amino acid constituents like glycine (gly), L-alanine (ala), L-valine (val) and L-phenylalanine (phe) as ligand [B] have been investigated using pH-metric measurements with a combined pH electrode at different temperatures (300, 310, 320 and 330 ± 0.1 K) in 50% (v/v) ethanol-water mixture containing I = 0.15 M NaClO(4) as supporting electrolyte. Computer assisted analysis of the experimental titration data showed the presence of ZnLB and ZnLB2 species as mixed ligand complexes in addition to various binary species. In ZnLB/ZnLB(2) species, both primary and secondary ligands act as bidentate to form a stable six, five membered chelate ring. The calculated stabilization parameter Deltalog K, log X, log X' and % R.S. values clearly show the mixed ligand complexes have higher stabilities than their binary. Thermodynamic parameters DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS have been derived from the temperature dependence of the stability constants. The complexation behavior of ZnLB species has been studied by means of electronic spectra. The percentage distribution of various binary and mixed ligand species of each type of the complexes in solution depending on pH and the ratio of Zn(II) to 2-aminobenzamide/amino acid of the systems. PMID:25551720

  13. Structural variation in Zn(II) coordination polymers built with a semi-rigid tetracarboxylate and different pyridine linkers: synthesis and selective CO2 adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Sen, Susan; Neogi, Subhadip; Aijaz, Arshad; Xu, Qiang; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2014-04-28

    In an effort towards the rational design of porous MOFs with a functionalized channel surface, 3,3',5,5'-tetracarboxydiphenylmethane (H4L1) has been used in combination with two different bipyridine ligands of similar lengths as linkers, and Zn(II) ions as nodes. Under solvothermal conditions, two Zn(II) coordination polymers, {[Zn(H2L1)(L2)] · DMF · 2H2O}n (1) and {[Zn2(L1)(L3)(DMF)2] · DMF · 4H2O}n (2) (DMF = dimethyl formamide, L2 = 3,6-di-pyridin-4-yl-[1,2,4,5]tetrazine, L3 = 4,4'-bispyridylphenyl) are formed in moderate yields. The obvious kink in the central methylene spacer of H4L1 induces either C2v or Cs symmetry in the ligand, allowing different architectures in the resulting frameworks. Single crystal X-ray analysis shows that compound 1 is a one-dimensional (1D) double chain architecture with rhombus voids, linked by Zn2(CO2)4 paddle-wheel secondary building units (SBUs). The tetrazine and pyridine moieties of the co-ligand and free carboxylic acid groups are lined along the voids of the framework. Compound 2, on the other hand, crystallizes as an infinite two-dimensional corrugated sheet structure, where individual sheets are stacked in--ABAB--patterns along the crystallographic b-axis. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (VTPXRD) studies reveal high thermal stability for 1 but 2 collapses soon after desolvation. The desolvated framework 1' shows selective CO2 adsorption over N2, H2, and CH4 at 273 K, with an isosteric heat of CO2 adsorption of 21.3 kJ mol(-1), suggesting an interaction of the CO2 molecules with the channel walls.

  14. Renal protein reactivity and stability of antibiotic amphenicols: structure and affinity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, the molecular recognition of the oldest active amphenicols by the most popular renal carrier, lysozyme, was deciphered by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling at the molecular scale. Steady state fluorescence data showed that the recognition of amphenicol by lysozyme yields a static type of fluorescence quenching. This corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results that lysozyme-amphenicol adduct formation has a moderate affinity of 10(4) M(-1), and the driving forces were found to be chiefly hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and π stacking. Far-UV CD spectra confirmed that the spatial structure of lysozyme was slightly changed with a distinct reduction of α-helices in the presence of amphenicol, suggesting partial destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, via the extrinsic 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescence spectral properties and molecular modeling, one could see that the amphenicol binding site was situated at the deep crevice on the protein surface, and the ligand was also near to several crucial amino acid residues, such as Trp-62, Trp-63 and Arg-73. Simultaneously, contrastive studies of protein-amphenicols revealed clearly that some substituting groups, e.g. nitryl in the molecular structure of ligands, may be vitally important for the recognition activity of amphenicols with lysozyme. Due to the connection of amphenicols with fatal detrimental effects and because lysozyme has been applied as a drug carrier for proximal tubular targeting, the discussion herein is necessary for rational antibiotic use, development of safe antibiotics and particularly a better appraisal of the risks associated with human exposure to toxic agrochemicals. PMID:25016933

  15. Plasmonically amplified bioassay - Total internal reflection fluorescence vs. epifluorescence geometry.

    PubMed

    Hageneder, Simone; Bauch, Martin; Dostalek, Jakub

    2016-08-15

    This paper investigates plasmonic amplification in two commonly used optical configurations for fluorescence readout of bioassays - epifluorescence (EPF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). The plasmonic amplification in the EPF configuration was implemented by using crossed gold diffraction grating and Kretschmann geometry of attenuated total reflection method (ATR) was employed in the TIRF configuration. Identical assay, surface architecture for analyte capture, and optics for the excitation, collection and detection of emitted fluorescence light intensity were used in both TIRF and EPF configurations. Simulations predict that the crossed gold diffraction grating (EPF) can amplify the fluorescence signal by a factor of 10(2) by the combination of surface plasmon-enhanced excitation and directional surface plasmon-coupled emission in the red part of spectrum. This factor is about order of magnitude higher than that predicted for the Kretschmann geometry (TIRF) which only took advantage of the surface plasmon-enhanced excitation. When applied for the readout of sandwich interleukin 6 (IL-6) immunoassay, the plasmonically amplified EPF geometry designed for Alexa Fluor 647 labels offered 4-times higher fluorescence signal intensity compared to TIRF. Interestingly, both geometries allowed reaching the same detection limit of 0.4pM despite of the difference in the fluorescence signal enhancement. This is attributed to inherently lower background of fluorescence signal for TIRF geometry compared to that for EPF which compensates for the weaker fluorescence signal enhancement. The analysis of the inflammation biomarker IL-6 in serum at medically relevant concentrations and the utilization of plasmonic amplification for the fluorescence measurement of kinetics of surface affinity reactions are demonstrated for both EPF and TIRF readout. PMID:27260457

  16. Plasmonically amplified bioassay - Total internal reflection fluorescence vs. epifluorescence geometry.

    PubMed

    Hageneder, Simone; Bauch, Martin; Dostalek, Jakub

    2016-08-15

    This paper investigates plasmonic amplification in two commonly used optical configurations for fluorescence readout of bioassays - epifluorescence (EPF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). The plasmonic amplification in the EPF configuration was implemented by using crossed gold diffraction grating and Kretschmann geometry of attenuated total reflection method (ATR) was employed in the TIRF configuration. Identical assay, surface architecture for analyte capture, and optics for the excitation, collection and detection of emitted fluorescence light intensity were used in both TIRF and EPF configurations. Simulations predict that the crossed gold diffraction grating (EPF) can amplify the fluorescence signal by a factor of 10(2) by the combination of surface plasmon-enhanced excitation and directional surface plasmon-coupled emission in the red part of spectrum. This factor is about order of magnitude higher than that predicted for the Kretschmann geometry (TIRF) which only took advantage of the surface plasmon-enhanced excitation. When applied for the readout of sandwich interleukin 6 (IL-6) immunoassay, the plasmonically amplified EPF geometry designed for Alexa Fluor 647 labels offered 4-times higher fluorescence signal intensity compared to TIRF. Interestingly, both geometries allowed reaching the same detection limit of 0.4pM despite of the difference in the fluorescence signal enhancement. This is attributed to inherently lower background of fluorescence signal for TIRF geometry compared to that for EPF which compensates for the weaker fluorescence signal enhancement. The analysis of the inflammation biomarker IL-6 in serum at medically relevant concentrations and the utilization of plasmonic amplification for the fluorescence measurement of kinetics of surface affinity reactions are demonstrated for both EPF and TIRF readout.

  17. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  18. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  19. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  20. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  1. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  2. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1996-01-01

    Novel fluorescent DNA-staining dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts.

  3. Complex Affine Toda Theories and Soliton Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiqing

    1995-01-01

    Toda field theories (TFT's) constitute a large class of integrable (1 + 1)-dimensional field theories that are relativistically invariant: included are conformal field theories and integrable deformations away from conformality. Because they are soluble, for example, by the inverse scattering method, and because they are related to many other areas of field theory, they have been studied extensively in recent years. Hirota's method is a straightforward procedure to obtain soliton solutions to non-linear integrable equations. In Hirota's method, one first writes the nonlinear equations in Hirota's bilinear form, and then expands the so called tau-functions as a power series in an arbitrary parameter. The power series terminates at some finite order, thus the solutions obtained are exact. For an N-soliton solution, the number of terms in the expansion grows exponentially with N, making direct calculation of N-soliton solutions difficult. We extend Hirota's one -parameter expansion to an N-parameter expansion. In the new expansion series, many terms are identical to those in the (N - 1)-soliton solutions, and new terms grow only linearly with N. Furthermore, we note that the expansion must terminate at some finite order, thus the vanishing of higher order terms can be used as constraints on these new terms. It turns out that these constraints can be used to determine the new terms completely. We used this extended Hirota's method to find N-soliton solutions for complex affine TFT's based on a simply-laced Kac-Moody algebra. Soliton solutions for non-simply-laced complex ATFT's can be obtained for those of simply-laced complex ATFT's by folding or twisting. Even though some soliton solutions have already been obtained for complex ATFT's by various methods, the physical implications of these solutions have not yet been thoroughly discussed. There are infinitely many distinct topological solitons in any given complex affine Toda field theory and most of them have complex

  4. Reduction of Human Defensin 5 Affords a High-Affinity Zinc-Chelating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunfei; Cougnon, Fabien B. L.; Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Hayden, Joshua A.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Human defensin 5 (HD5) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide that exhibits three disulfide bonds in the oxidized form (HD5ox). It is abundant in small intestinal Paneth cells, which release HD5 into the intestinal lumen and house a labile Zn(II) store of unknown function. Here we consider the redox properties of HD5 and report that the reduced form, HD5red, is a metal-ion chelator. HD5 has a midpoint potential of −257 mV at pH 7.0. HD5red utilizes its cysteine residues to coordinate one equivalent of Zn(II) with an apparent Kd1 value in the mid-picomolar range. Zn(II) or Cd(II) binding perturbs the oxidative folding pathway of HD5red to HD5ox. Whereas HD5red is highly susceptible to proteolytic degradation, the Zn(II)-bound form displays resistance to hydrolytic breakdown by trypsin and other proteases. The ability of a reduced defensin peptide to coordinate Zn(II) provides a putative mechanism for how these peptides persist in vivo. PMID:23841778

  5. A highly sensitive aptasensor for OTA detection based on hybridization chain reaction and fluorescent perylene probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Yuanya; Chen, Yanfen; Weng, Bo; Xu, Liqun; Li, Changming

    2016-07-15

    An optical aptasensor was developed for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification strategy and fluorescent perylene probe (PAPDI)/DNA composites. Dendritic DNA concatamers were synthesized by HCR strategy and modified on magnetic nanoparticles through aptamer as medium. A large amount of PAPDI probe aggregated under the induction of DNA concatamers and caused fluorescence quenching. In the presence of OTA, the PAPDI/DNA composites were released from magnetic nanoparticles due to the strong affinity between aptamer and OTA. In ethanol, PAPDI monomers disaggregated and produced strong fluorescence. The present method displays excellent sensitivity and selectivity towards OTA.

  6. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  7. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  8. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  9. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  10. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  11. Microfluidic biosensor for the detection of DNA by fluorescence enhancement and the following streptavidin detection by fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Aki, Michihiko; Onoshima, Daisuke; Arinaga, Kenji; Kaji, Noritada; Tokeshi, Manabu; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-15

    We reported an optical DNA/protein microfluidic sensor which consists of single stranded (ss) DNA-Cy3 probes on gold surface and simple line-shape microfluidic channel. These ssDNA-Cy3 probes with random sequence in bulk solution or on gold surface exhibits fluorescence enhancement after binding with complementary ssDNA (cssDNA) targets. Particularly it did not require complicated design or hairpin-like stem-loop conformation, which made it easier to be made and applied in analytes detection by fluorescence switching techniques. Using ssDNA-cy3 probes attached on gold surface in a microfluidic channel, strong fluorescence enhancement was measured by ssDNA with cssDNA binding or ssDNA with cssDNA-biotin binding. The following introduction of streptavidin resulted in fluorescence quenching (fluorescence decrease) because of the binding of hybridized DNA-biotin with streptavidin. This sensor showed strong affinity and high sensitivity toward the streptavidin, the minimum detectable concentration for streptavidin was 1 pM, equating to an absolute detection limit of 60 amol in this microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channel height and flow rate is optimized to increase surface reaction efficiency and fluorescence switching efficiency. In contrast to previously reported optical molecular beacon approach, this sensor can be used not only for the detection of cssDNA target, but also for the detection of streptavidin. This microfluidic sensor offers the promise of analyzing kinds of molecular targets or immunoreactions.

  12. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  13. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  14. Specific high-affinity binding of thiazole orange to triplex and G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Irit; Zikich, Dragoslav; Kotlyar, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Interaction of Thiazole Orange (TO) with double-, triple-, and quadruple-stranded forms of DNA was studied. We have demonstrated by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy that TO binds with much higher affinity to triplex and G-quadruplex DNA structures compared to double-stranded (ds) DNA. Complexes of the dye with DNA triplexes and G-quadruplexes are very stable and do not dissociate during chromatography and gel electrophoresis. TO binding to either triple- or quadruple-stranded DNA structures results in a >1000-fold increase in dye fluorescence. The fluorescence titration data showed that TO to triad and tetrad ratios, in tight complexes with the triplex and the G-quadruplex, are equal to 0.5 and 1, respectively. Preferential binding of TO to triplexes and G-quadruplexes enables selective detection of only these DNA forms in gels in the absence of free TO in electrophoresis running buffer. We have also demonstrated that incubation of U2OS cells with submicromolar concentrations of TO results in preferential staining of certain areas in the nucleus in contrast to DAPI which binds to dsDNA and efficiently stains regions that are unstained with TO. We suggest that TO staining may be useful for the detection of noncanonical structural motifs in genomic DNA.

  15. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  16. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  17. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  18. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  19. Banach frames in the affine synthesis problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, Pavel A.

    2009-10-01

    We consider the problem of representing functions f\\in L^p(\\mathbb R^d) by a series in elements of the affine system \\displaystyle \\psi_{j,k}(x)=\\lvert\\det a_j\\rvert^{1/2}\\psi(a_jx-bk), \\qquad j\\in\\mathbb N, \\quad k\\in\\mathbb Z^d. The corresponding representation theorems are established on the basis of the frame inequalities \\displaystyle A\\Vert g\\Vert _q\\le\\Vert\\{(g,\\psi_{j,k})\\}\\Vert _Y\\le B\\Vert g\\Vert _q for the Fourier coefficients \\displaystyle(g,\\psi_{j,k})=\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}g(x)\\psi_{j,k}(x)\\,dx of functions g\\in L^q(\\mathbb R^d), 1/p+1/q=1, where {\\Vert\\cdot\\Vert}_Y is the norm in some Banach space of number families \\{y_{j,k}\\} and 0 are constants. In particular, it is proved that if the integral of a function \\psi\\in L^1\\cap L^p(\\mathbb R^d), 1, is nonzero, so \\displaystyle\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}\\psi(x)\\,dx\

  20. Five new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers constructed by 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures, network topologies and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Xianrong; Yuan Hongyan; Feng Yunlong

    2012-07-15

    Five Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(BOABA)(bpp)(OH)]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}5.5H{sub 2}O (3), [CdNa(BOABA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (4) and [Cd{sub 2}(BOABA)(bimb)Cl(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) (H{sub 3}BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid, bpp=1,3-bi(4-pyridyl)propane, 2,2 Prime -bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine, bimb=1,4-bis(imidazol-1 Prime -yl)butane), have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG analyses. 1 is an uninodal 4-connected 2D square grid network based on binuclear zinc clusters. 2 is 2D wavelike layer structure and further linked by hydrogen bonds into the final 3D (5,6,6)-connected topology network. 3 is 3-connected 2D topology network and the 2,2 Prime -bipy ligands decorate in two different types. 4 is a (4,8)-connected 2D topology network with heterocaryotic {l_brace}Cd{sub 2}Na{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. 5 can be rationalized as a (3,10)-connected 3D topology network with tetranuclear {l_brace}Cd{sub 4}Cl{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. Meanwhile, photoluminescence studies revealed that these five coordination polymers display strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Five new d{sup 10} metal(II) coordination polymers based on H{sub 3}BOABA ligand were obtained and characterized. They display different topological structures and luminescent properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five d{sup 10} metal(II) polymers based on 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymers were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymers 1-5 display different

  1. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  2. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  3. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  4. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  5. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  6. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  7. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  8. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  9. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture. PMID:27473483

  10. [Fluorescent derivatives of diphtheria toxin subunit B and their interaction with Vero cells].

    PubMed

    Kaberniuk, A A; Labyntsev, A Iu; Kolybo, D V; Oliĭnyk, O S; Redchuk, T A; Korotkevych, N V; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O; Komisarenko, S V

    2009-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin's B subunit provides toxin interaction with its receptor on the cell surface and translocation of toxin's A subunit from endosome to cytozole of sensitive cells. Functional analogues of B subunit with fluorescent label are considered as perspective tools for studying the above mentioned processes. The aim of the work was to obtain fluorescent B subunit analogues and to detect the specificity of their interaction with Vero line cells. B subunit fluorescent analogues were obtained in two different ways. The first one was B subunit chemical conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate and the second one was genetic fusion of recombinant B subunit chain with enhanced green fluorescent protein chain. Specific interaction of B subunit fluorescent derivatives with Vero cells was studied by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Using competitive analysis it was shown that B subunit fluorescent analogues possessed different affinity for cells. The affinity of EGFP-SbB was higher than FITC-SbB. Our results indicate the possibility to use the fluorescent derivatives of B subunit as tools for identification of diphtheria toxin's receptor (HB-EGF) expression on the cell surface as well as for studying the interaction and penetration of diphtheria toxin to the cell.

  11. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  12. Antimicrobial photodisinfection with Zn(II) phthalocyanine adsorbed on TiO2 upon UVA and red irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, Vanya; Eneva, Ivelina; Kussovski, Vesselin; Borisova, Ekaterina; Angelov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The light exposure on a daily basis has been well accepted as a competitive method for decontamination of wastewater. The catalytic properties of TiO2 offer a great potential to reduce the transmission of pathogens in the environment. Although the titanium dioxide shows high activity against pathogens, its general usage in water cleaning is limited due to the insufficient excitation natural light (about 3% of the solar spectrum). A hydrophobic dodecylpyridyloxy Zn(II)-phthalocyanine with four peripheral hydrocarbon chains of C12 (ZnPcDo) was immobilized on a photocatalyst TiO2 anatase (P25). The resulted greenish colored nanoparticles of phthalocyanine were characterized by the means of absorption, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the phthalocyanine dye by the red fluorescence emission (650 - 740 nm). The intensive Q-band in the far red visible spectral region (~ 690 nm) suggested a monomeric state of phthalocyanine on TiO2 nanoparticles. Two pathogenic bacterial strains (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA and Salmonella enteritidis) associated with wastewater were photoinactivated with the suspension of the particles. The effective photoinactivation was observed with 1 g.L-1 TiO2 anatase at irradiation with UVA 364 nm as with UVA 364 nm and LED 643 nm. The gram-negative Salmonella enteritidis was fully photoinactivated with ZnPcDo-TiO2 and TiO2 alone at UVA 346 nm and at irradiation with two light sources (364 nm + 643 nm). The proposed conjugate appears as an useful composite material for antibacterial disinfection.

  13. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  14. Fluorogenic Enhancement of an in Vitro-Selected Peptide Ligand by Replacement of a Fluorescent Group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Liping; Hirano, Yoshinori; Kariminavargani, Marziyeh; Tada, Seiichi; Zhang, Guanxin; Uzawa, Takanori; Zhang, Deqing; Hirose, Takuji; Taiji, Makoto; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-16

    To prepare a fluorogenic peptide ligand which binds to an arbitrary target, we previously succeeded in seeking a fluorogenic ligand to calmodulin using in vitro selection. In this study the environment-sensitive fluorescent group in the selected peptide ligand was replaced with other fluorescent groups to find the possibility to increase the fluorogenic activity. Surface plasmon resonance measurement exhibited that the binding affinity was held even after the replacement. However, the replacement significantly affected the fluorogenic activity. It depended on the kind of incorporated fluorophors and linker length. As a result, the incorporation of 4-N,N-dimethylamino-1,8-naphthalimide enhanced the fluorescence intensity over 100-fold in the presence of target calcium-bound calmodulin. This study demonstrated that the functionality of in vitro selected peptide can be tuned with keeping the binding affinity. PMID:27459509

  15. SYBR Gold Fluorescence Quenching is a Sensitive Probe of Chitosan-microRNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos-Carballal, Beatriz; Swamy, Musti J; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Goycoolea, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    Competitive dye displacement titration has previously been used to characterize chitosan-DNA interactions using ethidium bromide. In this work, we aim to develop a fast and reliable method using SYBR Gold as a fluorescent probe to evaluate the binding affinity between ssRNA and chitosan. The interaction of chitosan with ssRNA was investigated as a function of temperature, molecular weight and degree of acetylation of chitosan, using competitive dye displacement titrations with fluorescence quenching. Affinity constants are reported, showing the high sensitivity of the interaction to the degree of acetylation of chitosan and barely dependent on the molecular weight. We propose that the mechanism of SYBR Gold fluorescence quenching is governed by both static and dynamic quenching.

  16. Enzyme-gold affinity labelling of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Berg, R H; Erdos, G W; Gritzali, M; Brown, R D

    1988-04-01

    The enzyme-linked colloidal gold affinity labelling technique was tested as a method to localize cellulose on thin sections of plant cell walls and slime mold spores. Commercially available cellulase from cultures of Trichoderma reesei, the main components being cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I, CBH II) and endoglucanase (EG), was linked to colloidal gold by using standard techniques and applied as a dilute, buffered suspension to thin sections. After brief exposure, e.g., 15-30 minutes, cellulose exposed on the surface of sections was labelled with the enzyme-gold complex. Poststaining did not appear to have a deleterious effect on the labelled sections. The specificity of labelling was demonstrated by its complete inhibition when carboxymethylcellulose was incorporated in the labelling mixture, by lack of labelling of 1,4-beta-mannans or 1,3-beta-xylans in noncellulosic walls of marine algae, by lack of labelling of 1,4-beta-glucans in chitin, by much lower labelling density when done at 4 degrees C, and by lack of labelling when sections were predigested with cellulase. Labelling with the crude commercial cellulase was compared to labelling with purified CBH I-, CBH II-, and EG-linked colloidal gold, and the labelling pattern was similar. This method was found useful on conventionally fixed material and required no special preparation other than the use of inert (Ni or Au) grids and 0.5% gelatin to reduce nonspecific binding of the gold complex. Labelling was similar in the several embedding resins tested: LR White, Lowicryl K4M, Epon 812, and Spurr's.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Optimal affine-invariant matching: performance characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mauro S.; Haralick, Robert M.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    1992-04-01

    The geometric hashing scheme proposed by Lamdan and Wolfson can be very efficient in a model-based matching system, not only in terms of the computational complexity involved, but also in terms of the simplicity of the method. In a recent paper, we discussed errors that can occur with this method due to quantization, stability, symmetry, and noise problems. These errors make the original geometric hashing technique unsuitable for use on the factory floor. Beginning with an explicit noise model, which the original Lamdan and Wolfson technique lacks, we derived an optimal approach that overcomes these problems. We showed that the results obtained with the new algorithm are clearly better than the results from the original method. This paper addresses the performance characterization of the geometric hashing technique, more specifically the affine-invariant point matching, applied to the problem of recognizing and determining the pose of sheet metal parts. The experiments indicate that with a model having 10 to 14 points, with 2 points of the model undetected and 10 extraneous points detected, and with the model points perturbed by Gaussian noise of standard deviation 3 (0.58 of range), the average amount of computation required to obtain an answer is equivalent to trying 11 of the possible three-point bases. The misdetection rate, measured by the percentage of correct bases matches that fail to verify, is 0.9. The percentage of incorrect bases that successfully produced a match that did verify (false alarm rate) is 13. And, finally, 2 of the experiments failed to find a correct match and verify it. Results for experiments with real images are also presented.

  18. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  19. A new boronic acid fluorescent sensor based on fluorene for monosaccharides at physiological pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Rahman; Mohadjerani, Maryam; Pooryousef, Mona; Eslami, Abbas; Emami, Saeed

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent boronic acids are very useful fluorescent sensor for detection of biologically important saccharides. Herein we synthesized a new fluorene-based fluorescent boronic acid that shows significant fluorescence changes upon addition of saccharides at physiological pH. Upon addition of fructose, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, ribose, and maltose at different concentration to the solution of 7-(dimethylamino)-9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl-2-boronic acid (7-DMAFBA, 1), significant decreases in fluorescent intensity were observed. It was found that this boronic acid has high affinity (Ka = 3582.88 M-1) and selectivity for fructose over glucose at pH = 7.4. The sensor 1 showed a linear response toward D-fructose in the concentrations ranging from 2.5 × 10-5 to 4 × 10-4 mol L-1 with the detection limit of 1.3 × 10-5 mol L-1.

  20. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and biological activities of two Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with one polyquinoline ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Li, Jun-Ling; Sun, Qian; Jiang, Lin; Gu, Wen; Liu, Xin; Tian, Jin-Lei; Yan, Shi-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Two new complexes, [CuLCl]ClO4 (1) and [Zn2L2SO4(H2O)2](ClO4)2 (2) [L = N,N-bis(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)quinolin-8-amine], have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The interactions of two complexes with CT-DNA have been investigated by UV absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis under physiological conditions. Results show that the complexes bind to CT-DNA with a moderate intercalative mode and exhibit efficient DNA cleavage activity on UV-A light of 365 nm. Furthermore, two complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process based on BSA binding experiments. Notably, in vitro cytotoxicity study of two complexes on four human tumor cells lines (7404, HeLa, MCF-7, and HepG-2) indicate that both of them have the potential to act as effective anticancer drugs with low IC50 values.

  2. Effect of receptor-ligand affinity on the strength of endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Truskey, G A

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of receptor-ligand affinity on the strength of endothelial cell adhesion. Linear and cyclic forms of the fibronectin (Fn) cell-binding domain peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) were covalently immobilized to glass, and Fn was adsorbed onto glass slides. Bovine aortic endothelial cells attached to the surfaces for 15 min. The critical wall shear stress at which 50% of the cells detached increased nonlinearly with ligand density and was greater with immobilized cyclic RGD than with immobilized linear RGD or adsorbed Fn. To directly compare results for the different ligand densities, the receptor-ligand dissociation constant and force per bond were estimated from data for the critical shear stress and contact area. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was used to measure the contact area as a function of separation distance. Contact area increased with increasing ligand density. Contact areas were similar for the immobilized peptides but were greater on surfaces with adsorbed Fn. The dissociation constant was determined by nonlinear regression of the net force on the cells to models that assumed that bonds were either uniformly stressed or that only bonds on the periphery of the contact region were stressed (peeling model). Both models provided equally good fits for cells attached to immobilized peptides whereas the peeling model produced a better fit of data for cells attached to adsorbed Fn. Cyclic RGD and linear RGD both bind to the integrin alpha v beta 3, but immobilized cyclic RGD exhibited a greater affinity than did linear RGD. Receptor affinities of Fn adsorbed to glycophase glass and Fn adsorbed to glass were similar. The number of bonds was calculated assuming binding equilibrium. The peeling model produced good linear fits between bond force and number of bonds. Results of this study indicate that 1) bovine aortic endothelial cells are more adherent on immobilized cyclic RGD peptide than linear

  3. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  4. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, J.W.; Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.

    1993-06-01

    An apparatus for measuring lignin concentration with time resolved fluorescence in an undiluted wood pulp or black liquor sample, on a real-time, in situ basis is described, comprising: light source means for applying excitation light pulses at a selected wavelength and at known time intervals to the undiluted sample for causing the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light with a fluorescence intensity that monotonically decreases in a quenched fluorescence regime; light detector means for measuring the emission light at the known time intervals and establishing signals indicative thereof; switching means for turning said light detector means on at precise specified time intervals after each excitation light pulse; and signal processing means connected to the light source means and the light detector means for comparing intensities of the emission light from the lignin in the quenched fluorescence regime to the intensities of the excitation light pulses on a time resolved basis for providing a measurement of the lignin concentration in the undiluted sample as a function of the time resolved emission light intensity.

  5. How Structure Defines Affinity in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Erijman, Ariel; Rosenthal, Eran; Shifman, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) in nature are conveyed by a multitude of binding modes involving various surfaces, secondary structure elements and intermolecular interactions. This diversity results in PPI binding affinities that span more than nine orders of magnitude. Several early studies attempted to correlate PPI binding affinities to various structure-derived features with limited success. The growing number of high-resolution structures, the appearance of more precise methods for measuring binding affinities and the development of new computational algorithms enable more thorough investigations in this direction. Here, we use a large dataset of PPI structures with the documented binding affinities to calculate a number of structure-based features that could potentially define binding energetics. We explore how well each calculated biophysical feature alone correlates with binding affinity and determine the features that could be used to distinguish between high-, medium- and low- affinity PPIs. Furthermore, we test how various combinations of features could be applied to predict binding affinity and observe a slow improvement in correlation as more features are incorporated into the equation. In addition, we observe a considerable improvement in predictions if we exclude from our analysis low-resolution and NMR structures, revealing the importance of capturing exact intermolecular interactions in our calculations. Our analysis should facilitate prediction of new interactions on the genome scale, better characterization of signaling networks and design of novel binding partners for various target proteins. PMID:25329579

  6. The sodium ion affinities of asparagine, glutamine, histidine and arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2008-01-01

    The sodium ion affinities of the amino acids Asn, Gln, His and Arg have been determined by experimental and computational approaches (for Asn, His and Arg). Na+-bound heterodimers with amino acid and peptide ligands (Pep1, Pep2) were produced by electrospray ionization. From the dissociation kinetics of these Pep1-Na+-Pep2 ions to Pep1-Na+ and Pep2-Na+, determined by collisionally activated dissociation, a ladder of relative affinities was constructed and subsequently converted to absolute affinities by anchoring the relative values to known Na+ affinities. The Na+ affinities of Asn, His and Arg, were calculated at the MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//MP2/6-31G(d) level of ab initio theory. The resulting experimental and computed Na+ affinities are in excellent agreement with one another. These results, combined with those of our previous studies, yield the sodium ion affinities of 18 out of the 20 [alpha]-amino acids naturally occurring in peptides and proteins of living systems.

  7. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L; White, Christopher J; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S

    2014-10-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  8. Bright Fluorescence and Host-Guest Sensing with a Nanoscale M₄L₆ Tetrahedron Accessed by Self-Assembly of Zinc-Imine Chelate Vertices and Perylene Bisimide Edges.

    PubMed

    Frischmann, Peter D; Kunz, Valentin; Würthner, Frank

    2015-06-15

    A highly luminescent Zn4L6 tetrahedron is reported with 3.8 nm perylene bisimide edges and hexadentate Zn(II)-imine chelate vertices. Replacing Fe(II) and monoamines commonly utilized in subcomponent self-assembly with Zn(II) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine provides access to a metallosupramolecular host with the rare combination of structural integrity at concentrations <10(-7) mol L(-1) and an exceptionally high fluorescence quantum yield of Φ(em) =0.67. Encapsulation of multiple perylene or coronene guest molecules is accompanied by strong luminescence quenching. We anticipate this self-assembly strategy may be generalized to improve access to brightly fluorescent coordination cages tailored for host-guest light-harvesting, photocatalysis, and sensing.

  9. Affine differential geometry analysis of human arm movements.

    PubMed

    Flash, Tamar; Handzel, Amir A

    2007-06-01

    Humans interact with their environment through sensory information and motor actions. These interactions may be understood via the underlying geometry of both perception and action. While the motor space is typically considered by default to be Euclidean, persistent behavioral observations point to a different underlying geometric structure. These observed regularities include the "two-thirds power law", which connects path curvature with velocity, and "local isochrony", which prescribes the relation between movement time and its extent. Starting with these empirical observations, we have developed a mathematical framework based on differential geometry, Lie group theory and Cartan's moving frame method for the analysis of human hand trajectories. We also use this method to identify possible motion primitives, i.e., elementary building blocks from which more complicated movements are constructed. We show that a natural geometric description of continuous repetitive hand trajectories is not Euclidean but equi-affine. Specifically, equi-affine velocity is piecewise constant along movement segments, and movement execution time for a given segment is proportional to its equi-affine arc-length. Using this mathematical framework, we then analyze experimentally recorded drawing movements. To examine movement segmentation and classification, the two fundamental equi-affine differential invariants-equi-affine arc-length and curvature are calculated for the recorded movements. We also discuss the possible role of conic sections, i.e., curves with constant equi-affine curvature, as motor primitives and focus in more detail on parabolas, the equi-affine geodesics. Finally, we explore possible schemes for the internal neural coding of motor commands by showing that the equi-affine framework is compatible with the common model of population coding of the hand velocity vector when combined with a simple assumption on its dynamics. We then discuss several alternative explanations

  10. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  11. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  12. Specificity and affinity of natural product cyclopentapeptide inhibitors against A. fumigatus, human, and bacterial chitinases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco V; Houston, Douglas R; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Hodkinson, Michael; Adams, David J; Shiomi, Kazuro; Omura, Satoshi; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2005-01-01

    Family 18 chitinases play key roles in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. There is a need for specific, potent inhibitors to probe the function of these chitinases in different organisms. Such molecules could also provide leads for the development of chemotherapeuticals with fungicidal, insecticidal, or anti-inflammatory potential. Recently, two natural product peptides, argifin and argadin, have been characterized, which structurally mimic chitinase-chitooligosaccharide interactions and inhibit a bacterial chitinase in the nM-mM range. Here, we show that these inhibitors also act on human and Aspergillus fumigatus chitinases. The structures of these enzymes in complex with argifin and argadin, together with mutagenesis, fluorescence, and enzymology, reveal that subtle changes in the binding site dramatically affect affinity and selectivity. The data show that it may be possible to develop specific chitinase inhibitors based on the argifin/argadin scaffolds.

  13. Isolation of murine telomere-proximal sequences by affinity capture and PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Rounds, D.; Ward, D.C.; Brueckner, M.

    1995-10-10

    We describe a method of selectively enriching for murine telomere-proximal sequences using affinity capture followed by PCR amplification. The telomeric fragments were selected from NotI-digested and lambda exonuclease-resected mouse genomic DNA by annealing to a biotinylated riboprobe containing multiple copies of the telomere repeat (TTAGGG){sub n}. The resultant DNA-RNA hybrids were selectively retained on a matrix with covalently bound avidin. The captured DNA was then specifically released by ribonuclease action, and PCR amplification was performed using mouse repeat primers. The PCR products were cloned and used to screen a mouse genomic cosmid library, and the resultant cosmid clones were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Ten of 70 clones analyzed gave telomere-proximal hybridization signals, indicating an at least 500-fold enrichment for telomere-proximal sequences. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A fully-integrated aptamer-based affinity assay platform for monitoring astronaut health in space.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xianbin; Durland, Ross H.; Hecht, Ariel H.; Singh, Anup K.; Sommer, Gregory Jon; Hatch, Anson V.

    2010-07-01

    Here we demonstrate the suitability of robust nucleic acid affinity reagents in an integrated point-of-care diagnostic platform for monitoring proteomic biomarkers indicative of astronaut health in spaceflight applications. A model thioaptamer targeting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) is evaluated in an on-chip electrophoretic gel-shift assay for human serum. Key steps of (i) mixing sample with the aptamer, (ii) buffer exchange, and (iii) preconcentration of sample were successfully integrated upstream of fluorescence-based detection. Challenges due to (i) nonspecific interactions with serum, and (ii) preconcentration at a nanoporous membrane are discussed and successfully resolved to yield a robust, rapid, and fully-integrated diagnostic system.

  15. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  16. Spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 3-acetylcoumarin-isonicotinoylhydrazone and their antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunoor, Rekha S.; Patil, Basavaraj R.; Badiger, Dayananda S.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Chandrashekhar, V. M.; Muchchandi, I. S.

    2010-11-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with a new heterocyclic Schiff base derived by the condensation of isonicotinoylhydrazide and 3-acetylcoumarin have been synthesized. 1H, 13C and 2D HETCOR NMR analyses confirm the formation of title compound and existence of the same in two isomeric forms. The metal complexes were characterized on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques like electronic, EPR, IR, 1H and 13C NMR studies, elemental analysis, magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis, and also by the aid of molar conductivity measurements. It is found that the Schiff base behaves as a monobasic tridentate ligand coordinating in the imidol form with 1:1 metal to ligand stoichiometry. Trigonal bipyramidal geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, while tetrahedral for Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The compounds were subjected to antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity screening using serial broth dilution method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) is determined. Zn(II) complex has shown significant antifungal activity with an MIC of 6.25 μg/mL while Cu(II) complex is noticeable for antibacterial activity at the same concentration. Anti-TB activity of the ligand has enhanced on complexation with Co(II) and Ni(II) ions.

  17. Determination of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in food and water samples after preconcentration by coprecipitation with Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, Mehmet; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Elvan, Hamide; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Duran, Celal

    2013-02-01

    A new, simple, and rapid separation and preconcentration procedure, for determination of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions in environmental real samples, has been developed. The method is based on the combination of coprecipitation of analyte ions by the aid of the Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate-(Mo(VI)-DDTC) precipitate and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The effects of experimental conditions like pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DDTC and Mo(VI), standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, etc. and also the influences of some foreign ions were investigated in detail on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions. The preconcentration factors were found to be 150 for Pb(II), Zn(II) and Co(II), and 200 for Cd(II) ions. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-2.2 μg L(-1) while the relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 5 % for the studied analyte ions. The accuracy of the method was checked by spiked/recovery tests and the analysis of certified reference material (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water). The procedure was successfully applied to seawater and stream water as liquid samples and baby food and dried eggplant as solid samples in order to determine the levels of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions. PMID:22527456

  18. Highly selective removal of Zn(II) ion from hot-dip galvanizing pickling waste with amino-functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 magnetic nano-adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shuangyou; Tang, Lihong; Li, Kai; Ning, Ping; Peng, Jinhui; Guo, Huibin; Zhu, Tingting; Liu, Ye

    2016-01-15

    Amino-functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 magnetic nano-adsorbent was used as a novel sorbent to highly selective removal of Zn(II) ion from hot-dip galvanizing pickling waste in the presence of Fe(II). These hot-dip galvanizing pickling waste mainly contain ZnCl2 and FeCl2 in aqueous HCl media. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and BET surface area measurements. Various factors influencing the adsorption of Zn(II) ion such as initial concentration of metal ions, the amount of adsorbent, pH value of the solutions, the concentration of coexisting iron ion were investigated by batch experiments. The results indicated that the adsorption equilibrium data obeyed the Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacities for Zn(II) to 169.5mg/g. The maximum adsorption occurred at pH 5±0.1 and Fe(II) interferences had no obvious influence. This work provides a potential and unique technique for zinc ion removal from hot-dip galvanizing pickling waste. PMID:26458121

  19. Affinity- and topology-dependent bound on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-08-01

    We provide a proof of a recently conjectured universal bound on current fluctuations in Markovian processes. This bound establishes a link between the fluctuations of an individual observable current, the cycle affinities driving the system into a non-equilibrium steady state, and the topology of the network. The proof is based on a decomposition of the network into independent cycles with both positive affinity and positive stationary cycle current. This formalism allows for a refinement of the bound for systems in equilibrium or with locally vanishing affinities.

  20. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  1. Thioureas as reporting elements for metal-responsive fluorescent chemosensors.

    PubMed

    Vonlanthen, Mireille; Finney, Nathaniel S

    2013-04-19

    Proof that sulfur is a viable reporting element for the development of fluorescent chemosensors for metal ions is presented. To date, the majority of metal-responsive fluorescent chemosensors have relied on metal-nitrogen coordination to provide a fluorescence response, most commonly by suppressing photoinduced electron transfer (PET) quenching. While chemosensors with direct application to biology, medicine, and analytical chemistry have been so developed, reliance on the coordination chemistry of nitrogen remains a practical and conceptual limitation. Building on the fact that thioureas can quench fluorescence emission by PET, it is shown that the quenched emission of thiourea-appended naphthalimides can be restored by metal binding and that metal affinity and selectivity can be controlled through structural modification of the thiourea substituents. Further, such chemosensors can function in aqueous media and, unlike nitrogen-based chemosensors, are unresponsive to increases in [H(+)]. Given that the coordination properties of sulfur are distinct from those of nitrogen, this work lays the foundation for the development of a new class of interesting and useful metal-responsive fluorescent probes. PMID:23470031

  2. Mechanisms of quinacrine binding and fluorescence in nuclei and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sumner, A T

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms has been investigated whereby quinacrine binds to the DNA of nuclei and chromosomes in cytological preparations fixed in methanol-acetic acid. A variety of evidence is consistent with the idea that the quinacrine binds by intercalation. This is supported by a high value for the affinity of quinacrine for DNA, together with a saturation value of 0.2 quinacrine molecules/nucleotide; binding in the presence of strong salt solutions; and inhibition of fluorescence and banding by denaturation or depurination of DNA. At high quinacrine concentrations, weak binding of quinacrine to nuclei and chromosomes also occurs, but this is not relevant to the production of strong fluorescence or Q-banding patterns. A number of factors were tested which might have affected quinacrine fluorescence and banding. These included: pH; blocking protein amino groups by acetylation or benzoylation; introduction of hydrophobic groups by benzoylation; and dephosphorylation. All these treatments were without effect. However, comparison of the quinacrine fluorescence of human and onion nuclei, which differ substantially in the base composition of their DNA, shows that quinacrine fluorescence can be enhanced in cytological preparations by AT-rich DNA. PMID:3721920

  3. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  4. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  5. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Crystal structure of toxin HP0892 from Helicobacter pylori with two Zn(II) at 1.8 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hookang; Jang, Sun-Bok; Pathak, Chinar; Yang, Yeon-Jin; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yu, Tae-Kyung; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and microorganism virulence have been consistently exhibited by bacteria and archaea, which survive in conditions of environmental stress through toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems. The HP0892–HP0893 TA system is one of the two known TA systems belonging to Helicobacter pylori. The antitoxin, HP0893, binds and inhibits the HP0892 toxin and regulates the transcription of the TA operon. Here, we present the crystal structure of the zinc-bound HP0892 toxin at 1.8 Å resolution. Reorientation of residues at the mRNase active site was shown. The involved residues, namely E58A, H86A, and H58A/ H60A, were mutated and the binding affinity was monitored by ITC studies. Through the structural difference between the apo and the metal-bound state, and using a homology modeling tool, the involvement of the metal ion in mRNase active site could be identified. The most catalytically important residue, His86, reorients itself to exhibit RNase activity. His47, Glu58, and His60 are involved in metal binding where Glu58 acts as a general base and His47 and His60 may also act as a general acid in enzymatic activity. Glu58 and Asp64 are involved in substrate binding and specific sequence recognition. Arg83 is involved in phosphate binding and stabilization of the transition state, and Phe90 is involved in base packing and substrate orientation. PMID:24677509

  7. Comparative electrochemical and photophysical studies of tetrathiafulvalene-annulated porphyrins and their Zn(II) complexes: the effect of metalation and structural variation.

    PubMed

    Jana, Atanu; Ishida, Masatoshi; Kwak, Kyuju; Sung, Young Mo; Kim, Dong Sub; Lynch, Vincent M; Lee, Dongil; Kim, Dongho; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    A series of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-annulated porphyrins, and their corresponding Zn(II) complexes, have been synthesized. Detailed electrochemical, photophysical, and theoretical studies reveal the effects of intramolecular charge-transfer transitions that originate from the TTF fragments to the macrocyclic core. The incremental synthetic addition of TTF moieties to the porphyrin core makes the species more susceptible to these charge-transfer (CT) effects as evidenced by spectroscopic studies. On the other hand, regular positive shifts in the reduction signals are seen in the square-wave voltammograms as the number of TTF subunits increases. Structural studies that involve the tetrakis-substituted TTF-porphyrin (both free-base and Zn(II) complex) reveal only modest deviations from planarity. The effect of TTF substitution is thus ascribed to electronic overlap between annulated TTF subunits rather than steric effects. The directly linked thiafulvalene subunits function as both π acceptors as well as σ donors. Whereas σ donation accounts for the substituent-dependent charge-transfer transitions, it is the π-acceptor nature of the appended tetrathiafulvalene groups that dominates the redox chemistry. Interactions between the subunits are also reflected in the square-wave voltammograms. In the case of the free-base derivatives that bear multiple TTF subunits, the neighboring TTF units, as well as the TTF(⋅+) generated through one-electron oxidation, can interact with each other; this gives rise to multiple signals in the square-wave voltammograms. On the other hand, after metalation, the electronic communication between the separate TTF moieties becomes restricted and they act as separate redox centers under conditions of oxidation. Thus only two signals, which correspond to TTF(⋅+) and TTF(2+), are observed. The reduction potentials are also seen to shift towards more negative values after metalation, a finding that is considered to reflect an increased

  8. The structure of N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine and its complexes with Zn(II) and Cd(II).

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Alvaro S; Reisinger, Sandra A; Fernandes, Manuel A; Perry, Christopher B; Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Marques, Helder M

    2009-12-14

    The crystal structure of the nitrate salt of N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethane-1,2-diamine (BHEEN), and its complex with Zn(II) and Cd(II) are reported. (H(2)BHEEN)(NO(3))(2) packs in a layered structure with a herringbone pattern within each layer arising from H-bonding between amino and alcohol protons and NO(3)(-) counterions. In [Zn(BHEEN)(2)]Cl(2), each ligand coordinates to Zn(II) through its two N-donors producing a distorted tetrahedral geometry at the metal centre. The two hydroxyethyl arms of each ligand are trans to each other and the crystals obtained contained a racemic mixture of the bis-trans-R,R and the bis-trans-S,S isomers. All four hydroxyl groups are H-bonded to chloride counter ions, creating a layered structure. Whilst distant from the metal ion (average 3.00 A), the four O atoms of the pendent hydroxylamino groups appear positioned to interact with the metal. The orientation of the arms is preserved in a B3LYP gas phase calculation of the structure. An analysis using Bader's Atoms in Molecules indicates that the Zn-N bonds are predominantly ionic with some covalent character and that there is a weak interaction between the metal and the hydroxyl groups. Several other weak interactions including four O...HN, five O...HC and a H-H dihydrogen bond were identified. The Cd(II) complex of BHEEN crystallised as a dimer [(mu-Cl)(2)(Cd(BHEEN)Cl)(2))] with two asymmetrically-bound bridging Cl(-) ligands and a terminally-coordinated Cl(-) on each metal ion. One hydroxyl group of each ligand is coordinated to the metal and the uncoordinated hydroxyl group is H-bonded to the H atom of the coordinated hydroxyl group of the second ligand in the complex. The ESI-MS spectrum shows the presence of di-cadmium complexes, but the most intense peaks are due to mono-cadmium complexes. The gas phase B3LYP structure of the dimer energy-minimises into two monomers and the longer bond between Cd(II) and bridging Cl(-) breaks. Hence, dimerisation may be a consequence of

  9. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  10. Impact of D2 Receptor Internalization on Binding Affinity of Neuroimaging Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ningning; Guo, Wen; Kralikova, Michaela; Jiang, Man; Schieren, Ira; Narendran, Raj; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Javitch, Jonathan A; Rayport, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic dopamine (DA) levels seem to affect the in vivo binding of many D2 receptor radioligands. Thus, release of endogenous DA induced by the administration of amphetamine decreases ligand binding, whereas DA depletion increases binding. This is generally thought to be due to competition between endogenous DA and the radioligands for D2 receptors. However, the temporal discrepancy between amphetamine-induced increases in DA as measured by microdialysis, which last on the order of 2 h, and the prolonged decrease in ligand binding, which lasts up to a day, has suggested that agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization may contribute to the sustained decrease in D2 receptor-binding potential seen following a DA surge. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro system showing robust agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization following treatment with the agonist quinpirole. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were stably co-transfected with human D2 receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and arrestin 3. Agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and radioligand competition binding. The binding of seven D2 antagonists and four agonists to the surface and internalized receptors was measured in intact cells. All the imaging ligands bound with high affinity to both surface and internalized D2 receptors. Affinity of most of the ligands to internalized receptors was modestly lower, indicating that internalization would reduce the binding potential measured in imaging studies carried out with these ligands. However, between-ligand differences in the magnitude of the internalization-associated affinity shift only partly accounted for the data obtained in neuroimaging experiments, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms beyond competition and internalization. PMID:19956086

  11. Vibriocholerae cytolysin recognizes the heptasaccharide core of complex N-glycans with nanomolar affinity

    PubMed Central

    Levan, Sophia; De, Swastik; Olson, Rich

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens selectively target host cells using adhesion molecules and secreted virulence factors that may utilize protein, lipid, or carbohydrate ligands on the cell surface. The human intestinal pathogen Vibrio cholerae secretes a pore-forming toxin, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC), which contains two domains that are structurally similar to known carbohydrate-binding proteins. These tandem domains are attached to the carboxy-terminus of the cytolytic domain and contain a β-trefoil fold and a β-prism fold. VCC has been shown to bind glycosylated proteins, and removal of the β-prism domain leads to a large decrease in lytic activity against rabbit erythrocytes. Despite these clues, the identity of the glycan receptors of VCC and the role of glycan binding in toxin activity remains unknown. To better understand this specificity, we used a combination of structural and functional approaches to characterize the carbohydrate-binding activity of the VCC toxin. We first probed the monosaccharide-binding activity of VCC and demonstrated that the toxin exhibits millimolar affinity for aldohexoses. To understand this specificity, we solved the crystal structure of the VCC β-prism domain bound to methyl-α-mannose. Next, we utilized a mammalian glycan screen to determine that the β-prism domain preferentially binds complex N-glycans with a heptasaccharide GlcNAc4 Man3 core (NGA2). Fluorescence anisotropy and surface plasmon resonance indicated an approximately 100-nanomolar affinity of the β-prism domain for the heptasaccharide core. Our results suggest that carbohydrate-binding domains on the VCC toxin facilitate high-affinity targeting of mammalian cell membranes, which may contribute to the ability of VCC to lyse cells at picomolar concentrations. PMID:23274141

  12. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  13. Au25(SG)18 as a fluorescent iodide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Man; Wu, Zhikun; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Guozhong; Wang, Hongzhi; Cai, Weiping

    2012-06-01

    The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors.The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: fluorescence spectra of Au25(SG)18 (1.6 μM in H2O) with successive titration of I- and the time-dependent fluorescence of Au25(SG)18. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30169e.

  14. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  15. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-01

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. PMID:25981289

  16. Dense Stereo Matching Method Based on Local Affine Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Shi, Wenxuan; Deng, Dexiang; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui

    2013-07-01

    A new method for constructing an accurate disparity space image and performing an efficient cost aggregation in stereo matching based on local affine model is proposed in this paper. The key algorithm includes a new self-adapting dissimilarity measurement used for calculating the matching cost and a local affine model used in cost aggregation stage. Different from the traditional region-based methods, which try to change the matching window size or to calculate an adaptive weight to do the aggregation, the proposed method focuses on obtaining the efficient and accurate local affine model to aggregate the cost volume while preserving the disparity discontinuity. Moreover, the local affine model can be extended to the color space. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to provide subpixel precision disparity maps compared with some state-of-the-art stereo matching methods. PMID:24163727

  17. On the thermodynamic basis of the affinity decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Colín, L. S.; Piña, E.; de la Selva, S. M. T.

    1990-03-01

    In the past five years exhaustive studies in chemical reactions have lead to an empirical equation describing how isothermal-isometric homogeneous reactions evolve towards equilibrium independently of their particular mechanism or rate law. Such an equation expresses the time rate of change of the chemical affinity as a linear function of the inverse of time. In this paper we show that by invoking the local equilibrium hypothesis one may provide, a time evolution equation for the chemical affinity that is uniquely given by the solution of the particular rate law of the reaction considered. Consequently such an equation is not of the same functional form for all reactions. On the other hand, integration of Dalton's law under specific initial conditions, together with the local equilibrium assumption and the ideality requirement for the reacting species, exhibits a unique inverse time decay for the chemical affinity. This explains the good fitting of the inverse in time dependence of the chemical affinity with experimental data.

  18. A thermodynamic approach to the affinity optimization of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ernesto

    2009-11-01

    High throughput screening and other techniques commonly used to identify lead candidates for drug development usually yield compounds with binding affinities to their intended targets in the mid-micromolar range. The affinity of these molecules needs to be improved by several orders of magnitude before they become viable drug candidates. Traditionally, this task has been accomplished by establishing structure activity relationships to guide chemical modifications and improve the binding affinity of the compounds. As the binding affinity is a function of two quantities, the binding enthalpy and the binding entropy, it is evident that a more efficient optimization would be accomplished if both quantities were considered and improved simultaneously. Here, an optimization algorithm based upon enthalpic and entropic information generated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry is presented.

  19. Frontal affinity chromatography (FAC): theory and basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is a versatile analytical tool for determining specific interactions between biomolecules and is particularly useful in the field of glycobiology. This article presents its basic aspects, merits, and theory. PMID:25117240

  20. Bidirectional Elastic Image Registration Using B-Spline Affine Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Wang, Chen; Kaminski, Naftali; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-01-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-Spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bi-directional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective / cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy. PMID:24530210

  1. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  2. Balancing between affinity and speed in target DNA search by zinc-finger proteins via modulation of dynamic conformational ensemble.

    PubMed

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Vuzman, Dana; Kemme, Catherine A; Levy, Yaakov; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-09-15

    Although engineering of transcription factors and DNA-modifying enzymes has drawn substantial attention for artificial gene regulation and genome editing, most efforts focus on affinity and specificity of the DNA-binding proteins, typically overlooking the kinetic properties of these proteins. However, a simplistic pursuit of high affinity can lead to kinetically deficient proteins that spend too much time at nonspecific sites before reaching their targets on DNA. We demonstrate that structural dynamic knowledge of the DNA-scanning process allows for kinetically and thermodynamically balanced engineering of DNA-binding proteins. Our current study of the zinc-finger protein Egr-1 (also known as Zif268) and its nuclease derivatives reveals kinetic and thermodynamic roles of the dynamic conformational equilibrium between two modes during the DNA-scanning process: one mode suitable for search and the other for recognition. By mutagenesis, we were able to shift this equilibrium, as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Using fluorescence and biochemical assays as well as computational simulations, we analyzed how the shifts of the conformational equilibrium influence binding affinity, target search kinetics, and efficiency in displacing other proteins from the target sites. A shift toward the recognition mode caused an increase in affinity for DNA and a decrease in search efficiency. In contrast, a shift toward the search mode caused a decrease in affinity and an increase in search efficiency. This accelerated site-specific DNA cleavage by the zinc-finger nuclease, without enhancing off-target cleavage. Our study shows that appropriate modulation of the dynamic conformational ensemble can greatly improve zinc-finger technology, which has used Egr-1 (Zif268) as a major scaffold for engineering.

  3. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  4. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  5. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  6. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  7. Fluorescent Gage Indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barns, C. E.; Gilbaugh, B. L.; Gin, B.; Holt, W. L.; Lesak, P.; Mancini, R.; Spencer, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of dye shows quality of contact between two mating parts. Mating parts checked for fit by spreading fluorescent dye on one, making brief light contact with other, and looking (under UV light) for transferred dye. Dye offers greater visibility under ultraviolet illumination, allowing better indication of how precisely parts match and what areas interfere.

  8. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  9. Hydride affinities of cumulated, isolated, and conjugated dienes in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Hao; Zhu, Yan; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2008-11-01

    The hydride affinities (defined as the enthalpy changes in this work) of 15 polarized dienes [five phenyl sulfone substituted allenes (1a), the corresponding five isolated dienes (1b), and the corresponding five conjugated dienes (1c)] in acetonitrile solution were determined by titration calorimetry for the first time. The results display that the hydride affinity scales of the 15 dienes in acetonitrile range from -71.6 to -73.9 kcal/mol for 1a, from -46.2 to -49.7 kcal/mol for 1b, and from -45.0 to -46.5 kcal/mol for 1c, which indicates that the hydride-obtaining abilities of the cumulated dienes (1a) are not only much larger than those of the corresponding conjugated dienes (1c) but also much larger than those of the corresponding isolated dienes (1b). The hydrogen affinities of the 15 dienes as well as the hydrogen affinities and the proton affinities of the radical anions of the dienes (1(-*)) in acetonitrile were also evaluated by using relative thermodynamic cycles according to Hess's law. The results show that (i) the hydrogen affinities of the neutral dienes 1 cover a range from -44.5 to -45.6 kcal/mol for 1a, from -20.4 to -21.4 kcal/mol for 1b, and from -17.3 to -18.5 kcal/mol for 1c; (ii) the hydrogen affinities of the radical anions of the dienes (1(-*)) in acetonitrile cover a range from -40.6 to -47.2 kcal/mol for 1a(-*), from -21.6 to -29.6 kcal/mol for 1b(-*), and from -10.0 to -15.4 kcal/mol for 1c(-*); (iii) the proton affinities of the 15 1a(-*) in acetonitrile cover a range from -97.0 to -100.6 kcal/mol for 1a(-*), from -77.8 to -83.4 kcal/mol for 1b(-*), and from -66.2 to -68.9 kcal/mol for 1c(-*). The main reasons for the great difference between the cumulated dienes and the corresponding isolated and conjugated dienes in the hydride affinity, hydrogen affinity, and proton affinity have been examined. It is evident that these experimental results should be quite valuable to facilitate the elucidation of the origins of the especially high

  10. AMP/GMP Analogs as Affinity ESIPT Probes for Highly Selective Sensing of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Living Systems.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Li, Peng; Han, Keli

    2015-11-01

    Current probes for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) detection had been developed mainly by adding a phosphate group to a dye, which would lead to indistinct performance when implemented in a living system as several phosphatases exist together. In this study, the nucleotides adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP) were introduced into 2'-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole-based probes, and highly fluorescent turn-on probes with good selectivity towards ALP over several phosphatases, as well as high affinity and low toxicity were obtained. In the presence of L-phenylalanine, an ALP inhibitor, a strong decrease in fluorescence recovery was observed. These probes allowed for real-time imaging of endogenous ALP activity in living cells as well as in a zebrafish model.

  11. Detection of saccharides with a fluorescent sensing device based on a gold film modified with 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Jen; Chang, Jui-Feng; Cheng, Nai-Jen; Yih, Jeng-Nan; Chiu, Kuo-Chi

    2013-09-01

    An extremely sensitive fluorescent sensor based on a phenylboronic acid monolayer was developed for detecting saccharide molecules. The fluorescent sensor was prepared by assembling a monolayer of 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (4-MPBA) onto a gold-coated compact disk. The change in the fluorescence of the 4-MPBA monolayer was extremely obvious in basic methanolic buffer containing monosaccharides down to the picomolar level. The fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the 4-MPBA monolayer was sensitive to monosaccharides and disaccharides, and the affinity of the monolayer toward saccharides was in the order of glucose < fructose < mannose < galactose < maltose > lactose > sucrose. Additionally, the fluorescence intensity of 4-MPBA monolayer was restorable after cleaning with weak acid, indicating that the reported fluorescent sensor with the detection limit of glucose down to the picomolar level is reusable for sensing saccharides.

  12. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katy A; O'Bryan, John P

    2011-01-01

    Defining the subcellular distribution of signaling complexes is imperative to understanding the output from that complex. Conventional methods such as immunoprecipitation do not provide information on the spatial localization of complexes. In contrast, BiFC monitors the interaction and subcellular compartmentalization of protein complexes. In this method, a fluororescent protein is split into amino- and carboxy-terminal non-fluorescent fragments which are then fused to two proteins of interest. Interaction of the proteins results in reconstitution of the fluorophore (Figure 1). A limitation of BiFC is that once the fragmented fluorophore is reconstituted the complex is irreversible. This limitation is advantageous in detecting transient or weak interactions, but precludes a kinetic analysis of complex dynamics. An additional caveat is that the reconstituted flourophore requires 30min to mature and fluoresce, again precluding the observation of real time interactions. BiFC is a specific example of the protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) which employs reporter proteins such as green fluorescent protein variants (BiFC), dihydrofolate reductase, b-lactamase, and luciferase to measure protein:protein interactions. Alternative methods to study protein:protein interactions in cells include fluorescence co-localization and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). For co-localization, two proteins are individually tagged either directly with a fluorophore or by indirect immunofluorescence. However, this approach leads to high background of non-interacting proteins making it difficult to interpret co-localization data. In addition, due to the limits of resolution of confocal microscopy, two proteins may appear co-localized without necessarily interacting. With BiFC, fluorescence is only observed when the two proteins of interest interact. FRET is another excellent method for studying protein:protein interactions, but can be technically challenging. FRET

  13. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  14. Development of a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for the measurement of heavy metals using a fiber optic chemical sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Prestel, Harald; Gahr, Achim; Niessner, Reinhard

    2000-05-01

    The development of a fiber optic sensor system is described, for the on-line detection of heavy metal ions in water. This is based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of suitable metal-ligand complexes. The sensor system is designed to measure heavy metal ions in the field. Flow injection analysis (FIA) is coupled with the sensor system, to overcome problems of a slow diffusion rate of heavy metals through the membrane of an in situ sensor head. Preliminary experiments show the new FIA system has good reproducibility, a high sample analysis rate and it can measure heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II)) at the ppb level, when using the appropriate ligands.

  15. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  16. Monitoring integrin activation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Craig T; Hyun, Young-Min; Kim, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant integrin activation is associated with several immune pathologies. In leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD), the absence or inability of β(2) integrins to undergo affinity upregulation contributes to recurrent infectious episodes and impaired wound healing, while excessive integrin activity leads to an exaggerated inflammatory response with associated tissue damage. Therefore, integrin activation is an attractive target for immunotherapies, and monitoring the effect of agents on integrin activation is necessary during preclinical drug development. The activation of integrins involves the structural rearrangement of both the extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we describe methods for monitoring integrin conformational activation using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  17. Fluorescent sensor for imidazole derivatives based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of a zinc porphyrin complex in a polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Ronghua; Liu, Feng; Li, Ke'an

    2004-12-15

    A new zinc(II) porphyrin conjugate with an appended pyrene subunit has been synthesized and shown to exhibit significant and analytical usefulness for fluorescence sensing toward imidazole derivatives. The molecular recognition was based on the bridging interaction of the imidazole ring of analyte with the zinc(II) center of the porphyrin, while the transduction signal for the recognition process was the pyrene excimer fluorescence. The sensor was constructed and applied for fluorescence assay of histidine in aqueous solution by immobilizing the sensing material in a plasticized PVC membrane. When the membrane was bathed in an alkaline solution void of histidine, zinc(II) porphyrin was present in the monomer form, and pyrene emitted monomer fluorescence at 378 and 397 nm. With the presence of histidine in the sample solution, histidine was extracted into the membrane phase and bridged with the Zn(II) center of the porphyrin, causing the monomer porphyrin to be converted to its dimeric species. Since the formation of porphyrin dimer was accompanied by the enhancement of pyrene excimer emission at 454 nm, the chemical recognition process could be directly translated into a fluorescent signal. With the optode membrane M1 described, histidine in sample solution from 6.76 x 10(-7) to 5.01 x 10(-3) M can be determined. The limit of detection was 1.34 x 10(-7) M. The optical selectivity coefficient obtained for histidine over biologically relevant amino acids and anions met the selectivity requirements for the determination of histidine in biological samples. Serum histidine values obtained by the optode membrane fell in the normal range of the content reported in the literature and were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC.

  18. Analysis of conjugation of chloramphenicol and hemoglobin by fluorescence, circular dichroism and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ye; Yang, Xin-Ling; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a low cost, broad spectrum, highly active antibiotic, and widely used in the treatment of serious infections, including typhoid fever and other life-threatening infections of the central nervous system and respiratory tract. The purpose of the present study was to examine the conjugation of chloramphenicol with hemoglobin (Hb) and compared with albumin at molecular level, utilizing fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) as well as molecular modeling. Fluorescence data indicate that drug bind Hb generate quenching via static mechanism, this corroborates UV/vis absorption measurements that the ground state complex formation with an affinity of 10 4 M -1, and the driving forces in the Hb-drug complex are hydrophilic interactions and hydrogen bonds, as derived from computational model. The accurate binding site of drug has been identified from the analysis of fluorescence and molecular modeling, α1β2 interface of Hb was assigned to possess high-affinity for drug, which located at the β-37 Trp nearby. The structural investigation of the complexed Hb by synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, and CD observations revealed some degree of Hb structure unfolding upon complexation. Based on molecular modeling, we can draw the conclusion that the binding affinity of drug with albumin is superior, compared with Hb. These phenomena can provide salient information on the absorption, distribution, pharmacology, and toxicity of chloramphenicol and other drugs which have analogous configuration with chloramphenicol.

  19. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  20. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-12-24

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  1. Electrochemical study of the complexes of aspartame with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions in the aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Semiha; Coskun, Emine; Biçer, Ender; Cakir, Osman

    2003-05-23

    The voltammetric behaviours of aspartame in the presence of some metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)) were investigated. In the presence of aspartame, copper ions reduced at two stages with quasi-reversible one-electron and, with increasing the aspartame (L) concentration, Cu(II)L(2) complex reduces at one-stage with irreversible two-electron reaction (-0.322 V). Zn(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=3.70) was recognized by a cathodic peak at -1.320 V. Ni(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=6.52) is reduced at the more positive potential (-0.87 V) than that of the hydrated Ni(II) ions (-1.088 V). In the case of the reduction of Ni(II) ions, aspartame serves as a catalyst. From electronic spectra data of the complexes, their stoichiometries of 1:2 (metal-ligand) in aqueous medium are determined. The greatness of these logarithmic values is agreement with Irwing-Williams series (NiZn). PMID:12747864

  2. Synthesis, DFT Calculation, and Antimicrobial Studies of Novel Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) Heteroleptic Complexes Containing Benzoylacetone and Dithiocarbamate

    PubMed Central

    Ekennia, Anthony C.; Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Osowole, Aderoju A.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2015-01-01

    Heteroleptic complexes of zinc(II), copper(II), manganese(II), and cobalt(II) of the types [MLL′(H2O)2]·nH2O and [MLL′]·nH2O have been synthesized using sodium N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate (L) and benzoylacetone (L′). The metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility, infrared (IR), and UV-visible spectroscopic studies. The electrical conductance measurements revealed the nonelectrolytic nature of the synthesized complexes. The results of the elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electronic spectra inferred that the Zn(II) complex adopted a four-coordinate geometry while the Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) complexes assumed octahedral geometries. The IR spectra showed that the metal ions coordinated with the ligands via the S- and O-donor atoms. The geometry, electronic, and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spin density distributions, relative strength of H–bonds, and thermodynamic parameters revealed that the order of stability of the metal complexes is Mn < Co < Cu > Zn. The agar diffusion methods were used to study the antimicrobial activity of the complexes against two Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. pneumoniae), one Gram negative bacterium (E. coli), and two fungi organisms (A. niger and A. candida) and the complexes showed a broad spectrum of activities against the microbes. PMID:26681931

  3. Two new Zn(II) coordination polymers based on mixed pipemidic acid and flexible aromatic dicarboxylic acid ligands: Syntheses, crystal structures and luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanxia; Zhou, Pingping

    2016-09-01

    Two new Zn(II) coordination polymers, namely [Zn(4,4‧-sdb) (HPPA)]n (1) and [Zn(2,2‧-bpdc)0.5(PPA)]n (2) (4,4‧-H2sdb = 4,4‧-sulfonyldibenzoate, 2,2‧-H2bpdc = 2,2‧-biphenyldicarboxylic acid, HPPA = pipemidic acid) were successfully obtained under hydrothermal conditions. These two compounds were further characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analyses and IR spectra. Compound 1 features a 1D chain structure, which further extended into a 3D supramolecular framework via intermolecular hydrogen bonds and weak van der Waals interactions, and compound 2 features a 3D framework with 6-connected α-Po-type topology. The structural regulation for these two compounds was successfully achieved by changing the flexible aromatic dicarboxylic acid ligand. Moreover, the thermal stabilities and luminescent properties for these two compounds were also investigated.

  4. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-01

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different.

  5. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-25

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different. PMID:24316543

  6. Removal of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by brown marine macro algae: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Olga M M; Martins, Ramiro J E; Delerue-Matos, Cristina M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-01

    Specific marine macro algae species abundant at the Portuguese coast (Laminaria hyperborea, Bifurcaria bifurcata, Sargassum muticum and Fucus spiralis) were shown to be effective for removing toxic metals (Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)) from aqueous solutions. The initial metal concentrations in solution were about 75-100 mg L(-1). The observed biosorption capacities for cadmium, zinc and lead ions were in the ranges of 23.9-39.5, 18.6-32.0 and 32.3-50.4 mg g(-1), respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that the metal uptake rate was rather fast, with 75% of the total amount occurring in the first 10 min for all algal species. Experimental data were well fitted by a pseudo-second order rate equation. The contribution of internal diffusion mechanism was significant only to the initial biosorption stage. Results indicate that all the studied macro algae species can provide an efficient and cost-effective technology for eliminating heavy metals from industrial effluents. PMID:17935878

  7. An acid-stable Zn(II) complex: electrodeposition in sulfuric acid and the effect on the zinc-lead dioxide battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao Miao; Gong, Yun; Zhang, Pan; Shi, Hui Fang; Lin, Jian Hua

    2014-12-01

    An acid-stable Zn(II) complex formulated as Zn2(HL)2(SO4)·H2O (1) and an acid-unstable complex formulated as Zn2L2·12H2O (2) were hydro(solvo)thermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 features a uninodal 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrating three-dimensional (3D) dense architecture with {4(12)·6(3)}-pcu topology, and complex 2 exhibits a 2-nodal (3, 6)-connected 3D open architecture with (4·6(2))2(4(2)·6(10)·8(3))-rtl topology. The results indicate that the stability of complex 1 in sulfuric acid is probably associated with the coordinated SO4(2-) in the quite dense structure, and complex 1 can also be synthesized via electrodeposition in sulfuric acid; it can improve the discharging characteristics of the zinc-lead dioxide battery at room temperature.

  8. Supramolecular complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) p-hydroxybenzoates with caffeine: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşdemir, Erdal; Özbek, Füreya Elif; Sertçelik, Mustafa; Hökelek, Tuncer; Çelik, Raziye Çatak; Necefoğlu, Hacali

    2016-09-01

    Three novel complexes Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) containing p-hydroxybenzoates and caffeine ligands were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and UV-vis Spectroscopy, molar conductivity and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The thermal properties of the synthesized complexes were investigated by TGA/DTA. The general formula of the complexes is [M(HOC6H4COO)2(H2O)4]·2(C8H10N4O2)·8H2O (where: M: Co, Ni and Zn). The IR studies showed that carboxylate groups of p-hydroxybenzoate ligands have monodentate coordination mode. The M2+ ions are octahedrally coordinated by two p-hydroxybenzoate ligands, four water molecules leading to an overall MO6 coordination environment. The medium-strength hydrogen bondings involving the uncoordinated caffeine ligands and water molecules, coordinated and uncoordinated water molecules and p-hydroxybenzoate ligands lead to three-dimensional supramolecular networks in the crystal structures.

  9. ZCF32, a fungus specific Zn(II)2 Cys6 transcription factor, is a repressor of the biofilm development in the human pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kakade, Pallavi; Sadhale, Parag; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-01-01

    As a human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans can cause a wide variety of disease conditions ranging from superficial to systemic infections. Many of these infections are caused by an inherent ability of the pathogen to form biofilms on medical devices resulting in high mortality. Biofilms formed by C. albicans are a complex consortium of yeast and hyphal cells embedded in an extracellular matrix and are regulated by a network of transcription factors. Here, we report the role of a novel Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor, ZCF32, in the regulation of biofilm formation. Global transcriptome analysis reveals that biofilm development is the most altered pathway in the zcf32 null mutant. To delineate the functional correlation between ZCF32 and biofilm development, we determined the set of genes directly regulated by Zcf32. Our data suggests that Zcf32 regulates biofilm formation by repressing the expression of adhesins, chitinases and a significant number of other GPI-anchored proteins. We establish that there is the lesser recruitment of Zcf32 on the promoters of biofilm genes in biofilm condition compared to the planktonic mode of growth. Taking together, we propose that the transcription factor ZCF32 negatively regulates biofilm development in C. albicans. PMID:27498700

  10. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes - An in vitro and in vivo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad ) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy.

  11. The Fusarium verticillioides FUM gene cluster encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 protein that affects FUM gene expression and fumonisin production.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daren W; Butchko, Robert A E; Busman, Mark; Proctor, Robert H

    2007-07-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by some Fusarium species and can contaminate maize or maize products. Ingestion of fumonisins is associated with diseases, including cancer and neural tube defects, in humans and animals. In fungi, genes involved in the synthesis of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites are often located adjacent to each other in gene clusters. Such genes can encode structural enzymes, regulatory proteins, and/or proteins that provide self-protection. The fumonisin biosynthetic gene cluster includes 16 genes, none of which appear to play a role in regulation. In this study, we identified a previously undescribed gene (FUM21) located adjacent to the fumonisin polyketide synthase gene, FUM1. The presence of a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA-binding domain in the predicted protein suggested that FUM21 was involved in transcriptional regulation. FUM21 deletion (Deltafum21) mutants produce little to no fumonisin in cracked maize cultures but some FUM1 and FUM8 transcripts in a liquid GYAM medium. Complementation of a Deltafum21 mutant with a wild-type copy of the gene restored fumonisin production. Analysis of FUM21 cDNAs identified four alternative splice forms (ASFs), and microarray analysis indicated the ASFs were differentially expressed. Based on these data, we present a model for how FUM21 ASFs may regulate fumonisin biosynthesis.

  12. Zn(II) and Cu(II) removal by Nostoc muscorum: a cyanobacterium isolated from a coal mining pit in Chiehruphi, Meghalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Smita; Diengdoh, Omega L; Syiem, Mayashree B; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Kiran, Mothe Gopi

    2015-03-01

    Nostoc muscorum was isolated from a coal mining pit in Chiehruphi, Meghalaya, India, and its potential to remove Zn(II) and Cu(II) from media and the various biochemical alterations it undergoes during metal stress were studied. Metal uptake measured as a function of the ions removed by N. muscorum from media supplemented independently with 20 μmol/L ZnSO4 and CuSO4 established the ability of this cyanobacterium to remove 66% of Zn(2+) and 71% of Cu(2+) within 24 h of contact time. Metal binding on the cell surface was found to be the primary mode of uptake, followed by internalization. Within 7 days of contact, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) mediated dissimilar effects on the organism. For instance, although chlorophyll a synthesis was increased by 12% in Zn(2+)-treated cells, it was reduced by 26% in Cu(2+)-treated cells. Total protein content remained unaltered in Zn(2+)-supplemented medium; however, a 15% reduction was noticed upon Cu(2+) exposure. Copper enhanced both photosynthesis and respiration by 15% and 19%, respectively; in contrast, photosynthesis was unchanged and respiration dropped by 11% upon Zn(2+) treatment. Inoculum age also influenced metal removal ability. Experiments in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosynthetic inhibitor), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (an uncoupler), and exogenous ATP established that metal uptake was energy dependent, and photosynthesis contributed significantly towards the energy pool required to mediate metal removals.

  13. Electrochemical study of the complexes of aspartame with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions in the aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Semiha; Coskun, Emine; Biçer, Ender; Cakir, Osman

    2003-05-23

    The voltammetric behaviours of aspartame in the presence of some metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)) were investigated. In the presence of aspartame, copper ions reduced at two stages with quasi-reversible one-electron and, with increasing the aspartame (L) concentration, Cu(II)L(2) complex reduces at one-stage with irreversible two-electron reaction (-0.322 V). Zn(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=3.70) was recognized by a cathodic peak at -1.320 V. Ni(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=6.52) is reduced at the more positive potential (-0.87 V) than that of the hydrated Ni(II) ions (-1.088 V). In the case of the reduction of Ni(II) ions, aspartame serves as a catalyst. From electronic spectra data of the complexes, their stoichiometries of 1:2 (metal-ligand) in aqueous medium are determined. The greatness of these logarithmic values is agreement with Irwing-Williams series (NiZn).

  14. Synthesis, DFT Calculation, and Antimicrobial Studies of Novel Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) Heteroleptic Complexes Containing Benzoylacetone and Dithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Ekennia, Anthony C; Onwudiwe, Damian C; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Osowole, Aderoju A; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    Heteroleptic complexes of zinc(II), copper(II), manganese(II), and cobalt(II) of the types [MLL'(H2O)2]·nH2O and [MLL']·nH2O have been synthesized using sodium N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate (L) and benzoylacetone (L'). The metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility, infrared (IR), and UV-visible spectroscopic studies. The electrical conductance measurements revealed the nonelectrolytic nature of the synthesized complexes. The results of the elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electronic spectra inferred that the Zn(II) complex adopted a four-coordinate geometry while the Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) complexes assumed octahedral geometries. The IR spectra showed that the metal ions coordinated with the ligands via the S- and O-donor atoms. The geometry, electronic, and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spin density distributions, relative strength of H-bonds, and thermodynamic parameters revealed that the order of stability of the metal complexes is Mn < Co < Cu > Zn. The agar diffusion methods were used to study the antimicrobial activity of the complexes against two Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. pneumoniae), one Gram negative bacterium (E. coli), and two fungi organisms (A. niger and A. candida) and the complexes showed a broad spectrum of activities against the microbes. PMID:26681931

  15. Two Affinity Sites of the Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor Identified by a Novel Homogeneous Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Rabal, Obdulia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Zamarbide, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; de Miguel, Irene; Lanciego, José L; Oyarzabal, Julen; Franco, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Endocannabinoids act on G protein-coupled receptors that are considered potential targets for a variety of diseases. There are two different cannabinoid receptor types: ligands for cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2Rs) show more promise than those for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) because they lack psychotropic actions. However, the complex pharmacology of these receptors, coupled with the lipophilic nature of ligands, is delaying the translational success of medications targeting the endocannabinoid system. We here report the discovery and synthesis of a fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157 (3-[[4-[2-tert-butyl-1-(tetrahydropyran-4-ylmethyl)benzimidazol-5-yl]sulfonyl-2-pyridyl]oxy]propan-1-amine), which was useful for pharmacological characterization of CB2R by using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. This methodology does not require radiolabeled compounds and may be undertaken in homogeneous conditions and in living cells (i.e., without the need to isolate receptor-containing membranes). The affinity of the labeled compound was similar to that of the unlabeled molecule. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays disclosed a previously unreported second affinity site and showed conformational changes in CB2R forming receptor heteromers with G protein-coupled receptor GPR55, a receptor for l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol. The populations displaying subnanomolar and nanomolar affinities were undisclosed in competitive assays using a well known cannabinoid receptor ligand, AM630 (1-[2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethyl]-2-methyl-3-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-6-iodoindole), and TH-chrysenediol, not previously tested on binding to cannabinoid receptors. Variations in binding parameters upon formation of dimers with GPR55 may reflect decreases in binding sites or alterations of the quaternary structure of the macromolecular G protein-coupled receptor complexes. In summary, the homogeneous binding assay described here may

  16. Green fluorescence induced by EF-hand assembly in a split GFP system.

    PubMed

    Lindman, Stina; Johansson, Ida; Thulin, Eva; Linse, Sara

    2009-06-01

    The affinity between the 1-157 and 158-238 fragments of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is too low for spontaneous in vivo reassembly of the protein upon co-expression of the two fragments. This prevents chromophore maturation and the cells lack GFP fluorescence. We have utilized the very high affinity between the two EF-hands of calbindin D(9k) to facilitate GFP assembly from its fragments and to introduce a calcium dependent molecular switch. In GFPN-EF1, residues 1-157 of GFP are fused to residues 1-43 of calbindin, and in EF2-GFPC, residues 44-75 of calbindin are fused to residues 158-238 of GFP. When co-expressed, GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC associate spontaneously and rapidly resulting in a folded reconstituted protein with bright GFP fluorescence. The high affinity of GFPN-EF1 for EF2-GFPC leads to brighter fluorescence of the cells compared to cells with a control constructs carrying leucine zippers (Wilson et al., Nature Methods 2004;3:255). The complex of GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC was purified from cells using metal-ion chelate chromatography and the temperature dependence of GFP fluorescence was found to be calcium dependent. The GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC fragments were separated by ion exchange chromatography. The assembly of the fragments was found to be reversible and the complex was regained upon mixing, as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data. The affinity between GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC as well as rates of association and dissociation were found to be Ca(2+)-dependent. PMID:19472338

  17. Fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    Water-soluble fluorescent metallic clusters at sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of an electron (˜0.5 nm for gold and silver) were created and their photophysical properties were investigated at the bulk and single molecule levels. We employed biocompatible dendrimer and peptide to prepare a series of strong fluorescent gold and silver clusters with chemical or photo reduction methods. Facilitated by the well-defined dendrimer size, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that the fluorescent silver nanocluster size ranges from 2 to 8 Ag atoms. The correlation of emission energy with the number of atoms, N, in each gold nanocluster is quantitatively fit for the smallest nanoclusters with no adjustable parameters by the simple scaling relation of EFermi/N1/3, in which EFermi is the Fermi energy of bulk gold. The transition energy scaling inversely with cluster radius indicates that electronic structure can be well described with the spherical jellium model and further demonstrates that these nanomaterials are "multi-electron artificial atoms". Fluorescence from these small metal clusters can be considered protoplasmonic, molecular transitions of the free conduction electrons before the onset of collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. In addition, very strong single molecular Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman enhancement by fluorescent silver clusters was observed. Pushing to larger sizes, we also created ˜2nm diameter glutathione encapsulated luminescent gold nanoparticles. Distinct from similarly sized but nonluminescent gold nanoparticles, these 2 nm gold nanoparticles show bright, long lifetime emission but no plasmon absorption. The emission might arise from charge transfer between gold atoms and the thiol ligand. Providing the "missing link" between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these highly fluorescent, water-soluble gold and silver nanoclusters offer complementary transition

  18. Excited protein states of human tear lipocalin for low- and high-affinity ligand binding revealed by functional AB loop motion.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Human tear lipocalin (TL), a prominent member of lipocalin family, exhibits functional and structural promiscuity. The plasticity of loop regions modulates entry to the ligand pocket at the "open" end of the eight-stranded beta-barrel. Site-directed multi-distance measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between functional loops register two excited protein states for low- and high-affinity ligand binding. At low pH, the longest loop AB adopts the conformation of the low-affinity excited protein state that matches the crystal structure of holo-TL at pH 8. A "crankshaft" like movement is detected for the loop AB in a low pH transition. At pH 7.3 the holo-protein assumes a high-affinity excited protein state, in which the loop AB is more compact (RMS=3.1A). In the apo-holo transition, the reporter Trp 28 moves about 4.5A that reflects a decrease in distance between Glu27 and Lys108. This interaction fixes the loop AB conformation for the high-affinity mode. No such movement is detected at low pH, where Glu27 is protonated. Data strongly indicate that the protonation state of Glu27 modulates the conformation of the loop AB for high- and low-affinity binding. PMID:20439130

  19. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  20. A naphthalimide derived fluorescent sensor for solid-phase screening of cucurbit[7]uril-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Gyan Hari; Battle, Cooper Hawkins; Grusenmeyer, Tod A; Zhu, Mengyuan; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan

    2016-02-01

    A naphthalimide based fluorescent sensor displaying a significant increase in emission upon binding CB[7] with notable pH stability was developed and utilized in a surface-bound displacement assay for the rapid detection of CB[7] encapsulation of therapeutically relevant drug classes. Previously unknown binders with moderate to strong affinities were discovered.