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Sample records for affinity fluorescent znii

  1. A fluorescent chemosensor for Zn(II). Exciplex formation in solution and the solid state.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Andrea; Berni, Emanuela; Bianchi, Antonio; Fornasari, Patrizia; Giorgi, Claudia; Lima, Joao C; Lodeiro, Carlos; Melo, Maria J; de Melo, J Seixas; Parola, Antonio Jorge; Pina, Fernando; Pina, Joao; Valtancoli, Barbara

    2004-07-21

    The macrocyclic phenanthrolinophane 2,9-[2,5,8-triaza-5-(N-anthracene-9-methylamino)ethyl]-[9]-1,10-phenanthrolinophane (L) bearing a pendant arm containing a coordinating amine and an anthracene group forms stable complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) in solution. Stability constants of these complexes were determined in 0.10 mol dm(-3) NMe(4)Cl H(2)O-MeCN (1:1, v/v) solution at 298.1 +/- 0.1 K by means of potentiometric (pH metric) titration. The fluorescence emission properties of these complexes were studied in this solvent. For the Zn(II) complex, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies were performed in ethanol solution and in the solid state. In solution, intramolecular pi-stacking interaction between phenanthroline and anthracene in the ground state and exciplex emission in the excited state were observed. From the temperature dependence of the photostationary ratio (I(Exc)/I(M)), the activation energy for the exciplex formation (E(a)) and the binding energy of the exciplex (-DeltaH) were determined. The crystal structure of the [ZnLBr](ClO(4)).H(2)O compound was resolved, showing that in the solid state both intra- and inter-molecular pi-stacking interactions are present. Such interactions were also evidenced by UV-vis absorption and emission spectra in the solid state. The absorption spectrum of a thin film of the solid complex is red-shifted compared with the solution spectra, whereas its emission spectrum reveals the unique featureless exciplex band, blue shifted compared with the solution. In conjunction with X-ray data the solid-state data was interpreted as being due to a new exciplex where no pi-stacking (full overlap of the pi-electron cloud of the two chromophores - anthracene and phenanthroline) is observed. L is a fluorescent chemosensor able to signal Zn(II) in presence of Cd(II) and Hg(II), since the last two metal ions do not give rise either to the formation of pi-stacking complexes or to exciplex emission in solution.

  2. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  3. Determination of stability constants of Cu(I), Cd(II) & Zn(II) complexes with thiols using fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael J; Ahner, Beth A

    2013-11-01

    Fluorometric competing-ligand titrations were used to measure stability constants of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(I) complexes of cysteine and glutathione (GSH). Cu(I)-stability constants were also determined for the dipeptides Arg-Cys and Gln-Cys which are produced by a marine alga under copper stress. The fluorescent ion indicators FluoZin-1 and BTC (Invitrogen) were used as competing ligands in titrations involving Zn(II) and Cd(II). Phen Green SK (Invitrogen) was likewise used in Cu(I) titrations. Conditional and cumulative general stability constants were determined using a least squares fit of the titration data to speciation models. The measured stability constants of Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes were consistent with previous work, validating our method and assumptions. Our results also include the first general stability constants for Cu(I)-cysteine complexes and an alternative set for Cu(I)-GSH complexes. While these stability constants indicate that Cu(I) forms strong complexes with thiols, they are not strong enough to effectively buffer Cu(I) in seawater.

  4. High-sensitivity determination of Zn(II) and Cu(II) in vitro by fluorescence polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Feliccia, Vincent; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that free Cu(II) may play a role in syndromes such as Crohn's and Wilson's diseases, as well as being a pollutant toxic at low levels to shellfish and sheep. Similarly, Zn(II) has been implicated in some neural damage in the brain resulting from epilepsy and ischemia. Several high sensitivity methods exist for determining these ions in solution, including GFAAS, ICP-MS, ICP-ES, and electrochemical techniques. However, these techniques are generally slow and costly, require pretreatment of the sample, require complex instruments and skilled personnel, and are incapable of imaging at the cellular and subcellular level. To address these shortcomings we developed fluorescence polarization (anisotropy) biosensing methods for these ions which are very sensitivity, highly selective, require simple instrumentation and little pretreatment, and are inexpensive. Thus free Cu(II) or Zn(II) can be determined at picomolar levels by changes in fluorescence polarization, lifetime, or wavelength ratio using these methods; these techniques may be adapted to microscopy.

  5. High kinetic stability of Zn(II) coordinated by the tris(histidine) unit of carbonic anhydrase towards solvolytic dissociation studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Solvolytic dissociation rate constants (kd) of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and its metallovariants (M-CAs, M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) were estimated by a ligand substitution reaction, which was monitored by affinity capillary electrophoresis to selectively detect the undissociated CAs in the reaction mixture. Using EDTA as the competing ligand for Zn-CA, the dissociation followed the unimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN1) mechanism with kd=1.0×10(-7)s(-1) (pH7.4, 25°C). The corresponding solvolysis half-life (t1/2) was 80days, showing the exceptionally high kinetic stability of t Zn-CA, in contrast to the highly labile [Zn(II)(H2O)6](2+), where the water exchange rate (kex) is high. This behavior is attributed to the tetrahedral coordination geometry supported by the tris(histidine) unit (His3) of CA. In the case of Co-CA, it showed a somewhat larger kd value (5.7×10(-7)s(-1), pH7.4, 25°C) even though it shares the same tetrahedral coordination environment with Zn-CA, suggesting that the d(7) electronic configuration of Co(II) in the transition state of the dissociation is stabilized by the ligand field. Among M-CAs, only Ni-CA showed a bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction path in its reaction with EDTA, implying that the large coordination number (6) of Ni(II) in Ni-CA allows EDTA to form an EDTA-Ni-CA intermediate. Overall, kd values roughly correlated with kex values among M-CAs, with the kd value of Zn-CA deviating strongly from the trend and highlighting the exceptionally high kinetic stabilization of Zn-CA by the His3 unit.

  6. RNA containing pyrrolocytidine base analogs: good binding affinity and fluorescence that responds to hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Alexander S; Damha, Masad J; Hudson, Robert H E

    2008-01-01

    6-Phenylpyrrolocytidine and 6-methoxymethylene-pyrrolocytidine are base-modified nucleosides with remarkable fluorescence properties. When incorporated into RNA, these analogs enhance binding affinity towards RNA and DNA targets with a concomitant change in their fluorescence upon duplex formation. The fluorescence response depends on the nature of the 6-substituent and the sequence position of the modified nucleoside. The fluorescence response of these structurally conservative, well-tolerated fluorescent nucleosides may be exploited as probes in the study of nucleic acid processing enzymes.

  7. RNA containing pyrrolocytidine base analogs: increased binding affinity and fluorescence that responds to hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Alexander S; Damha, Masad J; Hudson, Robert H E

    2008-01-01

    6-Phenylpyrrolocytidine and 6-methoxymethylene-pyrrolocytidine are base-modified nucleosides with remarkable fluorescence properties. These analogs produce increased binding affinity to both RNA and DNA targets when incorporated into oligoribonucleotides. The fluorescence observed for the single-stranded oligomers is quenched upon duplex formation with either RNA or DNA targets. The fluorescence response depends on the nature of the 6-substituent and the sequence position of the modified nucleoside.

  8. High affinity truncated DNA aptamers for the development of fluorescence based progesterone biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alhadrami, Hani A; Chinnappan, Raja; Eissa, Shimaa; Rahamn, Anas Abdel; Zourob, Mohammed

    2017-02-24

    Aptamers have shown a number of potential applications in sensing and therapeutic due to the high affinity and specificity towards their target molecules. Not all the nucleotides in the full length aptamers are involved in the binding with their targets. The non-binding domain of the aptamer may affect the binding affinity of the aptamer-target complex. Mapping the aptamer binding region could increase the affinity and the specificity. In this paper, we designed aptamer-based fluorescence sensors from a truncated progesterone (P4) aptamer. Then, fluorescein and quencher labelled aptamer complementary oligonucleotide sequences were hybridized to the truncated aptamer at different sites to form duplex structures. We used fluorescence-quencher pair displacement assay upon progesterone binding for the determination of P4. One of the truncated sequences has shown high binding affinity with 16 fold increase in the dissociation constant, Kd (2.1 nM) compared to the original aptamer. The aptasensor was highly selective for P4 against similar compounds such as 17-β estradiol, bisphenol-A and vitamin D. The sensor has been applied for the detection of P4 in spiked tap water and in urine samples showing good recovery. This new developed aptamer-based fluorescence biosensor can be applied in food, pharmaceutical, and clinical industries.

  9. Bodilisant-a novel fluorescent, highly affine histamine h3 receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J Stephan; Paulke, Alexander; Stark, Holger

    2013-02-14

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (K i hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy-transfer affects the determination of the affinity between ligand and proteins obtained by fluorescence quenching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianbo; Wei, Xinlin; Wang, Yuanfeng; Liu, Chunxi

    2009-11-01

    The interaction between esculin and serum albumins was investigated to illustrate that the fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET) affects the determination of the binding constants obtained by fluorescence quenching method. The binding constants ( Ka) obtained by the double-logarithm curve for esculin-BSA and esculin-HSA were 1.02 × 10 7 and 2.07 × 10 4 L/mol, respectively. These results from synchronous fluorescence showed that the Tyr and Trp residues of HSA were affected more deeply than those in BSA. The excitation profile of esculin showed that in the presence of BSA and HSA, the S 0 → S 1 transition of esculin ( λexmax≈340 nm) appears, which is similar to the λemmax of BSA and HSA. The critical distance ( R0) between BSA and esculin is higher than that of HSA, which showed that the affinity of esculin and HSA should be higher than that of BSA. After centrifugation, the concentrations of esculin bound to albumins were determined by means of the fluorescence of esculin. It was found that much more esculin was bound to HSA than to BSA. However, the bound models for BSA and HSA are almost the same. The concentration of esculin bound to serum albumin at first decreased with the addition of esculin and then increased. From above results, it can be concluded that the affinity of esculin and HSA should be higher than that of esculin and BSA. This example showed that in the presence of FRET, the binding constants between ligands and proteins based on fluorescence quenching might be deviated.

  11. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  12. Fluorescence measurements of the binding of cations to high-affinity and low-affinity sites on ATP-G-actin.

    PubMed

    Carlier, M F; Pantaloni, D; Korn, E D

    1986-08-15

    The binding of cations to ATP-G-actin has been assessed by measuring the kinetics of the increase in fluorescence of N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine-labeled actin. Ca2+ and Mg2+ compete for a single high-affinity site on ATP-G-actin with KD values of 1.5-15 nM for Ca2+ and 0.1-1 microM for Mg2+, i.e. with affinities 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported (Frieden, C., Lieberman, D., and Gilbert, H. R. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 8991-8993). As proposed by Frieden (Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886), the Mg-actin complex undergoes a slow isomerization (Kis = 0.03-0.1) to a higher affinity state (K'D = 4-40 nM). The replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at this high-affinity site causes a slow 10% increase in fluorescence that is 90% complete in about 200 s at saturating concentrations of Mg2+. Independently, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ bind to low-affinity sites (KD values of 0.15 mM for Ca2+ and Mg2+ and 10 mM for K+) which causes a rapid 6-8% increase in fluorescence (complete in less than 5 s). We propose that the activation step that converts Ca-G-actin to a polymerizable species upon addition of Mg2+ is the binding of Mg2+ to the low-affinity sites and not the replacement of Ca2+ by Mg2+ at the high-affinity site.

  13. Determining the Ice-binding Planes of Antifreeze Proteins by Fluorescence-based Ice Plane Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms. PMID:24457629

  14. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  15. Affinity fluorescence-labeled peptides for the early detection of cancer in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Appelman, Henry; Kwon, Rich; Soetikno, Roy; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Wang, Thomas D.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence-labeled peptides that affinity bind to neoplastic mucsosa are promising for use as a specific contrast agent in the detection of pre-malignant tissue in the esophagus. This method is can be used to identify expression of biological markers associated with dysplasia on endoscopic imaging as a guide for biopsy and represents a novel method for the early detection and prevention of cancer. We demonstrate the use of phage display to select affinity peptides and identify the sequence "ASYNYDA" that binds with high target-to-background ratio to dysplastic esophageal mucosa compared to that of intestinal metaplasia. Validation of preferential binding is demonstrated for neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. An optimal tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85% was found at the relative threshold of 0.60 with a target-to-background ratio of 1.81 and an area under the ROC curve of 0.87. Peptides are a novel class of ligand for targeted detection of pre-malignant mucosa for purposes of screening and surveillance.

  16. Nanofluidic Fluorescence Microscopy (NFM) for real-time monitoring of protein binding kinetics and affinity studies.

    PubMed

    Teerapanich, Pattamon; Pugnière, Martine; Henriquet, Corinne; Lin, Yii-Lih; Chou, Chia-Fu; Leïchlé, Thierry

    2017-02-15

    Kinetic monitoring of protein interactions offers insights to their corresponding functions in cellular processes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is the current standard tool used for label-free kinetic assays; however, costly and sophisticated setups are required, decreasing its accessibility to research laboratories. We present a cost-effective nanofluidic-based immunosensor for low-noise real-time kinetic measurement of fluorescent-labeled protein binding. With the combination of fluorescence microscopy and reversed buffer flow operation, association and dissociation kinetics can be accessed in one single experiment without extra buffer loading step, which results in a simplified operation and reduced time of analysis compared to typical microfluidic immunoassays. Kinetic constants of two representative protein-ligand binding pairs (streptavidin/biotin; IgG/anti-IgG) were quantified. The good agreement of extracted rate constants with literature values and analogous SPR measurements indicates that this approach is applicable to study protein interactions of medium- and high-affinities with a limit of detection down to 1 pM, regardless of the analyte size.

  17. Quantitative Affinity Determination by Fluorescence Anisotropy Measurements of Individual Nanoliter Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of reagents compartmentalized into individual nanoliter droplets are shown to yield high-resolution binding curves from which precise dissociation constants (Kd) for protein–peptide interactions can be inferred. With the current platform, four titrations can be obtained per minute (based on ∼100 data points each), with stoichiometries spanning more than 2 orders of magnitude and requiring only tens of microliters of reagents. In addition to affinity measurements with purified components, Kd values for unpurified proteins in crude cell lysates can be obtained without prior knowledge of the concentration of the expressed protein, so that protein purification can be avoided. Finally, we show how a competition assay can be set up to perform focused library screens, so that compound labeling is not required anymore. These data demonstrate the utility of droplet compartments for the quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and establish fluorescence anisotropy imaging as a quantitative technique in a miniaturized droplet format, which is shown to be as reliable as its macroscopic test tube equivalent. PMID:28192993

  18. Monitoring water supplies for weaponized bacteria and bacterial toxins using rapid fluorescence-based viability and affinity assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tassell, Roger L.; Evans, Mishell

    2004-03-01

    The rapid detection of weaponized bacteria and toxins is a major problem during a biological attack. Although sensitive detection formats exist for many biowarfare agents, they often require advanced training and complex procedures. Luna has developed simple, rapid means for determining the presence of pathogens and bacterial toxins in water supplies using fluorescence-based assays that can be adapted for field use. The batteries of rapid assays are designed for i) determining cell viability and bacterial loads by exploiting metabolic markers (e.g., acid-production, redox potentials, etc) and ii) detecting bacterial toxins using fluorescent, polymerized affinity liposomes (fluorosomes). The viability assays were characterized using E. coli, S. aureus and the anthrax simulant, B. globigii. The viability assays detected bacterial loads of ~ 104 CFU/ml and with simple filtration ~ 100CFU/ml could be detected. The affinity fluorosomes were characterized using cholera toxin (CT). Affinity liposomes displaying GM1 and anti-CT antibodies could detect CT at <μg/ml levels. Stability studies showed that affinity vesicles could be stored for weeks at 4°C or freeze-dried with no significant loss of binding capacity. Using an in-house fiber optic fluorescence system, Luna characterized the binding of affinity fluorosomes to respective targets and determined the responses of bacterial loads in the fluorescent viability assays. Using this two-tiered approach, Luna demonstrated that water susceptible to sabotage could be easily monitored and confirmed for specific agents using simple, general and specific fluorescence-based detection schemes based on metabolism and ligand-target interactions.

  19. A Human Pilot Study of the Fluorescence Affinity Sensor for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dutt-Ballerstadt, Ralph; Evans, Colton; Pillai, Arun P.; Orzeck, Eric; Drabek, Rafal; Gowda, Ashok; McNichols, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Objective We report results of a pilot clinical study of a subcutaneous fluorescence affinity sensor (FAS) for continuous glucose monitoring conducted in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The device was assessed based on performance, safety, and comfort level under acute conditions (4 h). Research Design and Methods A second-generation FAS (BioTex Inc., Houston, TX) was subcutaneously implanted in the abdomens of 12 people with diabetes, and its acute performance to excursions in blood glucose was monitored over 4 h. After 30–60 min the subjects, who all had fasting blood glucose levels of less than 200 mg/dl, received a glucose bolus of 75 g/liter dextrose by oral administration. Capillary blood glucose samples were obtained from the finger tip. The FAS data were retrospectively evaluated by linear least squares regression analysis and by the Clarke error grid method. Comfort levels during insertion, operation, and sensor removal were scored by the subjects using an analog pain scale. Results After retrospective calibration of 17 sensors implanted in 12 subjects, error grid analysis showed 97% of the paired values in zones A and B and 1.5% in zones C and D, respectively. The mean absolute relative error between sensor signal and capillary blood glucose was 13% [±15% standard deviation (SD), 100–350 mg/dl] with an average correlation coefficient of 0.84 (±0.24 SD). The actual average “warm-up” time for the FAS readings, at which highest correlation with glucose readings was determined, was 65 (±32 SD) min. Mean time lag was 4 (±5 SD) min during the initial operational hours. Pain levels during insertion and operation were modest. Conclusions The in vivo performance of the FAS demonstrates feasibility of the fluorescence affinity technology to determine blood glucose excursions accurately and safely under acute dynamic conditions in humans with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Specific engineering challenges to sensor and instrumentation robustness

  20. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  1. A homogeneous assay for relative affinity of binding proteins using a green fluorescent protein tag and membrane disk.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takashi; Kazama, Hitoshi; Satoh, Marie; Mizuki, Kazuhiro; Watabe, Hiroyuki

    2005-09-01

    When the association between a ligand immobilized on a membrane disk and a fluorescence-labeled analyte was monitored with a fluorescent microplate reader, the time-dependent increase in fluorescence intensity of the reaction mixture was observed. A novel assay system for the specific interaction based on this phenomenon was designated the homogeneous assay for fluorescence concentrated on membrane (HAFCOM). In this study, streptococcal protein G (SpG) and glycogen-binding subunit R5 of protein phosphatase 1 (PPP1R5) tagged by green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used as the fluorescence-labeled analytes, and the affinity change caused by various amino acid substitutions was measured with HAFCOM. From the site-directed mutagenesis of SpG and PPP1R5, it was clarified that (i) the association rate constant of the Lys454Pro/Glu456Gln mutant of SpG to goat immunoglobulin G was almost equivalent to that of the wild-type but its dissociation rate constant was about 2.7 times that of the wild-type and (ii) the amino acid substitutions of Phe180 in PPP1R5 reduced glycogen-binding by 30-50%. Since HAFCOM using the GFP-tagged analyte requires no special chemicals and instruments, this system can easily and economically assay the specific interaction between target protein and ligand.

  2. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: Naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-01

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27 ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure.

  3. A fluorescence nanosensor for glycoproteins with activity based on the molecularly imprinted spatial structure of the target and boronate affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Wei; Li, Ping; Xiao, Haibin; Wang, Hui; Tang, Bo

    2014-11-10

    Glycoproteins are closely associated with the occurrence of diverse diseases, and they have been used as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in clinical diagnostics. Currently, mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful tool for glycoprotein analysis, but it is almost impossible to directly identify glycoproteins without the preparation and pretreatment of samples. Furthermore, biological samples, especially proteins, are damaged by this process. Herein, we describe a novel fluorescence nanosensor based on a molecularly imprinted spatial structure and boronate affinity that is well-suited for monitoring glycoproteins selectively. Results showed that the recognition performance of the nanosensor for glycoproteins was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Moreover, the nanosensor was successfully applied to the detection of HRP in biological fluids. This study provides a facile and efficient fluorescence tool for glycoprotein detection in clinical diagnostics.

  4. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy for studying enantioselective interactions between omeprazole enantiomer and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yujing; Hong, Tingting; Chen, Xueping; Ji, Yibing

    2017-02-23

    Baseline separation of omeprazole (OME) enantiomers was achieved by affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE), using human serum albumin (HSA) as the chiral selector. The influence of several experimental variables such as HSA concentration, the type and content of organic modifiers, applied voltage and running buffer concentration on the separation was evaluated. The binding of esomeprazole (S-omeprazole, S-OME) and its R-enantiomer (R-omeprazole, R-OME) to HSA under simulated physiological conditions was studied by ACE and fluorescence spectroscopy which was considered as a reference method. ACE studies demonstrated that the binding constants of the two enantiomers and HSA were 3.18×10(3) M(-1) and 5.36×10(3) M(-1) , respectively. The binding properties including the fluorescence quenching mechanisms, binding constants, binding sites and the number of binding sites were obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy. Though the ACE method could not get enough data when compared with the fluorescence spectrum method, the separation and binding studies of chiral drugs could be achieved simultaneously via this method. This study is of great significance for the investigation and clinical application of chiral drugs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative study of affinity and selectivity of ligands targeting abasic and mismatch sites in DNA using a fluorescence-melting assay.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several families of small-molecule ligands have been developed to selectively target DNA pairing defects, such as abasic sites and mismatched base pairs, with the aim to interfere with the DNA repair and the template function of the DNA. However, the affinity and selectivity (with respect to well-matched DNA) of these ligands has barely been evaluated in a systematic way. Herein, we report a comparative study of binding affinity and selectivity of a representative panel of 16 ligands targeting abasic sites and a T-T mismatch in DNA, using a fluorescence-monitored melting assay. We demonstrate that bisintercalator-type macrocyclic ligands are characterized by moderate affinity but exceptionally high selectivity with respect to well-matched DNA, whereas other reported ligands show either modest selectivity or rather low affinity in identical conditions.

  6. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets.

  7. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  8. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; ...

    2016-05-30

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) bindsmore » preferentially to the alpha-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10–7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10–6 to 10–4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10–7 to 10–4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0001) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0001) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) at [Me(II)] of 10–7 M; at 10–5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10–5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb L-III-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II

  9. Acute In Vivo Performance Evaluation of the Fluorescence Affinity Sensor in the Intravascular and Interstitial Space in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Dutt-Ballerstadt, Ralph; Evans, Colton; Pillai, Arun P.; Gowda, Ashok; McNichols, Roger; Rios, Jesse; Cohn, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective We assessed and compared the performance levels of a fiber-coupled fluorescence affinity sensor (FAS) for glucose detection in the intradermal tissue and intravascular bed during glucose clamping and insulin administration in a large animal model. Research Design and Methods The FAS (BioTex Inc., Houston, TX) was implanted in interstitial tissue and in the intravenous space in nondiabetic, anesthetized pigs over 6–7 h. For intradermal assessment, a needle-type FAS was implanted in the upper back using a hypodermic needle. For intravenous assessment, the FAS was inserted through a catheter into the femoral artery and vein. Blood glucose changes were induced by infusion of dextrose and insulin through a catheterized ear or jugular vein. Results Based on retrospective analysis, the mean absolute relative error (MARE) of the sensor in blood and interstitial tissue was 11.9% [standard deviation (SD) = ±9.6%] and 23.8% (SD = ±19.4%), respectively. When excluding data sets from sensors that were affected by exogenous insulin, the MARE for those sensors tested in interstitial tissue was reduced to 16.3% (SD = ±12.5%). Conclusions The study demonstrated that the performance level of the FAS device implanted in interstitial tissue and blood can be very high. However, under certain circumstances, exogenous insulin caused the glucose concentration in interstitial tissue to be lower than in blood, which resulted in an overall lower level of accuracy of the FAS device. How significant this physiological effect is in insulin-treated persons with diabetes remains to be seen. In contrast, the level of accuracy of the FAS device in blood was very high because of high mass transfer conditions in blood. While the use of the FAS in both body sites will need further validation, its application in critically ill patients looks particularly promising. PMID:23439158

  10. Zn(II) ions substantially perturb Cu(II) ion coordination in amyloid-β at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Silva, K Ishara; Saxena, Sunil

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions with amyloid-β (Aβ) plays an important role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. We describe the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure metal-binding competition between Cu(II) and Zn(II) in amyloid-β at physiological pH. Continuous wave ESR measurements show that the affinity of Cu(II) toward Aβ(1-16) is significantly higher than that of Zn(II) at physiological pH. Importantly, of the two known Cu(II) coordination modes in Aβ, component I and component II, Zn(II) displaces Cu(II) only from component I. Our results indicate that at excess amounts of Zn(II) component II becomes the most dominant coordination mode. This observation is important as Aβ aggregates in the brain contain a high Zn(II) ion concentration. In order to determine details of the metal ion competition, electron spin echo envelope modulation experiments were carried out on Aβ variants that were systematically (15)N labeled. In the presence of Zn(II), most peptides use His 14 as an equatorial ligand to bind Cu(II) ions. Interestingly, Zn(II) ions completely substitute Cu(II) ions that are simultaneously coordinated to His 6 and His 13. Furthermore, in the presence of Zn(II), the proportion of Cu(II) ions that are simultaneously coordinated to His 13 and His 14 is increased. On the basis of our results we suggest that His 13 plays a critical role in modulating the morphology of Aβ aggregates.

  11. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  12. Development of new peptide-based receptor of fluorescent probe with femtomolar affinity for Cu(+) and detection of Cu(+) in Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwan Ho; Oh, Eun-Taex; Park, Heon Joo; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-11-15

    Developing fluorescent probes for monitoring intracellular Cu(+) is important for human health and disease, whereas a few types of their receptors showing a limited range of binding affinities for Cu(+) have been reported. In the present study, we first report a novel peptide receptor of a fluorescent probe for the detection of Cu(+). Dansyl-labeled tripeptide probe (Dns-LLC) formed a 1:1 complex with Cu(+) and showed a turn-on fluorescent response to Cu(+) in aqueous buffered solutions. The dissociation constant of Dns-LLC for Cu(+) was determined to be 12 fM, showing that Dns-LLC had more potent binding affinity for Cu(+) than those of previously reported chemical probes for Cu(+). The binding mode study showed that the thiol group of the peptide receptor plays a critical role in potent binding with Cu(+) and the sulfonamide and amide groups of the probe might cooperate to form a complex with Cu(+). Dns-LLC detected Cu(+) selectively by a turn-on response among various biologically relevant metal ions, including Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The selectivity of the peptide-based probe for Cu(+) was strongly dependent on the position of the cysteine residue in the peptide receptor part. The fluorescent peptide-based probe penetrated the living RKO cells and successfully detected Cu(+) in the Golgi apparatus in live cells by a turn-on response. Given the growing interest in imaging Cu(+) in live cells, a novel peptide receptor of Cu(+) will offer the potential for developing a variety of fluorescent probes for Cu(+) in the field of copper biochemistry.

  13. Zn(II) transport and distribution in rat spermatids.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J G; Arrate, M P; Santander, M; Guzman, L; Benos, D J

    1993-10-01

    Zn(II) is an essential trace element. In spermatozoa, Zn(II) modulates metabolism and chromatin condensation. The mechanisms of uptake and distribution of this ion in sperm cells have not been explored. In rat spermatids, our results indicate that 1) 65Zn(II) binds with fast kinetics to a labile, presumably extracellular, compartment. This binding is temperature insensitive and not modified by metabolic inhibitors. 2) Entry of 65Zn(II) in the absence of externally added proteins occurs through a mediated transport system that allows exchange to reach steady state in approximately 15 min at 34 degrees C. 3) Upon entering the cells, 65Zn(II) binds tightly to cellular organelles. 4) Exchangeable Zn(II) bound to cytoplasmic proteins plus free intracellular Zn(II) appears to be < 20% of total exchangeable Zn(II). 5) The intracellular exchangeable Zn(II) compartment is decreased by metabolic inhibitors, showing a direct or indirect link between energy metabolism and cellular Zn(II) levels. 6) 65Zn(II) efflux from rat spermatids is a process with a rate constant of 0.16 +/- 0.13 min-1 at 34 degrees C. This exit rate of Zn(II) is likely to be affected by Zn(II) release from cytoplasmic binding sites or organelles.

  14. CdS/TiO2-fluorescein isothiocyanate nanoparticles as fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe for the determination of trace alkaline phosphatase based on affinity adsorption assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-ping; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin; Wang, Xin-Xing; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2012-08-30

    The CdS/TiO(2)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) luminescent nanoparticles (CdS/TiO(2)-FITC) with the particle size of 20 nm have been synthesized by sol-gel method. CdS/TiO(2)-FITC could emit the fluorescence of both FITC and CdS/TiO(2). The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred between the donor CdS/TiO(2) and the acceptor FITC in the CdS/TiO(2)-FITC. Taking advantages of the excellent characteristics of FRET, a new CdS/TiO(2)-FITC FRET labeling reagent and a CdS/TiO(2)-FITC-wheat germ agglutinin (CdS/TiO(2)-FITC-WGA) fluorescent probe have been developed. The FRET occurring between the donor CdS/TiO(2) and the acceptor FITC in the labelled product CdS/TiO(2)-FITC-WGA-AP, formed in the affinity adsorption reaction between the WGA in this CdS/TiO(2)-FITC-WGA fluorescent probe and alkaline phosphatase (AP), sharply enhanced the fluorescence signal of FITC and quench the fluorescence signal of CdS/TiO(2). Moreover, the ΔF (the change of the fluorescence signal) of FITC and CdS/TiO(2) were proportional to the content of AP, respectively. Thus, a new method that CdS/TiO(2)-fluorescein isothiocyanate nanoparticles for the determination of trace AP based on FRET-affinity adsorption assay has been established. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of the method was 1.3×10(-17) g AP mL(-1) for CdS/TiO(2) and 1.1×10(-17) g AP mL(-1) for FITC, respectively. This sensitive, rapid, high selective and precise method has been applied to the determination of AP in human serum and the prediction of human disease with the results agreed well with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in Zhangzhou Municipal Hospital of Fujian Province. Simultaneously, the reaction mechanism for the determination of AP was also discussed.

  15. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo Jordan, M. Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M.; Lubag, Angelo J. M.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols. PMID:27562169

  16. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate.

    PubMed

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Lubag, Angelo J M; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-13

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols.

  17. Quenching of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence by Dissolved Oxygen Reveals Selective Single-Stranded DNA Affinities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-04-13

    The selective interactions between short oligomers of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and specific structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been exploited in powerful methods for nanotube sorting. We report here that nanotubes coated with ssDNA also display selective interactions through the selective quenching of nanotube fluorescence by dissolved oxygen. In aqueous solutions equilibrated under 1 atm of O2, emission intensity from semiconducting nanotubes is reduced by between 9 and 40%, varying with the combination of ssDNA sequence and nanotube structure. This quenching reverses promptly and completely on removal of dissolved O2 and may be due to physisorption on nanotube surfaces. Fluorescence quenching offers a simple, nondestructive approach for studying the structure-selective interactions of ssDNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes and identifying recognition sequences.

  18. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  19. Structural elucidation of estrus urinary lipocalin protein (EULP) and evaluating binding affinity with pheromones using molecular docking and fluorescence study

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Durairaj; Muthukumar, Subramanian; Saibaba, Ganesan; Siva, Durairaj; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader; Gulyás, Balázs; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of pheromones bound with carrier proteins belonging to lipocalin superfamily is known to prolong chemo-signal communication between individuals belonging to the same species. Members of lipocalin family (MLF) proteins have three structurally conserved motifs for delivery of hydrophobic molecules to the specific recognizer. However, computational analyses are critically required to validate and emphasize the sequence and structural annotation of MLF. This study focused to elucidate the evolution, structural documentation, stability and binding efficiency of estrus urinary lipocalin protein (EULP) with endogenous pheromones adopting in-silico and fluorescence study. The results revealed that: (i) EULP perhaps originated from fatty acid binding protein (FABP) revealed in evolutionary analysis; (ii) Dynamic simulation study shows that EULP is highly stable at below 0.45 Å of root mean square deviation (RMSD); (iii) Docking evaluation shows that EULP has higher binding energy with farnesol and 2-iso-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) than 2-naphthol; and (iv) Competitive binding and quenching assay revealed that purified EULP has good binding interaction with farnesol. Both, In-silico and experimental studies showed that EULP is an efficient binding partner to pheromones. The present study provides impetus to create a point mutation for increasing longevity of EULP to develop pheromone trap for rodent pest management. PMID:27782155

  20. In-line coupling of an aptamer based miniaturized monolithic affinity preconcentration unit with capillary electrophoresis and Laser Induced Fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Marechal, A; Jarrosson, F; Randon, J; Dugas, V; Demesmay, C

    2015-08-07

    A composite 30-cm capillary was prepared. The head of the capillary was a 1.5-cm original and miniaturized aptamer-based monolithic affinity support that was in-line coupled to the end of the capillary used for capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. The device was used for the preconcentration, separation and quantification of ochratoxin A (OTA) as a test solute. The 1.5-cm preconcentration unit consists of a fritless affinity monolithic bonded with 5'-SH-modified oligonucleotide aptamers. A vinyl spacer was used for thiol-ene photoclick chemistry with a 5min irradiation at 365nm. Photografting allowed to confine the binding reaction to the desired silica monolithic segment, upstream the empty section of the CE capillary using an UV mask. The photografting procedure was optimized preparing 10-cm capillary monoliths for nano-LC. The retention factors of cationic solutes in ion-exchange nano-LC allowed to follow the aptamer binding on the monolith. The reproducibility of the photografting process was satisfactory with inter-capillary variation lower than 10%. The aptamer bonding density can be increased by successive graftings of 100μM aptamer concentration solution (5pmol/cm/grafting). The optimal conditions to successfully perform the in-line coupling (preconcentration, elution and separation of OTA) with the composite capillary were adjusted depending on individual requirements of each step but also insuring compatibility. Under optimized conditions, OTA was successfully preconcentrated and quantified down to 0.1pg (percolation of 2.65μL of a 40ng/L OTA solution). A quantitative recovery of OTA (93±2%) was achieved in a single elution of 30pg percolated OTA amount. The reproducibility of the overall process was satisfactory with a relative standard deviation lower than 10% with negligible non-specific adsorption. This device was applied for the preconcentration and analysis of OTA in beer and wine at the ppb level within

  1. Enhancing the Photostability of Arylvinylenebipyridyl Compounds as Fluorescent Indicators for Intracellular Zinc(II) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Younes, Ali H.; Allen, John R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Arylvinylenebipyridyl (AVB) ligands are bright, zinc(II)-sensitive fluoroionophores. The applicability of AVBs as fluorescent indicators for imaging cellular zinc(II), however, is limited by low photostability, partially attributable to the photoisomerization of the vinylene functionality. Two configurationally immobilized (i.e., “locked”) AVB analogues are prepared in this work. The zinc(II)-sensitive photophysical properties and zinc(II) affinities of both AVBs and their locked analogues are characterized in organic and aqueous media. The zinc(II) sensitivity of the emission is attributed to the zinc(II)-dependent energies of the charge transfer excited states of these compounds. The configurationally locked ligands have improved photostability, while maintaining the brightness and zinc(II) sensibility of their AVB progenitors. The feasibility of the “locked” AVB analogues with improved photostability for imaging intracellular Zn(II) of eukaryotic cells using laser confocal fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated. PMID:25942357

  2. Evaluation of adsorption properties of sulphurised activated carbon for the effective and economically viable removal of Zn(II) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Anoop Krishnan, K; Sreejalekshmi, K G; Vimexen, V; Dev, Vinu V

    2016-02-01

    The prospective application of sulphurised activated carbon (SAC) as an ecofriendly and cost-effective adsorbent for Zinc(II) removal from aqueous phase is evaluated, with an emphasis on kinetic and isotherm aspects. SAC was prepared from sugarcane bagasse pith obtained from local juice shops in Sree Bhadrakali Devi Temple located at Ooruttukala, Neyyattinkara, Trivandrum, India during annual festive seasons. Activated carbon modified with sulphur containing ligands was opted as the adsorbent to leverage on the affinity of Zn(II) for sulphur. We report batch-adsorption experiments for parameter optimisations aiming at maximum removal of Zn(II) from liquid-phase using SAC. Adsorption of Zn(II) onto SAC was maximum at pH 6.5. For initial concentrations of 25 and 100mgL(-1), maximum of 12.3mgg(-1) (98.2%) and 23.7mgg(-1) (94.8%) of Zn(II) was adsorbed onto SAC at pH 6.5. Kinetic and equilibrium data were best described by pseudo-second-order and Langmuir models, respectively. A maximum adsorption capacity of 147mgg(-1) was obtained for the adsorption of Zn(II) onto SAC from aqueous solutions. The reusability of the spent adsorbent was also determined.

  3. Zn(II) adsorption from synthetic solution and kaolin wastewater onto vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Cláudio Pereira; Fernandes, Raphael Bragança Alves; de Lima Ribeiro, Kamilla; de Souza Nascimento, Bruna; de Barros, Priscila Martins

    2009-03-15

    The adsorption of Zn(II) from both synthetic solution and kaolin industry wastewater by cattle manure vermicompost was studied. The adsorption process was dependent on the various operating variables, viz., solution pH, particle size of the vermicompost, mass of vermicompost/volume of the Zn(II) solution ratio, contact time and temperature. The optimum conditions for Zn adsorption were pH 6.0, particle size of < or = 250 microm, 1 g per 10 mL adsorbent dose, contact time of 4h and temperature of 25 degrees C. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms fit well in the experimental data and their constants were evaluated, with R(2) values from 0.95 to 0.99. In synthetic solution, the maximum adsorption capacity of the vermicompost for Zn(2+) ions was 20.48 mg g(-1) at 25 degrees C when the vermicompost dose was 1 g 10 mL(-1) and the initial adjusted pH was 2. The batch adsorption studies of Zn(II) on vermicompost using kaolin wastewater have shown the maximum adsorption capacity was 2.49 mg g(-1) at pH 2 (natural pH of the wastewater). The small values of the constant related to the energy of adsorption (from 0.07 to 0.163 L mg(-1)) indicated that Zn(2+) ions were binded strongly to vermicompost. The values of the separation factor, R(L), which has been used to predict affinity between adsorbate and adsorbent were between 0 and 1, indicating that sorption was very favorable for Zn(II) in synthetic solution and kaolin wastewater. The thermodynamic parameter, the Gibbs free energy, was calculated for each system and the negative values obtained confirm that the adsorption processes are spontaneous. The DeltaG degrees values were -19.656 kJ mol(-1) and -16.849 kJ mol(-1) for Zn(II) adsorption on vermicompost in synthetic solution at pH 6 and 2, respectively, and -13.275 kJ mol(-1) in kaolin wastewater at pH 2.

  4. Synthesis, spectral and electrochemical properties of Al(III) and Zn(II) complexes with flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Rubens F. V. de; De Giovani, Wagner F.

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis, electrochemical and spectral (UV-vis, 1H NMR, IR, fluorescence) properties as well as thermal behaviors of Al(III) and Zn(II) complexes with the flavonoids quercetin (H 2L 1), rutin (H 2L 2) and galangin (HL 3) are presented. The complexes may be formulated as [Al 2(L 1)(H 2O) 8]Cl 4, [Al 3(L 2) 2(H 2O) 12]Cl 5, [Al(L 3)(H 2O) 4]Cl 2, [Zn 2(L 1)(H 2O) 4]Cl 2, [Zn 3(L 2) 2(H 2O) 6]Cl 2 and [Zn(L 3)(H 2O) 2]Cl. The higher fluorescence intensities of the complexes related to the free flavonoids, are attributed to the coordination of the ligands to the small, highly charged Al(III) and Zn(II) ions. The coordination effectively increases the rigidity of the ligand structure and increases the fluorescence quantum yield by reducing the probability of non-radiative energy dissipation process. Antioxidant activities of the compounds were also investigated under an electrochemical point of view. The cyclic voltammetric data show a considerable decrease of the oxidation potentials of the complexes related to that of the free flavonoids. Thus, the flavonoid-metal complexes are more effective antioxidants than the free flavonoids.

  5. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2016-05-30

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the alpha-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10–7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10–6 to 10–4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10–7 to 10–4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0001) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0001) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001) at [Me(II)] of 10–7 M; at 10–5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic, photoluminescence properties and biological evaluation of novel Zn(II) and Al(III) complexes of NOON tetradentate Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A; Badr, Ibrahim H A; El-Sayed, Ibrahim S A

    2012-11-01

    Novel mononuclear Zn(II) and Al(III) complexes were synthesized from the reactions of Zn(OAc)(2).2H(2)O and anhydrous AlCl(3) with neutral N2O2 donor tetradentate Schiff bases; N,N'bis(salicylaldehyde)4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine (H(2)L(1)) and N,N'bis(salicylaldehyde)4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylenediamine (H(2)L(2)). The new complexes were fully characterized by using micro analyses (CHN), FT-IR, (1)H NMR, UV-Vis spectra and thermal analysis. The analytical data have been showed that, the stoichiometry of the complexes is 1:1. Spectroscopic data suggested tetrahedral and square pyramidal geometries for Zn(II) and Al(III) complexes, respectively. The synthesized Zn(II), and Al(III) complexes exhibited intense fluorescence emission in the visible region upon UV-excitation in methylene chloride solution at ambient temperature. This high fluorescence emission was assigned to the strong coordination of the ligands to the small and the highly charged Zn(II) and Al(III) ions. Such strong coordination seems to extend the π-conjugation of the complexes. Thermal analysis measurements indicated that the complexes have good thermal stability. As a potential application the biological activity (e.g., antimicrobial action) of the prepared ligands and complexes was assessed by in-vitro testing of their effect on the growth of various strains of bacteria and fungi.

  7. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of Alexa Fluor 680-bombesin[7-14]NH2 peptide conjugate, a high-affinity fluorescent probe with high selectivity for the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lixin; Yu, Ping; Veerendra, Bhadrasetty; Rold, Tammy L; Retzloff, Lauren; Prasanphanich, Adam; Sieckman, Gary; Hoffman, Timothy J; Volkert, Wynn A; Smith, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors are overexpressed on several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. Bombesin (BBN), a 14-amino acid peptide that is an analogue of human GRP, binds to GRP receptors with very high affinity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a new fluorescent probe based on BBN having high tumor uptake and optimal pharmacokinetics for specific targeting and optical imaging of human breast cancer tissue. In this study, solid-phase peptide synthesis was used to produce H(2)N-glycylglycylglycine-BBN[7-14]NH(2) peptide with the following general sequence: H(2)N-G-G-G-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH(2)). This conjugate was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectra. The fluorescent probe Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) conjugate was prepared by reaction of Alexa Fluor 680 succinimidyl ester to H(2)N-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in dimethylformamide (DMF). In vitro competitive binding assays, using (125)I-Tyr(4)-BBN as the radiolabeling gold standard, demonstrated an inhibitory concentration 50% value of 7.7 +/- 1.4 nM in human T-47D breast cancer cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in human T-47D breast cancer cells indicated specific uptake, internalization, and receptor blocking of the fluorescent bioprobe in vitro. In vivo investigations in SCID mice bearing xenografted T-47D breast cancer lesions demonstrated the ability of this new conjugate to specifically target tumor tissue with high selectivity and affinity.

  8. High affinity receptor labeling based on basic leucine zipper domain peptides conjugated with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye: Visualization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor endocytosis in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ayako; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Okabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to visualize receptor trafficking in living neurons are important, but currently available methods are limited in their labeling efficiency, specificity and reliability. Here we report a method for receptor labeling with a basic leucine zipper domain peptide (ZIP) and a binding cassette specific to ZIP. Receptors are tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette at their extracellular domain. Tagged receptors expressed in cultured cells were labeled with exogenously applied fluorescently labeled ZIP with low background and high affinity. To test if ZIP labeling is useful in monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, we next conjugated ZIP with a pH-sensitive dye RhP-M (ZIP-RhP-M). ZIP binding to its binding cassette was pH-resistant and RhP-M fluorescence dramatically increased in acidic environment. Thus AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) labeled by ZIP-RhP-M can report receptor endocytosis and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Application of ZIP-RhP-M to cultured hippocampal neurons expressing AMPARs tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette resulted in appearance of fluorescent puncta in PSD-95-positive large spines, suggesting local endocytosis and acidification of AMPARs in individual mature spines. This spine pool of AMPARs in acidic environment was distinct from the early endosomes labeled by transferrin uptake. These results suggest that receptor labeling by ZIP-RhP-M is a useful technique for monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'.

  9. Adsorption behavior of Zn(II) on calcinated Chinese loess.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaowu; Li, Zhenze; Chen, Yunmin

    2009-01-30

    Chinese loess has proven to be effective in removing Zn(II) from aqueous solutions, but the resultant adsorbent-water slurry is difficult to separate. In this paper, the crude loess was calcinated to improve the separation efficiency of slurries in terms of sedimentary rate by increasing the particle sizes of the adsorbent. The sorption capacities of different sorbents, including crude loess, calcinated loess, de-organic crude loess and acid-treated calcinated loess, were obtained and sequenced. The adsorption capacity of the calcinated loess towards Zn(II) was found to be as high as 113.6 mg g(-1). The adsorption isotherms and kinetics of calcinated loess were best-fit with the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second order kinetics, respectively. The thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous with a high preference for Zn(II) removal. The adsorption of Zn(II) on calcinated loess implies an ion exchange of the solute with calcite and goethite due to the observed FT-IR and XRD patterns as well as the predicted mean free energies (-11.58 to -9.28 kJ mol(-1) by D-R model). The byproduct of adsorption can be purified and refreshed by using a 0.01 M HCl solution.

  10. Fluorescent detection of apoptotic cells using a family of zinc coordination complexes with selective affinity for membrane surfaces that are enriched with phosphatidylserine.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bradley D.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Lakshmi, C.; Hanshaw, Roger, G.

    2005-03-01

    The appearance of phosphatidylserine on the membrane surface of apoptotic cells (Jurkat, CHO, HeLa) is monitored by using a family of bis(Zn{sup 2+}-2,2{prime}-dipicolylamine) coordination compounds with appended fluorescein or biotin groups as reporter elements. The phosphatidylserine affinity group is also conjugated directly to a CdSe/CdS quantum dot to produce a probe suitable for prolonged observation without photobleaching. Apoptosis can be detected under a wide variety of conditions, including variations in temperature, incubation time, and binding media. Binding of each probe appears to be restricted to the cell membrane exterior, because no staining of organelles or internal membranes is observed.

  11. Enzyme-amplified protein micorarray and a fluidic renewable surface fluorescence immunoassay for botulinum neurotoxin detection using high-affinity recombinant antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Anheier, Norman C.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Smith, Leonard A.; Feldhaus, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2006-06-16

    With the use of high-affinity recombinant monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), two separate immunoassay platforms were developed for either the sensitive or the rapid detection of BoNT/A. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray was developed for the specific and sensitive detection of BoNT in buffer and clinical fluids. This assay has the sensitivity to detect BoNT in diverse samples down to 14 fM (1.4 pg/mL). Using the recombinant monoclonal antibodies, a renewable surface microcolumn sensor was developed for the rapid detection of BoNT/A in an automated fluidic system. While the ELISA microarray assay, because of its sensitivity, offers an alternative to the mouse bioassay, the renewable surface assay has potential as a rapid screening assay for the analysis of complex environmental samples.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, DNA- and HSA-binding studies of a dinuclear Schiff base Zn(II) complex derived from 2-hydroxynaphtaldehyde and 2-picolylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Zahra; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Sahihi, Mehdi; Moghadam, Majid; Tangestaninejad, Sharam; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj

    2015-09-01

    A tridentate Schiff base ligand NNO donor (HL: 1-((E)-((pyridin-2-yl)methylimino)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol was synthesized from condensation of 2-hydroxynaphtaldehyde and 2-picolylamine. Zinc complex, Zn2L2(NO3)2, was prepared from reaction of Zn(NO3)2 and HL at ambient temperature. The ligand and complex were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and elemental analysis (CHN). Furthermore, the structure of dinuclear Zn(II) complex was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The complex, Zn2L2(NO3)2, is centrosymmetric dimer in which deprotonated phenolates bridge the two Zn(II) atoms and link the two halves of the dimer. In the structure, Zinc(II) ions have a highly distorted six-coordinate structure bonded to two oxygen atoms from a bidentate nitrate group, the pyridine nitrogen, an amine nitrogen and phenolate oxygens. The interaction of dinuclear Zn(II) complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) and HSA was investigated under physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking methods. The estimated binding constants for the DNA-complex and HSA-complex were (3.60 ± 0.18) × 104 M-1 and (1.35 ± 0.24) × 104 M-1, respectively. The distance between dinuclear Zn(II) complex and HSA was obtained based on the Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer. Molecular docking studies revealed the binding of dinuclear Zn(II) complex to the major groove of FS-DNA and IIA site of protein by formation of hydrogen bond, π-cation and hydrophobic interactions.

  13. Adsorption of aqueous Zn(II) species on synthetic zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badillo-Almaraz, Véronica; Trocellier, Patrick; Dávila-Rangel, Ignacio

    2003-09-01

    To supply a good quality drinkable water tends to become a strategic task in both developed and under development countries in the world due to the number of potential contamination sources. One of the major problems is derived from the presence of heavy toxic metals like zinc or lead resulting from industrial activities. Zeolites are known as very efficient mineral substrates for fixing aqueous ionic species through their wide range of channels present in the crystalline structure and due to their strong surface reactivity. MicroPIXE coupled with microRBS (3.05 MeV 4He + ions) have been used to quantify the incorporation of zinc within two commercial zeolites containing alkali elements (zeolite X and clinoptilolite) in the concentration range of: 0.0002-0.05 M at neutral pH. At the beginning of the interaction between zeolite and Zn(II) solution, the adsorption process exhibits a direct proportionality between the content of zinc fixed on the mineral substrate and the aqueous concentration up to 0.01 M. Beyond this point a saturation effect seems to occur, indicating the strong decrease of available adsorption sites. Sodium or potassium ions are probably exchanged with Zn(II) ions during this process. The compared behaviour of the two zeolites is then discussed in terms of kinetic effects based on ionic radius values. A co-adsorption test carried on with a 50-50% Zn(II) 0.001 M-Pb(II) 0.001 M solution shows that lead does not occupy the same sites as zinc because the content of zinc fixed on the zeolite sample exactly corresponds to the result obtained with a pure 0.001 M Zn(II) solution. All these data clearly showed that zeolite surface reactivity is greatly influenced by the mineral cage-like structure and particularly the presence of pockets, spaces and channels.

  14. Monoligand Zn(II) Complexes:  Ab Initio Benchmark Calculations and Comparison with Density Functional Theory Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Valdés, Haydee; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2008-02-01

    A systematic theoretical study on several models of Zn(II) complexes has been carried out employing both ab initio correlated wave function and density functional methods. The performance of five different functionals namely PW91, PBE, B3LYP, MPWLYP1M, and TPSS in the prediction of metal-ligand bond distances, binding energies, and proton affinities has been assessed comparing the results to those obtained with the MP2 and CCSD(T) wave function methodologies. Several basis sets ranging from double-ζ up to quintuple-ζ quality have been used, including the recently developed all-electron correlation consistent basis sets for zinc. It is shown that all the tested functionals overestimate both the metal-ligand bond distances and the binding energies, being that the B3LYP and TPSS functionals are the ones that perform the best. An analysis of the metal-ligand interaction energy shows that induction and charge-transfer effects play a prominent role in the bonding of these systems, even for those complexes with the less polarizable ligands. This finding highlights the importance of a correct description of the polarization of the monomers' charge densities by any theoretical method which aims to be applied to the study of Zn(II) complexes.

  15. Adsorption of Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions in batch system by using the Eichhornia crassipes.

    PubMed

    Módenes, A N; Espinoza-Quiñones, F R; Borba, C E; Trigueros, D E G; Lavarda, F L; Abugderah, M M; Kroumov, A D

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the displacement effects on the sorption capacities of zinc and cadmium ions of the Eichornia crassipes-type biosorbent in batch binary system has been studied. Preliminary single metal sorption experiments were carried out. An improvement on the Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions removal was achieved by working at 30 °C temperature and with non-uniform biosorbent grain sizes. A 60 min equilibrium time was achieved for both Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions. Furthermore, it was found that the overall kinetic data were best described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. Classical multi-component adsorption isotherms have been tested as well as a modified extended Langmuir isotherm model, showing good agreement with the equilibrium binary data. Around 0.65 mequiv./g maximum metal uptake associated with the E. crassipes biosorbent was attained and the E. crassipes biosorbent has shown higher adsorption affinity for the zinc ions than for the cadmium ones in the binary system.

  16. Effect of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) on Pb(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium-derived materials.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Biosorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) from binary metal solutions onto the algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal industrial waste and a waste-based composite material was investigated at pH 5.3, in a batch system. Binary Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) solutions have been tested. For the same equilibrium concentrations of both metal ions (1 mmol l(-1)), approximately 66, 85 and 86% of the total uptake capacity of the biosorbents is taken by lead ions in the systems Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II), respectively. Two-metal results were fitted to a discrete and a continuous model, showing the inhibition of the primary metal biosorption by the co-cation. The model parameters suggest that Cd(II) and Zn(II) have the same decreasing effect on the Pb(II) uptake capacity. The uptake of Pb(II) was highly sensitive to the presence of Cu(II). From the discrete model it was possible to obtain the Langmuir affinity constant for Pb(II) biosorption. The presence of the co-cations decreases the apparent affinity of Pb(II). The experimental results were successfully fitted by the continuous model, at different pH values, for each biosorbent. The following sequence for the equilibrium affinity constants was found: Pb>Cu>Cd approximately Zn.

  17. Exceptional sensitivity to the synthetic approach and halogen substituent for Zn(II) coordination assemblies with 5-halonicotinic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Peng; Chen, Jing; Mu, Yu-Hai; Du, Miao

    2015-06-28

    Seven Zn(II) coordination complexes with 5-halonicotinic acids (HL-X, X = F, Cl, or Br) have been synthesized with different synthetic approaches, including layer diffusion or stirring method in an ambient environment and solvothermal synthesis at 100 °C. Assembly of HL-F with Zn(II) under different conditions will yield the same 2D network of [Zn(L-F)2]n (1). Interestingly, three distinct complexes, a 3D framework {[Zn2(L-Cl)4(H2O)](H2O)6}n (2) and two 2D pseudo-polymorphic isomers {[Zn(L-Cl)2](H2O)1.5}n (3) and {[Zn2(L-Cl)4](H2O)}n (4) can be obtained by reacting HL-Cl with Zn(II) under layer diffusion, stirring, and solvothermal conditions, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the -Cl substituent with -Br on the HL-X ligand will also afford three diverse coordination assemblies of 3D {[Zn2(L-Br)4(H2O)](CH3OH)2.5}n (5), mononuclear [Zn(HL-Br)2(H2O)4][L-Br]2 (6), and 2D {[Zn(L-Br)2](H2O)1.15}n (7) depending on the synthetic pathways. Beyond the significant influence of the synthetic approach, which will lead to the formation of various crystalline products, the halogen substitution effect of HL-X ligands on the coordination motifs has also been demonstrated. In addition, thermal stability and fluorescence for these crystalline materials will be presented.

  18. The interaction of native DNA with Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 5-triethyl ammonium methyl salicylidene orto-phenylendiimine.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Arturo; Barone, Giampaolo; Ruisi, Giuseppe; Anselmo, Daniele; Riela, Serena; Liveri, Vincenzo Turco

    2007-05-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with the Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 5-triethyl ammonium methyl salicylidene orto-phenylendiimine (ZnL(2+) and CuL(2+)), in 1 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solutions at neutral pH, has been monitored as a function of the metal complex-DNA molar ratio by UV absorption spectrophotometry, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results support for an intercalative interaction of both ZnL(2+) and CuL(2+) with DNA, showing CuL(2+) an affinity of approximately 10 times higher than ZnL(2+). In particular, the values of the binding constant, determined by UV spectrophotometric titration, equal to 7.3x10(4) and 1.3x10(6)M(-1), for ZnL(2+) and CuL(2+), respectively, indicate the occurrence of a marked interaction with a binding size of about 0.7 in base pairs. The temperature dependence of the absorbance at 258 nm suggests that both complexes strongly increase the DNA melting temperature (Tm) already at metal complex-DNA molar ratios equal to 0.1. As evidenced by the quenching of the fluorescence of ethidium bromide-DNA solutions in the presence of increasing amounts of metal complex, ZnL(2+) and CuL(2+) are able to displace the ethidium cation intercalated into DNA. A tight ZnL(2+)-DNA and CuL(2+)-DNA binding has been also proven by the appearance, in both metal complex-DNA solutions, of a broad induced CD band in the range 350-450 nm. In the case of the CuL(2+)-DNA system, the shape of the CD spectrum, at high CuL(2+) content, is similar to that observed for psi-DNA solutions. Such result allowed us to hypothesize that CuL(2+) induces the formation of supramolecular aggregates of DNA in aqueous solutions.

  19. Adsorption characteristics and behaviors of graphene oxide for Zn(II) removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wu, Yan; Huang, Huajun; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xueli; Lin, Ningbo; Qi, Yu

    2013-08-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized via modified Hummers’ method, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adsorption of Zn(II) on GO as a function of pH, adsorbent dosage, foreign ions, contact time, and temperature was investigated using batch technique. Results showed that the suitable pH for Zn(II) removal was about 7.0, and the optimal dosage was 2 mg. The adsorption of Zn(II) onto GO increased sharply within 20 min and obtained equilibrium gradually. Meanwhile, foreign ion and temperature also affected the adsorption performance of GO. The adsorption process was found to be well described by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Equilibrium studies indicated that the data of Zn(II) adsorption followed the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity for Zn(II) was up to 246 mg/g with a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant of 5.7 L/g at 20 °C. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from temperature-dependent sorption isotherms suggested that Zn(II) sorption on GO was an exothermic and spontaneous process in nature. The possibility of Zn(II) recovery was investigated and the result revealed that the maximum Zn(II) recovery yield was achieved with hydrochloric acid.

  20. Fluorescent derivatives of nucleotides. Metal ion interactions and pH dependency.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderkooi, J M; Weiss, C J; Woodrow, G V

    1979-01-01

    The fluorescence parameters of ethenoadenosine derivatives are influenced by metal cations and pH, as summarized here. The pH profile of ethenoadenosine determined by fluorescence intensity gives a normal titration curve and is not affected by ionic strength. In contrast, the pH titration curves of etheno-ATP, etheno ADP, and etheno AMP depend upon ionic strength. At high ionic strength normal curves are obtained, whereas at low ionic strength anomalies are obtained; this suggests that the phosphates can interact with the ring, possibly by hydrogen binding to the ring nitrogens. The room temperature fluorescence of ethenoadenosine occurs from the base form, although excitation of either the acid or base forms can contribute to the emission. This result can be explained if the excited state pK is lower than the ground state pK, and if deprotonation occurs within the time scale of the excited state. At low pH values the fluorescence lifetime of the base form is dependent upon the buffer concentration, indicating that the reverse reaction, protonation, occurs. The affinity constants for the binding of metals to the ethenoadenosine phosphates resemble those for the corresponding adenosine phosphates. Ni(II) and Co(II) are more effective than Mn(II) in quenching the fluorescence of ethenoadenosine phosphates; this result is predicted by Förster's theory for energy transfer based upon the overlap between donor emission spectrum and acceptor absorption spectrum. The diamagnetic ions Mg(II), Ca(II), and Zn(II) do not appear to affect the fluorescence of the ethenoadenosine phosphates directly, but rather to affect the conformation of the molecule, thereby affecting the quantum yield. PMID:45395

  1. Computer simulation of Zn(II) speciation and effect of Gd(III) on Zn(II) speciation in human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinping; Zhang, Haiyuan; Yang, Kuiyue; Niu, Chunji; Ni, Jiazuan

    2003-01-01

    The speciation and distribution of Zn(II) and the effect of Gd(III) on Zn(II) speciation in human blood plasma were studied by computer simulation. The results show that, in normal blood plasma, the most predominant species of Zn(II) are [Zn(HSA)] (58.2%), [Zn(IgG)](20.1%), [Zn(Tf)] (10.4%), ternary complexes of [Zn(Cit)(Cys)] (6.6%) and of [Zn(Cys)(His)H] (1.6%), and the binary complex of [Zn(Cys)2H] (1.2%). When zinc is deficient, the distribution of Zn(II) species is similar to that in normal blood plasma. Then, the distribution changes with increasing zinc(II) total concentration. Overloading Zn(II) is initially mainly bound to human serum albumin (HSA). As the available amount of HSA is exceeded, phosphate metal and carbonate metal species are established. Gd(III) entering human blood plasma predominantly competes for phosphate and carbonate to form precipitate species. However, Zn(II) complexes with phosphate and carbonate are negligible in normal blood plasma, so Gd(III) only have a little effect on zinc(II) species in human blood plasma at a concentration above 1.0 x 10(-4) M.

  2. Syntheses, structures and properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes based on N2-2-methylenepyridinyl 1,2,3-triazole ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunfeng; Wu, Jun; Ma, Shan; Zhou, Shilei; Meng, Xianggao; Jia, Lihui; Pan, Zhiquan

    2015-06-01

    Four new Zn(II) and Cu(II) coordinated polymers ([ZnL2N3]ClO4 (1), [Cu2L2(CH3CN)]Cl4 (2) [CuL](NO3)2 (3), [Cu(H2O)L](SO4) (4) L = 2-((4-phenyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-2-yl)methyl) pyridine (ptmp)) have been reported. All the compounds have been characterized by IR spectrum, elemental analyses and X-ray crystallography diffraction. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses show that one-dimensional polymers are formed in these four complexes. Chain-like structures are formed in complex 1, 2 and 3, which are connected by azide, chloride and nitrate anions, respectively. In complex 4, one-dimensional left-handed polymer is formed by a μ2-SO4 bridge. The fluorescent and electrochemical properties of these four complexes were investigated. It was found that these three Cu(II) complexes displayed a quenching of fluorescence, while Zn(II) complex exhibited a clear enhanced fluorescence.

  3. Synthesis, molecular structure, biological properties and molecular docking studies on Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes containing bipyridine-azide ligands.

    PubMed

    Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Jayamani, Arumugam; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi

    2015-01-07

    Metal complexes of the type Mn(bpy)2(N3)2 (1), Co(bpy)2(N3)2·3H2O (2) and Zn2(bpy)2(N3)4 (3) (Where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectral (FT-IR, UV-vis) studies. The structure of complexes (1-3) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the configuration of ligand-coordinated metal(II) ion was well described as distorted octahedral coordination geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and distorted square pyramidal geometry for Zn(II) complexes. DNA binding interaction of these complexes (1-3) were investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence circular dichroism spectral and molecular docking studies. The intrinsic binding constants Kb of complexes 1, 2 and 3 with CT-DNA obtained from UV-vis absorption studies were 8.37 × 10(4), 2.23 × 10(5) and 5.52 × 10(4) M(-1) respectively. The results indicated that the three complexes are able to bind to DNA with different binding affinity, in the order 2 > 1 > 3. Complexes (1-3) exhibit a good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins having relatively high binding constant values. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes 1-3 promote the cleavage ability of the pBR322 plasmid DNA in the presence of the reducing agent 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) but with different cleavage mechanisms: the complex 3 cleaves DNA via hydrolytic pathway (T4 DNA ligase assay), while the DNA cleavage by complexes 1 and 2 follows oxidative pathway. The chemical nuclease activity follows the order: 2 > 1 > 3. The effects of various activators were also investigated and the nuclease activity efficacy followed the order MPA > GSH > H2O2 > Asc. The cytotoxicity studies of complexes 1-3 were tested in vitro on breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and they found to be active.

  4. Crystal structures and thermodynamics/kinetics of Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tian; Yue, Ke-Fen; Zhao, Yi-xing; Chen, San-Ping; Zhou, Chun-sheng; Yan, Ni

    2016-07-01

    Solvothermal reactions of Zn(II) acetates and four V-shaped carboxylates ligands in the presence of 1,4-Bis(2-methyl-imidazol-1-yl)butane afforded four interesting Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical chains, namely, {[Zn(bib)(atibdc)]·2H2O}n (1), {[Zn(bib)(atbip)]·H2O}n (2), [Zn(bib)(2,2‧-tda)]}n (3) and {[Zn(bib)(5-tbipa)]·EtOH}n (4), (H2atibdc=5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid, H2atbip=5-amino-2,4,6-tribromoisophthalic acid, 2,2‧-H2tad=2,2‧-thiodiacetic acid, 5-H2tbipa=5-tert-butyl-isophthalic acid). 1 reveals a 3D chiral framework with three kinds of helical chains along a, b and c axis. 2 shows a 2D step-type chiral framework with right-handed helical chains. 3 displays a wavelike 2D layer network possessing alternate left- and right-handed helical chains. 4 presents a four-connected 3D framework with zigzag and meso-helical chains. The different spacers and substituent group of carboxylic acid ligands may lead to the diverse network structures of 1-4. The fluorescent properties of complexes 1-4 were studied. In addition, the thermal decompositions properties of 1-4 were investigated by simultaneous TG/DTG-DSC technique. The apparent activation energy E and the pre-exponential factor (A) of skeleton collapse for the complexes 1-4 are calculated by the integral Kissinger's method and Ozawa-Doyle's method. The activation energy E (E1=209.658 kJ·mol-1, E2=250.037 kJ mol-1, E3=225.300 kJ mol-1, E4=186.529 kJ·mol-1) demonstrates that the reaction rate of the melting decomposition is slow. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH‡, ΔG‡ and ΔS‡) at the peak temperatures of the DTG curves were also calculated. ΔG‡>0 indicates that the skeleton collapse is not spontaneous. ΔHd>0 suggests that the skeleton collapse is endothermic, corresponding to the intense endothermic peak of the DSC curve. The structural stability could be illustrated from the point of thermodynamics and kinetics.

  5. Crystal structures and thermodynamics/kinetics of Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical chains

    SciTech Connect

    He, Tian; Yue, Ke-Fen; Zhao, Yi-xing; Chen, San-Ping; Zhou, Chun-sheng; Yan, Ni

    2016-07-15

    Solvothermal reactions of Zn(II) acetates and four V-shaped carboxylates ligands in the presence of 1,4-Bis(2-methyl-imidazol-1-yl)butane afforded four interesting Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical chains, namely, {[Zn(bib)(atibdc)]·2H_2O}{sub n} (1), {[Zn(bib)(atbip)]·H_2O}{sub n} (2), {[Zn(bib)(2,2′-tda)]}{sub n} (3) and {[Zn(bib)(5-tbipa)]·EtOH}{sub n} (4), (H{sub 2}atibdc=5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid, H{sub 2}atbip=5-amino-2,4,6-tribromoisophthalic acid, 2,2′-H{sub 2}tad=2,2′-thiodiacetic acid, 5-H{sub 2}tbipa=5-tert-butyl-isophthalic acid). 1 reveals a 3D chiral framework with three kinds of helical chains along a, b and c axis. 2 shows a 2D step-type chiral framework with right-handed helical chains. 3 displays a wavelike 2D layer network possessing alternate left- and right-handed helical chains. 4 presents a four-connected 3D framework with zigzag and meso-helical chains. The different spacers and substituent group of carboxylic acid ligands may lead to the diverse network structures of 1–4. The fluorescent properties of complexes 1−4 were studied. In addition, the thermal decompositions properties of 1–4 were investigated by simultaneous TG/DTG–DSC technique. The apparent activation energy E and the pre-exponential factor (A) of skeleton collapse for the complexes 1–4 are calculated by the integral Kissinger's method and Ozawa–Doyle's method. The activation energy E (E{sub 1}=209.658 kJ·mol{sup −1}, E{sub 2}=250.037 kJ mol{sup −1}, E{sub 3}=225.300 kJ mol{sup −1}, E{sub 4}=186.529 kJ·mol{sup −1}) demonstrates that the reaction rate of the melting decomposition is slow. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH{sup ‡}, ΔG{sup ‡} and ΔS{sup ‡}) at the peak temperatures of the DTG curves were also calculated. ΔG{sup ‡}>0 indicates that the skeleton collapse is not spontaneous. ΔH{sub d}>0 suggests that the skeleton collapse is endothermic, corresponding to the intense endothermic peak of the DSC curve. The

  6. Two-photon absorption of Zn(II) octupolar molecules.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Simone; Fortunati, Ilaria; Scolaro, Sara; Zerbetto, Michele; Ferrante, Camilla; Signorini, Raffaella; Pedron, Danilo; Bozio, Renato; Locatelli, Danika; Righetto, Stefania; Roberto, Dominique; Ugo, Renato; Abbotto, Alessandro; Archetti, Graziano; Beverina, Luca; Ghezzi, Sergio

    2007-06-21

    In this work we present an investigation of the non-linear optical (NLO) properties of two octupolar chromophores: [Zn(4,4'-bis(dibutylaminostyryl)-[2,2']-bipyridine)(3)](2+) and [Zn(4,4'-bis((E)-2-(N-(TEG)pyrrol-2-yl)vinyl)-[2,2']-bipyridine)(3)](2+) with Zn(ii) as the coordination center, using two-photon emission technique (TPE) in fs-pulse temporal regime. Compared to the free ligands, our results do not show a net increase in the two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section for the octupolar complexes, once normalized to the ligand unit. This is in partial disagreement with a previous theoretical study investigating the first molecule where a significant increase of the TPA cross-section was predicted (X. J. Liu, et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 120, 11 493).

  7. Calcium ion gradients modulate the zinc affinity and antibacterial activity of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Hayden, Joshua A; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-31

    Calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein produced and released by neutrophils that inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering essential metal nutrients in the extracellular space. In this work, spectroscopic and thermodynamic metal-binding studies are presented to delineate the zinc-binding properties of CP. Unique optical absorption and EPR spectroscopic signatures for the interfacial His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of human calprotectin are identified by using Co(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Zinc competition titrations employing chromophoric Zn(II) indicators provide a 2:1 Zn(II):CP stoichiometry, confirm that the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of CP coordinate Zn(II), and reveal that the Zn(II) affinity of both sites is calcium-dependent. The calcium-insensitive Zn(II) competitor ZP4 affords dissociation constants of K(d1) = 133 ± 58 pM and K(d2) = 185 ± 219 nM for CP in the absence of Ca(II). These values decrease to K(d1) ≤ 10 pM and K(d2) ≤ 240 pM in the presence of excess Ca(II). The K(d1) and K(d2) values are assigned to the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites, respectively. In vitro antibacterial activity assays indicate that the metal-binding sites and Ca(II)-replete conditions are required for CP to inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Taken together, these data provide a working model whereby calprotectin responds to physiological Ca(II) gradients to become a potent Zn(II) chelator in the extracellular space.

  8. Removal of Zn(II) from simulated wastewater using an algal biofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuixia; Hu, Zhiquan; Zuo, Jiaolan; Hu, Mian; Xiao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    An algal biofilm was employed as a novel kind of adsorbing material to remove Zn(II) from simulated wastewater. The algal biofilm system formed by Oedogonium sp. was operated in a dynamic mode for a period of 14 days with an initial Zn(II) concentration of 10 mg/L. The average effluent Zn(II) concentration was 0.247 mg/L and the average removal efficiency reached 97.7%. The effects of Zn(II) on key algal physiological and biochemical indices such as chlorophyll content, nitrate reductase and superoxide dismutase activity, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and soluble protein levels were studied. Our results showed that the algal biofilm could adapt to the simulated wastewater containing Zn(II). Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses of algal biofilm revealed the presence of carboxyl, amino, and sulphonate groups, which were the main functional groups of EPS and proteins, and these were likely responsible for biosorption of the Zn(II) ions.

  9. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  10. Competitive adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from their binary and ternary acidic systems using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibin; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Jingting; Wang, Baolin; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-10-15

    The adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions in binary and ternary component systems by tourmaline was investigated. Kinetic data were accurately fitted to pseudo-second order and internal diffusion models, which indicated that the adsorption of heavy metals occurred on the interior surface of the sorbent and internal diffusion was the controlling mechanism during heavy metal ion adsorption but was not the only rate-controlling step. Additionally, tourmaline had a very good adsorption capacity for Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) in multi-component aqueous solutions at strongly acidic pH values (in contrast to industrial wastewater pH values). This good adsorption capacity is attributed to the fact that tourmaline can automatically adjust the pH values of acidic (except pH 2.0 and 3.0), neutral or alkaline aqueous solutions to 6.0. Adsorption isotherms and separation factors showed that tourmaline displays a high selectivity toward one metal in a two-component or a three-component system with an affinity order of Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II). Thermodynamic parameters indicated that heavy metal adsorption was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic. Therefore, tourmaline should be explored as a material for removing pollutants from the strongly acidic wastewater.

  11. [Biosorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in aqueous solutions by fruiting bodies of macrofungi (Auricularia polytricha and Tremella fuciformis)].

    PubMed

    Mo, Yu; Pan, Rong; Huang, Hai-wei; Cao, Li-xiang; Zhang, Ren-duo

    2010-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the ability of fruiting bodies of Auricularia polytricha and Tremella fuciformis to adsorb Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions, including biosorption ability of the biomass to remove heavy metals from solutions with different concentrations, kinetics of adsorption, influence of co-cations, and biosorption affinity in multi-metalsystem. Results showed that in the solutions with individual metal, the maximum biosorption amounts of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) by A. polytricha were 18.91, 18.69, 20.33, 12.42 mg x g(-1), respectively, and the highest removal rates for all cases were more than 85%. The maximum biosorption amounts of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) by T. fuciformis were 19.98, 20.15, 19.16, 16.41 mg x g(-1), respectively, and highest removal rates for all cases were more than 75%. In the solutions with initial concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 mg x L(-1), the biosorption amounts increased but the removal rates decreased as the initial concentrations increasing. The pseudo-second-order reaction model described adsorption kinetics of heavy metal ions by fruiting bodies of A. polytricha and T. fuciformis better than the pseudo-first-order reaction model. In the solutions with multi metals, the biosorption amounts of heavy metals by two biosorbent were in the order of Ph(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II). The ions with more negative charges were preferential to be sorbed. The biosorption ability of A. polytricha was inhibited in multi-metal solutions. In multi-metal solutions, T. fuciformis sorbed a higher amount of Pb(II) but lower amounts of other three ions than that in the individual metal solutions. The results indicated that both fruiting bodies of A. polytricha and T. fuciformis were potential biosorbents.

  12. Isolation and spectroscopic characterization of Zn(II), Cu(II), and Pd(II) complexes of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-derived ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Dariusz; Matwijczuk, Arkadiusz; Boroń, Bożena; Creaven, Bernadette; Fiedor, Leszek; Niewiadomy, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    A series of complexes incorporating Zn(II), Cu(II), and Pd(II) ions, and 4-(5-heptyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)benzene-1,3-diol (L1) as model ligand, was synthesized in order to examine the nature of potential interactions between biologically active ligands, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles and metal ions with proven biological relevance. The structures of the compounds isolated were characterized using a number of spectroscopic methods including IR, Uv-vis, AAS, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence (TRF). The results obtained suggest that the L1-Zn(II) and L1-Pd(II) complexes consist of one molecule of L1 and one acetate ion acting as ligands, while the L1-Cu(II) complex adapts a 2:1 (L1: metal) stoichiometry. The coordination of L1 to metal ions occurs most likely via one of the deprotonated hydroxyl groups of the resorcinyl moiety and one of the N atoms of the thiadiazole heterocycle.

  13. Light-induced oxidation of the telomeric G4 DNA in complex with Zn(II) tetracarboxymethyl porphyrin

    PubMed Central

    Beniaminov, Artemy D.; Novikov, Roman A.; Mamaeva, Olga K.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Livshits, Mikhail A.; Shchyolkina, Anna K.; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-specific ligands are convenient tools for the recognition, targeting or probing of non-canonical DNA structures. Porphyrin derivatives exhibit a preference for interaction with G-quadruplex (G4) structures over canonical duplex DNA and are able to cause photoinducible damage to nucleic acids. Here, we show that Zn(II) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-carboxymethyl-4-pyridinium)porphyrin (ZnP1) interacts with different conformations of the telomeric sequence d(TAGGG(TTAGGG)3) at submicromolar concentrations without any detectible disturbance of the particular fold. Among different folds, potassium (3+1) hybrid G4-structure. reveal the highest affinity to ZnP1. The pattern of guanine oxidation is specific for each telomeric DNA conformation and may serve as an additional tool for probing the G4 topology. The potassium (3+1) and parallel G4 conformations are more susceptible to light-induced oxidation than the sodium G4 conformation or double helix of the telomeric DNA. The major products of the guanine modifications are spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). ZnP1-induced oxidation of guanines results in the structural rearrangement of parallel and (3+1) G4 conformations yielding an antiparallel-like G4 conformation. The mechanism of the observed light-induced conformational changes is discussed. PMID:27915287

  14. Light-induced oxidation of the telomeric G4 DNA in complex with Zn(II) tetracarboxymethyl porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, Artemy D; Novikov, Roman A; Mamaeva, Olga K; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Smirnov, Igor P; Livshits, Mikhail A; Shchyolkina, Anna K; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N

    2016-12-01

    Structure-specific ligands are convenient tools for the recognition, targeting or probing of non-canonical DNA structures. Porphyrin derivatives exhibit a preference for interaction with G-quadruplex (G4) structures over canonical duplex DNA and are able to cause photoinducible damage to nucleic acids. Here, we show that Zn(II) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-carboxymethyl-4-pyridinium)porphyrin ( ZNP1: ) interacts with different conformations of the telomeric sequence d(TAGGG(TTAGGG)3) at submicromolar concentrations without any detectible disturbance of the particular fold. Among different folds, potassium (3+1) hybrid G4-structure. reveal the highest affinity to ZNP1: The pattern of guanine oxidation is specific for each telomeric DNA conformation and may serve as an additional tool for probing the G4 topology. The potassium (3+1) and parallel G4 conformations are more susceptible to light-induced oxidation than the sodium G4 conformation or double helix of the telomeric DNA. The major products of the guanine modifications are spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). ZNP1: -induced oxidation of guanines results in the structural rearrangement of parallel and (3+1) G4 conformations yielding an antiparallel-like G4 conformation. The mechanism of the observed light-induced conformational changes is discussed.

  15. Adsorption and Precipitation of Aqueous Zn(II) on Hematite Nano- and Microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Juyong; Farges, Francois; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-13

    As part of a study of the effect of particle size on reactivity of hematite to aqueous metal ions, the sorption of Zn(II) on hematite nanoparticles and microparticles was examined over a wide range of Zn(II) concentrations using Zn K-edge EXAFS. When reacted with nanoparticles at pH 5.5 and low Zn(II) sorption densities (0.04 {le} {Lambda} < 2.76 imol/m{sup 2}), Zn(II) formed five-coordinated or a mixture of four- and six-coordinated surface complexes with an average Zn-O distance of 2.04({+-}0.02){angstrom}. At pH 5.5 and high Zn(II) sorption densities (2.76 {ge} {Lambda} {le} 3.70 mol/m{sup 2}), formation of surface precipitates is suggested based on the presence of second-shell Zn and multiple scattering features in the Fourier transform (FT) of the EXAFS spectra. EXAFS fitting of these high {Lambda} samples yielded an average first-shell Zn-O distance of 2.10({+-}0.02){angstrom}, with second-shell Zn-Fe and Zn-Zn distances of 3.23({+-}0.03){angstrom} and 3.31({+-}0.03){angstrom}, respectively. Qualitative comparison between the EXAFS spectra of these sorption samples and that of amorphous zinc hydroxide and Zn-bearing hydrotalcite indicates the development of surface precipitates with increasing {Lambda}. EXAFS spectra of Zn(II) sorbed on hematite microparticles under similar experimental conditions showed no evidence for surface precipitates even at the highest Zn surface coverage ({Lambda} = 4 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}). These results indicate that reactivities of hematite nanoparticles and macroparticles differ with respect to Zn(II)aq, depending on Zn(II) sorption density. We suggest that the degree of hematite crystallinity affects the reactivity of hematite surfaces toward Zn(II)aq and the formation of the Zn(II) surface complexes.

  16. 8-aminoquinoline functionalized silica nanoparticles: a fluorescent nanosensor for detection of divalent zinc in aqueous and in yeast cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shiva K; Pal, Parul; Aston, D Eric; Bitterwolf, Thomas E; Branen, A Larry

    2011-05-01

    Zinc is one of the most important transition metal of physiological importance, existing primarily as a divalent cation. A number of sensors have been developed for Zn(II) detection. Here, we present a novel fluorescent nanosensor for Zn(II) detection using a derivative of 8-aminoquinoline (N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(3 (triethoxysilyl)propylamino)acetamide (QTEPA) grafted on silica nanoparticles (SiNPs). These functionalized SiNPs were used to demonstrate specific detection of Zn(II) in tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.22), in yeast cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspension, and in tap water. The silane QTEPA, SiNPs and final product were characterized using solution and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric techniques, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nanosensor shows almost 2.8-fold fluorescence emission enhancement and about 55 nm red-shift upon excitation with 330 ± 5 nm wavelength in presence of 1 μM Zn(II) ions in tris-HCl (pH 7.22). The presence of other metal ions has no observable effect on the sensitivity and selectivity of nanosensor. This sensor selectively detects Zn(II) ions with submicromolar detection to a limit of 0.1 μM. The sensor shows good applicability in the determination of Zn(II) in tris-HCl buffer and yeast cell environment. Further, it shows enhancement in fluorescence intensity in tap water samples.

  17. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  18. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  19. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  20. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  1. Cu(II) and Zn(II) adsorption capacity of three different clay liner materials.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Parolo, M E; Pettinari, G; Francisca, F M

    2014-12-15

    Sorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on three natural clays meeting the international requirements for use as liners was evaluated by means of batch tests. The purpose of this research was to determine the retention capacities of the clays for metal cations commonly present in urban solid waste leachates. The pH and ionic strength conditions were set at values frequently found in real leachates. The changes observed in the XRD patterns and FTIR spectra upon adsorption can be considered an evidence of clay-metal electrostatic interaction. The Langmuir model was found to best describe the sorption processes, offering maximum sorption capacities from 8.16 to 56.89 mg/g for Cu(II) and from 49.59 to 103.83 mg/g for Zn(II). All samples remove more Zn(II) than Cu(II), which may be related to the different geometry of the hydrated Cu(II) cation. The total amount of metal sorption was strongly influenced by the total specific surface area, the presence of carbonates and the smectite content of the clays. In addition to their known quality as physical barriers, the adsorbed amounts obtained indicate the suitability of the tested clays to contribute to the retardation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) transport through clay liners.

  2. A saponification-triggered gelation of ester-based Zn(II) complex through conformational transformations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Dubey, Mrigendra; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2014-09-11

    Novel saponification-triggered gelation in an ester-based bis-salen Zn(II) complex (1) is described. Strategic structural modifications induced by NaOH in 1 tune the dipolar-/π-interactions leading to J-aggregation and the creation of an inorganic gel material (IGM), which has been established by photophysical, DFT and rheological studies.

  3. Zn(II) coordination polymers with flexible V-shaped dicarboxylate ligand: Syntheses, helical structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lin; Liu, Chong-Bo; Yang, Gao-Shan; Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Hong; Wen, Hui-Liang

    2015-11-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of 2,2′-[hexafluoroisopropylidenebis(p-phenyleneoxy)]diacetic acid (H{sub 2}L) and zinc ions in the presence of N-donor ancillary ligands afford four novel coordination polymers, namely, [Zn{sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-OH)(μ{sub 4}-O){sub 0.5}(L)]·0.5H{sub 2}O (1), [Zn(L)(2,2′-bipy)(H{sub 2}O)] (2), [Zn{sub 3}(L){sub 3}(phen){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O (3) and [Zn{sub 2}(L){sub 2}(4,4′-bipy)] (4) (2,2′-bipy=2,2′-bipyridine; 4,4′-bipy=4,4′-bipyridine; phen=1,10-phenanthroline). Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, IR spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. Complex 1 shows a 3-D clover framework consisting of [Zn{sub 4}(µ{sub 4}-O)(µ{sub 2}-OH){sub 2}]{sup 4+} clusters, and exhibits a novel (3,8)-connected topological net with the Schläfli symbol of {3·4·5}{sub 2}{3"4·4"4·5"2·6"6·7"1"0·8"2}, and contains double-stranded and two kinds of meso-helices. 2 displays a helical chain structure, which is further extended via hydrogen bonds into a 3-D supramolecular structure with meso-helix chains. 3 displays a 2-D {4"4·6"2} parallelogram structure, which is further extended via hydrogen bonds into a 3-D supramolecular structure with single-stranded helical chains. 4 shows a 2-D {4"4·6"2} square structure with left- and right-handed helical chains. Moreover, the luminescent properties of 1–4 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four new Zn(II) coordination polymers with helical structures based on flexible V-shaped dicarboxylate ligand have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Photoluminescent properties have been investigated. - Highlights: • Four novel Zn(II) coordination polymers with V-shaped ligand were characterized. • Complexes 1–4 show diverse intriguing helical characters. • Fluorescence properties of complexes 1–4 were investigated.

  4. BIOCHEMISTRY OF MOBILE ZINC AND NITRIC OXIDE REVEALED BY FLUORESCENT SENSORS

    PubMed Central

    Pluth, Michael D.; Tomat, Elisa; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically mobile zinc and nitric oxide (NO) are two prominent examples of inorganic compounds involved in numerous signaling pathways in living systems. In the past decade, a synergy of regulation, signaling, and translocation of these two species has emerged in several areas of human physiology, providing additional incentive for developing adequate detection systems for Zn(II) ions and NO in biological specimens. Fluorescent probes for both of these bioinorganic analytes provide excellent tools for their detection, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We review the most widely used fluorescent sensors for biological zinc and nitric oxide, together with promising new developments and unmet needs of contemporary Zn(II) and NO biological imaging. The interplay between zinc and nitric oxide in the nervous, cardiovascular, and immune systems is highlighted to illustrate the contributions of selective fluorescent probes to the study of these two important bioinorganic analytes. PMID:21675918

  5. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  6. Zn(II) coordination to polyamine macrocycles containing dipyridine units. New insights into the activity of dinuclear Zn(II) complexes in phosphate ester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bazzicalupi, Carla; Bencini, Andrea; Berni, Emanuela; Bianchi, Antonio; Fornasari, Patrizia; Giorgi, Claudia; Valtancoli, Barbara

    2004-10-04

    Zn(II) binding by the dipyridine-containing macrocycles L1-L3 has been analyzed by means of potentiometric measurements in aqueous solutions. These ligands contain one (L1, L2) or two (L3) 2,2'-dipyridine units as an integral part of a polyamine macrocyclic framework having different dimensions and numbers of nitrogen donors. Depending on the number of donors, L1-L3 can form stable mono- and/or dinuclear Zn(II) complexes in a wide pH range. Facile deprotonation of Zn(II)-coordinated water molecules gives mono- and dihydroxo-complexes from neutral to alkaline pH values. The ability of these complexes as nucleophilic agents in hydrolytic processes has been tested by using bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) as a substrate. In the dinuclear complexes the two metals play a cooperative role in BNPP cleavage. In the case of the L2 dinuclear complex [Zn(2)L2(OH)(2)](2+), the two metals act cooperatively through a hydrolytic process involving a bridging interaction of the substrate with the two Zn(II) ions and a simultaneous nucleophilic attack of a Zn-OH function at phosphorus; in the case of the dizinc complex with the largest macrocycle L3, only the monohydroxo complex [Zn(2)L3(OH)](3+) promotes BNPP hydrolysis. BNPP interacts with a single metal, while the hydroxide anion may operate a nucleophilic attack. Both complexes display high rate enhancements in BNPP cleavage with respect to previously reported dizinc complexes, due to hydrophobic and pi-stacking interactions between the nitrophenyl groups of BNPP and the dipyridine units of the complexes.

  7. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  8. Mapping Protein–Protein Interactions of the Resistance-Related Bacterial Zeta Toxin–Epsilon Antitoxin Complex (ε2ζ2) with High Affinity Peptide Ligands Using Fluorescence Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bachiller, María Isabel; Brzozowska, Iwona; Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin systems constitute a native survival strategy of pathogenic bacteria and thus are potential targets of antibiotic drugs. Here, we target the Zeta–Epsilon toxin–antitoxin system, which is responsible for the stable maintenance of certain multiresistance plasmids in Gram-positive bacteria. Peptide ligands were designed on the basis of the ε2ζ2 complex. Three α helices of Zeta forming the protein–protein interaction (PPI) site were selected and peptides were designed conserving the residues interacting with Epsilon antitoxin while substituting residues binding intramolecularly to other parts of Zeta. Designed peptides were synthesized with an N-terminal fluoresceinyl-carboxy-residue for binding assays and provided active ligands, which were used to define the hot spots of the ε2ζ2 complex. Further shortening and modification of the binding peptides provided ligands with affinities <100 nM, allowing us to determine the most relevant PPIs and implement a robust competition binding assay. PMID:27438853

  9. New hybrid materials as Zn(II) sorbents in water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian

    2010-09-15

    Mesoporous silicas have been chemically modified with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole (MTTZ) obtaining hybrid materials denominated MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS. These materials were employed as Zn(II) sorbents from aqueous media at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, presence of other metals) has been studied using batch and column techniques. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used to determinate Zn(II) concentration in the filtrate or in the eluted solution after the adsorption process. The results indicate that under pH 8, the maximum adsorption value was 0.94 {+-} 0.01 and 0.72 {+-} 0.01 mmol Zn(II)/g for MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS, respectively. In tap water samples, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically MSU-2 and HMS with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole and to use the resulting modified mesoporous silica as an effective adsorbent for Zn(II) in aqueous media.

  10. Intracellular Zn(II) Intoxication Leads to Dysregulation of the PerR Regulon Resulting in Heme Toxicity in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions (Zn(II), Cu(II)/(I), Fe(III)/(II), Mn(II)) are essential for life and participate in a wide range of biological functions. Cellular Zn(II) levels must be high enough to ensure that it can perform its essential roles. Yet, since Zn(II) binds to ligands with high avidity, excess Zn(II) can lead to protein mismetallation. The major targets of mismetallation, and the underlying causes of Zn(II) intoxication, are not well understood. Here, we use a forward genetic selection to identify targets of Zn(II) toxicity. In wild-type cells, in which Zn(II) efflux prevents intoxication of the cytoplasm, extracellular Zn(II) inhibits the electron transport chain due to the inactivation of the major aerobic cytochrome oxidase. This toxicity can be ameliorated by depression of an alternate oxidase or by mutations that restrict access of Zn(II) to the cell surface. Conversely, efflux deficient cells are sensitive to low levels of Zn(II) that do not inhibit the respiratory chain. Under these conditions, intracellular Zn(II) accumulates and leads to heme toxicity. Heme accumulation results from dysregulation of the regulon controlled by PerR, a metal-dependent repressor of peroxide stress genes. When metallated with Fe(II) or Mn(II), PerR represses both heme biosynthesis (hemAXCDBL operon) and the abundant heme protein catalase (katA). Metallation of PerR with Zn(II) disrupts this coordination, resulting in depression of heme biosynthesis but continued repression of catalase. Our results support a model in which excess heme partitions to the membrane and undergoes redox cycling catalyzed by reduced menaquinone thereby resulting in oxidative stress. PMID:27935957

  11. Intracellular Zn(II) Intoxication Leads to Dysregulation of the PerR Regulon Resulting in Heme Toxicity in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chandrangsu, Pete; Helmann, John D

    2016-12-01

    Transition metal ions (Zn(II), Cu(II)/(I), Fe(III)/(II), Mn(II)) are essential for life and participate in a wide range of biological functions. Cellular Zn(II) levels must be high enough to ensure that it can perform its essential roles. Yet, since Zn(II) binds to ligands with high avidity, excess Zn(II) can lead to protein mismetallation. The major targets of mismetallation, and the underlying causes of Zn(II) intoxication, are not well understood. Here, we use a forward genetic selection to identify targets of Zn(II) toxicity. In wild-type cells, in which Zn(II) efflux prevents intoxication of the cytoplasm, extracellular Zn(II) inhibits the electron transport chain due to the inactivation of the major aerobic cytochrome oxidase. This toxicity can be ameliorated by depression of an alternate oxidase or by mutations that restrict access of Zn(II) to the cell surface. Conversely, efflux deficient cells are sensitive to low levels of Zn(II) that do not inhibit the respiratory chain. Under these conditions, intracellular Zn(II) accumulates and leads to heme toxicity. Heme accumulation results from dysregulation of the regulon controlled by PerR, a metal-dependent repressor of peroxide stress genes. When metallated with Fe(II) or Mn(II), PerR represses both heme biosynthesis (hemAXCDBL operon) and the abundant heme protein catalase (katA). Metallation of PerR with Zn(II) disrupts this coordination, resulting in depression of heme biosynthesis but continued repression of catalase. Our results support a model in which excess heme partitions to the membrane and undergoes redox cycling catalyzed by reduced menaquinone thereby resulting in oxidative stress.

  12. Structural characterization of 1,8-naphthalimides and in vitro microbiological activity of their Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabchev, Ivo; Yordanova, Stanislava; Bosch, Paula; Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Kukeva, Rositsa; Stoyanov, Stanimir; Stoyanova, Radostina

    2017-02-01

    Two new 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives (NI1 and NI2) have been synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of the new compounds have been investigated in organic solvents of different polarity. It has been shown that both compounds are solvent depended. Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of NI2 were obtained and characterized by IR-NMR, fluorescence and EPR spectroscopy. The influence of different metal cations on the fluorescence intensity has been investigated in acetonitrile solution. Antimicrobial composite PLA-metal complexes materials have been obtained for the first time. Microbiological activity of both metal complexes has been investigated in vitro against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and two yeasts. The various antimicrobial activities and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of both complexes have been determined. The microbiological activity of composite materials PLA-metal complexes in thin polymeric film has also been investigated. The results suggest that the new metal complexes could find application in designing new antimicrobial preparations to control the spread of infections.

  13. Fluorescent properties of some transition metals complexes with the new podand containing hydrazide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvirko, M.; Meshkova, S.; Chebotarska, I.; Kiriiak, G.; Gorodnyuk, V.

    2007-08-01

    The influence of some transition metal ions— Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ga(III), Ag(I), Cd(II), In(III), Hg(II), Tl(I,III), Au(I) on spectral-fluorescent properties of their complexes with new podand 1,17-bis-[(2-hydrazinocarbo)phenoxy]-3,6,9,12,15-pentaoxaheptadecane in solution was studied.

  14. Removal of Pb(II) and Zn(II) from Aqueous Solutions by Raw Crab Shell: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Han, Jie; Guo, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Removals of Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions from water using crab (Clistocoeloma sinensis) shell particles as biosorbent have been compared in this study. Uptake equilibriums for two ions well described by Langmuir isotherm revealed that crab shell possessed higher uptake capacity for Pb(II) (709 mg/g) than that for Zn(II) (117 mg/g). Kinetics data for the uptake of the two metals were successfully modeled using the pseudo-second-order model, where the initial uptake rate of Pb(II) was much faster than that of Zn(II). Dubinin-Radushkevick modeling and thermodynamic parameters hinted at different uptake mechanisms of Pb(II) and Zn(II) removal by crab shell, attested by FTIR, XRD, FESEM analysis. Pb(II) ion was removed mainly through the chemical reaction, while the uptake of Zn(II) ion onto crab shell was attributed to the chelation and coordination interactions. The polluted river water and laboratory wastewater both satisfied the standards for drinking and irrigation/fishery water, respectively, after being treated with crab shell particles.

  15. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  16. The ligand effect on the hydrolytic reactivity of Zn(II) complexes toward phosphate diesters.

    PubMed

    Bonfá, Lodovico; Gatos, Maddalena; Mancin, Fabrizio; Tecilla, Paolo; Tonellato, Umberto

    2003-06-16

    The catalytic effects of the Zn(II) complexes of a series of poliaminic ligands in the hydrolysis of the activated phosphodiesters bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (BNP) and 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) have been investigated. The reactions show first-order rate dependency on both substrate and metal ion complex and a pH dependence which is diagnostic of the acid dissociation of the reactive species. The mechanism of the metal catalyzed transesterification of HPNP has been assessed by solvent isotopic kinetic effect studies and involves the intramolecular nucleophilic attack of the substrate alcoholic group, activated by metal ion coordination. The intrinsic reactivity of the different complexes is controlled by the nature and structure of the ligand: complexes of tridentate ligands, particularly if characterized by a facial coordination mode, are more reactive than those of tetradentate ligands which can hardly allow binding sites for the substrate. In the case of tridentate ligands that form complexes with a facial coordination mode, a linear Brønsted correlation between the reaction rate (log k) and the pK(a) of the active nucleophile is obtained. The beta(nuc) values are 0.75 for the HPNP transesterification and 0.20 for the BNP hydrolysis. These values are indicated as the result of the combination of two opposite Lewis acid effects of the Zn(II) ion: the activation of the substrate and the efficiency of the metal coordinated nucleophile. The latter factor apparently prevails in determining the intrinsic reactivity of the Zn(II) complexes.

  17. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  18. Multifunctional Zn(II) Complexes: Photophysical Properties and Catalytic Transesterification toward Biodiesel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishek Kumar; Dhir, Abhimanew; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P

    2016-08-01

    Using 4-substituted derivatives of phenol-based compartmental Schiff-base hydroxyl-rich ligand, four multifunctional binuclear Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes were explored in the solid state, in solutions, and in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix, which revealed their good potential as tunable solid state emitters. Some of these complexes acted as efficient catalysts for the transesterification of esters and canola oil showing their potential in biodiesel generation. Mechanistic investigations using ESI-MS revealed that the transesterification catalyzed by these complexes proceeds through two types of acyl intermediates.

  19. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  20. Fluorescent Aptamer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui William; Kim, Youngmi; Meng, Ling; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Martin, Jennifer; Tang, Zhiwen; Shangguan, Dihua; O'Donoghue, Meghan; Tan, Weihong

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acid probes that can be evolved to have high specificity and affinity for different targets. These targets include biomar-ker proteins, small molecules, and even whole live cells that express a variety of surface proteins of interest. Aptamers offer several advantages over protein-based molecular probes such as low immunogenic activity, flexible modification, and in vitro synthesis. In addition, aptamers used as molecular probes can be made with easy signaling for binding with their corresponding targets. There are a few different fluorescence-based signal transduction mechanisms, such as direct fluorophore labeling, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence quenching, fluorescence anisotropy, and light-switching excimers. These signaling processes in combination with various labeling strategies of nucleic acid aptamers contribute to simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective biological assays. In this chapter, we discuss the optical signaling of aptamers for single proteins such as α-thrombin and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We also present detailed discussion about fluorescent aptamers developed from cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) for the recognition of different target tumor cells.

  1. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  2. Adsorption of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) on modified jute fibres.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S R; Pai, Roshan S

    2005-09-01

    The potential of a lignocellulosic fibre, jute, was assessed for adsorption of heavy metal ions like Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) from their aqueous solutions. The fibre was also used as adsorbent after chemically modifying it by two different techniques viz, loading of a dye with specific structure, C.I. Reactive Orange 13, and oxidising with hydrogen peroxide. Both the modified jute fibres gave higher metal ion adsorption. Thus, the dye loaded jute fibres showed metal ion uptake values of 8.4, 5.26 and 5.95 mg/g for Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II), respectively, while the corresponding values for oxidised jute fibres were 7.73, 5.57 and 8.02 mg/g, as against 4.23, 3.37 and 3.55 mg/g for unmodified jute fibres. Adsorption isotherm models indicated best fit for Langmuir model for the modified jute fibres. The adsorption values decreased with lowering of pH. The desorption efficiency, regenerative and reuse capacity of these adsorbents were also assessed for three successive adsorption-desorption cycles. The adsorptive capacity was retained only when the caustic soda regeneration is carried out as an intermediate step after desorption. Possible mechanism has been given.

  3. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  4. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  5. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  6. A comparative study for the ion exchange of Fe(III) and Zn(II) on zeolite NaY.

    PubMed

    Ostroski, Indianara C; Barros, Maria A S D; Silva, Edson A; Dantas, João H; Arroyo, Pedro A; Lima, Oswaldo C M

    2009-01-30

    The uptake capacity of Fe(III) and Zn(II) ions in NaY zeolite was investigated. Experiments were carried out in a fixed bed column at 30 degrees C, pH 3.5 and 4.5 for Fe(III) and Zn(II), respectively, and an average particle size of 0.180 mm. In order to minimize the diffusional resistances the influence of flow rate on the breakthrough curves at feed concentrations of 1.56 meq/L for Fe(III) and 0.844 meq/L for Zn(II) was investigated. Flow rate of the minimal resistance in the bed according to mass transfer parameter were 2.0 mL/min for iron and 8.0 mL/min for zinc ions. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models have been used to represent the column equilibrium data. The iron dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Langmuir equation and this mathematical model described well the experimental breakthrough curves for feed concentrations from 0.1 up to 3.5 meq/L. The zinc dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Freundlich equation. This equilibrium model was applied to mathematical model. Experimental breakthrough curves could be predicted. Experiments were also carried out in a batch reactor to investigate the kinetics adsorption of the ions Fe(III) and Zn(II). Langmuir kinetic model fit well both experimental data.

  7. Chelation of Cu(II), Zn(II), and Fe(II) by tannin constituents of selected edible nuts.

    PubMed

    Karamać, Magdalena

    2009-12-22

    The tannin fractions isolated from hazelnuts, walnuts and almonds were characterised by colorimetric assays and by an SE-HPLC technique. The complexation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) was determined by the reaction with tetramethylmurexide, whereas for Fe(II), ferrozine was employed. The walnut tannins exhibited a significantly weaker reaction with the vanillin/HCl reagent than hazelnut and almond tannins, but the protein precipitation capacity of the walnut fraction was high. The SE-HPLC chromatogram of the tannin fraction from hazelnuts revealed the presence of oligomers with higher molecular weights compared to that of almonds. Copper ions were most effectively chelated by the constituents of the tannin fractions of hazelnuts, walnuts and almonds. At a 0.2 mg/assay addition level, the walnut tannins complexed almost 100% Cu(II). The Fe(II) complexation capacities of the tannin fractions of walnuts and hazelnuts were weaker in comparison to that of the almond tannin fraction, which at a 2.5 mg/assay addition level, bound Fe(II) by approximately 90%. The capacity to chelate Zn(II) was quite varied for the different nut tannin fractions: almond tannins bound as much as 84% Zn(II), whereas the value for walnut tannins was only 8.7%; and for hazelnut tannins, no Zn(II) chelation took place at the levels tested.

  8. Removal of Zn(II) from electroplating effluent using yeast biofilm formed on gravels: batch and column studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Present study deals with the removal of Zn(II) ions from effluent using yeast biofilm formed on gravels. Methods The biofilm forming ability of Candida rugosa and Cryptococcus laurentii was evaluated using XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay and monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Copious amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by yeast species was quantified and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Results Yeast biofilm formed on gravels by C. rugosa and C. laurentii showed 88% and 74.2% removal of Zn(II) ions respectively in batch mode. In column mode, removal of Zn(II) ions from real effluent was found to be 95.29% by C. rugosa biofilm formed on gravels. Conclusion The results of the present study showed that there is a scope to develop a cost effective method for the efficient removal of Zn(II) from effluent using gravels coated with yeast biofilm. PMID:24397917

  9. Trace analysis of cefotaxime at carbon paste electrode modified with novel Schiff base Zn(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Preeti; Mohan, Swati; Kundu, Subir; Prakash, Rajiv

    2009-02-15

    Cefotaxime a third generation cephalosporin drug estimation in nanomolar concentration range is demonstrated for the first time in aqueous and human blood samples using novel Schiff base octahedral Zn(II) complex. The cefotaxime electrochemistry is studied over graphite paste and Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste capillary electrodes in H(2)SO(4) (pH 2.3) using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Cefotaxime enrichment is observed over Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste electrode probably due to interaction of functional groups of cefotaxime with Zn(II) complex. Possible interactions between metal complex and cefotaxime drug is examined by UV-vis and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) techniques and further supported by voltammetric analysis. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with modified electrode is applied for the determination of cefotaxime in acidified aqueous and blood samples. Cefotaxime estimation is successfully demonstrated in the range of 1-500 nM for aqueous samples and 0.1-100 microM in human blood samples. Reproducibility, accuracy and repeatability of the method are checked by triplicate reading for large number of samples. The variation in the measurements is obtained less than 10% without any interference of electrolyte or blood constituents.

  10. Tandem affinity purification vectors for use in gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Doherty, Geoff P; Lewis, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has become a valuable tool for the isolation of protein complexes. Here we describe the construction and use of a series of plasmid vectors for Gram positive bacteria. The vectors utilize the SPA tag as well as variants containing a 3C rather than the TEV protease site as 3C protease has been shown to work efficiently at the low temperatures (4 degrees C) used to isolate protein complexes. In addition, a further vector incorporates a GST moiety in place of the 3xFLAG of the SPA tag which provides an additional tagging option for situations where SPA binding may be inefficient. The vectors are all compatible with previously constructed fluorescent protein fusion vectors enabling construction of a suite of affinity and fluorescently tagged genes using a single PCR product.

  11. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  12. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  13. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on polyacrylic acid-coated hydrated aluminum-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingge; Michel, F Marc; Levard, Clement; Choi, Yong; Eng, Peter J; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) often forms coatings on minerals. Such coatings are expected to affect metal-ion sorption due to abundant sorption sites in NOM and potential modifications to mineral surfaces, but such effects are poorly understood in complex multicomponent systems. Using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), a simplified analog of NOM containing only carboxylic groups, Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning between PAA coatings and α-Al2O3 (1-102) and (0001) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield spectroscopy. In the single-metal-ion systems, PAA was the dominant sink for Pb(II) and Zn(II) for α-Al2O3(1-102) (63% and 69%, respectively, at 0.5 μM metal ions and pH 6.0). In equi-molar mixed-Pb(II)-Zn(II) systems, partitioning of both ions onto α-Al2O3(1-102) decreased compared with the single-metal-ion systems; however, Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) sorption to a greater extent than vice versa, suggesting that Zn(II) outcompeted Pb(II) for α-Al2O3(1-102) sorption sites. In contrast, >99% of both metal ions sorbed to PAA when equi-molar Pb(II) and Zn(II) were added simultaneously to PAA/α-Al2O3(0001). PAA outcompeted both α-Al2O3 surfaces for metal sorption but did not alter their intrinsic order of reactivity. This study suggests that single-metal-ion sorption results cannot be used to predict multimetal-ion sorption at NOM/metal-oxide interfaces when NOM is dominated by carboxylic groups.

  14. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  15. Picomolar affinity fibronectin domains engineered utilizing loop length diversity, recursive mutagenesis, and loop shuffling.

    PubMed

    Hackel, Benjamin J; Kapila, Atul; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-09-19

    The 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (Fn3) has been validated as an effective scaffold for molecular recognition. In the current work, it was desired to improve the robustness of selection of stable, high-affinity Fn3 domains. A yeast surface display library of Fn3 was created in which three solvent-exposed loops were diversified in terms of amino acid composition and loop length. The library was screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate binders to lysozyme. An affinity maturation scheme was developed to rapidly and broadly diversify populations of clones by random mutagenesis as well as homologous recombination-driven shuffling of mutagenized loops. The novel library and affinity maturation scheme combined to yield stable, monomeric Fn3 domains with 3 pM affinity for lysozyme. A secondary affinity maturation identified a stable 1.1 pM binder, the highest affinity yet reported for an Fn3 domain. In addition to extension of the affinity limit for this scaffold, the results demonstrate the ability to achieve high-affinity binding while preserving stability and the monomeric state. This library design and affinity maturation scheme is highly efficient, utilizing an initial diversity of 2x10(7) clones and screening only 1x10(8) mutants (totaled over all affinity maturation libraries). Analysis of intermediate populations revealed that loop length diversity, loop shuffling, and recursive mutagenesis of diverse populations are all critical components.

  16. Interaction of natural polyphenols with α-amylase in vitro: molecular property-affinity relationship aspect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Kai, Guoyin; Ni, Xiaoling; Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between the structural properties of natural polyphenols and their affinities for α-amylase were investigated by fluorescence titration analysis. The binding process with α-amylase was strongly influenced by the structural differences of the compounds under study. For instance, the methylation of the hydroxyl group in flavonoids increased their binding affinities for α-amylase by 2.14 to 7.76 times. The hydroxylation on rings A, B, and C of flavonoids also significantly affected their affinities for α-amylase. The glycosylation of isoflavones and flavanones reduced their affinities for α-amylase and the glycosylation of flavones and flavonols enhanced their affinities for α-amylase. Hydrogenation of the C2=C3 double bond of flavonoids decreased the binding affinities. The galloylated catechins had higher binding affinities with α-amylase than non-galloylated catechins and the pyrogallol-type catechins had higher affinities than the catechol-type catechins. The presence of the galloyl moiety is the most decisive factor. The glycosylation of resveratrol decreased its affinity for α-amylase. The esterification of gallic acid significantly reduced the affinity for α-amylase. The binding interaction between polyphenols and α-amylase was mainly caused by hydrophobic forces.

  17. Sol-gel encapsulation of binary Zn(II) compounds in silica nanoparticles. Structure-activity correlations in hybrid materials targeting Zn(II) antibacterial use.

    PubMed

    Halevas, E; Nday, C M; Kaprara, E; Psycharis, V; Raptopoulou, C P; Jackson, G E; Litsardakis, G; Salifoglou, A

    2015-10-01

    In the emerging issue of enhanced multi-resistant properties in infectious pathogens, new nanomaterials with optimally efficient antibacterial activity and lower toxicity than other species attract considerable research interest. In an effort to develop such efficient antibacterials, we a) synthesized acid-catalyzed silica-gel matrices, b) evaluated the suitability of these matrices as potential carrier materials for controlled release of ZnSO4 and a new Zn(II) binary complex with a suitably designed well-defined Schiff base, and c) investigated structural and textural properties of the nanomaterials. Physicochemical characterization of the (empty-loaded) silica-nanoparticles led to an optimized material configuration linked to the delivery of the encapsulated antibacterial zinc load. Entrapment and drug release studies showed the competence of hybrid nanoparticles with respect to the a) zinc loading capacity, b) congruence with zinc physicochemical attributes, and c) release profile of their zinc load. The material antimicrobial properties were demonstrated against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus) and negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Xanthomonas campestris) bacteria using modified agar diffusion methods. ZnSO4 showed less extensive antimicrobial behavior compared to Zn(II)-Schiff, implying that the Zn(II)-bound ligand enhances zinc antimicrobial properties. All zinc-loaded nanoparticles were less antimicrobially active than zinc compounds alone, as encapsulation controls their release, thereby attenuating their antimicrobial activity. To this end, as the amount of loaded zinc increases, the antimicrobial behavior of the nano-agent improves. Collectively, for the first time, sol-gel zinc-loaded silica-nanoparticles were shown to exhibit well-defined antimicrobial activity, justifying due attention to further development of antibacterial nanotechnology.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of VO(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based azo-linked Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, C.; Sheela, C. D.; Tharmaraj, P.; Johnson Raja, S.

    2012-12-01

    Azo-Schiff-base complexes of VO(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, mass spectra, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurement, electron spin resonance (EPR), CV, fluorescence, NLO and SEM. The conductance data indicate the nonelectrolytic nature of the complexes, except VO(II) complex which is electrolytic in nature. On the basis of electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility octahedral geometry has been proposed for the complexes. The EPR spectra of copper and oxovanadium complexes in DMSO at 300 and 77 K were recorded and its salient features are reported. The redox behavior of the copper(II) complex was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica typhi, Bacillus subtilis and Candida strains was studied and compared with that of free ligand by well-diffusion technique. The azo Schiff base exhibited fluorescence properties originating from intraligand (π-π∗) transitions and metal-mediated enhancement is observed on complexation and so the synthesized complexes can serve as potential photoactive materials as indicated from their characteristic fluorescence properties. On the basis of the optimized structures, the second-order nonlinear optical properties (NLO) are calculated by using second-harmonic generation (SHG) and also the surface morphology of the complexes was studied by SEM.

  19. Relationship between Ni(II) and Zn(II) Coordination and Nucleotide Binding by the Helicobacter pylori [NiFe]-Hydrogenase and Urease Maturation Factor HypB*

    PubMed Central

    Sydor, Andrew M.; Lebrette, Hugo; Ariyakumaran, Rishikesh; Cavazza, Christine; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires two nickel-containing enzymes, urease and [NiFe]-hydrogenase, for efficient colonization of the human gastric mucosa. These enzymes possess complex metallocenters that are assembled by teams of proteins in multistep pathways. One essential accessory protein is the GTPase HypB, which is required for Ni(II) delivery to [NiFe]-hydrogenase and participates in urease maturation. Ni(II) or Zn(II) binding to a site embedded in the GTPase domain of HypB modulates the enzymatic activity, suggesting a mechanism of regulation. In this study, biochemical and structural analyses of H. pylori HypB (HpHypB) revealed an intricate link between nucleotide and metal binding. HpHypB nickel coordination, stoichiometry, and affinity were modulated by GTP and GDP, an effect not observed for zinc, and biochemical evidence suggests that His-107 coordination to nickel toggles on and off in a nucleotide-dependent manner. These results are consistent with the crystal structure of HpHypB loaded with Ni(II), GDP, and Pi, which reveals a nickel site distinct from that of zinc-loaded Methanocaldococcus jannaschii HypB as well as subtle changes to the protein structure. Furthermore, Cys-142, a metal ligand from the Switch II GTPase motif, was identified as a key component of the signal transduction between metal binding and the enzymatic activity. Finally, potassium accelerated the enzymatic activity of HpHypB but had no effect on the other biochemical properties of the protein. Altogether, this molecular level information about HpHypB provides insight into its cellular function and illuminates a possible mechanism of metal ion discrimination. PMID:24338018

  20. Syntheses, crystal structures and DNA-binding studies of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes bearing asymmetrical aroylhydrazone ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yueqin; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Minya; He, Jing; Wang, Xuehong; Wu, Yanlong; Wang, Zhuye

    2017-02-01

    Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes with benzophenone benzoyl hydrazone (HBBH) and benzophenone salicylylhydrazone (HBSH) have been synthesized and characterized by different physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques (UV-vis, IR and NMR). The molecular structures of these complexes [Zn(BBH)2, Cu(BBH)2 and Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O] have also been determined by single X-ray diffraction technique. In Zn(BBH)2 and Cu(BBH)2 complexes, each ligand coordinates to metal through enol tautomeric form by azomethine-N and carbonylate-O resulting a 4-coordinate distorted tetrahedral geometry. While in Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O, each ligand coordinates to metal through keto tautomeric form resulting distorted octahedral geometry in which two chlorine atoms occupy the axial positions. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with Herring sperm DNA, studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, viscometric techniques and cyclic voltammetry, revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O was found to exhibit greater binding strength than the others. A strong hyperchromism effect and a slight red shift were exhibited by all complexes. The intrinsic binding constants are of moderate values and are about 3.28 × 104 M-1, 4.73 × 104 M-1 and 5.80 × 104 M-1, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry studies of the complexes binding with DNA indicate quasireversible oxidation and reduction potentials. The results suggest that the binding affinity of complexes lies in the order Cu(BSH)2Cl2H2O > Cu(BBH)2 > Zn(BBH)2.

  1. Enhanced removal of ethylbenzene from gas streams in biotrickling filters by Tween-20 and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yang, Chunping; Cheng, Yan; Huang, Jian; Yang, Haining; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li; He, Shanying

    2014-12-01

    The effects of Tween-20 and Zn(II) on ethylbenzene removal were evaluated using two biotrickling filters (BTFs), BTF1 and BTF2. Only BTF1 was fed with Tween-20 and Zn(II). Results show that ethylbenzene removal decreased from 94% to 69% for BTF1 and from 74% to 54% for BTF2 with increased organic loading from 64.8 to 189.0 g ethylbenzene/(m³·hr) at EBRT of 40 sec. The effect of EBRT (60-15 sec) at a constant ethylbenzene inlet concentration was more significant than that of EBRT (30-10 sec) at a constant organic loading. Biomass accumulation rate within packing media was reduced significantly.

  2. The frontline antibiotic vancomycin induces a zinc starvation response in bacteria by binding to Zn(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zarkan, Ashraf; Macklyne, Heather-Rose; Truman, Andrew W.; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin is a front-line antibiotic used for the treatment of nosocomial infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite its clinical importance the global effects of vancomycin exposure on bacterial physiology are poorly understood. In a previous transcriptomic analysis we identified a number of Zur regulon genes which were highly but transiently up-regulated by vancomycin in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we show that vancomycin also induces similar zinc homeostasis systems in a range of other bacteria and demonstrate that vancomycin binds to Zn(II) in vitro. This implies that vancomycin treatment sequesters zinc from bacterial cells thereby triggering a Zur-dependent zinc starvation response. The Kd value of the binding between vancomycin and Zn(II) was calculated using a novel fluorometric assay, and NMR was used to identify the binding site. These findings highlight a new biologically relevant aspect of the chemical property of vancomycin as a zinc chelator. PMID:26797186

  3. Adsorption and desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) on Ca- alginate immobilized activated rice bran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kamalia, N. Z.; Kusumawati, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran has been used for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of the pH, kinetics model, adsorption isotherm and desorption on the adsorption performance was investigated. Activated rice bran was immobilized by the entrapment in alginate beads. The adsorption strength of Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran was compared to Ca-alginate and non-immobilized activated rice bran. The concentrations of adsorbed ions were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The result showed that pH of 4.0 and the contact time of 120 min are the optimum condition for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II). The adsorption kinetic of Zn(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model with adsorption rate constant 4.9 x 10-2 and 3.14 g.mg-1.min-1, respectively. The both adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm with adsorption capacity of 2.03 and 2.42 mg.g-1 of adsorbent, respectively. The strength of Zn adsorption on Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran (86.63%) was more effective compared to Ca-alginate beads (60.96%) and activated rice bran (43.85%). The strength of Cu adsorption was 80.00%, 61.50% and 22.10%, respectively. The desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) showed that recovery percentage of the adsorption was 76.56% and 57.80% with the condition of using HCl 0.1 M as desorption agent for 1 hour.

  4. A tetrahedron in a cube: a dodecanuclear Zn(II) benzoate cluster from the use of 2-pyridinealdoxime.

    PubMed

    Konidaris, Konstantis F; Katsoulakou, Eugenia; Kaplanis, Michalis; Bekiari, Vlasoula; Terzis, Aris; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Manessi-Zoupa, Evy; Perlepes, Spyros P

    2010-05-21

    The reactions of 2-pyridinealdoxime with Zn(O(2)CPh)(2)·2H(2)O have led to a mononuclear complex and a dodecanuclear cluster; the Zn(12) compound, whose metallic skeleton describes a tetrahedron encapsulated in a distorted cube, is the biggest Zn(II) oxime cluster discovered to date and displays photoluminescence with a maximum at 354 nm upon maximum excitation at 314 nm.

  5. Adsorptive removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mohd F.; Ibrahim, Muhammad H. C.; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Chong, F. K.

    2012-09-01

    The study of rice husk-based activated carbon as a potential low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution was investigated. Rice husk, an agricultural waste, is a good alternative source for cheap precursor of activated carbon due to its abundance and constant availability. In this work, rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via chemical treatment using NaOH as an activation agent prior the carbonization process. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon carbonized at 650°C, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). Other analyses were also conducted on these samples using fourier transmitter infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), CHN elemental analyzer and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for characterization study. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were found to be 255 m2/g and 0.17 cm2/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution were carried out as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of Zn(II) ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution.

  6. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  7. Differential Binding of Co(II) and Zn(II) to Metallo-beta-Lactamase Bla2 from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, M.; Breece, R; Hajdin, C; Bender, K; Hu, Z; Costello, A; Bennett, B; Tierney, D; Crowder, M

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to probe the structure, mechanism, and biochemical properties of metallo-{beta}-lactamase Bla2 from Bacillus anthracis, the enzyme was overexpressed, purified, and characterized. Metal analyses demonstrated that recombinant Bla2 tightly binds 1 equiv of Zn(II). Steady-state kinetic studies showed that mono-Zn(II) Bla2 (1Zn-Bla2) is active, while di-Zn(II) Bla2 (ZnZn-Bla2) was unstable. Catalytically, 1Zn-Bla2 behaves like the related enzymes CcrA and L1. In contrast, di-Co(II) Bla2 (CoCo-Bla2) is substantially more active than the mono-Co(II) analogue. Rapid kinetics and UV-vis, 1H NMR, EPR, and EXAFS spectroscopic studies show that Co(II) binding to Bla2 is distributed, while EXAFS shows that Zn(II) binding is sequential. To our knowledge, this is the first documented example of a Zn enzyme that binds Co(II) and Zn(II) via distinct mechanisms, underscoring the need to demonstrate transferability when extrapolating results on Co(II)-substituted proteins to the native Zn(II)-containing forms.

  8. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  9. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; Hargrove, Paul; Roman, Eric

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core maps and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.

  10. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    DOE PAGES

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; ...

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core mapsmore » and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.« less

  11. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF INORGANIC RADICALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    energy in the latter compound is 110 kcals/mole, distinctly higher than in ammonia. Cyanogen (CN)2 and hydrocyanic acid (HCN) yield values for the...ions very readily, and the electron affinity is 49 kcals/mole. A comparison with the results from thiocyanic acid (HNCS) indicates that the H-N bond

  12. Fluorescence Analysis of Sulfonamide Binding to Carbonic Anhydrase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sheila C.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2006-01-01

    A practical laboratory experiment is described that illustrates the application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer to the study of protein-ligand binding. The affinities of wild-type and mutant human carbonic anhydrase II for dansylamide were determined by monitoring the increase in ligand fluorescence that occurs due to energy transfer…

  13. Interaction with biomacromolecules and antiproliferative activities of Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) complexes of demethylcantharate and 2,2'-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Lin, Qiu-Yue; Hu, Wan-Li; Song, Wen-Ji; Shen, Shu-Ting; Gui, Pan

    2013-06-01

    Three new transition metal complexes [Mn2(DCA)2(bipy)2]·5H2O (1), [M2(DCA)2(bipy)2(H2O)]·10H2O(M = Ni(II)(2);Zn(II)(3)), (DCA = demethylcantharate, 7-oxabicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2,3-dicarboxylate, C8H8O5) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, infrared spectra and X-ray diffraction techniques. Each metal ion was six-coordinated in complexes. Complex 1 has a Mn2O2 center. Complexes 2 and 3 have asymmetric binuclear structure. Great amount of intermolecular hydrogen-bonding and π-π* stacking interactions were formed in these complex structures. The DNA-binding properties of complexes were investigated by electronic absorption spectra and viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants Kb/(L mol-1) were 1.71 × 104 (1), 2.62 × 104 (2) and 1.59 × 104 (3) at 298 K. The complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) strongly through static quenching. The protein binding constants Ka/(L mol-1) were 7.27 × 104 (1), 4.55 × 104 (2) and 7.87 × 104 L mol-1 (3) and binding site was one. The complexes bind more tightly with DNA and BSA than with ligands. Complexes 1 and 3 had stronger inhibition ratios than Na2(DCA) against human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) lines and human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3) lines in vitro. Complex 3 showed the strongest antiproliferative activity against SMMC-7721 (IC50 = 29.46 ± 2.12 μmol L-1) and MGC80-3 (IC50 = 27.02 ± 2.38 μmol L-1), which shows potential in anti-cancer drug development.

  14. Comparative Study on the Efficiency of the Photodynamic Inactivation of Candida albicans Using CdTe Quantum Dots, Zn(II) Porphyrin and Their Conjugates as Photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Viana, Osnir S; Ribeiro, Martha S; Rodas, Andréa C D; Rebouças, Júlio S; Fontes, Adriana; Santos, Beate S

    2015-05-18

    The application of fluorescent II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as active photosensitizers in photodymanic inactivation (PDI) is still being evaluated. In the present study, we prepared 3 nm size CdTe QDs coated with mercaptosuccinic acid and conjugated them electrostatically with Zn(II) meso-tetrakis (N-ethyl-2-pyridinium-2-yl) porphyrin (ZnTE-2-PyP or ZnP), thus producing QDs-ZnP conjugates. We evaluated the capability of the systems, bare QDs and conjugates, to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and applied them in photodynamic inactivation in cultures of Candida albicans by irradiating the QDs and testing the hypothesis of a possible combined contribution of the PDI action. Tests of in vitro cytotoxicity and phototoxicity in fibroblasts were also performed in the presence and absence of light irradiation. The overall results showed an efficient ROS production for all tested systems and a low cytotoxicity (cell viability >90%) in the absence of radiation. Fibroblasts incubated with the QDs-ZnP and subjected to irradiation showed a higher cytotoxicity (cell viability <90%) depending on QD concentration compared to the bare groups. The PDI effects of bare CdTe QD on Candida albicans demonstrated a lower reduction of the cell viability (~1 log10) compared to bare ZnP which showed a high microbicidal activity (~3 log10) when photoactivated. The QD-ZnP conjugates also showed reduced photodynamic activity against C. albicans compared to bare ZnP and we suggest that the conjugation with QDs prevents the transmembrane cellular uptake of the ZnP molecules, reducing their photoactivity.

  15. Synthesis and luminescence properties of polymeric complexes of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Al(III) with 8-hydroxyquinoline side group-containing polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Baojiao; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Yanyan

    2013-01-01

    Three kinds of metalloquinolate-containing polystyrene were prepared via a polymer reaction and a coordination reaction. 5-Chloromethyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (CHQ) was first prepared through the chloromethylation reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) with 1,4-bichloromethoxy-butane as chloromethylation reagent. A polymer reaction, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction, was carried out between polystyrene (PS) and CHQ in the presence of Lewis catalyst, and HQ was bonded onto the side chains of PS, obtaining 8-hydroxyquinoline-functionalized Polystyrene, HQ-PS. And then, by using one-pot method with two-stage procedures, the coordination reaction of HQ-PS and small molecule HQ with metal ions including Al(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions, was allowed to be carried out, and three polymeric metalloquinolates, AlQ3-PS, ZnQ2-PS and CuQ2-PS, were successfully prepared, respectively. In the chemical structures of these polymeric metalloquinolates, metalloquinolates were chemically attached onto the side chains of PS. HQ-PS and three polymeric metalloquinolates were fully characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR and TGA. The luminescence properties of the three polymeric metalloquinolates were mainly investigated by UV/Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra in solutions and in solid film states. When excited by the ray at about 365 nm, the three polymeric metalloquinolates have blue-green luminescence, and the main emission peaks in the DMF solutions are located at 490, 482 and 502 nm for AlQ3-PS, ZnQ2-PS and CuQ2-PS, respectively. As compared with their emissions in solutions, the emissions in solid film states are red-shifted to some extent, and the main emission peaks are located at 500, 488 and 510 nm for AlQ3-PS, ZnQ2-PS and CuQ2-PS, respectively. Besides, these polymeric metalloquinolates have higher thermal stability than PS as polymeric skeleton.

  16. Bioinspired fluorescent dipeptide nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and real-time monitoring of drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    Peptide nanostructures are biodegradable and are suitable for many biomedical applications. However, to be useful imaging probes, the limited intrinsic optical properties of peptides must be overcome. Here we show the formation of tryptophan-phenylalanine dipeptide nanoparticles (DNPs) that can shift the peptide's intrinsic fluorescent signal from the ultraviolet to the visible range. The visible emission signal allows the DNPs to act as imaging and sensing probes. The peptide design is inspired by the red shift seen in the yellow fluorescent protein that results from π-π stacking and by the enhanced fluorescence intensity seen in the green fluorescent protein mutant, BFPms1, which results from the structure rigidification by Zn(II). We show that DNPs are photostable, biocompatible and have a narrow emission bandwidth and visible fluorescence properties. DNPs functionalized with the MUC1 aptamer and doxorubicin can target cancer cells and can be used to image and monitor drug release in real time.

  17. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  18. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  19. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago.

  20. Synthesis and spectral characterization of Zn(II) microsphere series for antimicrobial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay K.; Pandey, Sarvesh K.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    Microsphere series have been synthesized by reacting zinc(II) acetate dihydrate with Schiff bases derived from 2-hydrazino-5-[substituted phenyl]-1,3,4-thiadiazole/oxadiazole/triazole with salicylaldehyde. Elemental analysis suggests that the complexes have 1:2 and 1:1 stoichiometry of the type [Zn(L)2(H2O)2] and [Zn(L‧)(H2O)2]; LH = Schiff bases derived from 2-hydrazino-5-[substituted phenyl]-1,3,4-thia/oxadiazole with salicylaldehyde; L‧H2 = Schiff bases derived from 3-(substituted phenyl)-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1,2,4-triazole and salicylaldehyde and were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral data. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that synthesized materials have microsphere like structure and there EDX analysis comparably matches with elemental analysis. For the antimicrobial application Schiff bases and their zinc(II) complexes were screened for four bacteria e.g. Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus pyogenes and four fungi e.g. Cyrtomium falcatum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium and Curvularia pallescence by the reported method. Schiff base and Zn(II) compounds showed significant antimicrobial activities. However, activities increase upon chelation. Thermal analysis (TGA) data of compound (10) showed its stability up to 300 °C.

  1. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  2. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  3. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  4. Fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  5. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  6. PDZ affinity chromatography: a general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2014-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ∼90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins.

  7. Biosorption of Cr(VI) and Zn(II) ions from aqueous solution onto the solid biodiesel waste residue: mechanistic, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Shanmugaprakash; Venkatachalam, Sivakumar; Jeevamani, Prasana Manikanda Kartick; Rajarathinam, Nandusha

    2014-01-01

    In this present study, the biosorption of Cr(VI) and Zn(II) ions from synthetic aqueous solution on defatted J atropha oil cake (DJOC) was investigated. The effect of various process parameters such as the initial pH, adsorbent dosage, initial metal ion concentration and contact time has been studied in batch-stirred experiments. Maximum removal of Cr(VI) and Zn(II) ions in aqueous solution was observed at pH 2.0 and pH. 5.0, respectively. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) and Zn(II) ions from the aqueous solution was found to be 72.56 and 79.81%, respectively, for initial metal ion concentration of 500 mg/L at 6 g/L dosage concentration. The biosorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy and zero point charge. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models and the best fit is found to be with the Freundlich isotherm for both Cr(VI) and Zn(II) metal ions. The kinetic data obtained at different metal ion concentration have been analysed using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models and were found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The values of mass transfer diffusion coefficients (De) were determined by Boyd model and compared with literature values. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°, were analysed using the equilibrium constant values (Ke) obtained from experimental data at different temperatures. The results showed that biosorption of Cr(VI) and Zn(II) ions onto the DJOC system is more spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The results indicate that DJOC was shown to be a promising adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) and Zn(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  8. Specific light exposure of galactosylated Zn(II) phthalocyanines for selective PDT effects on breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, V. N.; Kril, A.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved non-invasive and curative procedure for different oncological and non-oncological applications. PDT is still under development due to several limitations which lead to partially successful photodynamic response. The crucial steps in PDT procedure are binding of the photosensitizer to outer cell membrane, its penetration and subcellular localization which envisage the target sites of reactive oxygen species generated during irradiation. Since the surrounding normal cells are also exposed to the photosensitizer and the ambient daylight can be harmful for healthy tissues after therapeutic light application, the challenging task in PDT research is to optimize the procedure in a way to reach tumor cell selectivity. The present study outlines the influence of a light exposure pre-treatment (prior therapeutic light) with specific wavelengths (365 nm and 635 nm) on the uptake, the localization and further re-localization of galactose-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanines into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The in vitro photodynamic effect towards tumor cells was studied in comparison to the normal cell line Balb/c 3T3 (clone 31) after pre-irradiation with UV light (365 nm) and red LED (635 nm). The results suggest that the galactose functional groups of Zn(II) phthalocyanine and the harmless UV light at 365 nm favor the selective PDT response.

  9. A Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein regulates the sirodesmin PL biosynthetic gene cluster in Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen M.; Gardiner, Donald M.; Keller, Nancy P.; Howlett, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    A gene, sirZ, encoding a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein is present in a cluster of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) toxin, sirodesmin PL in the ascomycete plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. RNA-mediated silencing of sirZ gives rise to transformants that produce only residual amounts of sirodesmin PL and display a decrease in the transcription of several sirodesmin PL biosynthetic genes. This indicates that SirZ is a major regulator of this gene cluster. Proteins similar to SirZ are encoded in the gliotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster of Aspergillus fumigatus (gliZ) and in an ETP-like cluster in Penicillium lilacinoechinulatum (PlgliZ). Despite its high level of sequence similarity to gliZ, PlgliZ is unable to complement the gliotoxin-deficiency of a mutant of gliZ in A. fumigatus. Putative binding sites for these regulatory proteins in the promoters of genes in these clusters were predicted using bioinformatic analysis. These sites are similar to those commonly bound by other proteins with Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding domains. PMID:18023597

  10. Quantum-chemical, NMR, FT IR, and ESI MS studies of complexes of colchicine with Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Wojciech; Kurek, Joanna; Barczyński, Piotr; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Colchicine is a tropolone alkaloid from Colchicinum autumnale. It shows antifibrotic, antimitotic, and anti-inflammatory activities, and is used to treat gout and Mediterranean fever. In this work, complexes of colchicine with zinc(II) nitrate were synthesized and investigated using DFT, (1)H and (13)C NMR, FT IR, and ESI MS. The counterpoise-corrected and uncorrected interaction energies of these complexes were calculated. We also calculated their (1)H, (13)C NMR, and IR spectra and compared them with the corresponding experimentally obtained data. According to the ESI MS mass spectra, colchicine forms stable complexes with zinc(II) nitrate that have various stoichiometries: 2:1, 1:1:1, and 2:1:1 with respect to colchichine, Zn(II), and nitrate ion. All of the complexes were investigated using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The calculated and the measured spectra showed differences before and after the complexation process. Calculated electron densities and bond critical points indicated the presence of bonds between the ligands and the central cation in the investigated complexes that satisfied the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Graphical Abstract DFT, NMR, FT IR, ESI MS, QTAIM and puckering studies of complexes of colchicine with Zn(II).

  11. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank-p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n-dimensions is bounded by (n + 1)!/p!(n − p)!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes. PMID:26858463

  13. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, Kenneth Sherman

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  14. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikal, Ahmed A.; Webb, Watt W.

    2002-11-01

    The inherent advantages of nonlinear excitation make multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) awell-suited imaging technique for extracting valuable information from turbid and thick biological samples. These advantages include high three-dimensional spatial resolution, large penetration depth, minimum out-of-focus cellular photodamage, and high signal-to-noise contrast. We have investigated the nonlinear spectroscopy of biologically important molecules such as NADH, flavins, and intrinsically fluorescent proteins. Fundamental understanding of the molecular spectroscopy and dynamics of these biomolecules is essential for advancing their applications in biological research. MPFM has been utilized for monitoring a large spectrum of biological processes including metabolic activity and exocytosis. We will discuss two-photon (2P) redox fluorescence microscopy of NADH, which gives a quantitative measure of the respiratory chain activity, thus allowing functional imaging of energy metabolism in neurons and native brain tissue. Finally, a rational design strategy, based on donor-acceptor-donor configuration, will be elucidated for fluorescent probes with large 2P-excitation cross-section. These dyes are water-soluble, yet possess a high affinity to organic phases with site-specific labeling and Ca+2 sensitivity (Kd ~ 350 nM). A brief account on the biological application of nanocrystals and second harmonic imaging will be reviewed.

  15. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  16. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  17. Syntheses, structures, luminescent and photocatalytic properties of two Zn(II) coordination polymers assembled with mixed bridging N-donors and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,5-imidazole dicarboxylic acid ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Hao, Xiang-Rong; Zhan, Pei-Ying; Su, Zhong-Min

    2017-04-01

    Two new Zn(II) coordination polymers with the formulas of {[Zn3(HCpIDC)2(4,4‧-bipy)(H2O)]·4H2O}n (1) and {[Zn2(CpIDC)(BIMB)]·H2O}n (2) [H4CpIDC = 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,5-imidazole dicarboxylic acid, 4,4‧-bipy = 4,4‧-bipyridine, and BIMB = 1,4-bis(1-imidazolyl)benzene] have been successfully synthesized. Both complexes 1 and 2 feature 3D frameworks in which the IDC groups of HCpIDC3- and CpIDC4- ligands link metal nodes leading to infinite 21 helical chains. The HCpIDC3- and CpIDC4- anions exhibit two coordination modes (μ4-kN,O: kN‧,O‧: kO″,O‴: kO″″ and μ5-kN,O: kN‧,O‧: kO″,O‴: kO″″: kO) in different coordination environments. Further structural analyses show that 1 and 2 are topologically bimodal 4-connected net and trinodal (3,4,6)-connected net, respectively. As is expected, two complexes with good thermal stability displayed strong fluorescence emissions in the solid state at the room temperature. Moreover, complex 1 has some extent of photocatalytic activities for RhB.

  18. Co-sequestration of Zn(II) and phosphate by γ-Al2O3: From macroscopic to microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuemei; Tan, Xiaoli; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-30

    Little information is available concerning co-sorbing oxyanion and metal contaminants in the environment, yet in most metal-contaminated areas, co-contamination by phosphate is common. In this study, the mutual effects of phosphate and Zn(II) on their interaction with γ-Al2O3 are investigated by batch experiments and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique. The results show that the co-sorption of phosphate on γ-Al2O3 modifies both the extent of Zn(II) sorption and the local atomic structures of sorbed Zn(II) ions. Multiple mechanisms are involved in Zn(II) retention in the presence of phosphate, including electrostatic interaction, binary and ternary surface complexation, and the formation of Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes. At pH 6.5, type III ternary surface complexation occurs concurrently with binary Zn-alumina surface complexation at low phosphate concentrations, whereas the formation of type III ternary surface complexes is promoted as the phosphate concentration increases. With further increasing phosphate concentration, Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes are formed. At pH 8.0, Zn dominantly forms type III ternary surface complexes in the presence of phosphate. The results of this study indicate the variability of Zn complexation on oxide surface and the importance of combining macroscopic observations with XAFS capable of determining metal complex formation mechanism for ternary system.

  19. Improving the separation of Cu(II) from Zn(II) based on an anion exchanger for the preparation a 62Zn/62Cu generator.

    PubMed

    El-Azony, K M

    2011-09-01

    A separation procedure of (64,67)Cu(II) from (65)Zn(II) was studied for serving (62)Zn/(62)Cu generator preparation. The distribution coefficients of (65)Zn(II) and (64,67)Cu(II) ions from homogeneous medium of hydrochloric acid and acetone onto De-Acidite FF anion exchanger were investigated. Both hydrochloric acid and acetone concentrations are important factors that affect the separation process. Effects of decreasing the HCl concentration from 0.2 to 0.04 M, increasing the acetone concentration from 5% to 80% and different acetone concentrations (5-97%) in 0.2M HCl were also studied on the separation of (64,67)Cu(II) from (65)Zn(II). The exchange capacity of Zn(II) on the De-Acidite FF matrix was obtained as 3.8 meq/g and the(64,67)Cu(II) elution efficiency was 92.5% using 20 ml of 0.2M HCl-60% acetone with flow rate of 2 ml/min.The radionuclidic purity and radiochemical purity of the eluted (64,67)Cu(II) were examined.

  20. Supramolecular architectures in luminescent Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes containing imidazole derivatives: Crystal structures, vibrational and thermal properties, Hirshfeld surface analysis and electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Santo, Alejandro; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Piro, Oscar E.; Pérez, Hiram; Ben Altabef, Aida; Gil, Diego M.

    2017-04-01

    Three novel zinc and cadmium complexes with 1-methylimidazole and 2-methylimidazole as ligands, mono-nuclear dichloro-bis(1-methylimidazole) zinc(II) and dibromo-bis(2-methylimidazole)cadmium(II) monohydrate complexes, and poly-nuclear bis(1-methylimidazole)-di-(μ2-bromo)cadmium(II) complex, namely, compounds 1-3, respectively, have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopies, thermal analysis and fluorescence. All the compounds exhibit interesting luminescent properties in solid state originated from intra-ligand (π→π*) transitions. Crystal structures of 1-3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in P21/n space group, the Zn(II) ion lies at a crystal general position in a tetrahedral environment, and the mono-nuclear units are weakly bonded to one another by Csbnd H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 crystallizes in Pnma space group, and mirror-related tetrahedral units around Cd(II) ion are H-bonded through a water molecule. Compound 3 crystallizes in P21/c space group, and the Cd(II) ion presents a centrosymmetric octahedral coordination. Neighboring and equatorial edge-sharing octahedra conform a polymeric arrangement that extends along the crystal a-axis. Weak hydrogen bonds are the major driving forces in the crystal packing of the three complexes. Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals a detailed scrutiny of intermolecular interactions experienced by each complex. The surfaces mapped over dnorm property highlight the X···H (X = Cl, Br) as the main intermolecular contacts for the three complexes, being also relevant the presence of O⋯H contacts for complex 2. The surfaces mapped over Shape index and curvedness properties for the two Cd complexes allow identify π … π stacking interactions which are absent in the Zn complex. 2D fingerprint plots have been used to quantify the relative contribution of the intermolecular contacts to crystal stability of compounds, showing

  1. A simple, high-resolution method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Fink, B E; Brunette, S R; Tse, W C; Hedrick, M P

    2001-06-27

    Full details of the development of a simple, nondestructive, and high-throughput method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are described. The method is based on the loss of fluorescence derived from the displacement of ethidium bromide or thiazole orange from the DNA of interest or, in selected instances, the change in intrinsic fluorescence of a DNA binding agent itself and is applicable for assessing relative or absolute DNA binding affinities. Enlisting a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all five base pair (512 hairpins) or four base pair (136 hairpins) sequences displayed in a 96-well format, a compound's rank order binding to all possible sequences is generated, resulting in a high-resolution definition of its sequence selectivity using this fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay. As such, the technique complements the use of footprinting or affinity cleavage for the establishment of DNA binding selectivity and provides the information at a higher resolution. The merged bar graphs generated by this rank order binding provide a qualitative way to compare, or profile, DNA binding affinity and selectivity. The 96-well format assay (512 hairpins) can be conducted at a minimal cost (presently ca. $100 for hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides/assay with ethiduim bromide or less with thiazole orange), with a rapid readout using a fluorescent plate reader (15 min), and is adaptable to automation (Tecan Genesis Workstation 100 robotic system). Its use in generating a profile of DNA binding selectivity for several agents including distamycin A, netropsin, DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and berenil is described. Techniques for establishing binding constants from quantitative titrations are compared, and recommendations are made for use of a Scatchard or curve fitting analysis of the titration binding curves as a reliable means to quantitate the binding affinity.

  2. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  3. Simultaneous Stripping Detection of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) Using a Bimetallic Hg-Bi/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Composite Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Ruizhuo; Zhu, Zhenqian; Tatum, Clarissa E.; Chambers, James Q.; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2011-01-01

    A new, sensitive platform for the simultaneous electrochemical assay of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution has been developed. The platform is based on a new bimetallic Hg-Bi/single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) composite modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), demonstrating remarkably improved performance for the anodic stripping assay of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II). The synergistic effect of Hg and Bi as well as the enlarged, activated surface and good electrical conductivity of SWNTs on GCE contribute to the enhanced activity of the proposed electrode. The analytical curves for Zn(II), Cd(II) an Pb(II) cover two linear ranges varying from 0.5 to 11 μg L-1 and 10 to 130 μg L-1 with correlation coefficients higher than 0.992. The limits of detection for Zn(II), Cd(II) are lower than 2 μg L-1 (S/N = 3). For Pb(II), moreover, there is another lower, linear range from 5 to 1100 ng L-1 with a coefficient of 0.987 and a detection limit of 0.12 ng L-1. By using the standard addition method, Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in river samples were successfully determined. These results suggest that the proposed method can be applied as a simple, efficient alternative for the simultaneous monitoring of heavy metals in water samples. In addition, this method demonstrates the powerful application of carbon nanotubes in electrochemical analysis of heavy metals. PMID:21660117

  4. An Optical Biosensor from Green Fluorescent Escherichia coli for the Evaluation of Single and Combined Heavy Metal Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Asmat; Surif, Salmijah; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence-based fiber optic toxicity biosensor based on genetically modified Escherichia coli (E. coli) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was developed for the evaluation of the toxicity of several hazardous heavy metal ions. The toxic metals include Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III). The optimum fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths of the optical biosensor were 400 ± 2 nm and 485 ± 2 nm, respectively. Based on the toxicity observed under optimal conditions, the detection limits of Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III) that can be detected using the toxicity biosensor were at 0.04, 0.32, 0.46, 2.80, 100, 250, 400, 720 and 2600 μg/L, respectively. The repeatability and reproducibility of the proposed biosensor were 3.5%–4.8% RSD (relative standard deviation) and 3.6%–5.1% RSD (n = 8), respectively. The biosensor response was stable for at least five weeks, and demonstrated higher sensitivity towards metal toxicity evaluation when compared to a conventional Microtox assay. PMID:26029952

  5. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  6. Antibacterial Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) Complexes of Thiadiazoles Schiff Bases

    PubMed Central

    Jaffery, Maimoon F.; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2001-01-01

    Schiff bases were obtained by condensation of 2-amino-l,3,4-thiadiazole with 5-substituted-salicylaldehydes which were further used to obtain complexes of the type [M(L)2]Cl2, where M=Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) or Zn(II). The new compounds described here have been characterized by physical, spectral and analytical data, and have been screened for antibacterial activity against several bacterial strains such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial potency of these Schiff bases increased upon chelation/complexation, against the tested bacterial species, opening new aproaches in the fight against antibiotic resistant strains. PMID:18475981

  7. Recovery and concentration of metal ions. 4: Uphill transport of Zn(II) in a multimembrane hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Wodzki, R.; Sionkowski, G.; Pozniak, G.

    1999-02-01

    A study has been made on the uphill transport of zinc cations across a multimembrane hybrid system (MHS) composed of two ion-exchange membranes (IEM) separated by a bulk liquid membrane (BLM). The fluxes of the Zn(II)/H countertransport were investigated as dependent on the composition and structure of ion-exchange polymer membranes (i), the solvent of a liquid membrane (II), the feed and strip membrane area ratio (iii), and the pH of the feed solution (iv). The IEMs of various ionogenic groups (sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, quaternized amine) and of various structure (clustered, gelatinous, porous) were examined in the MHS containing the BLM with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier of Zn(II) cations. It has been found that the Zn(II) fluxes are dependent on the properties of both the BLM and polymer membranes, i.e., on the BLM solvent viscosity (i), the nature and concentration of the IEM ion-exchange sites (ii), and the IEM thickness (iii). The best results were obtained when using hexane as the BLM solvent and the Nafion-117 membrane (perfluorinated polymer, sulfonic acid groups) as the cation-exchange membrane (CEM). The influence of the area ratio (feed-to-strip interface) has been checked for A{sub f}/A{sub g} equal to 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. It was found that the asymmetry of the system leads mainly to some changes in the accumulation of transported species in a liquid membrane phase.

  8. Method and apparatus for detection of fluorescently labeled materials

    DOEpatents

    Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter

    2004-05-25

    Fluorescently marked targets bind to a substrate 230 synthesized with polymer sequences at known locations. The targets are detected by exposing selected regions of the substrate 230 to light from a light source 100 and detecting the photons from the light fluoresced therefrom, and repeating the steps of exposure and detection until the substrate 230 is completely examined. The resulting data can be used to determine binding affinity of the targets to specific polymer sequences.

  9. Method and apparatus for detection of fluorescently labeled materials

    DOEpatents

    Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Fluorescently marked targets bind to a substrate 230 synthesized with polymer sequences at known locations. The targets are detected by exposing selected regions of the substrate 230 to light from a light source 100 and detecting the photons from the light fluoresced therefrom, and repeating the steps of exposure and detection until the substrate 230 is completely examined. The resulting data can be used to determine binding affinity of the targets to specific polymer sequences.

  10. Focused fluorescent probe library for metal cations and biological anions.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Sang Wook; Lee, Jun-Seok; Chang, Young-Tae; Hong, Jong-In

    2013-09-09

    A focused fluorescent probe library for metal cations was developed by combining metal chelators and picolinium/quinolinium moieties as combinatorial blocks connected through a styryl group. Furthermore, metal complexes derived from metal chelators having high binding affinities for metal cations were used to construct a focused probe library for phosphorylated biomolecules. More than 250 fluorescent probes were screened for identifying an ultraselective probe for dTTP.

  11. The Cutting Edge of Affinity Electrophoresis Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is an important technique that is widely used to separate and analyze biomolecules in the fields of biology and medicine. Both quantitative and qualitative information can be gained through affinity electrophoresis. Affinity electrophoresis can be applied through a variety of strategies, such as mobility shift electrophoresis, charge shift electrophoresis or capillary affinity electrophoresis. These strategies are based on changes in the electrophoretic patterns of biological macromolecules that result from interactions or complex-formation processes that induce changes in the size or total charge of the molecules. Nucleic acid fragments can be characterized through their affinity to other molecules, for example transcriptional factor proteins. Hydrophobic membrane proteins can be identified by means of a shift in the mobility induced by a charged detergent. The various strategies have also been used in the estimation of association/disassociation constants. Some of these strategies have similarities to affinity chromatography, in that they use a probe or ligand immobilized on a supported matrix for electrophoresis. Such methods have recently contributed to profiling of major posttranslational modifications of proteins, such as glycosylation or phosphorylation. Here, we describe advances in analytical techniques involving affinity electrophoresis that have appeared during the last five years. PMID:28248262

  12. Aptamer-Based Fluorescent Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Jianfeng; Cai, Weibo; Gao, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Selected from random pools of DNA or RNA molecules through systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), aptamers can bind to target molecules with high affinity and specificity, which makes them ideal recognition elements in the development of biosensors. To date, aptamer-based biosensors have used a wide variety of detection techniques, which are briefly summarized in this article. The focus of this review is on the development of aptamer-based fluorescent biosensors, with emphasis on their design as well as properties such as sensitivity and specificity. These biosensors can be broadly divided into two categories: those using fluorescently-labeled aptamers and others that employ label-free aptamers. Within each category, they can be further divided into “signal-on” and “signal-off” sensors. A number of these aptamer-based fluorescent biosensors have shown promising results in biological samples such as urine and serum, suggesting their potential applications in biomedical research and disease diagnostics. PMID:21838688

  13. Studies on the binding affinity of anticancer drug mitoxantrone to chromatin, DNA and histone proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hajihassan, Zahra; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra

    2009-01-01

    Mitoxantrone is a potent antitumor drug, widely used in the treatment of various cancers. In the present study, we have investigated and compared the affinity of anticancer drug, mitoxantrone, to EDTA-soluble chromatin (SE-chromatin), DNA and histones employing UV/Vis, fluorescence, CD spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that the interaction of mitoxantrone with SE-chromatin proceeds into compaction/aggregation as revealed by reduction in the absorbencies at 608 and 260 nm (hypochromicity) and disappearance of both histones and DNA on the gels. Mitoxantrone interacts strongly with histone proteins in solution making structural changes in the molecule as shown by CD and fluorescence analysis. The binding isotherms demonstrate a positive cooperative binding pattern for the chromatin- mitoxantrone interaction. It is suggested higher binding affinity of mitoxantrone to chromatin compared to DNA implying that the histone proteins may play an important role in the chromatin- mitoxantrone interaction process. PMID:19284573

  14. Complex formation equilibria of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with triethylenetetramine and its mono- and di-acetyl metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nurchi, Valeria M; Crisponi, Guido; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Cooper, Garth J S

    2013-05-07

    Triethylenetetramine (TETA) dihydrochloride, or trientine, is a therapeutic molecule that has long been used as a copper-chelating agent for the second-line treatment of patients with Wilson's disease. More recently, it has also been employed as an experimental therapeutic molecule in diabetes where it improves cardiac structure in patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy and left-ventricular hypertrophy. TETA is metabolized by acetylation, which leads to the formation of two main metabolites in humans and other mammals, monoacetyl-TETA (MAT) and diacetyl-TETA (DAT). These metabolites have been identified in the plasma and urine of healthy and diabetic subjects treated with TETA, and could themselves play a role in TETA-mediated copper chelation and restoration of physiological copper regulation in diabetes. In this regard, a potentiometric and spectrophotometric study of Cu(II)-complex formation equilibria of TETA, MAT and DAT is presented here, to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the stoichiometries of the complexes formed and of their relative stability constants. A potentiometric study has also been conducted on the corresponding Zn(II) complexes, to evaluate any possible interference with TETA-mediated Cu(II) binding by this second physiological transition-metal ion, which is present in similar concentrations in human plasma and which also binds to TETA. An ESI-MS study of these systems has both confirmed the complex formation mechanisms established from the potentiometric and spectrophotometric results, and in addition provided direct information on the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in solution. These data when taken together show that the 1 : 1 complexes formed with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have different degrees of protonation. The stability of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with the three ligands, evaluated by the parameters pCu and pZn, decreases with the introduction of the acetyl groups. Nevertheless the stability of Cu(II) complexes with MAT is

  15. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  16. Zinspy Sensors with Enhanced Dynamic Range for Imaging Neuronal Cell Zinc Uptake and Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Ryu, Jubin W.; Jaworski, Jacek; Feazell, Rodney P.; Sheng, Morgan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Thiophene moieties were incorporated into previously described Zinspy (ZS) fluorescent Zn(II) sensor motifs (Nolan, E. M.; Lippard, S. J. Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 8310–8317) to provide enhanced fluorescence properties, low-micromolar dissociation constants for Zn(II), and improved Zn(II) selectivity. Halogenation of the xanthenone and benzoate moieties of the fluorescein platform systematically modulates the excitation and emission profiles, pH-dependent fluorescence, Zn(II) affinity, and Zn(II) complexation rates, offering a general strategy for tuning multiple properties of xanthenone-based metal ion sensors. Extensive biological studies in cultured cells and primary neuronal cultures demonstrate 2-{6-hydroxy-3-oxo-4,5-bis[(pyridin-2-ylmethylthiophen-2-ylmethylamino)methyl]-3H-xanthen-9-yl}benzoic acid (ZS5) to be a versatile imaging tool for detecting Zn(II) in vivo. ZS5 localizes to the mitochondria of HeLa cells and allows visualization of glutamate-mediated Zn(II) uptake in dendrites and Zn(II) release resulting from nitrosative stress in neurons. PMID:17132019

  17. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  18. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  19. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  20. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  1. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  2. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements monitor the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to study ...

  3. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ALDH2 catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Magnesium ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements have monitored the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to elucidate the extent of...

  4. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  5. In Silico Analysis for Transcription Factors With Zn(II)2C6 Binuclear Cluster DNA-Binding Domains in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Sergi; Moreno, Inmaculada; Nieto, Almudena; Gómez, Micaela; Sentandreu, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    A total of 6047 open reading frames in the Candida albicans genome were screened for Zn(II)2C6-type zinc cluster proteins (or binuclear cluster proteins) involved in DNA recognition. These fungal proteins are transcription regulators of genes involved in a wide range of cellular processes, including metabolism of different compounds such as sugars or amino acids, as well as multi-drug resistance, control of meiosis, cell wall architecture, etc. The selection criteria used in the sequence analysis were the presence of the CysX2CysX6CysX5-16CysX2CysX6-8Cys motif and a putative nuclear localization signal. Using this approach, 70 putative Zn(II)2C6 transcription factors have been found in the genome of C. albicans. PMID:18629206

  6. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mureau, Natacha; Mendoza, Ernest; Silva, S Ravi P

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under dielectrophoretic conditions and demonstrate their collection with fluorescence microscopy. SWCNTs are dispersed in water with the aid of a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, and labeled through noncovalent binding with the dye 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diOC(6)). The chromophore's affinity to the SWCNTs is due to pi-stacking interactions. Carbon nanotube (CNT) localization is clearly identified on the fluorescence images, showing that the nanotubes concentrate between the electrodes and align along the electric field lines.

  7. Subcomponent self-assembly of a 4 nm M4 L6 tetrahedron with Zn(II) vertices and perylene bisimide dye edges.

    PubMed

    Frischmann, Peter D; Kunz, Valentin; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Würthner, Frank

    2015-02-09

    Formation of a tetrahedron with >4 nm perylene bisimide (PBI) dye edges and Zn(II) vertices in a one-pot 22 component self-assembly reaction is reported. The luminescent polyhedron equilibrates to a Zn2 L3 helicate and disassembles upon dilution. Insights into the subcomponent self-assembly of extended PBI ligands help to refine design rules for constructing large photofunctional metallosupramolecular hosts.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  9. Sensitive electrochemical sensor using a graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite for simultaneous detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Ruecha, Nipapan; Rodthongkum, Nadnudda; Cate, David M; Volckens, John; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S

    2015-05-18

    This work describes the development of an electrochemical sensor for simultaneous detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) using a graphene-polyaniline (G/PANI) nanocomposite electrode prepared by reverse-phase polymerization in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Two substrate materials (plastic film and filter paper) and two nanocomposite deposition methods (drop-casting and electrospraying) were investigated. Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry currents were higher for plastic vs. paper substrates. Performance of the G/PANI nanocomposites was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The G/PANI-modified electrode exhibited high electrochemical conductivity, producing a three-fold increase in anodic peak current (vs. the unmodified electrode). The G/PANI-modified electrode also showed evidence of increased surface area under SEM. Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry was used to measure Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) in the presence of Bi(III). A linear working range of 1-300 μg L(-1) was established between anodic current and metal ion concentration with detection limits (S/N=3) of 1.0 μg L(-1) for Zn(II), and 0.1 μg L(-1) for both Cd(II) and Pb(II). The G/PANI-modified electrode allowed selective determination of the target metals in the presence of common metal interferences including Mn(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(II). Repeat assays on the same device demonstrated good reproducibility (%RSD<11) over 10 serial runs. Finally, this system was utilized for determining Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) in human serum using the standard addition method.

  10. Spectral and thermodynamic properties of Ag(I), Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), U(IV), and Zn(II) binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong W; Do, Young S; Zea, Corbin J; McEllistrem, Marcus T; Lee, Sung-W; Semrau, Jeremy D; Pohl, Nicola L; Kisting, Clint J; Scardino, Lori L; Hartsel, Scott C; Boyd, Eric S; Geesey, Gill G; Riedel, Theran P; Shafe, Peter H; Kranski, Kim A; Tritsch, John R; Antholine, William E; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2006-12-01

    Methanobactin (mb) is a novel chromopeptide that appears to function as the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system in methanotrophic bacteria. To examine this potential physiological role, and to distinguish it from iron binding siderophores, the spectral (UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron) and thermodynamic properties of metal binding by mb were examined. In the absence of Cu(II) or Cu(I), mb will bind Ag(I), Au(III), Co(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), U(VI), or Zn(II), but not Ba(II), Ca(II), La(II), Mg(II), and Sr(II). The results suggest metals such as Ag(I), Au(III), Hg(II), Pb(II) and possibly U(VI) are bound by a mechanism similar to Cu, whereas the coordination of Co(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) by mb differs from Cu(II). Consistent with its role as a copper-binding compound or chalkophore, the binding constants of all the metals examined were less than those observed with Cu(II) and copper displaced other metals except Ag(I) and Au(III) bound to mb. However, the binding of different metals by mb suggests that methanotrophic activity also may play a role in either the solubilization or immobilization of many metals in situ.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, O A; Rakha, T H; Metwally, H M; Abu El-Reash, G M

    2014-06-05

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  12. Preparation of cross-linked magnetic chitosan-phenylthiourea resin for adsorption of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Abdel-Latif, D A

    2012-03-30

    In this study, cross-linked magnetic chitosan-phenylthiourea (CSTU) resin were prepared and characterized by means of FTIR, (1)H NMR, SEM high-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared resin were used to investigate the adsorption properties of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) metal ions in an aqueous solution. The extent of adsorption was investigated as a function of pH and the metal ion removal reached maximum at pH 5.0. Also, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were estimated. These data indicated that the adsorption process is exothermic and followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Equilibrium studies showed that the data of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) adsorption followed the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacities for Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) were estimated to be 135 ± 3, 120 ± 1 and 52 ± 1 mg/g, which demonstrated the high adsorption efficiency of CSTU toward the studied metal ions.

  13. Molecular structure, UV/vis spectra, and cyclic voltammograms of Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-oxaporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Stute, Silvio; Götzke, Linda; Meyer, Dirk; Merroun, Mohamed L; Rapta, Peter; Kataeva, Olga; Seichter, Wilhelm; Gloe, Kerstin; Dunsch, Lothar; Gloe, Karsten

    2013-02-04

    The 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-oxaporphyrin complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) have been crystallized and studied by X-ray diffraction, NMR and UV/vis spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry as well as cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray structure of the earlier described Cu(II) complex is also reported. All complex structures possess a five-coordinate, approximately square-pyramidal geometry with a slight deviation of the heteroaromatic moieties from planarity. The packing structures are characterized by parallel strands of complex molecules interacting by weak hydrogen bonds. In the case of Zn(II) an octahedral complex has also been isolated using a side-chain hydroxy functionalized oxaporphyrin ligand; the structure was verified by NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry studies reveal that the reduction of the complex bound Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) ions is a ligand-centered process whereas the first oxidation step depends on the metal ion present.

  14. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-((thiophen-2-ylmethylene)amino)benzamide: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, DFT and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B S

    2015-01-05

    The paper presents the synthesis of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of general composition M(L)X₂ and M(L)₂X₂ (M=Ni(II), Zn(II), X=Cl(-1), OAc(-1)) with Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminobenzamide with thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by (1)H NMR, UV-VIS, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The effect of these complexes on proliferation of human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were studied and compared with those of free ligand.

  15. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-((thiophen-2-ylmethylene)amino)benzamide: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, DFT and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of general composition M(L)X2 and M(L)2X2 (M = Ni(II), Zn(II), X = Cl-1, OAc-1) with Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminobenzamide with thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by 1H NMR, UV-VIS, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The effect of these complexes on proliferation of human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were studied and compared with those of free ligand.

  16. Biosorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions by cross-linked metal-imprinted chitosans with epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yun; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Arh-Hwang

    2011-03-01

    Cross-linked metal-imprinted chitosan microparticles were prepared from chitosan, using four metals (Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II)) as templates, and epichlorohydrin as the cross-linker. The microparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. They were used for comparative biosorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in an aqueous solution. The results showed that the sorption capacities of Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) on the templated microparticles increased from 25 to 74%, 13 to 46%, 41 to 57%, and 12 to 43%, respectively, as compared to the microparticles without metal ion templates. The dynamic study showed that the sorption process followed the second-order kinetic equation. Three sorption models, Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich, were applied to the equilibrium isotherm data. The result showed that the Langmuir isotherm equation best fitted for monolayer sorption processes. Furthermore, the microparticles can be regenerated and reused for the metal removal.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Rakha, T. H.; Metwally, H. M.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  18. Non-affine deformations in flexible and semi-flexible polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anindita; Wen, Qi; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, Tom; Janmey, Paul; Yodh, Arjun

    2011-03-01

    We test the validity of affine deformation assumption in flexible and semi-flexible polymer networks by embedding different-sized fluorescent tracer beads within model polymer networks and quantifying their displacements under shear. A conventional rheometer is used with a confocal microscope for this purpose. Non-affinity is quantified as a function of applied strain, polymer chain density, cross-link concentration, network morphology, reaction kinetics and size of probe particles used. ~Non-affinity measurements in flexible polymer gels are in qualitative agreement with current theories in rubber elasticity. ~For semi-flexible bio-polymer gels, measurements indicate that non-affine deformations are small for networks of thinner, relatively flexible filaments and get smaller as strain increases into non-linear elastic regime. These small measures are consistent with the entropic model for non-linear elasticity of semi-flexible gels. However, as filament stiffness and mesh size increase, the deformations become more non-affine, as predicted by the enthalpic bending and stretching models of non-linear elasticity. MRSEC DMR-0520020, DMR-0505048, and DMR- 0079909. Done...processed 7726 records...17:54:11 Beginning APS data extraction...17:54:12

  19. Probing the binding affinity of plasma proteins adsorbed on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Shaoning

    2017-04-06

    Nanoparticle (NP) surfaces are modified immediately by the adsorption of proteins when exposed to human blood, leading to the formation of a protein corona. The adsorption of serum proteins is the key process for exploring the bioapplication and biosafety of NPs. In this study, NP-protein binding affinity (Ka) was investigated. Some serum proteins, such as human serum albumin (HSA), trypsin (TRP), hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (MB), immunoglobulin G (IgG), carbonic anhydrase (CA), fibrinogen (FIB), chymotrypsin and r-globulin, were used with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to address binding affinity according to isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence quenching. The NP protein binding affinities determined by the two methods were in agreement, and depended on the protein properties and size of the NPs. The two methods are convenient, and the results are highly comparable. These methods can be extended to determine the binding affinity of NP protein interactions. The adsorption of proteins upon the AuNP surface is a complex process and depends on several factors, but the binding affinities are higher for proteins with more cysteine residues located on the surface.

  20. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  1. Synthesis and Spectroscopic and Biological Activities of Zn(II) Porphyrin with Oxygen Donors

    PubMed Central

    Bajju, Gauri Devi; Kundan, Sujata; Bhagat, Madhulika; Gupta, Deepmala; Kapahi, Ashu; Devi, Geeta

    2014-01-01

    Results of investigation of the physicochemical properties of zinc complexes containing substituted phenols as axial ligand having general formula [X-Zn-t(p-CH3) PP] [where X = different phenolates as axial ligand] in impurity-free organic solvent are presented. The four-coordinated zinc porphyrin accepts one axial ligand in 1 : 1 molar ratio to form five-coordinated complex, which is purified by column chromatography and characterized by physicochemical, biological evaluation and TGA/DTA studies. Absorption spectra show two principal effects: a red shift for phenols bearing substituted electron releasing groups (−CH3, −NH2) and blue shift for phenols bearing electron withdrawing groups (−NO2, −Cl) relative to Zn-t(p-CH3) PP, respectively. 1H NMR spectra show that the protons of the phenol ring axially attached to the central metal ion are merged with the protons of the porphyrin ring. Fluorescence spectra show two fluorescence peaks in the red region with emission ranging from 550 nm to 700 nm. IR spectra confirm the appearance of Zn-NPor and Zn-O vibrational frequencies, respectively. According to the thermal studies, the complexes have a higher thermal stability and the decomposition temperature of these complexes depends on the axial ligation. The respective complexes of X-ZnII-t(p-CH3) PP were found to possess higher antifungal activity (up to 90%) and higher in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cells lines. PMID:24744692

  2. Stability of flavin semiquinones in the gas phase: the electron affinity, proton affinity, and hydrogen atom affinity of lumiflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlan; Papson, Kaitlin; Ochran, Richard; Ridge, Douglas P

    2013-11-07

    Examination of electron transfer and proton transfer reactions of lumiflavin and proton transfer reactions of the lumiflavin radical anion by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. From the equilibrium constant determined for electron transfer between 1,4-naphthoquinone and lumiflavin the electron affinity of lumiflavin is deduced to be 1.86 ± 0.1 eV. Measurements of the rate constants and efficiencies for proton transfer reactions indicate that the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion is between that of difluoroacetate (331.0 kcal/mol) and p-formyl-phenoxide (333.0 kcal/mol). Combining the electron affinity of lumiflavin with the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion gives a lumiflavin hydrogen atom affinity of 59.7 ± 2.2 kcal/mol. The ΔG298 deduced from these results for adding an H atom to gas phase lumiflavin, 52.1 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with ΔG298 for adding an H atom to aqueous lumiflavin from electrochemical measurements in the literature, 51.0 kcal/mol, and that from M06-L density functional calculations in the literature, 51.2 kcal/mol, suggesting little, if any, solvent effect on the H atom addition. The proton affinity of lumiflavin deduced from the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction between lumiflavin and 2-picoline is 227.3 ± 2.0 kcal mol(-1). Density functional theory calculations on isomers of protonated lumiflavin provide a basis for assigning the most probable site of protonation as position 1 on the isoalloxazine ring and for estimating the ionization potentials of lumiflavin neutral radicals.

  3. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  4. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  5. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  6. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same…

  7. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  8. Affine coherent states and Toeplitz operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutníková, Mária; Hutník, Ondrej

    2012-06-01

    We study a parameterized family of Toeplitz operators in the context of affine coherent states based on the Calderón reproducing formula (= resolution of unity on L_2( {R})) and the specific admissible wavelets (= affine coherent states in L_2( {R})) related to Laguerre functions. Symbols of such Calderón-Toeplitz operators as individual coordinates of the affine group (= upper half-plane with the hyperbolic geometry) are considered. In this case, a certain class of pseudo-differential operators, their properties and their operator algebras are investigated. As a result of this study, the Fredholm symbol algebras of the Calderón-Toeplitz operator algebras for these particular cases of symbols are described. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  9. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  10. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  11. Syntheses, structural characterization, luminescence and optical studies of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes containing salophen ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, M. S.; Pawal, S. B.; Lolage, S. R.; Chavan, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Some Ni(II) (1a-d) and Zn(II) (2a-d) salophen complexes were prepared by the treatment of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde, 5-(trimethylsilylethynyl)salicylaldehyde, 5-(4-nitrophenyl)ethynylsalicylaldehyde or 5-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethynylsalicylaldehyde with nickel acetate or zinc acetate followed by addition of 2,3-diamino-5-bromopyridine. All complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and mass spectral studies. X-ray powder diffraction of representative complexes 1c and 2b and SEM studies of 1b and 2d are used to elucidate the crystal structure and morphology of the complexes. The electrochemical behavior reveals that the redox responses of Ni(II) complexes shifted to more negative potential in order to increase the π-conjugation in the complexes. Room temperature luminescence is observed for all complexes corresponding to π→π* ILCT transition with some MLCT character in DMF and is finely tuned by the degree of extended π-conjugation and variation of the substituent group with different electronic effects in the complexes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the complexes was screened by Kurtz-powder technique indicating that all complexes possesses promising potential for the application as a useful nonlinear optical material.

  12. Use of Affinity Diagrams as Instructional Tools in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselden, Polly G.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how the affinity diagram, a tool for gathering information and organizing it into natural groupings, can be used in inclusive classrooms. It discusses how students can be taught to use an affinity diagram, how affinity diagrams can be used to reflect many voices, and how affinity diagrams can be used to plan class projects.…

  13. Regulation of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1) expression by cisplatin and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng Dong; Long, Yan; Chen, Helen H W; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay in cancer chemotherapy for many human malignancies. Drug resistance is an important obstacle to achieving the maximal therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Understanding how platinum drugs enter cells is of great importance in improving therapeutic efficacy. It has been demonstrated that human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is involved in transporting cisplatin into cells to elicit cytotoxic effects, although other mechanisms may exist. In this communication, we demonstrate that cisplatin transcriptionally induces the expression of hCtr1 in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Cisplatin functions as a competitor for hCtr1-mediated copper transport, resulting in reduced cellular copper levels and leading to upregulated expression of Sp1, which is a positive regulator for hCtr1 expression. Thus, regulation of hCtr1 expression by cisplatin is an integral part of the copper homeostasis regulation system. We also demonstrate that Ag(I) and Zn(II), which are known to suppress hCtr1-mediated copper transport, can also induce hCtr1/Sp1 expression. In contrast, Cd(II), another inhibitor of copper transport, downregulates hCtr1 expression by suppressing Sp1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate diverse mechanisms of regulating copper metabolism by these heavy metals.

  14. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  15. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  16. On the electron affinity of B2

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vanda A.; Taylor, Peter

    2009-02-02

    We present the results of high-level ab initio calculations on the electron affinity of B2. Our new best estimate of 1.93±0.03 eV is in agreement with previous calculations as well as the sole existing experimental estimate of 1.8 eV, as derived from quantities with an uncertainty of 0.4 eV. The electron affinity of atomic boron, which is much smaller, is also calculated for comparison, and again found to be in good agreement with experiment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  17. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  18. Evidence of multi-affinity in the Japanese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    Fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (Tokyo Stock Price Index: TOPIX) are analyzed using a multi-affine analysis method. In the research to date, only some simulated self-affine models have shown multi-affinity. In most experiments using observations of self-affine fractal profiles, multi-affinity has not been found. However, we find evidence of multi-affinity in fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (TOPIX). The qth-order Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. This multi-affinity indicates that there are plural mechanisms that affect the same time scale as stock market price fluctuation dynamics.

  19. Unusual Recognition and Separation of Hydrated Metal Sulfates [M2(μ-SO4)2(H2O)n, M = Zn(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II)] by a Ditopic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tamal Kanti; Dutta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2016-04-04

    A ditopic receptor L1, having metal binding bis(2-picolyl) donor and anion binding urea group, is synthesized and explored toward metal sulfate recognition via formation of dinuclear assembly, (L1)2M2(SO4)2. Mass spectrometric analysis, (1)H-DOSY NMR, and crystal structure analysis reveal the existence of a dinuclear assembly of MSO4 with two units of L1. (1)H NMR study reveals significant downfield chemical shift of -NH protons of urea moiety of L1 selectively with metal sulfates (e.g., ZnSO4, CdSO4) due to second-sphere interactions of sulfate with the urea moiety. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies suggest the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction toward metal sulfate recognition in solution state, whereas intermolecular H-bonding interactions are observed in solid state. In contrast, anions in their tetrabutylammonium salts fail to interact with the urea -NH probably due to poor acidity of the tertiary butyl urea group of L1. Metal sulfate binding selectivity in solution is further supported by isothermal titration calorimetric studies of L1 with different Zn salts in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), where a binding affinity is observed for ZnSO4 (Ka = 1.23 × 10(6)), which is 30- to 50-fold higher than other Zn salts having other counteranions in DMSO. Sulfate salts of Cd(II)/Co(II) also exhibit binding constants in the order of ∼1 × 10(6) as in the case of ZnSO4. Positive role of the urea unit in the selectivity is confirmed by studying a model ligand L2, which is devoid of anion recognition urea unit. Structural characterization of four MSO4 [M = Zn(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II)] complexes of L1, that is, complex 1, [(L1)2(Zn)2(μ-SO4)2]; complex 2, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Cd)2(μ-SO4)2]; complex 3, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Co)2(μ-SO4)2]; and complex 4, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Mn)2(μ-SO4)2], reveal the formation of sulfate-bridged eight-membered crownlike binuclear complexes, similar to one of the concentration-dependent dimeric forms of MSO4 as observed in solid state

  20. Ionic selectivity of low-affinity ratiometric calcium indicators: mag-Fura-2, Fura-2FF and BTC.

    PubMed

    Hyrc, K L; Bownik, J M; Goldberg, M P

    2000-02-01

    Accurate measurement of elevated intracellular calcium levels requires indicators with low calcium affinity and high selectivity. We examined fluorescence spectral properties and ionic specificity of three low-affinity, ratiometric indicators structurally related to Fura-2: mag-Fura-2 (furaptra), Fura-2FF, and BTC. The indicators differed in respect to their excitation wavelengths, affinity for Ca2+ (Kd approximately 20 microM, 6 microM and 12 microM respectively) and selectivity over Mg2+ (Kd approximately 2 mM for mag-Fura-2, > 10 mM for Fura-2FF and BTC). Among the tested indicators, BTC was limited by a modest dynamic range upon Ca2+ binding, susceptibility to photodamage, and sensitivity to alterations in pH. All three indicators bound other metal ions including Zn2+, Cd2+ and Gd3+. Interestingly, only in the case of BTC were spectral differences apparent between Ca2+ and other metal ions. For example, the presence of Zn2+ increased BTC fluorescence 6-fold at the Ca2+ isosbestic point, suggesting that this dye may be used as a fluorescent Zn2+ indicator. Fura-2FF has high specificity, wide dynamic range, and low pH sensitivity, and is an optimal low-affinity Ca2+ indicator for most imaging applications. BTC may be useful if experimental conditions require visible wavelength excitation or sensitivity to other metal ions including Zn2+.

  1. On modality and complexity of affine embeddings

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    2001-08-31

    Let G be a reductive algebraic group and let H be a reductive subgroup of G. The modality of a G-variety X is the largest number of the parameters in a continuous family of G-orbits in X. A precise formula for the maximum value of the modality over all affine embeddings of the homogeneous space G/H is obtained.

  2. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  3. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  4. Stabilization of the Motion of Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, E. A.; Martynyuk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient conditions for the stability of a nonlinear affine system subject to interval initial conditions are established. These conditions are based on new estimates of the norms of the solutions of the systems of perturbed equations of motion. This stabilization method is used to analyze an electromechanical system with permanent magnet

  5. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  6. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  7. Interplay of bifurcated hydrogen bonds in making of inclusion/pseudo-inclusion complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of a salophen type ligand: Crystal structures and spectral aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambili, K. U.; Sithambaresan, M.; Kurup, M. R. Prathapachandra

    2017-04-01

    Three novel photoluminescent materials were synthesized by treating Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) acetate salts with a Schiff base prepared from 3-ethoxysalicylaldehyde and 2-aminobenzylamine. Among the prepared complexes, Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are inclusion compounds while Zn(II) complex is a pseudo-inclusion compound. They were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible and EPR spectra. Single crystal XRD studies of these complexes suggest that Ni(II) and Cu(II) are in a distorted square planar environment while the spatial arrangement of donor atoms in Zn(II) complex is best described as distorted square based pyramid although significant distortion towards trigonal bipyramid is noticed. Stabilized crystal packing of the complexes is established via supramolecular interactions. The metal chelate rings as the π system for C-H···π interactions found in Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes explicit the concept of metalloaromaticity. TG-DTG studies reveal that all the complexes are thermally stable. Both ligand and complexes exhibit intense photoluminescence in near UV region. However, Zn(II) complex giving an intense blue-green emission spectrum at maximum wavelength of 518 nm with shoulder peaks, could be used for optoelectronic applications.

  8. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  9. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  10. Magnesium(II) and zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX's stabilize the lowest oxygen affinity state of human hemoglobin even more strongly than deoxyheme.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, G; Morimoto, H; Yun, K M; Park, S Y; Nakagawa, A; Minagawa, H; Shibayama, N

    1999-10-08

    Studies of oxygen equilibrium properties of Mg(II)-Fe(II) and Zn(II)-Fe(II) hybrid hemoglobins (i.e. alpha2(Fe)beta2(M) and alpha2(M)beta2(Fe); M=Mg(II), Zn(II) (neither of these closed-shell metal ions binds oxygen or carbon monoxide)) are reported along with the X-ray crystal structures of alpha2(Fe)beta2(Mg) with and without CO bound. We found that Mg(II)-Fe(II) hybrids resemble Zn(II)-Fe(II) hybrids very closely in oxygen equilibrium properties. The Fe(II)-subunits in these hybrids bind oxygen with very low affinities, and the effect of allosteric effectors, such as proton and/or inositol hexaphosphate, is relatively small. We also found a striking similarity in spectrophotometric properties between Mg(II)-Fe(II) and Zn(II)-Fe(II) hybrids, particularly, the large spectral changes that occur specifically in the metal-containing beta subunits upon the R-T transition of the hybrids. In crystals, both alpha2(Fe)beta2(Mg) and alpha2(Fe-CO)beta2(Mg) adopt the quaternary structure of deoxyhemoglobin. These results, combined with the re-evaluation of the oxygen equilibrium properties of normal hemoglobin, low-affinity mutants, and metal substituted hybrids, point to a general tendency of human hemoglobin that when the association equilibrium constant of hemoglobin for the first binding oxygen molecule (K1) approaches 0.004 mmHg(-1), the cooperativity as well as the effect of allosteric effectors is virtually abolished. This is indicative of the existence of a distinct thermodynamic state which determines the lowest oxygen affinity of human hemoglobin. Moreover, excellent agreement between the reported oxygen affinity of deoxyhemoglobin in crystals and the lowest affinity in solution leads us to propose that the classical T structure of deoxyhemoglobin in the crystals represents the lowest affinity state in solution. We also survey the oxygen equilibrium properties of various metal-substituted hybrid hemoglobins studied over the past 20 years in our laboratory. The bulk

  11. Enhancing single-molecule fluorescence with nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Acuna, Guillermo; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has become an important research tool in the life sciences but a number of limitations hinder the widespread use as a standard technique. The limited dynamic concentration range is one of the major hurdles. Recent developments in the nanophotonic field promise to alleviate these restrictions to an extent that even low affinity biomolecular interactions can be studied. After motivating the need for nanophotonics we introduce the basic concepts of nanophotonic devices such as zero mode waveguides and nanoantennas. We highlight current applications and the future potential of nanophotonic approaches when combined with biological systems and single-molecule spectroscopy.

  12. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  13. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  14. Synthesis, characterization of 1,2,4-triazole Schiff base derived 3d-metal complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2, MCF-7 cell line, BSA binding fluorescence and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Tyagi, Monika; Agrawal, Swati; Chandra, Sulekh; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika

    2017-01-01

    Two novel Schiff base ligands H2L1 and H2L2 have been synthesized by condensation reaction of amine derivative of 1,2,4-triazole moiety with 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde. Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of the synthesized Schiff bases were prepared by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 1:1. The structure of the Schiff bases and synthesized metal complexes were established by 1H NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass spectrometry and molar conductivity. The thermal stability of the complexes was study by TGA. Fluorescence quenching mechanism of metal complexes 1-4 show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) complex binds more strongly to BSA. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31 + g(d,p) basis set. The spectral data shows that the ligands behaves as binegative tridentate. On the basis of the spectral studies, TGA and DFT data an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II), square planar for Cu(II) and tetrahedral for Zn(II) complexes. The anticancer activity were screened against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (Hep-G2). Result indicates that metal complexes shows increase cytotoxicity in proliferation to cell lines as compared to free ligand.

  15. Synthesis, characterization of 1,2,4-triazole Schiff base derived 3d-metal complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2, MCF-7 cell line, BSA binding fluorescence and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Prateek; Tyagi, Monika; Agrawal, Swati; Chandra, Sulekh; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika

    2017-01-15

    Two novel Schiff base ligands H2L(1) and H2L(2) have been synthesized by condensation reaction of amine derivative of 1,2,4-triazole moiety with 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde. Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) of the synthesized Schiff bases were prepared by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 1:1. The structure of the Schiff bases and synthesized metal complexes were established by (1)H NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass spectrometry and molar conductivity. The thermal stability of the complexes was study by TGA. Fluorescence quenching mechanism of metal complexes 1-4 show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) complex binds more strongly to BSA. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. The spectral data shows that the ligands behaves as binegative tridentate. On the basis of the spectral studies, TGA and DFT data an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II), square planar for Cu(II) and tetrahedral for Zn(II) complexes. The anticancer activity were screened against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (Hep-G2). Result indicates that metal complexes shows increase cytotoxicity in proliferation to cell lines as compared to free ligand.

  16. The Affinity of Cholesterol for Different Phospholipids Affects Lateral Segregation in Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Oskar; Hautala, Victor; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Dehio, Henrike; Murata, Michio; Slotte, J Peter; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2016-08-09

    Saturated and unsaturated phospholipids (PLs) can segregate into lateral domains. The preference of cholesterol for saturated acyl chains over monounsaturated, and especially polyunsaturated ones, may also affect lateral segregation. Here we have studied how cholesterol influenced the lateral segregation of saturated and unsaturated PLs, for which cholesterol had a varying degree of affinity. The fluorescence lifetime of trans-parinaric acid reported the formation of ordered domains (gel or liquid-ordered (lo)) in bilayers composed of different unsaturated phosphatidylcholines, and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine or n-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin, in the presence or absence of cholesterol. We observed that cholesterol facilitated lateral segregations and the degree of facilitation correlated with the relative affinity of cholesterol for the different PLs in the bilayers. Differential scanning calorimetry and (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance showed that cholesterol increased the thermostability of both the gel and lo-domains. Increased number of double bonds in the unsaturated PL increased the order in the lo-domains, likely by enriching the ordered domains in saturated lipids and cholesterol. This supported the conclusions from the trans-parinaric acid experiments, and offers insight into how cholesterol facilitated lateral segregation. In conclusion, the relative affinity of cholesterol for different PLs appears to be an important determinant for the formation of ordered domains. Our data suggests that knowledge of the affinity of cholesterol for the different PLs in a bilayer allows prediction of the degree to which the sterol promotes lo-domain formation.

  17. Potential toxicity and affinity of triphenylmethane dye malachite green to lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Li, Xiu-Nan; Diao, Jian-Xiong; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Li; Ma, Lin; Yang, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Li; Sun, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Malachite green is a triphenylmethane dye that is used extensively in many industrial and aquacultural processes, generating environmental concerns and health problems to human being. In this contribution, the complexation between lysozyme and malachite green was verified by means of computer-aided molecular modeling, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) approaches. The precise binding patch of malachite green in lysozyme has been identified from molecular modeling and ANS displacement, Trp-62, Trp-63, and Trp-108 residues of lysozyme were earmarked to possess high-affinity for this dye, the principal forces in the lysozyme-malachite green adduct are hydrophobic and π-π interactions. Steady state fluorescence proclaimed the complex of malachite green with lysozyme yields quenching through static type, which substantiates time-resolved fluorescence measurements that lysozyme-malachite green conjugation formation has an affinity of 10(3)M(-1). Moreover, via molecular modeling and also CD data, we can safely arrive at a conclusion that the polypeptide chain of lysozyme partially destabilized upon complexation with malachite green. The data emerged here will help to further understand the toxicological action of malachite green in human body.

  18. Batch affinity adsorption of His-tagged proteins with EDTA-based chitosan.

    PubMed

    Hua, Weiwei; Lou, Yimin; Xu, Weiyuan; Cheng, Zhixian; Gong, Xingwen; Huang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Affinity adsorption purification of hexahistidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins using EDTA-chitosan-based adsorption was designed and carried out. Chitosan was elaborated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the resulting polymer was characterized by FTIR, TGA, and TEM. Different metals including Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were immobilized with EDTA-chitosan, and their capability to the specific adsorption of His-tagged proteins were then investigated. The results showed that Ni(2+)-EDTA-chitosan and Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan had high affinity toward the His-tagged proteins, thus isolating them from protein mixture. The target fluorescent-labeled hexahistidine protein remained its fluorescent characteristic throughout the purification procedure when Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan was used as a sorbent, wherein the real-time monitor was performed to examine the immigration of fluorescent-labeled His-tagged protein. Comparatively, Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan showed more specific binding ability for the target protein, but with less binding capacity. It was further proved that this purification system could be recovered and reused at least for 5 times and could run on large scales. The presented M(2+)-EDTA-chitosan system, with the capability to specifically bind His-tagged proteins, make the purification of His-tagged proteins easy to handle, leaving out fussy preliminary treatment, and with the possibility of continuous processing and a reduction in operational cost in relation to the costs of conventional processes.

  19. Metal Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni (II) complexes of ursodeoxycholic acid as putative anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Dyakova, Lora; Culita, Daniela-Cristina; Marinescu, Gabriela; Alexandrov, Marin; Kalfin, Reni; Patron, Luminita; Alexandrova, Radostina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of metal [Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II)] complexes with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on the viability and proliferation of tumour and non-tumour cells. Cell lines established from retrovirus-transformed chicken hepatoma (LSCC-SF-Mc29) and rat sarcoma (LSR-SF-SR) as well as from human cancers of the breast (MCF-7), uterine cervix (HeLa), lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) were used as model systems. Non-tumour human embryo (Lep-3) cells were also included in some of the experiments. The investigations were carried out by the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, neutral red uptake cytotoxicity assay, crystal violet staining, double staining with acridine orange and propidium iodide and the colony-forming method. The results obtained revealed that: (1) UDCA and its metal complexes in the tested concentrations decreased (to a varying degree) the viability and proliferation of the treated cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner; (2) chicken hepatoma (LSCC-SF-Mc29) cells were most sensitive to the cytotoxic and antiproliferative action of the compounds tested, followed by rat sarcoma (LSR-SF-SR) cells; (3) Cu‒UDCA and Ni‒UDCA were more effective against animal LSCC-SF-Mc29 and LSR-SF-SR cells, while Zn‒UDCA significantly decreased the viability and proliferation of human tumour cell lines; (4) applied independently, UDCA expressed lower cytotoxic/cytostatic activity as compared to metal complexes; and (5) the sensitivity of the non-tumour embryonic Lep-3 cells to the effects of UDCA and its metal complexes was comparable or even higher than those of the human tumour cells. PMID:26019542

  20. Comparative Raman study of four plant metallothionein isoforms: Insights into their Zn(II) clusters and protein conformations.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Mireia; Tinti, Anna; Bofill, Roger; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Silvia; Torreggiani, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Four Metallothioneins (MTs) from soybean (Glycine max) were heterologously synthesized and comparatively analysed by Raman spectroscopy. The participation of protein donor groups (S-thiol and N-imidazol) in Zn(II) chelation, as well as the presence of secondary structure elements was comparatively analysed. Metal clusters with different geometry can be hypothesised for the four GmMTs: a cubane-like or an adamantane-like metal cluster in Zn-GmMT1, and dinuclear Zn-S clusters in Zn-GmMT2, Zn-GmMT3 and Zn-GmMT4. The latter have also a similar average Cys/Zn content, whereas a lower ratio is present in Zn-GmMT1. This is possible thanks to the involvement in metal coordination of a greater number of bridging Cys, as well as of some carboxylate groups. As regards secondary structure elements, a large content of β-turn segments is present in all four Zn-GmMTs, especially for isoforms 1 and 4. β-strands give a contribution to the folding of three GmMTs isoforms, and the highest percentage was found in Zn-GmMT2 (~45%). Conversely, the α-helix content is negligible in all the GmMTs except in Zn-GmMT3, where this peculiar feature coincides with the possible involvement of the two His residues in metal coordination. Conversely, His is predominantly free and present as tautomer I in Zn-GmMT4. In conclusion, this work illustrates the attractive potential of Raman spectroscopy, combined with other techniques, to be a very informative tool for evidencing structural differences among in vivo synthesized metal-MT complexes.

  1. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  2. Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a tool for assessing mosaic disease severity in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin; Eghan, Moses J; Asare-Bediako, Elvis; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K

    2012-01-01

    Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence was used in agronomical assessment (disease severity and average yield per plant). Because cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is of economic importance, improved cultivars with various levels of affinity for cassava mosaic disease were investigated. Fluorescence data correlated with cassava mosaic disease severity levels and with the average yield per plant.

  3. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Mohd F. Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-24

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m{sup 2}/g and 0.17 cm{sup 2}/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  4. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mohd F.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m2/g and 0.17 cm2/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  5. Optical mesosensors for monitoring and removal of ultra-trace concentration of Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions from water.

    PubMed

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Shenashen, M A; Ismael, M; Khairy, M; Awual, Md R

    2012-11-21

    Optical captor design is necessary for the controlled development of a technique for detecting and removing heavy and toxic metals from drinking water with high flexibility and low capital cost. We designed chemical mesocaptors for optical separation/extraction and monitoring/detection of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions from water even at trace concentration levels without a preconcentration process. The mesoporous aluminosilica carriers with three-dimensional (3D) structures, high aluminum content, natural surfaces, and active acid sites strongly induced H-bonding and dispersive interactions with organic moieties, thereby leading to the formation of stable captors without chromophore leaching during the removal assays of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. Using such a tailored mesocaptor design, the direct immobilization of these hydrophobic ligands (4,5-diamino-6-hydroxy-2-mercaptopyrimidine and diphenylthiocarbazone) into ordered pore-based aluminasilica monoliths enabled the easy generation and transduction of optical colour signals as a response to metal-to-ligand binding events, even at ultra-trace concentrations (~10(-9) mol dm(-3)) of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in drinking water, without the need for sophisticated instruments. Theoretical models have been developed to provide insights into the effect of active site surfaces on the enhancement of the optical removal process in terms of long-term stability, reversibility, and selectivity, hence allowing us to understand the role of mesoscopic geometry and nanoscale pore orientation of mesocaptors better. Generally, this ion-capture model enables the development of a simple and effective technique for effective wastewater treatment and management.

  6. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to <1% at 10

  7. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-07

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity.

  8. Formation of a unique zinc carbamate by CO2 fixation: implications for the reactivity of tetra-azamacrocycle ligated Zn(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Notni, Johannes; Schenk, Stephan; Görls, Helmar; Breitzke, Hergen; Anders, Ernst

    2008-02-18

    The macrocyclic ligand [13]aneN 4 ( L1, 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacyclotridecane) was reacted with Zn(II) perchlorate and CO 2 in an alkaline methanol solution. It was found that, by means of subtle changes in reaction conditions, two types of complexes can be obtained: (a) the mu 3 carbonate complex 1, {[Zn( L1)] 3(mu 3-CO 3)}(ClO 4) 4, rhombohedral crystals, space group R3 c, with pentacoordinate zinc in a trigonal bipyramidal enviroment, and (b) an unprecedenced dimeric Zn(II) carbamate structure, 2, [Zn( L2)] 2(ClO 4) 2, monoclinic crystals, space group P2 1/ n. The ligand L2 (4-carboxyl-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacyclotridecane) is a carbamate derivative of L1, obtained by transformation of a hydrogen atom of one of the NH moieties into carbamate by means of CO 2 uptake. In compound 2, the distorted tetrahedral Zn(II) coordinates to the carbamate moiety in a monodentate manner. Most notably, carbamate formation can occur upon reaction of CO 2 with the [Zn L1] (2+) complex, which implicates that a Zn-N linkage is cleaved upon attack of CO 2. Since complexes of tetra-azamacrocycles and Zn(II) are routinely applied for enzyme model studies, this finding implies that the Zn-azamacrocycle moiety generally should no longer be considered to play always only an innocent role in reactions. Rather, its reactivity has to be taken into account in respective investigations. In the presence of water, 2 is transformed readily into carbonate 1. Both compounds have been additionally characterized by solid-state NMR and infrared spectroscopy. A thorough comparison of 1 with related azamacrocycle ligated zinc(II) carbonates as well as a discussion of plausible reaction paths for the formation of 2 are given. Furthermore, the infrared absorptions of the carbamate moiety have been assigned by calculating the vibrational modes of the carbamate complex using DFT methods and the vibrational spectroscopy calculation program package SNF.

  9. Thermal Studies of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) Complexes of Some N-Alkyl-N-Phenyl-Dithiocarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes of N-ethyl-N-phenyl and N-butyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamates have been studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The products of the decomposition, at two different temperatures, were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that while the zinc and cadmium complexes undergo decomposition to form metal sulphides, and further undergo oxidation forming metal oxides as final products, the mercury complexes gave unstable volatiles as the final product. PMID:22949811

  10. Optimal Affine-Invariant Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mauro S.; Haralick, Robert M.; Phillips, Tsaiyun I.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    1989-03-01

    The affine-transformation matching scheme proposed by Hummel and Wolfson (1988) is very efficient in a model-based matching system, not only in terms of the computational complexity involved, but also in terms of the simplicity of the method. This paper addresses the implementation of the affine-invariant point matching, applied to the problem of recognizing and determining the pose of sheet metal parts. It points out errors that can occur with this method due to quantization, stability, symmetry, and noise problems. By beginning with an explicit noise model which the Hummel and Wolfson technique lacks, we can derive an optimal approach which overcomes these problems. We show that results obtained with the new algorithm are clearly better than the results from the original method.

  11. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  12. Negative affinity X-ray photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Duckett, S.

    1974-01-01

    A new X-ray image intensifier is described. The device should eventually have a quantum efficiency which is an order of magnitude greater than that of presently available high spatial resolution X-ray detectors, such as microchannel plates. The new intesifier is based upon a GaAs crystal photocathode which is activated to achieve negative electron affinity. Details concerning the detector concept are discussed together with the theoretical relations involved, X-ray data, and optical data.

  13. Fluorescent indicator dyes for calcium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Roger Y. (Inventor); Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new class of highly fluorescent indicator dyes that are specific for calcium ions. The new fluorescent indicator dyes combine a stilbene-type fluorophore with a tetracarboxylate parent Ca.sup.2+ chelating compound having the octacoordinate pattern of liganding groups characteristic of EGTA and BAPTA. Preferred forms contain extra heterocyclic bridges to reinforce the ethylenic bond of the stilbene and to reduce hydrophobicity. Compared to their widely used predecessor, quin2, the new dyes offer up to thirty-fold brighter fluorescence, major changes in wavelength (not just intensity) upon Ca.sup.2+ binding, slightly lower affinities for Ca.sup.2+, slightly longer wavelengths of excitation, and considerably improved selectivity for Ca.sup.2+ over other divalent cations. These properties, particularly the wavelength sensitivity to Ca.sup.2+, make the dyes useful indicators for many intracellular applications, especially in single cells, adherent cell layers, or bulk tissues. The present invention also discloses an improved method for synthesizing alpha-acyloxyalkyl bromides wherein the bromides so synthesized are free of contaminating bis(1-bromoalkyl)ether. The improved method is exemplified herein in the synthesis of acetoxymethyl bromide, a compound useful in preparing the acetoxymethyl esters disclosed herein as novel Ca.sup.2+ specific fluorescent indicators.

  14. Quantitative in vivo solubility and reconstitution of truncated circular permutants of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Ming; Nayak, Sasmita; Bystroff, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    Several versions of split green fluorescent protein (GFP) fold and reconstitute fluorescence, as do many circular permutants, but little is known about the dependence of reconstitution on circular permutation. Explored here is the capacity of GFP to fold and reconstitute fluorescence from various truncated circular permutants, herein called "leave-one-outs" using a quantitative in vivo solubility assay and in vivo reconstitution of fluorescence. Twelve leave-one-out permutants are discussed, one for each of the 12 secondary structure elements. The results expand the outlook for the use of permuted split GFPs as specific and self-reporting gene encoded affinity reagents.

  15. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  16. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture.

  17. Novel Chalcone-Based Fluorescent Human Histamine H3 Receptor Ligands as Pharmacological Tools

    PubMed Central

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J. Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Stark, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Novel fluorescent chalcone-based ligands at human histamine H3 receptors (hH3R) have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compounds described are non-imidazole analogs of ciproxifan with a tetralone motif. Tetralones as chemical precursors and related fluorescent chalcones exhibit affinities at hH3R in the same concentration range like the reference antagonist ciproxifan (hH3R pKi value of 7.2). Fluorescence characterization of our novel ligands shows emission maxima about 570 nm for yellow fluorescent chalcones and ≥600 nm for the red fluorescent derivatives. Interferences to cellular autofluorescence could be excluded. All synthesized chalcone compounds could be used to visualize hH3R proteins in stably transfected HEK-293 cells using confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. These novel fluorescent ligands possess high potential to be used as pharmacological tools for hH3R visualization in different tissues. PMID:22470321

  18. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  19. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; ...

    2016-05-07

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (≥10–5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0more » 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Furthermore, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (≤10–6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) substantially (~52% to ~13% at 10–7 M, and ~23% to ~5% at 10–6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces (~15% to ~28% at 10–7 M, and ~1% to ~7% at 10–6 M) .The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (~28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (~13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10–7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions.« less

  20. Highly sensitive turn-on fluorescence detection of thrombomodulin based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Liyan; Zhu, Jiaming; Wang, Wen; Jin, Lehe; Fu, Yanjiao; Duan, Bohui; Tan, Liang

    2017-02-01

    As an integral glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial cells, thrombomodulin (TM) has very high affinity for thrombin. TM has been regarded to be a marker of endothelial damage since it can be released during endothelial cell injury. In this work, a highly sensitive fluorescence method for the quantitative detection of TM was developed. TM antibody (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were bound on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to construct BSA-AuNPs-Ab nanocomposites and they were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The fluorescence of acridine orange (AO) was quenched by the prepared gold nanocomposites based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the presence of TM, the fluorescence was turned on due to the effective separation of AO from the surface of gold nanocomposites. Under optimum conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity displayed a linear relationship with the logarithm of the TM concentration from 0.1 pg mL- 1 to 5 ng mL- 1 with a low detection limit of 12 fg mL- 1. The release of soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) by the injured HUVEC-C cells in the presence of H2O2 was investigated using the proposed method. The released sTM content in the growth medium was found to be increased with the enhancement of contact time of the cells with H2O2.

  1. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy.

  2. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  3. Integrin avidity regulation: are changes in affinity and conformation underemphasized?

    PubMed

    Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-10-01

    Integrins play critical roles in development, wound healing, immunity and cancer. Central to their function is their unique ability to modulate dynamically their adhesiveness through both affinity- and valency-based mechanisms. Recent advances have shed light on the structural basis for affinity regulation and on the signaling mechanisms responsible for both affinity and valency modes of regulation.

  4. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  5. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  6. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  7. Holograms with fluorescent benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pérez, A.; Toxqui-López, S.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Dorantes-Garcia, V.

    2011-02-01

    Behavior study of the diffraction efficiency parameter from holographic gratings, with fluorescents inks such as benzyls. We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence to blue laser to make transmissions holograms using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensibilizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence propertied of inks, mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we show the results of painting hologram method with fluorescents inks and describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with gratings with a He-Cd laser at 442nm and we later were painting with fluorescent ink, interesting fluorescence characteristic to the hologram.

  8. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv.

  9. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  10. Using Fluorophore-labeled Oligonucleotides to Measure Affinities of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian J.; Larkin, Chris; Guja, Kip; Schildbach, Joel F.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in fluorescence emission intensity and anisotropy can reflect changes in the environment and molecular motion of a fluorophore. Researchers can capitalize on these characteristics to assess the affinity and specificity of DNA-binding proteins using fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides. While there are many advantages to measuring binding using fluorescent oligonucleotides, there are also some distinct disadvantages. Here we describe some of the relevant issues for the novice, illustrating key points using data collected with the F plasmid relaxase domain and a variety of labeled oligonucleotides. Topics include selection of a fluorophore, experimental design using a fluorometer equipped with an automatic titrating unit, and analysis of direct binding and competition assays. PMID:19152864

  11. Comparative adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) ions in aqueous solution on the crosslinked chitosan with epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Arh-Hwang; Liu, Sheng-Chang; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Yun

    2008-06-15

    The crosslinked chitosans synthesized by the homogeneous reaction of chitosan in aqueous acetic acid solution with epichlorohydrin were used to investigate the adsorptions of three metals of Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) ions in an aqueous solution. The crosslinked chitosan characterized by 13CNMR, SEM, and elemental analysis, and the effects of pH and anion on the adsorption capacity were carried out. The dynamical study demonstrated that the adsorption process was followed the second-order kinetic equation. The results obtained from the equilibrium isotherms adsorption studies of three metals of Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) ions by being analyzed in three adsorption models, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinnin-Radushkevich isotherm equations, indicated to be well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm equation under the concentration range studied, by comparing the linear correlation coefficients. The order of the adsorption capacity (Qm) for three metal ions was as follows: Cu2+>Pb2+>Zn2+. This technique for syntheses of the crosslinked chitosans with epichlorohydrin via the homogeneous reaction in aqueous acetic acid solution showed that the adsorptions of three metal ions in aqueous solution were followed the monolayer coverage of the adsorbents through physical adsorption phenomena.

  12. Reaction of Pb(II) and Zn(II) with Ethyl Linoleate To Form Structured Hybrid Inorganic–Organic Complexes: A Model for Degradation in Historic Paint Films

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Margaret G.; Palmer, Michael R.; Suchomel, Matthew R.; Berrie, Barbara H.

    2016-09-23

    To investigate soap formation in drying oils in historic paints, the reaction between metal acetates (K+, Zn2+, Pb2+) and ethyl linoleate (EL) was studied using optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and electron microscopy. Pb(II) and Zn(II) react rapidly with EL to form highly structured, spherulitic, luminescent crystallites that aggregate. Evidence from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis and high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction indicates that these are organic–inorganic hybrid complexes or coordination polymers. FTIR absorbance peaks at ca. 1540 cm–1 for Pb(II) and ca. 1580 cm–1 for Zn(II) are consistent with the formation of carboxylate complexes. The complexes formed offer insight into the degradation processes observed in oil paint films, suggesting that soap formation is rapid when metal ions are solubilized and can occur with unsaturated fatty acids that are present in fresh oils. These complexes may account for the atypical luminescence observed in lead-containing cured oil paint films.

  13. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  14. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  15. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs does not change the affinity of its SH3 domains for Sos proline-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Cussac, D; Frech, M; Chardin, P

    1994-09-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptide binding to Grb2 induces tryptophan fluorescence changes in the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. Affinities are in the nanomolar range, the Shc peptide having the highest affinity, followed by peptides mimicking Grb2 binding sites on EGF and HGF receptors, the putative sites on insulin and IGF-1 receptors having much lower affinities. Proline-rich peptide binding to the SH3 domains induces fluorescence changes mainly in the C-terminal SH3. Affinities are in the micromolar range, the highest affinity peptides mimicking the first proline-rich motif of the Sos C-terminus. Additional residues before this PVPPPVPP motif provide a minor contribution to the binding, but the two residues after this motif are important and may contribute to specificity. The affinity of each SH3 for each proline-rich motif is too low to account for the high stability of the Grb2-Sos complex, suggesting that Grb2 recognizes other structural features in the Sos C-terminus. Binding of a phosphotyrosine peptide to the SH2 has no effect on the SH3s. Thus the binding of Grb2 to a receptor or to an associated protein phosphorylated on tyrosines is unlikely to activate the exchange factor activity of Sos through a conformational change transmitted from the SH2 to the SH3 domains.

  16. Binding patterns and structure-affinity relationships of food azo dyes with lysozyme: a multitechnique approach.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Li

    2013-12-18

    Food dyes serve to beguile consumers: they are often used to imitate the presence of healthful, colorful food produce such as fruits and vegetables. But considering the hurtful impact of these chemicals on the human body, it is time to thoroughly uncover the toxicity of these food dyes at the molecular level. In the present contribution, we have examined the molecular reactions of protein lysozyme with model food azo compound Color Index (C.I.) Acid Red 2 and its analogues C.I. Acid Orange 52, Solvent Yellow 2, and the core structure of azobenzene using a combination of biophysical methods at physiological conditions. Fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), time-resolved fluorescence, UV-vis absorption as well as computer-aided molecular modeling were used to analyze food dye affinity, binding mode, energy transfer, and the effects of food dye complexation on lysozyme stability and conformation. Fluorescence emission spectra indicate complex formation at 10(-5) M dye concentration, and this corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results showing the diminution in the tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence mainly via a static type (KSV = 1.505 × 10(4) M(-1)) and Förster energy transfer. Structural analysis displayed the participation of several amino acid residues in food dye protein adducts, with hydrogen bonds, π-π and cation-π interactions, but the conformation of lysozyme was unchanged in the process, as derived from fluorescence emission, far-UV CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. The overall affinity of food dye is 10(4) M(-1) and there exists only one kind of binding domain in protein for food dye. These data are consistent with hydrophobic probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) displacement, and molecular modeling manifesting the food dye binding patch was near to Trp-62 and Trp-63 residues of lysozyme. On the basis of the computational analyses, we determine that the type of substituent on the azobenzene structure has a powerful influence on the

  17. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  18. On the electron affinity of Be2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the electron affinity (EA) of Be2 using a large Slater-type orbital basis set and extensive correlation based upon a CASSCF reference are reported. The adiabatic EAs are estimated to be 0.44 eV for the 2Sigma sub g(+) state and 0.56 eV for the 2Pi sub u state. The extra electron attaches into an empty bonding orbital, causing a shortening of the bond length and an increase in omega(e). The D(e) of the 2Pi sub u state of Be2 is six times as large as the D(e) of Be2.

  19. A genetically encoded fluorescent reporter of ATP/ADP ratio

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jim; Hung, Yin Pun; Yellen, Gary

    2008-01-01

    A fluorescent sensor of adenylate nucleotides was constructed by combining a circularly permuted variant of green fluorescent protein with a bacterial regulatory protein, GlnK1, from Methanococcus jannaschii. The affinity for Mg-ATP is below 100 nM, as seen for the other members of the bacterial PII regulator family – a surprisingly high affinity given normal intracellular [ATP] in the millimolar range. ADP binds to the same site, competing with Mg-ATP but producing a smaller change in fluorescence. With normal physiological concentrations of ATP and ADP, the binding site is saturated, but competition between the two substrates causes the sensor to behave as a nearly ideal reporter of the ATP/ADP concentration ratio. This principle for sensing the ratio of two analytes by competition at a high affinity site probably underlies the normal functioning of PII regulatory proteins. The engineered sensor, Perceval, can be used to monitor the ATP/ADP ratio during live cell imaging. PMID:19122669

  20. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  1. Synthesis of biocompatible glycodendrimer based on fluorescent perylene bisimides and its bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Rang; An, Hong-Wei; Rong, Rui-Xue; Cao, Zhi-Ran; Li, Xiao-Liu

    2014-04-01

    A novel water-soluble fluorescent glycodendrimer based on perylene bisimides is synthesized, which exhibits high fluorescence quantum yield of 54%. While the binding interactions of PBI-Man with Concanavalin A (Con A) are studied by fluorescence spectra and CD spectra, which show strong binding affinity for Con A with the binding constant of 3.8 × 10(7) m(-1) for monomeric mannose, nearly four orders of magnitude higher affinity than the monovalent mannose ligand. Furthermore, the fluorescence imaging of macrophage cell with PBI-Man is investigated, and shows selectively binding interaction with the mannose receptor-medicated cell entry. Moreover, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) activities of PBI-Man show that PBI-Man as a biocompatible agent is noncytotoxic to living cells.

  2. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Extraction of haemoglobin from human blood by affinity precipitation using a haptoglobin-based stimuli-responsive affinity macroligand.

    PubMed

    Stocker-Majd, Gisela; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-06-13

    Affinity precipitation was compared to affinity chromatography and batch adsorption as the final purification step in a protocol for the isolation of haemoglobin from human blood. Haptoglobin was the affinity ligand. The first steps on the process were realized by traditional methods (lyses of red blood cells followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation). For affinity chromatography (and batch adsorption) the ligand was linked to Sepharose, for affinity precipitation to a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Five haptoglobin-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bioconjugates (affinity macroligands) were constructed with different polymer: haptoglobin-coupling ratios. Conjugation of haptoglobin to the soluble poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) apparently does not change the interaction thermodynamics with haemoglobin, as the haemoglobin binding constants calculated by a Scatchard analysis for the affinity macroligand were of the same order of magnitude as those described in the literature for the haemoglobin-haptoglobin complex in solution. Two elution protocols were used for haemoglobin release from the various affinity materials, one at pH 2, the other with 5 M urea at pH 11. Both affinity chromatography and affinity precipitation yielded a pure haemoglobin of high quality. Compared to the affinity chromatography, affinity precipitation showed a significantly higher ligand efficiency (ratio of the experimental capacity to the theoretical one). The method thus makes better use of the expensive affinity ligands. As affinity precipitation only requires small temperature changes to bring about precipitation/redissolution of the affinity complexes and a centrifugation step for recovery of the precipitate, the method in addition has advantages in term of scalability and simplicity.

  4. Monitoring the human beta1, beta2, beta3 adrenergic receptors expression and purification in Pichia pastoris using the fluorescence properties of the enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Talmont, Franck

    2009-01-01

    The three beta adrenergic receptor subtypes, beta1-, beta2- and beta3-, were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. These receptors were N-terminally fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and the fluorescent properties of EGFP were used: (1) to select the recombinant strains, (2) to monitor the expression of the fluorescent receptors, and (3) to monitor the purification of the receptors by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. We demonstrate here that Pichia pastoris can be an alternative host to express and purify milligram amounts of human beta adrenergic receptors.

  5. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  6. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  7. Affinity-based target deconvolution of safranal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Affinity-based target deconvolution is an emerging method for the identification of interactions between drugs/drug candidates and cellular proteins, and helps to predict potential activities and side effects of a given compound. In the present study, we hypothesized that a part of safranal pharmacological effects, one of the major constituent of Crocus sativus L., relies on its physical interaction with target proteins. Methods Affinity chromatography solid support was prepared by covalent attachment of safranal to agarose beads. After passing tissue lysate through the column, safranal-bound proteins were isolated and separated on SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot software. Results and major conclusion Data showed that safranal physically binds to beta actin, cytochrome b-c1 complex sub-unit 1, trifunctional enzyme sub-unit beta and ATP synthase sub-unit alpha and beta. These interactions may explain part of safranal’s pharmacological effects. However, phenotypic and/or biological relevance of these interactions remains to be elucidated by future pharmacological studies. PMID:23514587

  8. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  9. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  10. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  11. Application of silica fume as a new SP-extractor for trace determination of Zn(II) and Cd(II) in pharmaceutical and environmental samples by square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Salwa A.; Gaber, Ahmed A. Abdel; Rahim, Asmaa M. Abdel

    2015-04-01

    In this work, silica fume (SF) is used as a solid-phase extractor for extraction of Zn(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Characterization of SF is performed by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum experimental conditions for the two metal ions are investigated using batch and column techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity values are found to be 54.13 and 121.28 mg g-1 at the optimum pH 6.0 and 8.0 for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The equilibrium data are analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms by nonlinear regression analysis. Also, the kinetics analysis revealed that the overall adsorption process is successfully fitted with the pseudo-second-order model. The method is applied for determination of the target metal ions in pharmaceutical and environmental samples using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The limit of detection (LOD) values are 0.102 and 1.43 × 10-3 mg L-1 for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The percentage recovery values are 98.8-100.5 % which indicate the success of the proposed method for determination of Zn(II) and Cd(II) without interfering effects.

  12. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  13. A simple approach for preparation of affinity matrices: Simultaneous purification and reversible immobilization of a streptavidin mutein to agarose matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sau-Ching; Wang, Chris; Hansen, Dave; Wong, Sui-Lam

    2017-01-01

    SAVSBPM18 is an engineered streptavidin for affinity purification of both biotinylated biomolecules and recombinant proteins tagged with streptavidin binding peptide (SBP) tags. To develop a user-friendly approach for the preparation of the SAVSBPM18-based affinity matrices, a designer fusion protein containing SAVSBPM18 and a galactose binding domain was engineered. The galactose binding domain derived from the earthworm lectin EW29 was genetically modified to eliminate a proteolytic cleavage site located at the beginning of the domain. This domain was fused to the C-terminal end of SAVSBPM18. It allows the SAVSBPM18 fusions to bind reversibly to agarose and can serve as an affinity handle for purification of the fusion. Fluorescently labeled SAVSBPM18 fusions were found to be stably immobilized on Sepharose 6B-CL. The enhanced immobilization capability of the fusion to the agarose beads results from the avidity effect mediated by the tetrameric nature of SAVSBPM18. This approach allows the consolidation of purification and immobilization of SAVSBPM18 fusions to Sepharose 6B-CL in one step for affinity matrix preparation. The resulting affinity matrix has been successfully applied to purify both SBP tagged β-lactamase and biotinylated proteins. No significant reduction in binding capacity of the column was observed for at least six months. PMID:28220817

  14. Cleavage of an RNA model catalyzed by dinuclear Zn(II) complexes containing rate-accelerating pendants. Comparison of the catalytic benefits of H-bonding and hydrophobic substituents.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mark F; Brown, R Stan

    2010-12-17

    The transesterification of a simple RNA model, 2-hydroxypropyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (2, HpNPP) promoted by seven dinuclear Zn(II) catalysts (3,4,5,6,7,8,9:Zn(II)2:(-OCH3)) based on the bis[bis(2-substituted-pyridinyl-6-methyl)]amine ligand system was investigated in methanol under sspH-controlled conditions at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C. The two metal complexing ligands were joined together via the amino N connected to a m-xylyl linker (3, 4, 5, 6, 7) where the 2-pyridinyl substituent = H, CH3, (CH)4, NH2, and NH(C═O)CH3, respectively, and a propyl linker (8, 9) where the ring substituent = H and CH3. All of the dinuclear complexes except 8:Zn(II)2 exhibit saturation kinetics for the kobs versus [catalyst] plots from which one can determine catalyst:substrate binding constants (KM), the catalytic rate constants for their decomposition (kcat), and the second order catalytic rate constants (k2cat = kcat/KM). In the case of 8:Zn(II)2, the plots of kobs versus [catalyst] as a function of sspH are linear, and the catalytic rate constants (k2cat) are defined as the gradients of the plots. Analysis of all of the data at the sspH optimum for each reaction indicates that the presence of the amino and acetamido H-bonding groups and the CH3 group provides similar increases of the kcat terms of 25−50 times that exhibited by the parent complex 3:Zn(II)2. However, in terms of substrate catalyst binding (KM), there is no clear trend that H-bonding groups or the CH3 group provides stronger binding than the parent complex. In terms of the overall second order catalytic rate constant, the CH3, amino, and NH(C═O)CH3 groups provide 20, 10, and 68 times the k2cat observed for the parent complex. In the case of 9:Zn(II)2, the presence of the methyl groups provides a 1000-fold increase in activity (judged by k2cat) over the parent complex 8:Zn(II)2. The results are interpreted to indicate that H-bonding effects may be important for catalysis and less so for substrate binding, but the

  15. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  16. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W

    2015-08-01

    The use of a method of coupling DNA was investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP (CAAT/enhancer binding protein) fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry used is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3' end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose that couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture, and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes, including E2A, c-Myc, and Myo-D, were also purified, but myogenin and NFκB were not. Therefore, this approach proved to be valuable for both affinity chromatography and the trapping approach.

  17. Microdevices integrating affinity columns and capillary electrophoresis for multi-biomarker analysis in human serum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weichun; Yu, Ming; Sun, Xiuhua; Woolley, Adam T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Biomarkers in human body fluids have great potential for use in screening for diseases such as cancer and diabetes, diagnosis, determining the effectiveness of treatments, and detecting recurrence. Present 96-well immunoassay technology effectively analyzes large numbers of samples; however, this approach is more expensive and less time effective on single or a few samples. In contrast, microfluidic systems are well suited for assaying small numbers of specimens in a point-of-care setting, provided suitable procedures are developed to work within peak capacity constraints when analyzing complex mixtures like human blood serum. Here, we developed integrated microdevices with an affinity column and capillary electrophoresis channels to isolate and quantitate a panel of proteins in complex matrices. To form an affinity column, a thin film of a reactive polymer was photopolymerized in a microchannel, and four antibodies were covalently immobilized to it. The retained protein amounts were consistent from chip to chip, demonstrating reproducibility. Furthermore, the signals from four fluorescently labeled proteins captured on-column were in the same range after rinsing, indicating the column has little bias toward any of the four antibodies or their antigens. These affinity columns have been integrated with capillary electrophoresis separation, enabling us to simultaneously quantify four protein biomarkers in human blood serum in the low ng/mL range using either a calibration curve or standard addition. Our systems provide a fast, integrated and automated platform for multiple biomarker quantitation in complex media such as human blood serum. PMID:20664867

  18. Microarrays as Model Biosensor Platforms to Investigate the Structure and Affinity of Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer A.; Chushak, Yaroslav; Chávez, Jorge L.; Hagen, Joshua A.; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization of nucleic acid aptamer recognition elements selected free in solution onto the surface of biosensor platforms has proven challenging. This study investigated the binding of multiple aptamer/target pairs immobilized on a commercially available microarray as a model system mimicking biosensor applications. The results indicate a minimum distance (linker length) from the surface and thymine nucleobase linker provides reproducible binding across varying conditions. An indirect labeling method, where the target was labeled with a biotin followed by a brief Cy3-streptavidin incubation, provided a higher signal-to-noise ratio and over two orders of magnitude improvement in limit of detection, compared to direct Cy3-protein labeling. We also showed that the affinities of the aptamer/target interaction can change between direct and indirect labeling and conditions to optimize for the highest fluorescence intensity will increase the sensitivity of the assay but will not change the overall affinity. Additionally, some sequences which did not initially bind demonstrated binding when conditions were optimized. These results, in combination with studies demonstrating enhanced binding in nonselection buffers, provided insights into the structure and affinity of aptamers critical for biosensor applications and allowed for generalizations in starting conditions for researchers wishing to investigate aptamers on a microarray surface. PMID:27042344

  19. The mammalian profilin isoforms display complementary affinities for PIP2 and proline-rich sequences.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, A; Verschelde, J L; Jonckheere, V; Goethals, M; Vandekerckhove, J; Ampe, C

    1997-02-03

    We present a study on the binding properties of the bovine profilin isoforms to both phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and proline-rich peptides derived from vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and cyclase-associated protein (CAP). Using microfiltration, we show that compared with profilin II, profilin I has a higher affinity for PIP2. On the other hand, fluorescence spectroscopy reveals that proline-rich peptides bind better to profilin II. At micromolar concentrations, profilin II dimerizes upon binding to proline-rich peptides. Circular dichroism measurements of profilin II reveal a significant conformational change in this protein upon binding of the peptide. We show further that PIP2 effectively competes for binding of profilin I to poly-L-proline, since this isoform, but not profilin II, can be eluted from a poly-L-proline column with PIP2. Using affinity chromatography on either profilin isoform, we identified profilin II as the preferred ligand for VASP in bovine brain extracts. The complementary affinities of the profilin isoforms for PIP2 and the proline-rich peptides offer the cell an opportunity to direct actin assembly at different subcellular localizations through the same or different signal transduction pathways.

  20. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  1. The affine cohomology spaces and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraj, Nizar Ben; Laraiedh, Ismail

    2016-12-01

    We compute the nth cohomology space of the affine Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) on the (1,1)-dimensional real superspace with coefficient in a large class of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-modules M. We apply our results to the module of weight densities and the module of linear differential operators acting on a superspace of weighted densities. This work is the generalization of a result by Basdouri et al. [The linear 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-invariant differential operators on weighted densities on the superspace ℝ1|n and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-relative cohomology, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 10 (2013), Article ID: 1320004, 9 pp.

  2. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  3. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  4. Engineering GCaMP affinity and kinetics for improved tracking of neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan Richard

    Fluorescent calcium indicator proteins (FCIPs) are powerful tools for monitoring neural activity. However, they still have significant performance limitations compared with synthetic indicators based on the small-molecule chelator BAPTA. Because of high cooperativity originating from a calmodulin-based recombinant calcium sensor, a given GECI is only sensitive to a small part of a neuron's likely calcium concentration range, which can span a range of 0.1-10 microM. GECIs also have up to 100-fold slower reponse kinetics than BAPTA-based indicators. Overcoming limitations in range and kinetics is a key step toward monitoring spike times and firing rates in cell-type-specific brain circuits. We are engaged in structure-based design to vary the affinity and accelerate the response kinetics of a widely used GECI, GCaMP3. We have designed more than 50 novel variants by targeted mutation of GCaMP3's calmodulin (CaM) domain and its intraprobe peptide partner, RS20. In our cuvet characterizations of purified protein, we have attained a nearly 40-fold (0.16-6 microM) range of KD without impairing per-molecule brightness. In stopped-flow biochemical measurements, off-responses to sharp decreases in calcium are more than 10 times faster than any other published GECI. Most of the gap in off-response speed between G-CaMP3 and BAPTA-based indicators could be closed without perturbing KD. In Drosophila antennal nerve axons, sensory stimulation-evoked fluorescence responses were significantly enhanced in speed and amplitude in two novel GECIs. With our biophysical measurements, we discovered that the N-lobe of the bilobular CaM domain is required for the high-fluorescence state and the C-lobe contributes to high affinity Ca2+ binding. To account for our observations, we propose a molecular dynamics model of GCaMP3 with two kinetic pathways leading to a high-fluorescence state. First, small amounts of Ca 2+ activate a slow "C-like" pathway through sequential binding to the C

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. [Isolation and purification of enhanced green fluorescent protein using chromatography].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qinghua; Song, Shuliang; Liang, Hao; Wang, Weili; Ji, Aiguo

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is a common biological marker. In this research, on the foundation of successful clone and expression of EGFP, a two-step chromatographic method was established to separate and purify EGFP, which includes the use of HisTrap HP immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and Sephadex G-10 HR size exclusion chromatography in sequence. Sephacryl S-300 HR size exclusion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were used to check out the purity of EGFP. At last, it was found that EGFP still had fluorescent activity using fluorescence spectrophotometric detection and Native-PAGE detection. This method can effectively separate the active EGFP. The purity of the obtained EGFP was more than 98%.

  9. Effect of oxygen on free radicals in DOPA-melanin complexes with netilmicin, diamagnetic Zn(II), and paramagnetic Cu(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine interactions between molecules of oxygen O2 and free radicals of DOPA-melanin and its complexes with netilmicin, Zn(II) and Cu(II). EPR spectra were measured for evacuated samples and then compared to earlier data for the samples in air. The concentrations of free radicals in the evacuated samples were higher than for samples in air. The strongest effect was observed for DOPA-melanin and melanin samples containing Cu(II). Evacuation of DOPA-melanin and DOPA-melanin-Cu(II) samples causes high EPR line broadening. Faster spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in evacuated melanin samples than in samples in air.

  10. Isostructural 1D coordination polymers of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) with phenylpropynoic acid and DABCO as organic linkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, Rajendran; Varghese, Babu; Sankararaman, Sethuraman

    2014-11-01

    Using phenylpropynoic acid (PPA) and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) as organic spacers, isostructural coordination polymers of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) were synthesized by solvothermal method and structurally characterized using single crystal XRD, powder XRD, 13C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal XRD data revealed four PPA units coordinating with two metal ions forming a paddle wheel secondary building unit (SBU). The paddle wheel units are connected through coordination of DABCO nitrogen to the metal centers from the axial positions leading to the formation of the 1D coordination polymers along the c axis. Intermolecular π stacking and Csbnd H…π interactions between the adjacent polymer chains convert the 1D coordination polymer into an interesting 3D network with the Csbnd H…π bonds running along the crystallographic a and b axes. Thermal and nitrogen adsorption studies of these coordination polymers are reported.

  11. New metastable hybrid phase, Zn 2(OH) 2(C 8H 4O 4), exhibiting unique oxo-penta-coordinated Zn(II) atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Anne; Mesbah, Adel; Aranda, Lionel; Rabu, Pierre; François, Michel

    2009-04-01

    The metastable phase ( phase 1) Zn(OH) 2(tp) 2 (tp = C 8H 4O 42-) was found to be an intermediate forming during the hydrothermal synthesis of Zn 3(OH) 4tp ( phase 2). Its structure has been determined ab initio from synchrotron powder diffraction data and refined with the Rietveld method: space group P2 1/ c, a = 3.48856(2) Å, b = 5.84645(2) Å, c = 22.1331(1) Å, β = 103.46(1)°, Dx = 2.488 g/cm 3, Rp = 0.10, RB = 0.095 (402 independent reflections). The structures of the two analogues were compared. Whereas a mixed coordination of the zinc atoms was found in phase 2, phase 1 exhibits only penta-coordinated Zn(II). Moreover, different optical properties were observed, Zn 2(OH) 2(tp) showing photoluminescence at 378 nm under λex = 316 nm.

  12. Inhibition of the HIF1α-p300 interaction by quinone- and indandione-mediated ejection of structural Zn(II)

    PubMed Central

    Jayatunga, Madura K. P.; Thompson, Sam; McKee, Tawnya C.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Reece, Kelie M.; Hardy, Adam P.; Sekirnik, Rok; Seden, Peter T.; Cook, Kristina M.; McMahon, James B.; Figg, William D.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions between the hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) and the transcriptional coactivators p300/CBP are potential cancer targets due to their role in the hypoxic response. A natural product based screen led to the identification of indandione and benzoquinone derivatives that reduce the tight interaction between a HIF-1α fragment and the CH1 domain of p300. The indandione derivatives were shown to fragment to give ninhydrin, which was identified as the active species. Both the naphthoquinones and ninhydrin were observed to induce Zn(II) ejection from p300 and the catalytic domain of the histone demethylase KDM4A. Together with previous reports on the effects of reated compounds on HIF-1α and other systems, the results suggest that care should be taken in interpreting biological results obtained with highly electrophilic/ thiol modifying compounds. PMID:25023609

  13. Chitosan supported Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes as heterogeneous catalysts for one-pot synthesis of amides from ketones via Beckmann rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anuradha; Kumari, Shweta; Layek, Samaresh; Pathak, Devendra D.

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan supported Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, TGA, XRD, FESEM, EDX, AAS and Elemental Analysis. These complexes have been found to be efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalysts for the one-pot synthesis of amides via Beckmann rearrangement. All three complexes can be easily filtered out from the reaction medium and reused up to five times without significant loss of catalytic activity. The reported protocol is economical and novel in the sense that amides can be easily synthesized in only one-step. All products were obtained as white to off-white crystalline solids and fully characterized by 1H NMR, FT-IR and Mass Spectra.

  14. Two-dimensional fluorescence intensity distribution analysis: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Kask, P; Palo, K; Fay, N; Brand, L; Mets, U; Ullmann, D; Jungmann, J; Pschorr, J; Gall, K

    2000-04-01

    A method of sample analysis is presented which is based on fitting a joint distribution of photon count numbers. In experiments, fluorescence from a microscopic volume containing a fluctuating number of molecules is monitored by two detectors, using a confocal microscope. The two detectors may have different polarizational or spectral responses. Concentrations of fluorescent species together with two specific brightness values per species are determined. The two-dimensional fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (2D-FIDA), if used with a polarization cube, is a tool that is able to distinguish fluorescent species with different specific polarization ratios. As an example of polarization studies by 2D-FIDA, binding of 5'-(6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine) (TAMRA)-labeled theophylline to an anti-theophylline antibody has been studied. Alternatively, if two-color equipment is used, 2D-FIDA can determine concentrations and specific brightness values of fluorescent species corresponding to individual labels alone and their complex. As an example of two-color 2D-FIDA, binding of TAMRA-labeled somatostatin-14 to the human type-2 high-affinity somatostatin receptors present in stained vesicles has been studied. The presented method is unusually accurate among fluorescence fluctuation methods. It is well suited for monitoring a variety of molecular interactions, including receptors and ligands or antibodies and antigens.

  15. A novel fluorescent probe: europium complex hybridized T7 phage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-Mei; Jin, Qiaoling; Sutton, April; Chen, Liaohai

    2005-01-01

    We report on the creation of a novel fluorescent probe of europium-complex hybridized T7 phage. It was made by filling a ligand-displayed T7 ghost phage with a fluorescent europium complex particle. The structure of the hybridized phage, which contains a fluorescent inorganic core surrounded by a ligand-displayed capsid shell, was confirmed by electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), bioassays, and fluorescence spectrometer. More importantly, as a benefit of the phage display technology, the hybridized phage has the capability to integrate an affinity reagent against virtually any target molecules. The approach provides an original method to fluorescently "tag" a bioligand and/or to "biofunctionalize" a fluorophore particle. By using other types of materials such as radioactive or magnetic particles to fill the ghost phage, we envision that the hybridized phages represent a new class of fluorescent, magnetic, or radioprobes for imaging and bioassays and could be used both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Al(OH)3 facilitated synthesis of water-soluble, magnetic, radiolabelled and fluorescent hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cui, X; Green, M A; Blower, P J; Zhou, D; Yan, Y; Zhang, W; Djanashvili, K; Mathe, D; Veres, D S; Szigeti, K

    2015-06-07

    Magnetic and fluorescent hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were synthesised using Al(OH)3-stabilised MnFe2O4 or Fe3O4 nanoparticles as precursors. They were readily and efficiently radiolabelled with (18)F. Bisphosphonate polyethylene glycol polymers were utilised to endow the nanoparticles with excellent colloidal stability in water and to incorporate cyclam for high affinity labelling with (64)Cu.

  17. Studies on interactions between plant secondary metabolites and glutathione transferase using fluorescence quenching method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Cheng, Xinsheng; Wang, Chuanqin; Xue, Zechun; Yang, Liwen; Xi, Zheng

    2007-04-01

    The interactions between plant secondary metabolites (tannic acid, rutin, cinnamic acid and catechin) and glutathione transferase (GST) were investigated by fluorescence and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Intrinsic fluorescence of GST was measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan (Trp) residues and quenching constants were determined using the Stern-Volmer equation. The binding affinity was found to be strongest for tannic acid and ranked in the order tannic acid>rutin>cinnamic acid>catechin. The pH values in the range of 6.7-7.9, except for tannic acid, did not affect significantly the affinity of rutin, cinnamic acid and catechin with GST. Results showed that the fluorescence quenching of GST was a static_quenching. Fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy suggested that only the tannic acid changed the microenvironment of the Trp residues. Furthermore, the number of binding sites and binding constants at different pH values showed that tannic acid had strongest affinity towards GST and hydrogen bonding played an important role in the affinity between GST and the metabolites.

  18. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1996-01-01

    Novel fluorescent DNA-staining dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts.

  19. Affinity chromatography of GroEL chaperonin based on denatured proteins: role of electrostatic interactions in regulation of GroEL affinity for protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kaĭsheva, A L; Kashparov, I A; Kotova, N V; Kaliman, P A; Semisotnov, G V

    2006-12-01

    The chaperonin GroEL of the heat shock protein family from Escherichia coli cells can bind various polypeptides lacking rigid tertiary structure and thus prevent their nonspecific association and provide for acquisition of native conformation. In the present work we studied the interaction of GroEL with six denatured proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, ribonuclease A, egg lysozyme in the presence of dithiothreitol, pepsin, beta-casein, and apocytochrome c) possessing negative or positive total charge at neutral pH values and different in hydrophobicity (affinity for a hydrophobic probe ANS). To prevent the influence of nonspecific association of non-native proteins on their interaction with GroEL and make easier the recording of the complexing, the proteins were covalently attached to BrCN-activated Sepharose. At low ionic strength (lower than 60 mM), tight binding of the negatively charged denatured proteins with GroEL (which is also negatively charged) needed relatively low concentrations (approximately 10 mM) of bivalent cations Mg2+ or Ca2+. At the high ionic strength (approximately 600 mM), a tight complex was produced also in the absence of bivalent cations. In contrast, positively charged denatured proteins tightly interacted with GroEL irrespectively of the presence of bivalent cations and ionic strength of the solution (from 20 to 600 mM). These features of GroEL interaction with positively and negatively charged denatured proteins were confirmed by polarized fluorescence (fluorescence anisotropy). The findings suggest that the affinity of GroEL for denatured proteins can be determined by the balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions.

  20. Chromosome pairing affinities in interspecific hybrids reflect phylogenetic distances among lady's slipper orchids (Paphiopedilum)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung-I; Chang, Fang-Chi; Chung, Mei-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Lady's slipper orchids (Paphiopedilum) are of high value in floriculture, and interspecific hybridization has long been used for breeding improved cultivars; however, information regarding the genome affinities of species and chromosome pairing behaviour of the hybrids remains almost unknown. The present work analyses the meiotic behaviour of interspecific hybrids by genomic in situ hybridization and cytologically evaluates the genomic relationships among parental species. Methods Eight interspecific F1 hybrids of Paphiopedilum species in various subgenera or sections were investigated in this study. The chromosome behaviour in meiosis of these interspecific hybrids was analysed and subjected to genomic in situ hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Key Results Genomic in situ hybridization was demonstrated as an efficient method to differentiate between Paphiopedilum genomes and to visualize the chromosome pairing affinities in interspecific F1 hybrids, clarifying the phylogenetic distances among these species. Comparatively regular chromosome pairing observed in the hybrids of P. delenatii × P. bellatulum, P. delenatii × P. rothschildianum and P. rothschildianum × P. bellatulum suggested high genomic affinities and close relationships between parents of each hybrid. In contrast, irregular chromosome associations, such as univalents, trivalents and quadrivalents occurred frequently in the hybrids derived from distant parents with divergent karyotypes, such as P. delenatii × P. callosum, P. delenatii × P. glaucophyllum, P. rothschildianum × P. micranthum and P. rothschildianum × P. moquetteanum. The existence of multivalents and autosyndesis demonstrated by genomic in situ hybridization in this study indicates that some micro-rearrangements and other structural alterations may also play a part in differentiating Paphiopedilum species at chromosomal level, demonstrated as different chromosome pairing affinities in

  1. Application of volcanic ash particles for protein affinity purification with a minimized silica-binding tag.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed A A; Ikeda, Takeshi; Motomura, Kei; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    We recently reported that the spore coat protein, CotB1 (171 amino acids), from Bacillus cereus mediates silica biomineralization and that the polycationic C-terminal sequence of CotB1 (14 amino acids), designated CotB1p, serves as a silica-binding tag when fused to other proteins. Here, we reduced the length of this silica-binding tag to only seven amino acids (SB7 tag: RQSSRGR) while retaining its affinity for silica. Alanine scanning mutagenesis indicated that the three arginine residues in the SB7 tag play important roles in binding to a silica surface. Monomeric l-arginine, at concentrations of 0.3-0.5 M, was found to serve as a competitive eluent to release bound SB7-tagged proteins from silica surfaces. To develop a low-cost, silica-based affinity purification procedure, we used natural volcanic ash particles with a silica content of ∼70%, rather than pure synthetic silica particles, as an adsorbent for SB7-tagged proteins. Using green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mKate2 as model proteins, our purification method achieved 75-90% recovery with ∼90% purity. These values are comparable to or even higher than that of the commonly used His-tag affinity purification. In addition to low cost, another advantage of our method is the use of l-arginine as the eluent because its protein-stabilizing effect would help minimize alteration of the intrinsic properties of the purified proteins. Our approach paves the way for the use of naturally occurring materials as adsorbents for simple, low-cost affinity purification.

  2. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  3. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  4. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  5. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  6. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  7. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  8. Reinforcement of frontal affinity chromatography for effective analysis of lectin-oligosaccharide interactions.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, J; Arata, Y; Kasai, K

    2000-08-25

    Frontal affinity chromatography is a method for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. We reinforced it by incorporating various merits of a contemporary liquid chromatography system. As a model study, the interaction between an immobilized Caenorhabditis elegans galectin (LEC-6) and fluorescently labeled oligosaccharides (pyridylaminated sugars) was analyzed. LEC-6 was coupled to N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated Sepharose 4 Fast Flow (100 microm diameter), and packed into a miniature column (e.g., 10 x 4.0 mm, 0.126 ml). Twelve pyridylaminated oligosaccharides were applied to the column through a 2-ml sample loop, and their elution patterns were monitored by fluorescence. The volume of the elution front (V) determined graphically for each sample was compared with that obtained in the presence of an excess amount of hapten saccharide, lactose (V0); and the dissociation constant, Kd, was calculated according to the literature [K. Kasai, Y. Oda, M. Nishikawa, S. Ishii, J. Chromatogr. 376 (1986) 33]. This system also proved to be useful for an inverse confirmation; that is, application of galectins to an immobilized glycan column (in the present case, asialofetuin was immobilized on Sepharose 4 Fast Flow), and the elution profiles were monitored by fluorescence based on tryptophan. The relative affinity of various galectins for asialofetuin could be easily compared in terms of the extent of retardation. The newly constructed system proved to be extremely versatile. It enabled rapid (analysis time 12 min/cycle) and sensitive (20 nM for pyridylaminated derivatives, and 1 microg/ml for protein) analyses of lectin-carbohydrate interactions. It should become a powerful tool for elucidation of biomolecular interactions, in particular for functional analysis of a large number of proteins that should be the essential issues of post-genome projects.

  9. Removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) by hematite nanoparticles: effect of sorbent concentration, pH, temperature, and exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Heather J; Engates, Karen E; Grover, Valerie A

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticles offer the potential to improve environmental treatment technologies due to their unique properties. Adsorption of metal ions (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Zn(II)) to nanohematite was examined as a function of sorbent concentration, pH, temperature, and exhaustion. Adsorption experiments were conducted with 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 g/L nanoparticles in a pH 8 solution and in spiked San Antonio tap water. The adsorption data showed the ability of nanohematite to remove Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn species from solution with adsorption increasing as the nanoparticle concentration increased. At 0.5 g/L nanohematite, 100 % Pb species adsorbed, 94 % Cd species adsorbed, 89 % Cu species adsorbed and 100 % Zn species adsorbed. Adsorption kinetics for all metals tested was described by a pseudo second-order rate equation with lead having the fastest rate of adsorption. The effect of temperature on adsorption showed that Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) underwent an endothermic reaction, while Zn(II) underwent an exothermic reaction. The nanoparticles were able to simultaneously remove multiple metals species (Zn, Cd, Pb, and Cu) from both a pH 8 solution and spiked San Antonio tap water. Exhaustion experiments showed that at pH 8, exhaustion did not occur for the nanoparticles but adsorption does decrease for Cd, Cu, and Zn species but not Pb species. The strong adsorption coupled with the ability to simultaneously remove multiple metal ions offers a potential remediation method for the removal of metals from water.

  10. Five coordinate M(II)-diphenolate [M = Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)] Schiff base complexes exhibiting metal- and ligand-based redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Franks, Mark; Gadzhieva, Anastasia; Ghandhi, Laura; Murrell, David; Blake, Alexander J; Davies, E Stephen; Lewis, William; Moro, Fabrizio; McMaster, Jonathan; Schröder, Martin

    2013-01-18

    Five-coordinate Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes containing pentadentate N(3)O(2) Schiff base ligands [1A](2-) and [1B](2-) have been synthesized and characterized. X-ray crystallographic studies reveal five coordinate structures in which each metal ion is bound by two imine N-donors, two phenolate O-donors, and a single amine N-donor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies suggest that the N(3)O(2) coordination spheres of [Cu(1A)] and [Cu(1B)] are retained in CH(2)Cl(2) solution and solid-state superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometric studies confirm that [Ni(1A)] and [Ni(1B)] adopt high spin (S = 1) configurations. Each complex exhibits two reversible oxidation processes between +0.05 and +0.64 V vs [Fc](+)/[Fc]. The products of one- and two-electron oxidations have been studied by UV/vis spectroelectrochemistry and by EPR spectroscopy which confirm that each oxidation process for the Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes is ligand-based with sequential formation of mono- and bis-phenoxyl radical species. In contrast, the one-electron oxidation of the Ni(II) complexes generates Ni(III) products. This assignment is supported by spectroelectrochemical and EPR spectroscopic studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and the single crystal X-ray structure of [Ni(1A)][BF(4)] which contains Ni in a five-coordinate distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  11. Phenoxo bridged dinuclear Zn(II) Schiff base complex as new precursor for preparation zinc oxide nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structures and photoluminescence studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saeednia, S.; Iranmanesh, P.; Ardakani, M. Hatefi; Mohammadi, M.; Norouzi, Gh.

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • A novel nano-scale Zn(II) complex was synthesized by solvothermal method. • Chemical structure of the nanostructures was characterized as well as bulk complex. • The photoluminescence property of the complex was investigated at room temperature. • The thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis were carried out. • Thermal decomposition of the nanostructures was prepared zinc oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of a novel Zn(II) Schiff base complex, [Zn(HL)NO{sub 3}]{sub 2} (1), (H{sub 2}L = 2-[(2-hydroxy-propylimino) methyl] phenol), was synthesized by using solvothermal method. Shape, morphology and chemical structure of the synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectoscopy (FT-IR) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Structural determination of compound 1 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results were revealed that the zinc complex is a centrosymmetric dimer in which deprotonated phenolates bridge the two five-coordinate metal atoms and link the two halves of the dimer. The thermal stability of compound 1 was analyzed by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of the initial substrates concentration and reaction time on size and morphology of compound 1 nanostructure was investigated as well. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of the complex 1 were examined. ZnO nanoparticles with diameter between 15 and 20 nm were simply synthesized by solid-state transformation of compound 1 at 700 °C.

  12. Smooth affine shear tight frames: digitization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly discuss one of the recent developed directional multiscale representation systems: smooth affine shear tight frames. A directional wavelet tight frame is generated by isotropic dilations and translations of directional wavelet generators, while an affine shear tight frame is generated by anisotropic dilations, shears, and translations of shearlet generators. These two tight frames are actually connected in the sense that the affine shear tight frame can be obtained from a directional wavelet tight frame through subsampling. Consequently, an affine shear tight frame indeed has an underlying filter bank from the MRA structure of its associated directional wavelet tight frame. We call such filter banks affine shear filter banks, which can be designed completely in the frequency domain. We discuss the digitization of affine shear filter banks and their implementations: the forward and backward digital affine shear transforms. Redundancy rate and computational complexity of digital affine shear transforms are also investigated in this paper. Numerical experiments and comparisons in image/video processing show the advantages of digital affine shear transforms over many other state-of-art directional multiscale representation systems.

  13. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  14. Laser fluorescence diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. K.; Krasilnikov, D. M.; Turkin, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper descsribes the development of an apparatus, method, and practical recommendation on using fluorescence diagnostics in alimentary-intestinal tract surgery and analyses of blood serum and plasma for investigating influence of various drug preparations on a human organism. The report of the firm Israel Aircraft Industries on the high efficiency of using fluorescent analysis in early diagnostics of rectum, lung, and breast cancer has stimulated our publication.

  15. Phase-Conjugated Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number)FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP PHASE-CONJUGATED FLUORESCENCE EMITTED POWER FOUR -WAVE MIXING THREE CONTRIBUTIONS...atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave mixing is studied from first principles. The MaxwellLeisenberg equations are solved for the...Fronczak Hall State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14260 Fluorescent emission by an atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave

  16. Renal protein reactivity and stability of antibiotic amphenicols: structure and affinity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, the molecular recognition of the oldest active amphenicols by the most popular renal carrier, lysozyme, was deciphered by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling at the molecular scale. Steady state fluorescence data showed that the recognition of amphenicol by lysozyme yields a static type of fluorescence quenching. This corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results that lysozyme-amphenicol adduct formation has a moderate affinity of 10(4) M(-1), and the driving forces were found to be chiefly hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and π stacking. Far-UV CD spectra confirmed that the spatial structure of lysozyme was slightly changed with a distinct reduction of α-helices in the presence of amphenicol, suggesting partial destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, via the extrinsic 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescence spectral properties and molecular modeling, one could see that the amphenicol binding site was situated at the deep crevice on the protein surface, and the ligand was also near to several crucial amino acid residues, such as Trp-62, Trp-63 and Arg-73. Simultaneously, contrastive studies of protein-amphenicols revealed clearly that some substituting groups, e.g. nitryl in the molecular structure of ligands, may be vitally important for the recognition activity of amphenicols with lysozyme. Due to the connection of amphenicols with fatal detrimental effects and because lysozyme has been applied as a drug carrier for proximal tubular targeting, the discussion herein is necessary for rational antibiotic use, development of safe antibiotics and particularly a better appraisal of the risks associated with human exposure to toxic agrochemicals.

  17. Uptake and distribution of fluorescently labeled cobalamin in neoplastic and healthy breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Michelle J.; McGreevy, James M.; Holden, Joseph A.; West, Frederick G.; Grissom, Charles B.

    2000-05-01

    Fluorescent analogs of cobalamin (vitamin B12) have been developed as diagnostic markers of cancer cells. These compounds are recognized by transcobalamin, a cobalamin transport protein, with high affinity, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. The cellular sequestration and gross distribution of fluorescent cobalamin bioconjugates in breast tissue is being examined by epifluorescence microscopy. The distribution of each compound is being evaluated in proliferative and non-proliferative tissue, i.e. normal tissue and breast carcinoma. The results of preliminary studies suggest that fluorescent analogs of cobalamin may be a useful tool in therapeutic breast operations to define tumor margins and to distinguish neoplastic breast tissue from healthy breast tissue.

  18. Fluorescence turn-on sensing of protein based on mannose functionalized perylene bisimides and its fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Rang; An, Hong-Wei; Rong, Rui-Xue; Cao, Zhi-Ran; Li, Xiao-Liu

    2014-08-15

    A new water-soluble glycocluster based on perylene bisimides PBI-12-Man has been designed and synthesized, and its specific and selective binding property with Concanavalin A (Con A) has been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, which showed strong binding affinity for Con A with the binding constant of 8.2×10(5)M(-1) for monomeric mannose unit, two orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding monosaccharide ligand. Most interestingly, a fluorescence enhancement of PBI-12-Man was observed upon binding with Con A because of deaggregation of the self-assembly of PBI-12-Man induced by carbohydrate-protein interaction, and the further study of the fluorescence enhancement with macrophage cells showed that PBI-12-Man as a biocompatible agent had fluorescence imaging of the surface mannose receptor of the cells. Such fluorescence turn-on sensing of protein based on carbohydrate-protein interactions would facilitate the development of new protein-specific fluorescent probe for diagnosis and molecular imaging under live cell conditions.

  19. Fluorescence of Melanin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, James Martin

    1981-06-01

    Optical fluorescence in aqueous suspensions of synthetic dopa melanin has been detected and investigated. A fluorescence lifetime of 8.3 ns was measured in pulsed laser experiments. Fluorescence was observed for excitation between 290 and 420 nm. The emission as a function of wavelength displayed a single broad maximum falling between 440 and 480 nm, depending on excitation wavelength. The dependence of the quantum efficiency for fluorescence on parameters such as solution temperature, viscosity, pH, and concentration of metal ion, such as copper, has been investigated. The emission intensity decreased at both high and low values of pH, with increasing temperatures, and with increasing metal ion concentration, and decreasing viscosity. The pH dependence of the fluorescence can be related to changes in the ionization state of the various ionizable groups attached to the fluorophores. A self consistent model was developed in which proton transfer from these groups was fast compared with fluorescence rates for one type of fluorophore and slow compared with those for another type. The fluorescence dependence on copper ion concentration is explained in terms of a model invoking a reaction between melanin fluorophores and copper ions leading to the formation of a melanin-copper complex which is itself fluorescent. A model incorporating diffusion controlled chemical reactions between fluorescents groups and quencher groups on the melanin polymer is developed and used to explain the observed dependence of melanin fluorescence on solvent viscosity. Over the temperature range 20(DEGREES)C-70(DEGREES)C, an Arrhenius type behavior was found with an activation enthalpy of 1.3 Kcal/mole. Using the temperature dependence of the viscous quenching model as well as the temperature dependence of the fluorophore-radical equilibrium concentration leads to a temperature dependence which is in reasonable agreement with the observed behavior. Many aspects of the experimental results

  20. Affine connection form of Regge calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Regge action is represented analogously to how the Palatini action for general relativity (GR) as some functional of the metric and a general connection as independent variables represents the Einstein-Hilbert action. The piecewise flat (or simplicial) spacetime of Regge calculus is equipped with some world coordinates and some piecewise affine metric which is completely defined by the set of edge lengths and the world coordinates of the vertices. The conjugate variables are the general nondegenerate matrices on the three-simplices which play the role of a general discrete connection. Our previous result on some representation of the Regge calculus action in terms of the local Euclidean (Minkowsky) frame vectors and orthogonal connection matrices as independent variables is somewhat modified for the considered case of the general linear group GL(4, R) of the connection matrices. As a result, we have some action invariant w.r.t. arbitrary change of coordinates of the vertices (and related GL(4, R) transformations in the four-simplices). Excluding GL(4, R) connection from this action via the equations of motion we have exactly the Regge action for the considered spacetime.

  1. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  2. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  3. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  4. Cambrian trilobites with Siberian affinities, southwestern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.R.; Egbert, R.M.; Sullivan, R.; Knoth, J.S.

    1985-02-01

    Cambrian trilobites occur in two levels (about 7 m apart) in the core of a large, complex anticlinal structure in the area between the Taylor Mountains and the Hoholitna River in southwestern Alaska. The lower collection contains Erbia, Macannaia (a species close to Soviet forms described as Pagetia ferox Lermontova), two species of Kootenia (including one perhaps cospecific with forms from the central Brooks range), and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. It is clear that biogeographic affinities are with the transitional facies of the eastern Siberian platform and the south Siberian foldbelt. In Soviet terms, the age of the collection falls in a disputed interval called latest Early Cambrian (Tojonian) by some authors, and earliest Middle Cambrian (Amgan) by others. In North American terms, Macannaia is known only from early Middle Cambrian beds. The younger collection contains abundant agnostids, a variety of conocoryphids, Paradoxides, and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. This is an assemblage of undoubted late Middle Cambrian age, comparable to faunas described from the Maya State of the Siberian platform and the Paradoxides paradoxissimus Stage of the Baltic region. Both faunas are from ocean-facing or outer shelf environments. None of the key non-agnostid or non-pagetiid elements have been seen previously in deposits of Cambrian North America.

  5. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  6. Macroporous chitin affinity membranes for lysozyme separation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, E; Zeng, X

    1997-12-20

    Macroporous chitin membranes with high, controlled porosity and good mechanical properties have been prepared using a technique developed in this laboratory based on silica particles as porogen. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme. Chitin membranes (1 mm thickness) can be operated at high fluxes (>/=1.1 mL/min/cm(2)) corresponding to pressure drops >/=2 psi. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme ( approximately 50 mg/mL membrane) is by an order of magnitude higher than that of the chitin beads employed in column separation. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the membranes showed very high selectivity towards lysozyme. The effect of some important operation parameters, such as the flow rates during loading and elution were investigated. Lysozyme of very high purity (>98%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and from egg white. The results indicate that the macroporous chitin membranes can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme at large scale. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 610-617, 1997.

  7. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  8. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  9. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  10. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kyle G; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-28

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein's affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states.

  11. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  12. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  13. Bisubstrate fluorescent probes and biosensors in binding assays for HTS of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Uri, Asko; Lust, Marje; Vaasa, Angela; Lavogina, Darja; Viht, Kaido; Enkvist, Erki

    2010-03-01

    Conjugates of adenosine mimics and d-arginine-rich peptides (ARCs) are potent inhibitors of protein kinases (PKs) from the AGC group. Labeling ARCs with fluorescent dyes or immobilizing on chip surfaces gives fluorescent probes (ARC-Photo) and biosensors that can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of protein kinases. The bisubstrate character (simultaneous association with both binding sites of the kinase) and high affinity of ARCs allow ARC-based probes and sensors to be used for characterization of inhibitors targeted to either binding site of the kinase with affinities in whole nanomolar to micromolar range. The ability to penetrate cell plasma membrane and bind to the target kinase fused with a fluorescent protein leads to the possibility to use ARC-Photo probes for high content screening (HCS) of inhibitors in cellular milieu with detection of intensity of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores.

  14. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  15. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    PubMed

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  16. Antimicrobial photodisinfection with Zn(II) phthalocyanine adsorbed on TiO2 upon UVA and red irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, Vanya; Eneva, Ivelina; Kussovski, Vesselin; Borisova, Ekaterina; Angelov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The light exposure on a daily basis has been well accepted as a competitive method for decontamination of wastewater. The catalytic properties of TiO2 offer a great potential to reduce the transmission of pathogens in the environment. Although the titanium dioxide shows high activity against pathogens, its general usage in water cleaning is limited due to the insufficient excitation natural light (about 3% of the solar spectrum). A hydrophobic dodecylpyridyloxy Zn(II)-phthalocyanine with four peripheral hydrocarbon chains of C12 (ZnPcDo) was immobilized on a photocatalyst TiO2 anatase (P25). The resulted greenish colored nanoparticles of phthalocyanine were characterized by the means of absorption, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the phthalocyanine dye by the red fluorescence emission (650 - 740 nm). The intensive Q-band in the far red visible spectral region (~ 690 nm) suggested a monomeric state of phthalocyanine on TiO2 nanoparticles. Two pathogenic bacterial strains (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA and Salmonella enteritidis) associated with wastewater were photoinactivated with the suspension of the particles. The effective photoinactivation was observed with 1 g.L-1 TiO2 anatase at irradiation with UVA 364 nm as with UVA 364 nm and LED 643 nm. The gram-negative Salmonella enteritidis was fully photoinactivated with ZnPcDo-TiO2 and TiO2 alone at UVA 346 nm and at irradiation with two light sources (364 nm + 643 nm). The proposed conjugate appears as an useful composite material for antibacterial disinfection.

  17. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  18. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  19. Camelid VHH affinity ligands enable separation of closely related biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Timothy M.; Wendeler, Michaela; Wang, Xiangyang; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interest in new and diverse classes of molecules such as recombinant toxins, enzymes, and blood factors continues to grow for use a biotherapeutics. Compared to monoclonal antibodies, these novel drugs typically lack a commercially available affinity chromatography option, which leads to greater process complexity, longer development timelines, and poor platformability. To date, for both monoclonal antibodies and novel molecules, affinity chromatography has been mostly reserved for separation of process‐related impurities such as host cell proteins and DNA. Reports of affinity purification of closely related product variants and modified forms are much rarer. In this work we describe custom affinity chromatography development using camelid VHH antibody fragments as "tunable" immunoaffinity ligands for separation of product‐related impurities. One example demonstrates high selectivity for a recombinant immunotoxin where no binding was observed for an undesired deamidated species. Also discussed is affinity purification of a coagulation factor through specific recognition of the gamma‐carboxylglutamic acid domain. PMID:27677057

  20. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  1. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  2. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  3. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  4. A new boronic acid fluorescent sensor based on fluorene for monosaccharides at physiological pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Rahman; Mohadjerani, Maryam; Pooryousef, Mona; Eslami, Abbas; Emami, Saeed

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent boronic acids are very useful fluorescent sensor for detection of biologically important saccharides. Herein we synthesized a new fluorene-based fluorescent boronic acid that shows significant fluorescence changes upon addition of saccharides at physiological pH. Upon addition of fructose, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, ribose, and maltose at different concentration to the solution of 7-(dimethylamino)-9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl-2-boronic acid (7-DMAFBA, 1), significant decreases in fluorescent intensity were observed. It was found that this boronic acid has high affinity (Ka = 3582.88 M-1) and selectivity for fructose over glucose at pH = 7.4. The sensor 1 showed a linear response toward D-fructose in the concentrations ranging from 2.5 × 10-5 to 4 × 10-4 mol L-1 with the detection limit of 1.3 × 10-5 mol L-1.

  5. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  6. The effect of Cu2+ on interaction between flavonoids with different C-ring substituents and bovine serum albumin: structure-affinity relationship aspect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuping; Shi, Shuyun; Sun, Xiaorui; Xiong, Xiang; Peng, Mijun

    2011-12-01

    Four flavonoids quercetin (QU), luteolin (LU), taxifolin (TA) and (+)-catechin (CA) with the same A- and B-rings but different C-ring substituents have been investigated for their binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the absence and presence of Cu(2+) by means of various spectroscopic methods such as fluorescence, UV-visible and circular dichroism (CD). The results indicated that hydroxyl group at 3-position increased the binding affinities between flavonoids and BSA. The values of the binding affinities were in the order: QU>CA>TA>LU. The presence of Cu(2+) affected the interactions of flavonoids with BSA significantly. The binding affinities of QU and TA for BSA were decreased about 6.7% and 13.2%. However, the binding affinities of LU and CA for BSA were increased about 43.0% and 20.7%. The formation of Cu(2+)-flavonoid complex and steric hindrance together influenced the binding affinities of QU, LU and TA for BSA, while the conformational change of BSA may be the main reason for the increased binding affinity of CA for BSA. However, the quenching mechanism for QU, LU, TA and CA to BSA was based on static quenching combined with non-radiative energy transfer irrespective of the absence or presence of Cu(2+). The UV-visible results showed the change in BSA conformation and the formation of flavonoid-Cu(2+) complex. The CD results also explained the conformational changes of BSA on binding with flavonoids.

  7. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  8. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to < 10 ns. A temporal resolution of half the excitation period is possible which in this instance is 15 ns. This stroboscopic technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  9. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime attachment LIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Oord, Cornelius J. R.; Stoop, Karel W. J.; van Geest, Lambertus K.

    2001-05-01

    We present the Lambert Instruments Fluorescence Lifetime Attachment LIFA. LIFA enables easy to use and affordable microscopy and macroscopic FLIM. The system implements the homodyne detection scheme for measuring the fluorescence lifetime in each pixel of the image. The microscopy system features an ultra bright LED illuminator, the LI-(mu) Cam intensified CCD camera a high frequency signal generator. The illuminator replaces the excitation light source of a standard fluorescence microscopy, while the LI-(mu) CAM intensified CCD camera is attached to the photo-port. Both the illuminator and the intensifier are modulated at a frequency up to 100 MHz at a series of phase differences. The lifetime image is calculated from the series of images on a personal computer.

  11. Affinity capillary electrophoresis: the theory of electromigration.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Dvořák, Martin; Ansorge, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We focus on the state-of-the-art theory of electromigration under single and multiple complexation equilibrium. Only 1:1 complexation stoichiometry is discussed because of its unique status in the field of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). First, we summarize the formulas for the effective mobility in various ACE systems as they appeared since the pioneering days in 1992 up to the most recent theories till 2015. Disturbing phenomena that do not alter the mobility of the analyte directly but cause an unexpected peak broadening have been studied only recently and are also discussed in this paper. Second, we turn our attention to the viscosity effects in ACE. Change in the background electrolyte viscosity is unavoidable in ACE but numerous observations scattered throughout the literature have not been reviewed previously. This leads to an uncritical employment of correction factors that may or may not be appropriate in practice. Finally, we consider the ionic strength effects in ACE, too. Limitations of the current theories are also discussed and the tasks identified where open problems still prevail. Graphical Abstract A weak base (A) undergoes an acidic-basic equilibria (in blue) and migrates with an electrophoretic mobility of [Formula: see text]. Simultaneously, it interacts with a selector (sel) while the analyte-selector complex migrates with an electrophoretic mobility of [Formula: see text]. The strength of the interaction (in orange) is governed by the binding constant, K A , and the concentration of the selector, c sel . This all gives the analyte an effective mobility of [Formula: see text] and moves it out of the zero position (EOF; right top insert). The interaction of the positively charged analyte with the neutral selector slows down the analyte with increasing selector concentration (right bottom insert).

  12. Molecular engineering of a fluorescent bioprobe for sensitive and selective detection of amphibole asbestos.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takenori; Alexandrov, Maxym; Nishimura, Tomoki; Hirota, Ryuichi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kuroda, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy-based affinity assay could enable highly sensitive and selective detection of airborne asbestos, an inorganic environmental pollutant that can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer. We have selected an Escherichia coli histone-like nucleoid structuring protein, H-NS, as a promising candidate for an amphibole asbestos bioprobe. H-NS has high affinity to amphibole asbestos, but also binds to an increasingly common asbestos substitute, wollastonite. To develop a highly specific Bioprobe for amphibole asbestos, we first identified a specific but low-affinity amosite-binding sequence by slicing H-NS into several fragments. Second, we constructed a streptavidin tetramer complex displaying four amosite-binding fragments, resulting in the 250-fold increase in the probe affinity as compared to the single fragment. The tetramer probe had sufficient affinity and specificity for detecting all the five types of asbestos in the amphibole group, and could be used to distinguish them from wollastonite. In order to clarify the binding mechanism and identify the amino acid residues contributing to the probe's affinity to amosite fibers, we constructed a number of shorter and substituted peptides. We found that the probable binding mechanism is electrostatic interaction, with positively charged side chains of lysine residues being primarily responsible for the probe's affinity to asbestos.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and biological activities of two Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with one polyquinoline ligand.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Li, Jun-Ling; Sun, Qian; Jiang, Lin; Gu, Wen; Liu, Xin; Tian, Jin-Lei; Yan, Shi-Ping

    2014-09-15

    Two new complexes, [CuLCl]ClO4 (1) and [Zn2L2SO4(H2O)2](ClO4)2 (2) [L=N,N-bis(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)quinolin-8-amine], have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The interactions of two complexes with CT-DNA have been investigated by UV absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis under physiological conditions. Results show that the complexes bind to CT-DNA with a moderate intercalative mode and exhibit efficient DNA cleavage activity on UV-A light of 365 nm. Furthermore, two complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process based on BSA binding experiments. Notably, in vitro cytotoxicity study of two complexes on four human tumor cells lines (7404, HeLa, MCF-7, and HepG-2) indicate that both of them have the potential to act as effective anticancer drugs with low IC50 values.

  14. A modified fluorescent intercalator displacement assay for RNA ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chow, Christine S.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) is a convenient and practical tool for identifying new nucleic-acid-binding ligands. The success of FID is based on the fact that it can be fashioned into a versatile screening assay for assessing the relative binding affinities of compounds to nucleic acids. FID is a tagless approach; the target RNAs and the ligands or small molecules under investigation do not have to be modified in order to be examined. In this study, a modified FID assay for screening RNA-binding ligands was established using 3-methyl-2-((1-(3-(trimethylammonio)propyl)-4-quinolinylidene)methyl)benzothiazolium (TO-PRO) as the fluorescent indicator. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results provide direct evidence that correlates the reduction in fluorescence intensity observed in the FID assay with displacement of the dye molecule from RNA. The assay was successfully applied to screen a variety of RNA-binding ligands with a set of small hairpin RNAs. Ligands that bind with moderate affinity to the chosen RNA constructs (A-site, TAR, h31, and H69) were identified. PMID:20863807

  15. Preparation of affinity membranes using thermally induced phase separation for one-step purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Takafumi; Hoe, Kazuki; Tabayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Shimada, Josui; Goto, Masahiro; Matsuyama, Hideto; Maruyama, Tatsuo

    2013-03-15

    We synthesized several surfactant-like ligands and prepared affinity membranes by introducing them into porous polymeric membranes using the thermally induced phase separation method. The ligands (nitrilotriacetate, iminodiacetate, and glutathione) were successfully displayed on the surfaces of cellulose diacetate membranes. Membranes functionalized with nitrilotriacetate and glutathione captured and released hexahistidine-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (His-tag GFP) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) selectively under appropriate conditions. The affinity membranes also enabled highly selective purification of target proteins (GFP and GST) from cell lysates. The protein-binding capacity was 15 μg/cm(2) for His-tag GFP and 13 μg/cm(2) for GST. The application-specific membranes described in this work will aid high-throughput screening and high-throughput analysis of recombinant proteins.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Molecularly Imprinted Graphene Quantum Dots for the Determination of Dopamine with Affinity-Adjustable.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xi; Wang, Anqi; Yu, Chenfei; Wu, Shishan; Shen, Jian

    2015-06-10

    A facilely prepared fluorescence sensor was developed for dopamine (DA) determination based on polyindole/graphene quantum dots molecularly imprinted polymers (PIn/GQDs@MIPs). The proposed sensor exhibits a high sensitivity with a linear range of 5 × 10(-10) to 1.2 × 10(-6) M and the limit of detection as low as 1 × 10(-10) M in the determination of DA, which is probably due to the tailor-made imprinted cavities for binding DA thought hydrogen bonds between amine groups of DA and oxygen-containing groups of the novel composite. Furthermore, the prepared sensor can rebind DA in dual-type: a low affinity type (noncovalent interaction is off) and a high affinity type (noncovalent interaction is on), and the rebinding interaction can be adjusted by tuning the pH, which shows a unique potential for adjusting the binding interaction while keeping the specificity, allowing for wider applications.

  17. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingge; Gelabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2016-05-07

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (≥10–5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Furthermore, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (≤10–6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) substantially (~52% to ~13% at 10–7 M, and ~23% to ~5% at 10–6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces (~15% to ~28% at 10–7 M, and ~1% to ~7% at 10–6 M) .The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (~28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (~13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10–7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 –1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions.

  18. MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry and thermogravimetric analysis of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) adducts with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol 5000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwelase, S. R.; Bariyanga, J.

    2002-05-01

    We have prepared and isolated complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol 5000 in a pH 7 buffer at 40 °C in order to study the interaction of this polymer carrier with the ions likely to be found in the human body. Their characterization was done by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The mass spectra allowed us to determine not only the molecular weights but also the nature of the complexes and the findings were in agreement with the elementary analysis data. The calcium ion was found not directly linked to polyethylene glycol but through water molecules. The overall results indicated strong bonding for Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes and weak interactions for Mg(II), Ca(II) and Pt(II).

  19. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  20. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  1. Fluorescent vancomycin and terephthalate comodified europium-doped layered double hydroxides nanoparticles: synthesis and application for bacteria labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Wang, Nan; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-09-01

    Vancomycin (Van)- and terephthalate (TA)-comodified europium-doped layered double hydroxides (Van-TA-Eu-LDHs) nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a two-step method, in which, TA acted as a sensitizer to enhance the fluorescent property and Van was modified on the surface of LDH to act as an affinity reagent to bacteria. The obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and fluorescent spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the prepared Van- and TA-comodified europium-doped layered double hydroxides (Van-TA-Eu-LDHs) nanoparticles with diameter of 50 nm in size showed highly efficient fluorescent property. Furthermore, due to the high affinity of Van to bacteria, the prepared Van-TA-Eu-LDHs nanoparticles showed efficient bacteria labelling by fluorescent property. The prepared nanoparticles may have wide applications in the biological fields, such as biomolecular labelling and cell imaging.

  2. Bright Fluorescence and Host-Guest Sensing with a Nanoscale M₄L₆ Tetrahedron Accessed by Self-Assembly of Zinc-Imine Chelate Vertices and Perylene Bisimide Edges.

    PubMed

    Frischmann, Peter D; Kunz, Valentin; Würthner, Frank

    2015-06-15

    A highly luminescent Zn4L6 tetrahedron is reported with 3.8 nm perylene bisimide edges and hexadentate Zn(II)-imine chelate vertices. Replacing Fe(II) and monoamines commonly utilized in subcomponent self-assembly with Zn(II) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine provides access to a metallosupramolecular host with the rare combination of structural integrity at concentrations <10(-7) mol L(-1) and an exceptionally high fluorescence quantum yield of Φ(em) =0.67. Encapsulation of multiple perylene or coronene guest molecules is accompanied by strong luminescence quenching. We anticipate this self-assembly strategy may be generalized to improve access to brightly fluorescent coordination cages tailored for host-guest light-harvesting, photocatalysis, and sensing.

  3. DNA Duplex Engineering for Enantioselective Fluorescent Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuehua; Lin, Fan; Wu, Tao; Zhou, Yufeng; Li, Qiusha; Shao, Yong; Xu, Zhiai

    2017-02-21

    The rapid identification of biomacromolecule structure that has a specific association with chiral enantiomers especially from natural sources will be helpful in developing enantioselective sensor and in speeding up drug exploitation. Herein, owing to its existence also in living cells, apurinic/apyrimidinic site (AP site) was first engineered into ds-DNA duplex to explore its competence in enantiomer selectivity. An AP site-specific fluorophore was utilized as an enantioselective discrimination probe to develop a straightforward chiral sensor using natural tetrahydropalmatine (L- and D-THP) as enantiomer representatives. We found that only L-THP can efficiently replace the prebound fluorophore to cause a significant fluorescence increase due to its specific binding with the AP site (two orders magnitude higher in affinity than binding with D-THP). The AP site binding specificity of L-THP over D-THP was assessed via intrinsic fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry, and DNA stability. The enantioselective performance can be easily tuned by the sequences near the AP site and the number of AP sites. A single AP site provides a perfect binding pocket to differentiate the chiral atom-induced structure discrepancy. We expect that our work will inspire interest in engineering local structures into a ds-DNA duplex for developing novel enantioselective sensors.

  4. Affinity and specificity of interactions between Nedd4 isoforms and the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Henry, Pauline C; Kanelis, Voula; O'Brien, M Christine; Kim, Brian; Gautschi, Ivan; Forman-Kay, Julie; Schild, Laurent; Rotin, Daniela

    2003-05-30

    The epithelial Na+ channel (alphabetagammaENaC) regulates salt and fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. Each ENaC subunit contains a PY motif (PPXY) that binds to the WW domains of Nedd4, a Hect family ubiquitin ligase containing 3-4 WW domains and usually a C2 domain. It has been proposed that Nedd4-2, but not Nedd4-1, isoforms can bind to and suppress ENaC activity. Here we challenge this notion and show that, instead, the presence of a unique WW domain (WW3*) in either Nedd4-2 or Nedd4-1 determines high affinity interactions and the ability to suppress ENaC. WW3* from either Nedd4-2 or Nedd4-1 binds ENaC-PY motifs equally well (e.g. Kd approximately 10 microm for alpha- or betaENaC, 3-6-fold higher affinity than WW4), as determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Moreover, dNedd4-1, which naturally contains a WW3* instead of WW2, is able to suppress ENaC function equally well as Nedd4-2. Homology models of the WW3*.betaENaC-PY complex revealed that a Pro and Ala conserved in all WW3*, but not other Nedd4-WW domains, help form the binding pocket for PY motif prolines. Extensive contacts are formed between the betaENaC-PY motif and the Pro in WW3*, and the small Ala creates a large pocket to accommodate the peptide. Indeed, mutating the conserved Pro and Ala in WW3* reduces binding affinity 2-3-fold. Additionally, we demonstrate that mutations in PY motif residues that form contacts with the WW domain based on our previously solved structure either abolish or severely reduce binding affinity to the WW domain and that the extent of binding correlates with the level of ENaC suppression. Independently, we show that a peptide encompassing the PY motif of sgk1, previously proposed to bind to Nedd4-2 and alter its ability to regulate ENaC, does not bind (or binds poorly) the WW domains of Nedd4-2. Collectively, these results suggest that high affinity of WW domain-PY-motif interactions rather than affiliation with Nedd4-1/Nedd-2 is critical for ENaC suppression

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter isolates from sediments and the association with phenanthrene binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    In this study, selected spectroscopic characteristics of sediment organic matter (SOM) were compared and discussed with respect to their different isolation methods, the source discrimination capabilities, and the association with the extent of phenanthrene binding. A total of 16 sediments were collected from three categorized locations including a costal lake, industrial areas, and upper streams, each of which is likely influenced by the organic sources of algal production, industrial effluent, and terrestrial input, respectively. The spectroscopic properties related to aromatic structures and terrestrial humic acids were more pronounced for alkaline extractable organic matter (AEOM) isolates than for the SOM isolates based on water soluble extracts and pore water. The three categorized sampling locations were the most differentiated in the AEOM isolates, suggesting AEOM may be the most representative SOM isolates in terms of describing the chemical properties and the organic sources of SOM. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) based on fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) showed that a combination of three fluorescent groups could represent all the fluorescence features of SOM. The three categorized sampling locations were well discriminated by the percent distributions of humic-like fluorescent groups of the AEOM isolates. The relative distribution of terrestrial humic-like fluorophores was well correlated with the extent of phenanthrene binding (r=0.571; p<0.05), suggesting that the presence of humic acids in SOM may contribute to the enhancement of binding with hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA) further demonstrated that the extent of SOM's binding affinity might be affected by the degree of biogeochemical transformation in SOM.

  6. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  7. Synthesis, characterization and DNA binding/cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of aminonaphthoquinone.

    PubMed

    Kosiha, A; Parthiban, C; Elango, Kuppanagounder P

    2017-03-01

    The Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of an aminonaphthoquinone ligand (L) have been prepared and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The structures of L and its Zn(II) complex are confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. The results indicate that Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes possess tetrahedral geometry while Cu(II) complex exhibits square planar structure. The interaction of L and its complexes with CT-DNA reveal that they could interact with CT-DNA through intercalation. The DNA cleavage studies of the L and its complexes indicate that the Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes cleave the circular form of the DNA relatively to a greater extent than the other complexes. The results of the interaction of these compounds with bovine serum albumin (BSA) indicate that the complexes exhibit a strong binding to BSA over the L. The in vitro anticancer activities indicate that these compounds exhibit substantial activity against human breast (MCF7) and lung cancer (A549) cell lines. The characteristics of apoptosis in cell morphology have been observed using AO/EB and DAPI staining and the results suggest that an apoptotic mode of cell death with these compounds. The overall results and discussion indicate that coordination of metal ions with the ligand enhances the biological activity.

  8. Spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 3-acetylcoumarin-isonicotinoylhydrazone and their antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunoor, Rekha S.; Patil, Basavaraj R.; Badiger, Dayananda S.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Chandrashekhar, V. M.; Muchchandi, I. S.

    2010-11-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with a new heterocyclic Schiff base derived by the condensation of isonicotinoylhydrazide and 3-acetylcoumarin have been synthesized. 1H, 13C and 2D HETCOR NMR analyses confirm the formation of title compound and existence of the same in two isomeric forms. The metal complexes were characterized on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques like electronic, EPR, IR, 1H and 13C NMR studies, elemental analysis, magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis, and also by the aid of molar conductivity measurements. It is found that the Schiff base behaves as a monobasic tridentate ligand coordinating in the imidol form with 1:1 metal to ligand stoichiometry. Trigonal bipyramidal geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, while tetrahedral for Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The compounds were subjected to antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity screening using serial broth dilution method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) is determined. Zn(II) complex has shown significant antifungal activity with an MIC of 6.25 μg/mL while Cu(II) complex is noticeable for antibacterial activity at the same concentration. Anti-TB activity of the ligand has enhanced on complexation with Co(II) and Ni(II) ions.

  9. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years.

  10. Au25(SG)18 as a fluorescent iodide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Man; Wu, Zhikun; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Guozhong; Wang, Hongzhi; Cai, Weiping

    2012-06-01

    The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors.The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: fluorescence spectra of Au25(SG)18 (1.6 μM in H2O) with successive titration of I- and the time-dependent fluorescence of Au25(SG)18. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30169e.

  11. Selective nonpeptidic fluorescent ligands for oxytocin receptor: design, synthesis, and application to time-resolved FRET binding assay.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Iuliia A; Margathe, Jean-François; Rodriguez, Thiéric; Pflimlin, Elsa; Dupuis, Elodie; Hibert, Marcel; Durroux, Thierry; Bonnet, Dominique

    2015-03-12

    The design and the synthesis of the first high-affinity fluorescent ligands for oxytocin receptor (OTR) are described. These compounds enabled the development of a TR-FRET based assay for OTR, readily amenable to high throughput screening. The validation of the assay was achieved by competition experiments with both peptide and nonpeptide OTR ligands as competitors. These probes represent the first selective fluorescent ligands for the oxytocin G protein-coupled receptor.

  12. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  13. Microencapsulated Fluorescent Dye Penetrant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Microencapsulated fluorescent dye pentrant materials were evaluated for feasibility as a technique to detect cracks on metal surfaces when applied as...a free flowing dry powder. Various flourescent dye solutions in addition to a commercial penetrant (Zyglo ZL-30) were microencapsulated and tested on

  14. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  15. Fluorescence Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Ryan K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the modern surgical era is highlighted by multiple technological advances and innovations, one area that has remained constant is the dependence of the surgeon's vision on white-light reflectance. This renders different body tissues in a limited palette of various shades of pink and red, thereby limiting the visual contrast available to the operating surgeon. Healthy tissue, anatomic variations, and diseased states are seen as slight discolorations relative to each other and differences are inherently limited in dynamic range. In the upcoming years, surgery will undergo a paradigm shift with the use of targeted fluorescence imaging probes aimed at augmenting the surgical armamentarium by expanding the “visible” spectrum available to surgeons. Such fluorescent “smart probes” will provide real-time, intraoperative, pseudo-color, high-contrast delineation of both normal and pathologic tissues. Fluorescent surgical molecular guidance promises another major leap forward to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes, and to reduce overall healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of current and future surgical applications of fluorescence imaging in diseased and nondiseased tissues and focus on the innovative fields of image processing and instrumentation. PMID:23335674

  16. Entropy and Mg2+ control ligand affinity and specificity in the malachite green binding RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Bernard Da Costa, Jason; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The binding of small molecule targets by RNA aptamers provides an excellent model to study the versatility of RNA function. The malachite green aptamer binds and recognizes its ligand via stacking and electrostatic interactions. The binding of the aptamer to its original selection target and three related molecules was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis, and fluorescence titration. The results reveal that the entropy of complex formation plays a large role in determining binding affinity and ligand specificity. These data combined with previous structural studies show that metal ions are required to stabilize the complexes with non-native ligands whereas the complex with the original selection target is stable at low salt and in the absence of divalent metal ions.

  17. Direct detection of antibody concentration and affinity in human serum using microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Svenja; Seidel, Susanne A I; Duhr, Stefan; Uhland, Kerstin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Jenne, Dieter; Braun, Dieter

    2012-04-17

    The direct quantification of both the binding affinity and absolute concentration of disease-related biomarkers in biological fluids is particularly beneficial for differential diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we extend microscale thermophoresis to target immunological questions. Optically generated thermal gradients were used to deplete fluorescently marked antigens in 2- and 10-fold-diluted human serum. We devised and validated an autocompetitive strategy to independently fit the concentration and dissociation constant of autoimmune antibodies against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor related to dilated cardiomyopathy. As an artificial antigen, the peptide COR1 was designed to mimic the second extracellular receptor loop. Thermophoresis resolved antibody concentrations from 2 to 200 nM and measured the dissociation constant as 75 nM. The approach quantifies antibody binding in its native serum environment within microliter volumes and without any surface attachments. The simplicity of the mix and probe protocol minimizes systematic errors, making thermophoresis a promising detection method for personalized medicine.

  18. A fully-integrated aptamer-based affinity assay platform for monitoring astronaut health in space.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xianbin; Durland, Ross H.; Hecht, Ariel H.; Singh, Anup K.; Sommer, Gregory Jon; Hatch, Anson V.

    2010-07-01

    Here we demonstrate the suitability of robust nucleic acid affinity reagents in an integrated point-of-care diagnostic platform for monitoring proteomic biomarkers indicative of astronaut health in spaceflight applications. A model thioaptamer targeting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) is evaluated in an on-chip electrophoretic gel-shift assay for human serum. Key steps of (i) mixing sample with the aptamer, (ii) buffer exchange, and (iii) preconcentration of sample were successfully integrated upstream of fluorescence-based detection. Challenges due to (i) nonspecific interactions with serum, and (ii) preconcentration at a nanoporous membrane are discussed and successfully resolved to yield a robust, rapid, and fully-integrated diagnostic system.

  19. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  20. Binding Affinities Controlled by Shifting Conformational Equilibria: Opportunities and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Michielssens, Servaas; de Groot, Bert L.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Conformational selection is an established mechanism in molecular recognition. Despite its power to explain binding events, it is hardly used in protein/ligand design to modulate molecular recognition. Here, we explore the opportunities and limitations of design by conformational selection. Using appropriate thermodynamic cycles, our approach predicts the effects of a conformational shift on binding affinity and also allows one to disentangle the effects induced by a conformational shift from other effects influencing the binding affinity. The method is assessed and applied to explain the contribution of a conformational shift on the binding affinity of six ubiquitin mutants showing different conformational shifts in six different complexes. PMID:25992736

  1. Effect of Some Substituents Increasing the Solubility of Zn(II) and Al(III) Phthalocyanines on Their Photophysical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chernonosov, A. A.; Ermilov, E. A.; Röder, B.; Solovyova, L. I.; Fedorova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Water solubility of phthalocyanines (Pcs) usually increases by the introduction of charged or carboxy substituents in the peripheral positions of the macrocycle. As a result, such structural changes influence their photophysical and photochemical properties as photosensitizers. Phthalocyanines substituted with four or eight terminal carboxyl groups and having in some cases additional eight positive charges (water soluble phthalocyanines) were studied in order to evaluate the spectroscopic and photophysical effects of these side residues on the chromophore properties. The quantum yield of singlet oxygen (1O2) generation, the triplet-triplet absorption, and the transient absorption spectra were measured and linked to the structure of the substituents. It was shown that charged substituents did not change the quantum yields of 1O2 generation but decrease its lifetimes. The introduction of the charged substituents not only increases the water solubility but also significantly changes absorption, fluorescence, and transient absorption spectra of water soluble Pcs. PMID:25302061

  2. 2-line ferrihydrite: synthesis, characterization and its adsorption behaviour for removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rout, K; Mohapatra, M; Anand, S

    2012-03-21

    Nano-structured 2-line ferrihydrite was synthesized by a pH-controlled precipitation technique at 90 °C. Chemical, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman analyses confirmed the sample to be 2-line ferrihydrite. The nano nature of the prepared sample was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface area obtained by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method was 175.8 m(2) g(-1). The nanopowder so obtained was used to study its behaviour for the removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. The relative importance of experimental parameters such as solution pH, contact time and concentration of adsorbate on the uptake of various cations was evaluated. By increasing the pH from 2.0 to 5.5, adsorption of the four cations increased. The kinetics parameters were compared by fitting the contact time data to both linear as well as non-linear forms of pseudo-second-order models. Linear forms of both Langmuir and Freundlich models fitted the equilibrium data of all the cations except for Pb(II) which was also fitted to the non-linear forms of both the models as it gave a low R(2) value of 0.85 for the Langmuir model. High Langmuir monolayer capacities of 366, 250, 62.5 and 500 mg g(-1) were obtained for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively. Presence of chloride or sulfate had an adverse effect on cation adsorption. The interactive effects on adsorption from solutions containing two, three or four cations were studied. Surprisingly no Cd(II) adsorption was observed in Pb(II)-Cd(II), Pb(II)-Cd(II)-Zn(II) and Pb(II)-Cd(II)-Cu(II)-Zn(II) systems under the studied concentration range. The overall loading capacity of the adsorbent decreased in mixed cation systems. Metal ion loaded adsorbents were characterized by XRD, FTIR and Raman techniques. The high adsorption capability of the 2-lines ferrihydrite makes it a potentially attractive adsorbent for the removal of cations from aqueous solutions.

  3. Mechanism of the influence of EGTA on the affinity of the Ca-transporting and Ca-binding systems of the cell for calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Orolv, S.N.; Sitozhevskii, A.V.; Pokudin, N.I.; Agnaev, V.M.

    1986-05-20

    The activity of Ca-ATPases of erythrocyte ghosts and the sarcoplasmic reticulum, as the rate of ATP-dependent uptake of /sup 44/Ca by inside-out vesicles of erythrocyte membranes, vesicles of sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, was investigated. Evidently in all cases, the introduction of EGTA into the incubation medium leads to an increase in the affinity of the Ca-pumps for Ca/sup 2 +/ without any change in their maximum activity. An analogous effect of EGTA was detected in a determination of the affinity of Ca/sup 2 +/ of calmodulin, troponin S, and the fluorescent dye quin 2. It is suggested that the action of EGTA on the affinity of the Ca-transporting and Ca-binding systems of the cell for Ca/sup 2 +/ is associated with displacement of impurities of di- and trivalent cations.

  4. Affinity polymers tailored for the protein A binding site of immunoglobulin G proteins.

    PubMed

    Latza, Patricia; Gilles, Patrick; Schaller, Torsten; Schrader, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rational design in combination with a screening process was used to develop affinity polymers for a specific binding site on the surface of immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins. The concept starts with the identification of critical amino acid residues on the protein interface and their topological arrangement. Appropriate binding monomers were subsequently synthesized. Together with a sugar monomer (2-5 equiv) for water solubility and a dansyl monomer (0.5 equiv) as a fluorescent label, they were subjected in aqueous solution to linear radical copolymerization in various compositions (e.g., azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN), homogeneous water/DMF mixtures). After ultrafiltration and lyophilization, colorless dry water-soluble powders were obtained. NMR spectroscopic and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) characterization indicated molecular weights between 30 and 500 kD and confirmed retention of monomer composition as well as the absence of monomers. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screen of the polymer libraries (20-50 members), few copolymers qualified as strong and selective binders for the protein A binding site on the Fc fragment of the antibody. Their monomer composition precisely reflected the critical amino acids found at the interface. The simple combination of a charged and a nonpolar binding monomer sufficed for selective submicromolar IgG recognition by the synthetic polymer. Affinities were confirmed by fluorescence titrations; they increased with decreasing salt load but remained largely unaltered at lowered pH. Other proteins, including those of similar size and isoelectric point (pI), were bound 10-1000 times less tightly. This example indicates that interaction domains in other proteins may also be targeted by synthetic polymers if their comonomer composition reflects the nature and arrangement of amino acid residues on the protein surface.

  5. Detection of saccharides with a fluorescent sensing device based on a gold film modified with 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Jen; Chang, Jui-Feng; Cheng, Nai-Jen; Yih, Jeng-Nan; Chiu, Kuo-Chi

    2013-09-01

    An extremely sensitive fluorescent sensor based on a phenylboronic acid monolayer was developed for detecting saccharide molecules. The fluorescent sensor was prepared by assembling a monolayer of 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (4-MPBA) onto a gold-coated compact disk. The change in the fluorescence of the 4-MPBA monolayer was extremely obvious in basic methanolic buffer containing monosaccharides down to the picomolar level. The fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the 4-MPBA monolayer was sensitive to monosaccharides and disaccharides, and the affinity of the monolayer toward saccharides was in the order of glucose < fructose < mannose < galactose < maltose > lactose > sucrose. Additionally, the fluorescence intensity of 4-MPBA monolayer was restorable after cleaning with weak acid, indicating that the reported fluorescent sensor with the detection limit of glucose down to the picomolar level is reusable for sensing saccharides.

  6. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  7. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  8. Integrated affinity capture, purification, and capillary electrophoresis microdevice for quantitative double-stranded DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Toriello, Nicholas M; Liu, Chung N; Blazej, Robert G; Thaitrong, Numrin; Mathies, Richard A

    2007-11-15

    A novel injection method is developed that utilizes a thermally switchable oligonucleotide affinity capture gel to mediate the concentration, purification, and injection of dsDNA for quantitative microchip capillary electrophoresis analysis. The affinity capture matrix consists of a 20 base acrydite modified oligonucleotide copolymerized into a 6% linear polyacrylamide gel that captures ssDNA or dsDNA analyte including PCR amplicons and synthetic oligonucleotides. Double stranded PCR amplicons with complementarity to the capture probe up to 81 bases from their 5' terminus are reproducibly captured via helix invasion. By integrating the oligo capture matrix directly with the CE separation channel, the electrophoretically mobilized target fragments are quantitatively captured and injected after thermal release for unbiased, efficient, and quantitative analysis. The capture process exhibits optimal efficiency at 44 degrees C and 100 V/cm with a 20 microM affinity capture probe (TM = 57.7 degrees C). A dsDNA titration assay with 20 bp fragments validated that dsDNA is captured at the same efficiency as ssDNA. Dilution studies with a duplex 20mer show that targets can be successfully captured and analyzed with a limit of detection of 1 pM from 250 nL of solution (approximately 150,000 fluorescent molecules). Simultaneous capture and injection of amplicons from E. coli K12 and M13mp18 using a mixture of two different capture probes demonstrates the feasibility of multiplex target capture. Unlike the traditional cross-injector, this method enables efficient capture and injection of dsDNA amplicons which will facilitate the quantitative analysis of products from integrated nanoliter-scale PCR reactors.

  9. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  10. Evaluation of homologous, heterologous, and affinity conjugates for the serodiagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus).

    PubMed

    Silva, D A O; Vitaliano, S N; Mineo, T W P; Ferreira, R A; Bevilacqua, E; Mineo, J R

    2005-10-01

    Use of serological tests in the diagnosis of infectious diseases in wild animals has several limitations, primarily the difficulty of obtaining species-specific reagents. Wild canids, such as maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus), are highly predisposed to infection by Toxoplasma gondii and, to a lesser extent, to Neospora caninum. The aim of the present study was to evaluate homologous, heterologous, and affinity conjugates in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect fluorescent antibody tests (IFATs) for detecting immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against T. gondii and N. caninum in maned wolves. Serum samples were obtained from 59 captive animals in Brazil and tested by ELISA for T. gondii serology and IFAT for N. caninum serology using 3 different enzymatic and fluorescent conjugates: homologous (guinea pig anti-maned wolf IgG-peroxidase and -fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]), heterologous (rabbit anti-dog IgG-peroxidase and -FITC), and affinity (protein A-peroxidase and -FITC). Seropositivity to T. gondii was comparable among the homologous (69.5%), heterologous (74.6%), and affinity (71.2%) enzymatic conjugates. A significant positive correlation was found between the antibody levels determined by the 3 enzymatic conjugates. The highest mean antibody levels (ELISA index = 4.5) were observed with the protein A-peroxidase conjugate. The same seropositivity to N. caninum (8.5%) was found with the homologous and heterologous fluorescent conjugates, but protein A-FITC was not able to detect or confirm any positive samples with homologous or heterologous conjugates. Our results demonstrate that homologous, heterologous, and affinity conjugates might be used in ELISA for serological assays of T. gondii in wild canids, whereas for N. caninum infection, only the homologous or heterologous fluorescent conjugates have been shown to be useful.

  11. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  12. Cobalt, nickel, copper and zinc complexes with 1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxaldehyde Schiff bases: antimicrobial, spectroscopic, thermal and fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kiran; Kumar, Yogender; Puri, Parvesh; Kumar, Mahender; Sharma, Chetan

    2012-06-01

    Two new Schiff bases of 1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxaldehyde and 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl/H-1,2,4-triazole [HL(1-2)] and their Cobalt, Nickel, Copper and Zinc complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (UV-vis, IR, (1)H NMR, Fluorescence) studies, thermal techniques and magnetic measurements. A square planar geometry for Cu(II) and octahedral geometry for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been proposed. In order to evaluate the biological activity of Schiff bases and to assess the role of metal ion on biological activity, the pyrazole Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been studied in vitro antibacterial against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal against Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus. In most of the cases higher activity was exhibited upon coordination with metal ions.

  13. Bidirectional elastic image registration using B-spline affine transformation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C; Ma, Hongxia; Leader, Joseph; Kaminski, Naftali; Gur, David; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-06-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bidirectional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective/cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy.

  14. Bidirectional Elastic Image Registration Using B-Spline Affine Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Wang, Chen; Kaminski, Naftali; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-01-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-Spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bi-directional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective / cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy. PMID:24530210

  15. A thermodynamic approach to the affinity optimization of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ernesto

    2009-11-01

    High throughput screening and other techniques commonly used to identify lead candidates for drug development usually yield compounds with binding affinities to their intended targets in the mid-micromolar range. The affinity of these molecules needs to be improved by several orders of magnitude before they become viable drug candidates. Traditionally, this task has been accomplished by establishing structure activity relationships to guide chemical modifications and improve the binding affinity of the compounds. As the binding affinity is a function of two quantities, the binding enthalpy and the binding entropy, it is evident that a more efficient optimization would be accomplished if both quantities were considered and improved simultaneously. Here, an optimization algorithm based upon enthalpic and entropic information generated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry is presented.

  16. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  17. Fluorescent sensor for imidazole derivatives based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of a zinc porphyrin complex in a polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Ronghua; Liu, Feng; Li, Ke'an

    2004-12-15

    A new zinc(II) porphyrin conjugate with an appended pyrene subunit has been synthesized and shown to exhibit significant and analytical usefulness for fluorescence sensing toward imidazole derivatives. The molecular recognition was based on the bridging interaction of the imidazole ring of analyte with the zinc(II) center of the porphyrin, while the transduction signal for the recognition process was the pyrene excimer fluorescence. The sensor was constructed and applied for fluorescence assay of histidine in aqueous solution by immobilizing the sensing material in a plasticized PVC membrane. When the membrane was bathed in an alkaline solution void of histidine, zinc(II) porphyrin was present in the monomer form, and pyrene emitted monomer fluorescence at 378 and 397 nm. With the presence of histidine in the sample solution, histidine was extracted into the membrane phase and bridged with the Zn(II) center of the porphyrin, causing the monomer porphyrin to be converted to its dimeric species. Since the formation of porphyrin dimer was accompanied by the enhancement of pyrene excimer emission at 454 nm, the chemical recognition process could be directly translated into a fluorescent signal. With the optode membrane M1 described, histidine in sample solution from 6.76 x 10(-7) to 5.01 x 10(-3) M can be determined. The limit of detection was 1.34 x 10(-7) M. The optical selectivity coefficient obtained for histidine over biologically relevant amino acids and anions met the selectivity requirements for the determination of histidine in biological samples. Serum histidine values obtained by the optode membrane fell in the normal range of the content reported in the literature and were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC.

  18. Analysis of conjugation of chloramphenicol and hemoglobin by fluorescence, circular dichroism and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ye; Yang, Xin-Ling; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a low cost, broad spectrum, highly active antibiotic, and widely used in the treatment of serious infections, including typhoid fever and other life-threatening infections of the central nervous system and respiratory tract. The purpose of the present study was to examine the conjugation of chloramphenicol with hemoglobin (Hb) and compared with albumin at molecular level, utilizing fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) as well as molecular modeling. Fluorescence data indicate that drug bind Hb generate quenching via static mechanism, this corroborates UV/vis absorption measurements that the ground state complex formation with an affinity of 10 4 M -1, and the driving forces in the Hb-drug complex are hydrophilic interactions and hydrogen bonds, as derived from computational model. The accurate binding site of drug has been identified from the analysis of fluorescence and molecular modeling, α1β2 interface of Hb was assigned to possess high-affinity for drug, which located at the β-37 Trp nearby. The structural investigation of the complexed Hb by synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, and CD observations revealed some degree of Hb structure unfolding upon complexation. Based on molecular modeling, we can draw the conclusion that the binding affinity of drug with albumin is superior, compared with Hb. These phenomena can provide salient information on the absorption, distribution, pharmacology, and toxicity of chloramphenicol and other drugs which have analogous configuration with chloramphenicol.

  19. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-12-24

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  20. Electrospun polyethersulfone affinity membrane: membrane preparation and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zuwei; Lan, Zhengwei; Matsuura, Takeshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Non-woven polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were prepared by electrospinning. After heat treatment and surface activation, the membranes were covalently functionalized with ligands to be used as affinity membranes. The membranes were characterized in terms of fiber diameter, porosity, specific area, pore size, ligand density and binding capacities. To evaluate the binding efficiency of the membrane, dynamic adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the Cibacron blue F3GA (CB) functionalized PES membrane was studied. Experimental breakthrough curves were fitted with the theoretical curves based on the plate model to estimate plate height (H(p)) of the affinity membrane. The high value of H(p) (1.6-8 cm) of the affinity membrane implied a poor dynamic binding efficiency, which can be explained by the intrinsic microstructures of the material. Although the electrospun membrane might not be an ideal candidate for the preparative affinity membrane chromatography for large-scale production, it still can be used for fast small-scale protein purification in which a highly efficient binding is not required. Spin columns packed with protein A/G immobilized PES membranes were demonstrated to be capable of binding IgG specifically. SDS-PAGE results demonstrated that the PES affinity membrane had high specific binding selectivity for IgG molecules and low non-specific protein adsorption. Compared with other reported affinity membranes, the PES affinity membrane had a comparable IgG binding capacity of 4.5 mg/ml, and had a lower flow through pressure drop due to its larger pore size. In conclusion, the novel PES affinity membrane is an ideal spin column packing material for fast protein purification.

  1. Considering affinity: an ethereal conversation (part two of three).

    PubMed

    Winsor, Mary P

    2015-06-01

    In 1840 Hugh Strickland published a diagram showing the relationships of genera of birds in the kingfisher family. Three years later he applied this mapping idea to genera of birds of prey and songbirds, creating a large wall chart that he displayed to colleagues but never published. Both of his diagrams featured a scale of degrees of affinity. The meaning of taxonomic affinity was something Darwin thought about deeply. Details in the chart undermine Strickland's claim that his method was purely inductive.

  2. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  3. Green fluorescence induced by EF-hand assembly in a split GFP system.

    PubMed

    Lindman, Stina; Johansson, Ida; Thulin, Eva; Linse, Sara

    2009-06-01

    The affinity between the 1-157 and 158-238 fragments of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is too low for spontaneous in vivo reassembly of the protein upon co-expression of the two fragments. This prevents chromophore maturation and the cells lack GFP fluorescence. We have utilized the very high affinity between the two EF-hands of calbindin D(9k) to facilitate GFP assembly from its fragments and to introduce a calcium dependent molecular switch. In GFPN-EF1, residues 1-157 of GFP are fused to residues 1-43 of calbindin, and in EF2-GFPC, residues 44-75 of calbindin are fused to residues 158-238 of GFP. When co-expressed, GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC associate spontaneously and rapidly resulting in a folded reconstituted protein with bright GFP fluorescence. The high affinity of GFPN-EF1 for EF2-GFPC leads to brighter fluorescence of the cells compared to cells with a control constructs carrying leucine zippers (Wilson et al., Nature Methods 2004;3:255). The complex of GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC was purified from cells using metal-ion chelate chromatography and the temperature dependence of GFP fluorescence was found to be calcium dependent. The GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC fragments were separated by ion exchange chromatography. The assembly of the fragments was found to be reversible and the complex was regained upon mixing, as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data. The affinity between GFPN-EF1 and EF2-GFPC as well as rates of association and dissociation were found to be Ca(2+)-dependent.

  4. Direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Premer, Scott A; Hoy, Julie A; Trent, James T; Hargrove, Mark S

    2003-06-01

    The biological functions of heme proteins are linked to their rate and affinity constants for ligand binding. Kinetic experiments are commonly used to measure equilibrium constants for traditional hemoglobins comprised of pentacoordinate ligand binding sites and simple bimolecular reaction schemes. However, kinetic methods do not always yield reliable equilibrium constants with more complex hemoglobins for which reaction mechanisms are not clearly understood. Furthermore, even where reaction mechanisms are clearly understood, it is very difficult to directly measure equilibrium constants for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to high-affinity (K(D) < 1 micro M) hemoglobins. This work presents a method for direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins that utilizes a competition for ligands between the "target" protein and an array of "scavenger" hemoglobins with known affinities. This method is described for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to two hexacoordinate hemoglobins: rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and Synechocystis hemoglobin. Our results demonstrate that although these proteins have different mechanisms for ligand binding, their affinities for oxygen and carbon monoxide are similar. Their large affinity constants for oxygen, 285 and approximately 100 micro M(-1) respectively, indicate that they are not capable of facilitating oxygen transport.

  5. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as affinity ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Li, C. M.; Zhou, Q.; Gan, Y.; Bao, Q. L.

    2007-03-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes is very challenging for their applications. The paper here describes a new method to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as specific affinity adsorbents. MWCNTs were acid purified and pretreated with (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (APTES) in order to introduce abundant amino groups on the surface of MWCNTs. After the conversion of amino groups to carboxyl groups by succinic acid anhydride, MWCNTs were attached to protein A or aminodextran using 1-ethyl-3,3' (dimethylamion)-propylcarbodiimide as a biofunctional crosslinker. The incorporation of aminodextran as a spacer arm noticeably increased the binding capacity of the APTES-modified MWCNTs for protein A. The application of affinity MWCNTs for purification of immunoglobulin G was then evaluated. The affinity of MWCNTs with AMD spacer exhibited a high adsorption capacity of ~361 µg IgG/mg MWCNT (wet basis). About 75% of bound IgG was eluted from affinity MWCNTs (ANT-I and ANT-II) and ELISA confirmed that the biological activity of IgG was well preserved during the course of affinity separation. The functionalized MWCNTs could be potentially used in affinity chromatography.

  6. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) Complexes of Salan-Type Ligand Containing Ester Groups: Synthesis, Characterization, Electrochemical Properties, and In Vitro Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jeslin Kanaga Inba, P.; Annaraj, B.; Thalamuthu, S.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A salen ligand on reduction and N-alkylation affords a novel [N2O2] chelating ligand containing ester groups [L = diethyl-2,2′-(propane-1,3-diylbis((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzyl)azanediyl))diacetate]. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by NMR and HPLC chromatograms. Its Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by a combination of elemental analysis, IR, NMR, UV-Vis, and mass spectral data, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTA). The magnetic moments, UV-Vis, and EPR spectral studies support square planar geometry around the Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions. A tetrahedral geometry is observed in four-coordinate zinc with bulky N-alkylated salan ligand. The redox properties of the copper complex were examined in DMSO by cyclic voltammetry. The voltammograms show quasireversible process. The interaction of metal complexes with CT DNA was investigated by UV-Vis absorption titration, ethidium bromide displacement assay, cyclic voltammetry methods, and agarose gel electrophoresis. The apparent binding constant values suggest moderate intercalative binding modes between the complexes and DNA. The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials of the synthesized compounds were also determined. PMID:23983672

  7. Removal of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by brown marine macro algae: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Olga M M; Martins, Ramiro J E; Delerue-Matos, Cristina M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-01

    Specific marine macro algae species abundant at the Portuguese coast (Laminaria hyperborea, Bifurcaria bifurcata, Sargassum muticum and Fucus spiralis) were shown to be effective for removing toxic metals (Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)) from aqueous solutions. The initial metal concentrations in solution were about 75-100 mg L(-1). The observed biosorption capacities for cadmium, zinc and lead ions were in the ranges of 23.9-39.5, 18.6-32.0 and 32.3-50.4 mg g(-1), respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that the metal uptake rate was rather fast, with 75% of the total amount occurring in the first 10 min for all algal species. Experimental data were well fitted by a pseudo-second order rate equation. The contribution of internal diffusion mechanism was significant only to the initial biosorption stage. Results indicate that all the studied macro algae species can provide an efficient and cost-effective technology for eliminating heavy metals from industrial effluents.

  8. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-01

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different.

  9. Array of peptide-modified electrodes for the simultaneous determination of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Serrano, Núria; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz; Cetó, Xavier; Del Valle, Manel

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports the development of three peptide modified sensors in which glutathione (GSH) and its fragments Cys-Gly and γ-Glu-Cys were immobilized respectively through aryl diazonium electrochemical grafting onto the surface of graphite-epoxy composite electrodes (GEC), and used for the simultaneous determination of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The concentration interval ranged from 0.1 to 1.5 μmol L(-1) for each metal, and the technique used was differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry. This study aimed to the comparison of the information provided by one single modified electrode at both fixed and multiple pH values (pH 6.8, 7.5 and 8.2) for the simultaneous determination of the three metals, with those supplied by the three-sensor array at multiple pH values. For the processing of the voltammograms, the fast Fourier transform was selected as the preprocessing tool for data compression coupled with an artificial neural network for the modeling of the obtained responses.

  10. Mixed metal hydroxycarboxylic acid complexes. Spectrophotometric study of complexes of U(VI) with In(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Manzurola, E.; Apelblat, A.; Markovits, G.; Levy, O. )

    1988-01-01

    The formation of mixed metal complexes between uranium (VI), as the central metal ion, and aluminum (III), indium (III), copper (II), zinc (II) and cadmium (II), as the additional metal ions, with a hydroxycarboxylic acid chosen between citric, tartaric or malic, has been studied using spectrophotometric methods. The effect of pH has been examined, and the results show that at pH = 4 stable complexes are formed for most of the systems. At this pH the method of mole ratio and Job's method of continuous variations, were employed to determine the stoichiometry of the mixed metal complexes. Al(III), In(III) and Cu(II) showed a high tendency to form mixed metal complexes with U(VI), while the formation of complexes is uncertain for Cd(II) and Zn(II). The ratio of the ligand to the total metal ion has been found to be 2:1 and metal:metal ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 have been observed.

  11. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes--an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-24

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy.

  12. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes - An in vitro and in vivo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad ) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy.

  13. Metallomicellar catalysis: hydrolysis of phosphate monoester and phosphodiester by Cu(II), Zn(II) complexes of pyridyl ligands in CTAB micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fubin; Huang, Liya; Meng, Xiangguang; Du, Juan; Yu, Xiaoqi; Zhao, Yufen; Zeng, Xiancheng

    2006-11-01

    The catalytic hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP) by metallomicelles composed of Cu(II) or Zn(II) complexes of bispyridine-containing alkanol ligands in CTAB micellar solution was investigated at 30 degrees C. The experimental results indicate that the complexes with a 1:1 ratio of ligands to metal ions for ligands 1 (1,7-bis(6-hydroxymethyl-2-pyridyl)-2,6-dioxaheptane) and 3 (1,4-bis[(6-hydroxymethyl-2-pyridyl)-2-oxapropyl]benzene) and a 1:2 ratio of ligands to metal ions for ligand 2 (1,14-bis(6-hydroxymethyl-2-pyridyl)-2,13-dioxatetradecane) in CATB micellar solution are the active species for the catalytic hydrolysis of BNPP and NPP, respectively. The ternary complex kinetic model for metallomicellar catalysis was employed to obtain the relative kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, which demonstrated the catalytic mechanism for the hydrolysis of BNPP and NPP by metallomicelles.

  14. ZCF32, a fungus specific Zn(II)2 Cys6 transcription factor, is a repressor of the biofilm development in the human pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kakade, Pallavi; Sadhale, Parag; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-01-01

    As a human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans can cause a wide variety of disease conditions ranging from superficial to systemic infections. Many of these infections are caused by an inherent ability of the pathogen to form biofilms on medical devices resulting in high mortality. Biofilms formed by C. albicans are a complex consortium of yeast and hyphal cells embedded in an extracellular matrix and are regulated by a network of transcription factors. Here, we report the role of a novel Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor, ZCF32, in the regulation of biofilm formation. Global transcriptome analysis reveals that biofilm development is the most altered pathway in the zcf32 null mutant. To delineate the functional correlation between ZCF32 and biofilm development, we determined the set of genes directly regulated by Zcf32. Our data suggests that Zcf32 regulates biofilm formation by repressing the expression of adhesins, chitinases and a significant number of other GPI-anchored proteins. We establish that there is the lesser recruitment of Zcf32 on the promoters of biofilm genes in biofilm condition compared to the planktonic mode of growth. Taking together, we propose that the transcription factor ZCF32 negatively regulates biofilm development in C. albicans. PMID:27498700

  15. Supramolecular complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) p-hydroxybenzoates with caffeine: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşdemir, Erdal; Özbek, Füreya Elif; Sertçelik, Mustafa; Hökelek, Tuncer; Çelik, Raziye Çatak; Necefoğlu, Hacali

    2016-09-01

    Three novel complexes Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) containing p-hydroxybenzoates and caffeine ligands were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and UV-vis Spectroscopy, molar conductivity and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The thermal properties of the synthesized complexes were investigated by TGA/DTA. The general formula of the complexes is [M(HOC6H4COO)2(H2O)4]·2(C8H10N4O2)·8H2O (where: M: Co, Ni and Zn). The IR studies showed that carboxylate groups of p-hydroxybenzoate ligands have monodentate coordination mode. The M2+ ions are octahedrally coordinated by two p-hydroxybenzoate ligands, four water molecules leading to an overall MO6 coordination environment. The medium-strength hydrogen bondings involving the uncoordinated caffeine ligands and water molecules, coordinated and uncoordinated water molecules and p-hydroxybenzoate ligands lead to three-dimensional supramolecular networks in the crystal structures.

  16. The uptake mechanism of Cd(II), Cr(VI), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) by mycelia and fruiting bodies of Galerina vittiformis.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Dilna; Balakrishnan, Raj Mohan; Shetty, Vidya K

    2013-01-01

    Optimum concentrations of heavy metals like copper, cadmium, lead, chromium, and zinc in soil are essential in carrying out various cellular activities in minimum concentrations and hence help in sustaining all life forms, although higher concentration of these metals is lethal to most of the life forms. Galerina vittiformis, a macrofungus, was found to accumulate these heavy metals into its fleshy fruiting body in the order Pb(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II) > Cr(VI) from 50 mg/kg soil. It possesses various ranges of potential cellular mechanisms that may be involved in detoxification of heavy metals and thus increases its tolerance to heavy metal stress, mainly by producing organic acids and phytochelatins (PCs). These components help in repairing stress damaged proteins and compartmentalisation of metals to vacuoles. The stress tolerance mechanism can be deduced by various analytical tools like SEM-EDX, FTIR, and LC-MS. Production of two kinds of phytochelatins was observed in the organism in response to metal stress.

  17. Zn(II) and Cu(II) removal by Nostoc muscorum: a cyanobacterium isolated from a coal mining pit in Chiehruphi, Meghalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Smita; Diengdoh, Omega L; Syiem, Mayashree B; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Kiran, Mothe Gopi

    2015-03-01

    Nostoc muscorum was isolated from a coal mining pit in Chiehruphi, Meghalaya, India, and its potential to remove Zn(II) and Cu(II) from media and the various biochemical alterations it undergoes during metal stress were studied. Metal uptake measured as a function of the ions removed by N. muscorum from media supplemented independently with 20 μmol/L ZnSO4 and CuSO4 established the ability of this cyanobacterium to remove 66% of Zn(2+) and 71% of Cu(2+) within 24 h of contact time. Metal binding on the cell surface was found to be the primary mode of uptake, followed by internalization. Within 7 days of contact, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) mediated dissimilar effects on the organism. For instance, although chlorophyll a synthesis was increased by 12% in Zn(2+)-treated cells, it was reduced by 26% in Cu(2+)-treated cells. Total protein content remained unaltered in Zn(2+)-supplemented medium; however, a 15% reduction was noticed upon Cu(2+) exposure. Copper enhanced both photosynthesis and respiration by 15% and 19%, respectively; in contrast, photosynthesis was unchanged and respiration dropped by 11% upon Zn(2+) treatment. Inoculum age also influenced metal removal ability. Experiments in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosynthetic inhibitor), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (an uncoupler), and exogenous ATP established that metal uptake was energy dependent, and photosynthesis contributed significantly towards the energy pool required to mediate metal removals.

  18. The Fusarium verticillioides FUM Gene Cluster Encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 Protein That Affects FUM Gene Expression and Fumonisin Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A. E.; Busman, Mark; Proctor, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by some Fusarium species and can contaminate maize or maize products. Ingestion of fumonisins is associated with diseases, including cancer and neural tube defects, in humans and animals. In fungi, genes involved in the synthesis of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites are often located adjacent to each other in gene clusters. Such genes can encode structural enzymes, regulatory proteins, and/or proteins that provide self-protection. The fumonisin biosynthetic gene cluster includes 16 genes, none of which appear to play a role in regulation. In this study, we identified a previously undescribed gene (FUM21) located adjacent to the fumonisin polyketide synthase gene, FUM1. The presence of a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA-binding domain in the predicted protein suggested that FUM21 was involved in transcriptional regulation. FUM21 deletion (Δfum21) mutants produce little to no fumonisin in cracked maize cultures but some FUM1 and FUM8 transcripts in a liquid GYAM medium. Complementation of a Δfum21 mutant with a wild-type copy of the gene restored fumonisin production. Analysis of FUM21 cDNAs identified four alternative splice forms (ASFs), and microarray analysis indicated the ASFs were differentially expressed. Based on these data, we present a model for how FUM21 ASFs may regulate fumonisin biosynthesis. PMID:17483290

  19. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of biopolymeric Schiff bases of salicylaldehydes and chitosan.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Eliene Leandro; Barbosa, Hellen Franciane Gonçalves; Dockal, Edward Ralph; Cavalheiro, Éder Tadeu Gomes

    2017-02-01

    Schiff bases have been prepared from biopolymer chitosan and salicylaldehyde, 5-methoxysalicylaldehyde, and 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde. Ligands were synthesized in a 1:1.5mol ratio, and their Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes in a 1:1mol ratio (ligand:metal). Ligands were characterized by (1)H NMR and FTIR, resulting in degrees of substitution from 43.7 to 78.7%. Complexes were characterized using FTIR, electronic spectra, XPRD. The compounds were confirmed by the presence of an imine bond stretching in the 1630-1640cm(-1) and νMetal-N and νMetal-O at <600cm(-1). Electronic spectra revealed that both Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes present a square plane geometry. The crystallinity values were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. Thermal behavior of all compounds was evaluated by TGA/DTG and DTA curves with mass losses related to dehydration and decomposition, with characteristic events for ligand and complexes. Schiff base complexes presented lower thermal stability and crystallinity than the starting chitosan. Residues were the metallic oxides as confirmed by XPRD, whose amounts were used in the calculation of the percentage of complexed metal ions. Surface morphologies were analyzed with SEM-EDAX. Preliminary cytotoxicity tests were performed using MTT assay with HeLa cells. Despite the differences in solubility, the free bases presented relatively low toxicity.

  20. Synthesis, DFT Calculation, and Antimicrobial Studies of Novel Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) Heteroleptic Complexes Containing Benzoylacetone and Dithiocarbamate

    PubMed Central

    Ekennia, Anthony C.; Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Osowole, Aderoju A.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2015-01-01

    Heteroleptic complexes of zinc(II), copper(II), manganese(II), and cobalt(II) of the types [MLL′(H2O)2]·nH2O and [MLL′]·nH2O have been synthesized using sodium N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate (L) and benzoylacetone (L′). The metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility, infrared (IR), and UV-visible spectroscopic studies. The electrical conductance measurements revealed the nonelectrolytic nature of the synthesized complexes. The results of the elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electronic spectra inferred that the Zn(II) complex adopted a four-coordinate geometry while the Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) complexes assumed octahedral geometries. The IR spectra showed that the metal ions coordinated with the ligands via the S- and O-donor atoms. The geometry, electronic, and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spin density distributions, relative strength of H–bonds, and thermodynamic parameters revealed that the order of stability of the metal complexes is Mn < Co < Cu > Zn. The agar diffusion methods were used to study the antimicrobial activity of the complexes against two Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. pneumoniae), one Gram negative bacterium (E. coli), and two fungi organisms (A. niger and A. candida) and the complexes showed a broad spectrum of activities against the microbes. PMID:26681931

  1. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Yoshida, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  2. Holograms of fluorescent albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2011-09-01

    We report the characterization and analysis of photochromic films gallus gallus albumin as a matrix modified for holographic recording. Photo-oxidation of homogeneous mixtures prepared with albumin-propylene glycol, to combine chemically with aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate at certain concentrations. We analyzed the diffraction gratings, through the diffraction efficiency of the proposed material. Also, eosin was used as a fluorescent agent, so it is found that produces an inhibitory effect, thus decreasing the diffraction efficiency of the matrices prepared in near-identical circumstances. The work was to achieve stability of albumin films, were prepared with propylene glycol. Finally, experimental studies were performed with films when subjected to aqueous solution of eosin (fluorescent agent) to verify the ability to increase or decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  3. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  4. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  5. Chelators Exhibiting Triple Fluorescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-31

    Collins et al. I excited state (LE). Grabowski et al proposed the twisted intramolecular charge transfer ( TICT ) state 2 to successfully account for the...red-shifted fluorescence. Grabowski et al. Pure Appl. Chem.. 1983. 3 55. 245. TICT refers to the state wherein an intramolecular char,,e transfer takes...phenyl acceptor ring from the dimethyl amino donor group. The TICT 6 state has been observed in other molecular systems bearing donor and acceptor

  6. Local BLyS production by T follicular cells mediates retention of high affinity B cells during affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Radhika; Matthews, Andrew H.; Zhang, Bochao; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Scholz, Jean L.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Leonard, Warren J.; Stohl, William; Hershberg, Uri

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the role of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and its receptors in the germinal center (GC) reaction and affinity maturation. Despite ample BLyS retention on B cells in follicular (FO) regions, the GC microenvironment lacks substantial BLyS. This reflects IL-21–mediated down-regulation of the BLyS receptor TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) on GC B cells, thus limiting their capacity for BLyS binding and retention. Within the GC, FO helper T cells (TFH cells) provide a local source of BLyS. Whereas T cell–derived BLyS is dispensable for normal GC cellularity and somatic hypermutation, it is required for the efficient selection of high affinity GC B cell clones. These findings suggest that during affinity maturation, high affinity clones rely on TFH-derived BLyS for their persistence. PMID:24367004

  7. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered. PMID:21714025

  8. Green fluorescent protein: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Remington, S James

    2011-09-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994-2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationships in photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and nonfluorescent chromoproteins are also briefly covered.

  9. Novel heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones derivatives as colorimetric and "turn on" fluorescent sensors for fluoride anion sensing employing hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Ashok Kumar, S L; Saravana Kumar, M; Sreeja, P B; Sreekanth, A

    2013-09-01

    Two novel heterocyclic thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized, and characterized, by means of spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Their chromophoric-fluorogenic response towards anions in competing solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was studied. The receptor shows selective recognition towards fluoride anion. The binding affinity of the receptors with fluoride anion was calculated using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques.

  10. Measuring Norfloxacin Binding to Trypsin Using a Fluorescence Quenching Assay in an Upper-Division, Integrated Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching assays are often used to measure dissociation constants that quantify the binding affinity between small molecules and proteins. In an upper-division undergraduate laboratory course, where students work on projects using a guided inquiry-based approach, a binding titration experiment at physiological pH is performed to…

  11. Fluorescence lifetime analysis and effect of magnesium ions on binding of NADH to human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence ALDH1 activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity to the enzyme thus reducing activity. By using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we have resolved t...

  12. A naphthalimide derived fluorescent sensor for solid-phase screening of cucurbit[7]uril-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Gyan Hari; Battle, Cooper Hawkins; Grusenmeyer, Tod A; Zhu, Mengyuan; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan

    2016-02-07

    A naphthalimide based fluorescent sensor displaying a significant increase in emission upon binding CB[7] with notable pH stability was developed and utilized in a surface-bound displacement assay for the rapid detection of CB[7] encapsulation of therapeutically relevant drug classes. Previously unknown binders with moderate to strong affinities were discovered.

  13. Aggregation of two carboxylic derivatives of porphyrin and their affinity to bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Bing; Wang, Yi-Nong; Ma, Jian-Biao

    2006-07-01

    Aggregation of two porphyrin derivatives with carboxylic groups, 4-oxo-4-((4-(10,15,20-triphenyl-21 H,23 H-porphin-5-yl)phenyl)amino)butanoic acid (MAC) and 4,4',4″,4‴-[21 H,23 H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(4,1-phenyleneimino)]tetrakis(4-oxo-butanoic acid) (TA4C), and their affinity to bovine serum albumin were investigated via absorption spectrometry, 1H NMR and fluorescence spectrometry. MAC and its complexes with β-cyclodextrin could form aggregates in an aqueous solution while TA4C was self-associated loosely. From the absorbance profiles of MAC in the titration of bovine serum albumin, hypochromicity was observed without any shift of the maximum absorbance wavelength. In both absorption spectra of TA4C in aqueous solutions and in solid state, three Q bands appeared in the visible region. In the measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra upon titration of BSA, some spectral changes of TA4C were observed. The whole procedure of titration could be divided into three successive stages. The three-banded profiles of TA4C might be explained according to a loose dimer model.

  14. Aggregation of two carboxylic derivatives of porphyrin and their affinity to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yao-Bing; Wang, Yi-Nong; Ma, Jian-Biao

    2006-07-01

    Aggregation of two porphyrin derivatives with carboxylic groups, 4-oxo-4-((4-(10,15,20-triphenyl-21H,23H-porphin-5-yl)phenyl)amino)butanoic acid (MAC) and 4,4',4'',4'''-[21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(4,1-phenyleneimino)]tetrakis(4-oxo-butanoic acid) (TA4C), and their affinity to bovine serum albumin were investigated via absorption spectrometry, (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectrometry. MAC and its complexes with beta-cyclodextrin could form aggregates in an aqueous solution while TA4C was self-associated loosely. From the absorbance profiles of MAC in the titration of bovine serum albumin, hypochromicity was observed without any shift of the maximum absorbance wavelength. In both absorption spectra of TA4C in aqueous solutions and in solid state, three Q bands appeared in the visible region. In the measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra upon titration of BSA, some spectral changes of TA4C were observed. The whole procedure of titration could be divided into three successive stages. The three-banded profiles of TA4C might be explained according to a loose dimer model.

  15. Structural and spectroscopic study of 6,7-dicyano-substituted lumazine with high electron affinity and proton acidity.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ken-ichi; Nagahara, Kenta; Yoshii, Yuuya; Hoshino, Norihisa; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki

    2013-05-02

    The introduction of cyano groups into lumazine (pteridine-2,4-(1H,3H)dione) at the C6 and C7 positions enhances its electron affinity, proton acidity, and solubility in solvents. As a result, 6,7-dicyanolumazine (DCNLH2) forms charge transfer (CT) complexes with donors such as tetrathiafulvalene, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine, and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and readily dissociates a proton from the N1 nitrogen to form a monoanionic salt with tetrabutylammonium (TBA(+)). Crystal structures of the CT complexes consist of mixed stacks in which DCNLH2 interacts with donors in face-to-face configurations, but they form intermolecular hydrogen bonds differently depending on the donor type. In the TBA(+) salt, two deprotonated DCNLH(-) monoanions form a unique dianionic dimer connected by two centrosymmetric hydrogen bonds, N3-H···O-C2, which is electronically isolated by the presence of bulky TBA(+) countercations and the absence of a proton at the N1 hydrogen-bonding site. This dimer fluoresces yellowish green (fluorescence quantum yield Φ = 0.04). Because the DCNLH(-) anion only shows weak blue fluorescence in aqueous solution (Φ < 0.01), we suggest that the dimer formation is responsible for the fluorescence enhancement with a large emission band shift to the low-energy side.

  16. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  17. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants monitored by domain-specific intrinsic phenylalanine and tyrosine fluorescence.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Sorensen, Brenda R; Rusinova, Elena; Laws, William R; Ross, J B Alexander; Shea, Madeline A

    2002-11-01

    Cooperative calcium binding to the two homologous domains of calmodulin (CaM) induces conformational changes that regulate its association with and activation of numerous cellular target proteins. Calcium binding to the pair of high-affinity sites (III and IV in the C-domain) can be monitored by observing calcium-dependent changes in intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence intensity (lambda(ex)/lambda(em) of 277/320 nm). However, calcium binding to the low-affinity sites (I and II in the N-domain) is more difficult to measure with optical spectroscopy because that domain of CaM does not contain tryptophan or tyrosine. We recently demonstrated that calcium-dependent changes in intrinsic phenylalanine fluorescence (lambda(ex)/lambda(em) of 250/280 nm) of an N-domain fragment of CaM reflect occupancy of sites I and II (VanScyoc, W. S., and M. A. Shea, 2001, Protein Sci. 10:1758-1768). Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, we now show that these excitation and emission wavelength pairs for phenylalanine and tyrosine fluorescence can be used to monitor equilibrium calcium titrations of the individual domains in full-length CaM. Calcium-dependent changes in phenylalanine fluorescence specifically indicate ion occupancy of sites I and II in the N-domain because phenylalanine residues in the C-domain are nonemissive. Tyrosine emission from the C-domain does not interfere with phenylalanine fluorescence signals from the N-domain. This is the first demonstration that intrinsic fluorescence may be used to monitor calcium binding to each domain of CaM. In this way, we also evaluated how mutations of two residues (Arg74 and Arg90) located between sites II and III can alter the calcium-binding properties of each of the domains. The mutation R74A caused an increase in the calcium affinity of sites I and II in the N-domain. The mutation R90A caused an increase in calcium affinity of sites III and IV in the C-domain whereas R90G caused an increase in calcium affinity

  18. Synthesis of functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters for acid phosphatase sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-10-01

    A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by introducing an alkaline aqueous solution of MUA into the GSH-Au+ complexes or AuNC@GSH solution. Subsequently, a reliable AuNC@GSH/MUA-based real-time assay of acid phosphatase (ACP) is established for the first time, inspired by the selective coordination of Fe3+ with surface ligands of AuNCs, the higher binding affinity between the pyrophosphate ion (PPi) and Fe3+, and the hydrolysis of PPi into orthophosphate by ACP. Our fluorescent chemosensor can also be applied to assay ACP in a real biological sample and, furthermore, to screen the inhibitor of ACP. This report paves a new avenue for synthesizing AuNCs based on either the bottom-up reduction or top-down etching method, establishing real-time fluorescence assays for ACP by means of PPi as the substrate, and further exploring the sensing applications of fluorescent AuNCs.A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by

  19. Tolerance of a knotted near infrared fluorescent protein to random circular permutation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Naresh; Kuypers, Brianna E.; Nassif, Barbara; Thomas, Emily E.; Alnahhas, Razan N.; Segatori, Laura; Silberg, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphP) are knotted proteins that have been developed as near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP) reporters of gene expression. To explore how rearrangements in the peptides that interlace into the knot within the BphP photosensory core affect folding, we subjected iRFP to random circular permutation using an improved transposase mutagenesis strategy and screened for variants that fluoresce. We identified twenty seven circularly permuted iRFP that display biliverdin-dependent fluorescence in Escherichia coli. The variants with the brightest whole cell fluorescence initiated translation at residues near the domain linker and knot tails, although fluorescent variants were discovered that initiated translation within the PAS and GAF domains. Circularly permuted iRFP retained sufficient cofactor affinity to fluoresce in tissue culture without the addition of biliverdin, and one variant displayed enhanced fluorescence when expressed in bacteria and tissue culture. This variant displayed a similar quantum yield as iRFP, but exhibited increased resistance to chemical denaturation, suggesting that the observed signal increase arose from more efficient protein maturation. These results show how the contact order of a knotted BphP can be altered without disrupting chromophore binding and fluorescence, an important step towards the creation of near-infrared biosensors with expanded chemical-sensing functions for in vivo imaging. PMID:27304983

  20. Biosensors based on surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dostálek, Jakub; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    The implementation of surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors enables increasing their sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. In SPR-based biosensors, surface plasmons probe the binding of target molecules contained in a liquid sample by their affinity partners attached to a metallic sensor surface. SPR biosensors relying on the detection of refractive index changes allow for direct observation of the binding of large and medium size molecules that produces sufficiently large refractive index changes. In SPR biosensors exploiting SPFS, the capture of fluorophore-labeled molecules to the sensor surface is observed by the detection of fluorescence light emitted from the surface. This technique takes advantage of the enhanced intensity of electromagnetic field accompanied with the resonant excitation of surface plasmons. The interaction with surface plasmons can greatly increase the measured fluorescence signal through enhancing the excitation rate of fluorophores and by more efficient collecting of fluorescence light. SPFS-based biosensors were shown to enable the analysis of samples with extremely low analyte concentrations and the detection of small molecules. In this review, we describe the fundamental principles, implementations, and current state of the art applications of SPFS biosensors. This review focuses on SPFS-based biosensors employing the excitation of surface plasmons on continuous metal-dielectric interfaces.

  1. Nanoparticle multivalency counterbalances the ligand affinity loss upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Robert; Pollinger, Klaus; Veser, Anika; Breunig, Miriam; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-11-28

    The conjugation of receptor ligands to shielded nanoparticles is a widely used strategy to precisely control nanoparticle-cell interactions. However, it is often overlooked that a ligand's affinity can be severely impaired by its attachment to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains that are frequently used to protect colloids from serum protein adsorption. Using the model ligand EXP3174, a small-molecule antagonist for the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R), we investigated the ligand's affinity before and after its PEGylation and when attached to PEGylated nanoparticles. The PEGylated ligand displayed a 580-fold decreased receptor affinity compared to the native ligand. Due to their multivalency, the nanoparticles regained a low nanomolar receptor affinity, which is in the range of the affinity of the native ligand. Moreover, a four orders of magnitude higher concentration of free ligand was required to displace PEGylated nanoparticles carrying EXP3174 from the receptor. On average, one nanoparticle was decorated with 11.2 ligand molecules, which led to a multivalent enhancement factor of 22.5 compared to the monovalent PEGylated ligand. The targeted nanoparticles specifically bound the AT1R and showed no interaction to receptor negative cells. Our study shows that the attachment of a small-molecule ligand to a PEG chain can severely affect its receptor affinity. Concomitantly, when the ligand is tethered to nanoparticles, the immense avidity greatly increases the ligand-receptor interaction. Based on our results, we highly recommend the affinity testing of receptor ligands before and after PEGylation to identify potent molecules for active nanoparticle targeting.

  2. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P

    2016-12-09

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets.

  3. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets. PMID:28060343

  4. Interaction of cromolyn sodium with human serum albumin: a fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-Jun; Liu, Yi; Pi, Zhen-Bang; Qu, Song-Sheng

    2005-12-15

    The interaction between cromolyn sodium (CS) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. In the discussion of the mechanism, it was proved that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by CS is a result of the formation of a CS-HSA complex. Quenching constants were determined using the Sterns-Volmer equation to provide a measure of the binding affinity between CS and HSA. The thermodynamic parameters DeltaG, DeltaH, and DeltaS at different temperatures were calculated. The distance r between donor (Trp214) and acceptor (CS) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy data and UV-vis absorbance spectra have suggested that the association between CS and HSA changed the molecular conformation of HSA and the electrostatic interactions play a major role in CS-HSA association.

  5. Graphene oxide-based fluorescent sensor for sensitive turn-on detection of sinapine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xia; Han, Ling; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Fenghong

    2017-03-01

    Sinapine (SP) has attracted extensive attention in food and medical field because it is a crucial component in many plants with unique physiological activities. Here, we reported a fluorescent sensor based on the unique properties of graphene oxide (GO) for rapid, sensitive detection of SP concentration. In this strategy, GO has stronger affinity toward SP and can be also served as a quencher for DNA fluorescence probe. The fluorescence can make a recovery by the addition of SP, which can competitively desorb probe from the surface of GO, and the SP can thus be monitored by recording the fluorescence change. Because of the low background assays and high quenching ability offered by GO, the developed method provides a great potential for plant-derived molecules research.

  6. Synthesis, metal coordination, and cellular internalization of a siderophore-bearing NIR fluorescent carbocyanine probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yunpeng; Xu, Baogang; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    In order to explore novel NIR fluorescent probes for optical imaging in biomedicines, one desferrioxamine (DFO)-bearing NIR fluorescent probe was designed and synthesized based on a dicarboxylic acid-containing carbocyanine (Cypate). Similar to the free DFO, the resulting conjugate Cypate-DFO showed high binding affinity with Fe(III) and Ga(III) as identified by ES-MS. Nevertheless, the iron binding was found to quench its fluorescent emission significantly, suggesting that the siderophore moiety might perturb the spectroscopic properties of the attached carbocyanine fluorophore through metal binding. As observed by fluorescence microscopy, Cypate-DFO showed significant cellular internalization in A549 cells in vitro. Further studies on novel Cypate-DFO derivatives of this type may reveal some exciting properties and biological activities.

  7. Crystal structure and ligand affinity of avidin in the complex with 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Avidin is a protein found in egg white that binds numerous organic compounds with high affinity, especially biotin and its derivatives. Due to its extraordinary affinity for its ligands, avidin is extensively used in biotechnology. X-ray crystallography and fluorescence-based biophysical techniques were used to show that avidin binds the dye 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA) with a lower affinity than biotin. The apparent dissociation constant determined for the avidin complex with HABA by microscale thermophoresis (MST) is 4.12 μM. The crystal structure of avidin-HABA complex was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å (PDB entry 5chk). The crystals belong to a hexagonal system, in the space group P6422. In that structure, the hydrazone tautomer of HABA is bound at the bottom part of the central calyx near the polar residues. We show interactions of the dye with avidin and compare them with the previously reported avidin-biotin complex.

  8. Tryptophan tags and de novo designed complementary affinity ligands for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Pina, Ana Sofia; Carvalho, Sara; Dias, Ana Margarida G C; Guilherme, Márcia; Pereira, Alice S; Caraça, Luciana T; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-11-11

    A common strategy for the production and purification of recombinant proteins is to fuse a tag to the protein terminal residues and employ a "tag-specific" ligand for fusion protein capture and purification. In this work, we explored the effect of two tryptophan-based tags, NWNWNW and WFWFWF, on the expression and purification of Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) used as a model fusion protein. The titers obtained with the expression of these fusion proteins in soluble form were 0.11mgml(-1) and 0.48mgml(-1) for WFWFWF and NWNWNW, respectively. A combinatorial library comprising 64 ligands based on the Ugi reaction was prepared and screened for binding GFP-tagged and non-tagged proteins. Complementary ligands A2C2 and A3C1 were selected for the effective capture of NWNWNW and WFWFWF tagged proteins, respectively, in soluble forms. These affinity pairs displayed 10(6)M(-1) affinity constants and Qmax values of 19.11±2.60ugg(-1) and 79.39ugg(-1) for the systems WFWFWF AND NWNWNW, respectively. GFP fused to the WFWFWF affinity tag was also produced as inclusion bodies, and a refolding-on column strategy was explored using the ligand A4C8, selected from the combinatorial library of ligands but in presence of denaturant agents.

  9. Gradient-based habitat affinities predict species vulnerability to drought.

    PubMed

    Debinski, Diane M; Caruthers, Jennet C; Cook, Dianne; Crowley, Jason; Wickham, Hadley

    2013-05-01

    Ecological fingerprints of climate change are becoming increasingly evident at broad geographical scales as measured by species range shifts and changes in phenology. However, finer-scale species-level responses to environmental fluctuations may also provide an important bellwether of impending future community responses. Here we examined changes in abundance of butterfly species along a hydrological gradient of six montane meadow habitat types in response to drought. Our data collection began prior to the drought, and we were able to track changes for 11 years, of which eight were considered mild to extreme drought conditions. We separated the species into those that had an affinity for hydric vs. xeric habitats. We suspected that drought would favor species with xeric habitat affinities, but that there could be variations in species-level responses along the hydrological gradient. We also suspected that mesic meadows would be most sensitive to drought conditions. Temporal trajectories were modeled for both species groups (hydric vs. xeric affinity) and individual species. Abundances of species with affinity for xeric habitats increased in virtually all meadow types. Conversely, abundances of species with affinity for hydric habitats decreased, particularly in mesic and xeric meadows. Mesic meadows showed the most striking temporal abundance trajectory: Increasing abundances of species with xeric habitat affinity were offset by decreasing or stable abundances of species with hydric habitat affinity. The one counterintuitive finding was that, in some hydric meadows, species with affinity for hydric habitats increased. In these cases, we suspect that decreasing moisture conditions in hydric meadows actually increased habitat suitability because sites near the limit of moisture extremes for some species became more acceptable. Thus, species responses were relatively predictable based upon habitat affinity and habitat location along the hydrological gradient, and

  10. A Comparative Study of the Application of Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrices Combined with Parallel Factor Analysis and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization in the Analysis of Zn Complexation by Humic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Boguta, Patrycja; Pieczywek, Piotr M.; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the application of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs) combined with two decomposition methods: parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to study the interaction mechanisms between humic acids (HAs) and Zn(II) over a wide concentration range (0–50 mg·dm−3). The influence of HA properties on Zn(II) complexation was also investigated. Stability constants, quenching degree and complexation capacity were estimated for binding sites found in raw EEM, EEM-PARAFAC and EEM-NMF data using mathematical models. A combination of EEM fluorescence analysis with one of the proposed decomposition methods enabled separation of overlapping binding sites and yielded more accurate calculations of the binding parameters. PARAFAC and NMF processing allowed finding binding sites invisible in a few raw EEM datasets as well as finding totally new maxima attributed to structures of the lowest humification. Decomposed data showed an increase in Zn complexation with an increase in humification, aromaticity and molecular weight of HAs. EEM-PARAFAC analysis also revealed that the most stable compounds were formed by structures containing the highest amounts of nitrogen. The content of oxygen-functional groups did not influence the binding parameters, mainly due to fact of higher competition of metal cation with protons. EEM spectra coupled with NMF and especially PARAFAC processing gave more adequate assessments of interactions as compared to raw EEM data and should be especially recommended for modeling of complexation processes where the fluorescence intensities (FI) changes are weak or where the processes are interfered with by the presence of other fluorophores. PMID:27782078

  11. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%.

  12. The proton affinities of saturated and unsaturated heterocyclic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabli, Samira; van Beelen, Eric S. E.; Ingemann, Steen; Henriksen, Lars; Hammerum, Steen

    2006-03-01

    The proton affinities derived from G3-calculations of 23 five-membered ring heteroaromatic molecules agree well with the experimentally determined values available in the literature. The calculated local proton affinities show that the principal site of protonation of the heteroaromatic compounds examined is an atom of the ring, carbon when there is only one heteroatom in the ring, and nitrogen where there are two or more heteroatoms. The experimental proton affinities of non-aromatic cyclic ethers, amines and thioethers are also in excellent agreement with the calculated values, with two exceptions (oxetane, N-methylazetidine). The literature proton affinities of the four simple cyclic ethers, oxetane, tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran and oxepane were confirmed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, in order to examine the disagreement between the values predicted by extrapolation or additivity for tetrahydrofuran and tetrahydropyran and those determined by experiment and by calculation. The proton affinity differences between the pairs tetrahydropyran/1,4-dioxane, piperidine/morpholine and related compounds show that introduction of an additional oxygen atom in the ring considerably lowers the basicity.

  13. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  14. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  15. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  16. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  17. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva, M S; Graça, V C; Reis, L V; Santos, P F; Almeida, P; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2013-12-01

    The most selective purification method for proteins and other biomolecules is affinity chromatography. This method is based on the unique biological-based specificity of the biomolecule-ligand interaction and commonly uses biological ligands. However, these ligands may present some drawbacks, mainly because of their cost and lability. Dye-affinity chromatography overcomes the limitations of biological ligands and is widely used owing to the low cost of synthetic dyes and to their resistance to biological and chemical degradation. In this work, immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dyes are used in order to exploit affinity interactions with standard proteins such as lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin. These studies evaluate the affinity interactions occurring between the immobilized ligand and the different proteins, as a reflection of the sum of several molecular interactions, namely ionic, hydrophobic and van der Waals, spread throughout the structure, in a defined spatial manner. The results show the possibility of using an aminosquarylium cyanine dye bearing a N-hexyl pendant chain, with a ligand density of 1.8 × 10(-2) mmol of dye/g of chromatographic support, to isolate lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin from a mixture. The application of a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient resulted in the recovery of lysozyme in the flowthrough. On the other hand, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin were retained, involving different interactions with the ligand. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential applicability of ligands such as aminosquarylium cyanine dyes for the separation and purification of proteins by affinity chromatography.

  18. Calix receptor edifice; scrupulous turn off fluorescent sensor for Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Keyur D; Gupte, Hrishikesh S; Makwana, Bharat A; Vyas, Disha J; Maity, Debdeep; Jain, Vinod K

    2012-11-01

    Novel Supramolecular fluorescence receptor derived from calix-system i.e. calix[4]resorcinarene bearing dansylchloride as fluorophore was designed and synthesized. The compound was purified by column chromatography and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and Mass spectroscopy. Tetradansylated calix[4] resorcinarene (TDCR) shows a boat conformation with C(2)v symmetry. The complexation behaviour of metal cations [Ag(I), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), U(VI) (1 × 10(-4) M)] with tetra dansylated calix[4]resorcinarene (1 × 10(-6) M) was studied by spectophotometry and spectrofluorometry. Red shift in the absorption spectra led us to conclude that there is strong complexation Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II) with TDCR. These metal cations also produce quenching with red shifts in the emission spectra. The maximum quenching in emission intensity was observed in the case of Fe(III) and its binding constant was also found to be significantly higher than that of Co(II) and Cu(II). Quantum yield of metal complexes of Fe(III) was found to be lower in comparison with Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes. Stern Volmer analysis indicates that the mechanism of fluorescence quenching is either purely dynamic, or purely static.

  19. Unsymmetrical Schiff base (ON) ligand on complexation with some transition metal ions: Synthesis, spectral characterization, antibacterial, fluorescence and thermal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Omyma A. M.; El-Medani, Samir M.; Abu Serea, Maha R.; Sayed, Abeer S. S.

    2015-02-01

    A series of eight metal Schiff base complexes were synthesized by the thermal reaction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Zn(II), Hg(II), La(III) or Sm(III) with a Schiff base "L" produced by the condensation of furfuraldehyde and 1,2-diaminobenzene. These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, FT-IR, molar conductance, mass spectrometry, thermal and fluorescence studies. The studies suggested the coordination of the ligand L to metal through azomethine imine nitrogen and furan oxygen atoms of Schiff base moiety. Thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses data were studied and indicated high stability for all complexes and suggested the presence of lattice and/or coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Coats-Redfern method has been used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveal that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes which can attain a square planner arrangements. The ligand and its complexes exhibited intraligand (π-π∗) fluorescence and can potentially serve as photoactive materials. Both the ligand and its complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities.

  20. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  1. Dual-Modal Magnetic Resonance/Fluorescent Zinc Probes for Pancreatic β-Cell Mass Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Minuzzi, Florencia; Sae-Heng, Myra; Rivas, Charlotte; Juretschke, Hans-Paul; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Allegrini, Peter R; Laurent, Didier; Duckworth, Andrew R; Beeby, Andrew; Rutter, Guy A; Long, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the contribution of changes in pancreatic β-cell mass to the development of all forms of diabetes mellitus, few robust approaches currently exist to monitor these changes prospectively in vivo. Although magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) provides a potentially useful technique, targeting MRI-active probes to the β cell has proved challenging. Zinc ions are highly concentrated in the secretory granule, but they are relatively less abundant in the exocrine pancreas and in other tissues. We have therefore developed functional dual-modal probes based on transition-metal chelates capable of binding zinc. The first of these, Gd⋅1, binds ZnII directly by means of an amidoquinoline moiety (AQA), thus causing a large ratiometric Stokes shift in the fluorescence from λem=410 to 500 nm with an increase in relaxivity from r1=4.2 up to 4.9 mM−1 s−1. The probe is efficiently accumulated into secretory granules in β-cell-derived lines and isolated islets, but more poorly by non-endocrine cells, and leads to a reduction in T1 in human islets. In vivo murine studies of Gd⋅1 have shown accumulation of the probe in the pancreas with increased signal intensity over 140 minutes. PMID:25736590

  2. A Smart Near-Infrared Fluorescence Probe for Selective Detection of Tau Fibrils in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yujin; Park, Kwang-Su; Ha, Taewoong; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Hwang, Yu Jin; Lee, Junghee; Ryu, Hoon; Choo, Hyunah; Chong, Youhoon

    2016-11-16

    Development of a novel, tau-selective smart near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe was attempted by combining the previously identified core scaffold 3,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylaniline-4-yl moiety, with the characteristic donor-π-acceptor architecture of the smart NIRF Aβ probes DANIR-2c and MCAAD-3. A series of compounds (2 and 3) were prepared, which were identified as "turn-on" NIRF probes for the visual detection of tau aggregates and Aβ fibrils (λem = 650 nm, Stokes shifts = 70-110 nm). In particular, combination of the 3,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylanilin-4-yl moiety and the donor part of MCAAD-3 endowed the resulting probes, 3g and 3h, with significant selectivity toward tau aggregates (selectivity for tau over Aβ = 5.7 and 3.8); they showed much higher fluorescence intensities upon binding to tau aggregates (FItau = 49 and 108) than when bound to Aβ fibrils (FIAβ = 9 and 28). Quantitative analysis of binding affinities and fluorescence properties of 3g and 3h revealed that microenvironment-sensitive molecular rotor-like behavior, rather than binding affinity to the target, is responsible for their selective turn-on fluorescence detection of tau fibrils. Selective fluorescent labeling of tau fibrils by 3g and 3h was further demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining of human Alzheimer's disease brain sections, which showed colocalization of the probes (3g and 3h) and phosphorylated tau antibody.

  3. Fluorescence assay of the interaction between hemoglobin and the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte membrane band 3.

    PubMed

    Sega, Martiana F; Chu, Haiyan; Christian, John A; Low, Philip S

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen tension has emerged as a potent regulator of multiple erythrocyte properties, including glucose metabolism, cell volume, ATP release, and cytoskeletal organization. Because hemoglobin (Hb)(1) binds to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) in an oxygen dependent manner, with deoxyHb exhibiting significantly greater affinity for cdb3 than oxyHb, the deoxyHb-cdb3 interaction has been hypothesized to constitute the molecular switch for all O2-controlled erythrocyte processes. In this study, we describe a rapid and accurate method for quantitating the interaction of deoxyHb binding to cdb3. For this purpose, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) is fused to the COOH-terminus of cdb3, and the binding of Hb to the NH2-terminus of cdb3-eGFP is quantitated by Hb-mediated quenching of cdb3-eGFP fluorescence. As expected, the intensity of cdb3-eGFP fluorescence decreases only slightly following addition of oxyHb. However, upon deoxygenation of the same Hb-cdb3 solution, the fluorescence decreases dramatically (i.e. confirming that deoxyHb exhibits much greater affinity for cdb3 than oxyHb). Using this fluorescence quenching method, we not only confirm previously established characteristics of the Hb-cdb3 interaction, but also establish an assay that can be exploited to screen for inhibitors of the sickle Hb-cdb3 interaction that accelerates sickle Hb polymerization.

  4. Computer-aided design of peptide near infrared fluorescent probe for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congying; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Integrin αvβ3 receptors are expressed on activated endothelial cells during neovascularization to maintain tumor growth, so they become hot research tagets in cancer diagnosis. Peptides possess several attractive features when compared to protein and small molecule, such as small size and high structural compatibility with target proteins. Efficient design of high-affinity peptide ligands to Integrin αvβ3 receptors has been an important problem. Designed peptides in silico provide a valuable and high-selectivity peptide, meanwhile decrease the time of drug screening. In this study, we design peptide which can bind with integrin αvβ3 via computer, and then synthesis near infrared fluorescent probe. The characterization of this near infrared fluorescent probe was detected by UV. To investigate the tumor cell targeting of this probe, it was labeled with visible fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (RhB) for microscopy. To evaluate the targeting capability of this near infrared fluorescent probe, mice bearing integrin αvβ3 positive tumor xenografts were used. In vitro cellular experiments indicated that this probe have a clear binding affinity to αvβ3-positive tumor cells. In vivo experiments confirmed the receptor binding specificity of this probe. The peptide of computational design can bind with integrin αvβ3. Combined peptide near-infrared fluorescent probe with imaging technology use for clinical and tumor diagnosis have a greater development in future.

  5. Fluorescence in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Henrik

    Following the initial detection by Bowen in 1934 of the strong O III lines being due to accidental resonance with strong He II radiation, many strong spectral emission lines are explained as produced by fluorescence. Many of these are Fe II lines pumped by H Lyα, as a consequence of strong radiation from hydrogen and a favorable energy level structure for Fe II. The lines are observed in many types of objects with low density plasma components. The Weigelt condensations in the vicinity of the massive star Eta Carinae is one location where these lines are observed and can be studied in detail, as well as been used for diagnostics.

  6. Fluorescence Detection In Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarner, Susan

    1988-04-01

    Fluorescence detection is in common usage in forensic science laboratories for the visualization of three enzyme markers. The fluorogenic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate, 4-methylutbel-liveryl acetate, and fluorecein diacetate, are acted upon by the enzymes Erythrocyte Acid Phospha, tase, Esterase-D, and Carbonic Anhydrase-III, respectively, to produce compounds visible to the analyst when viewed with transmitted UV light at 365 nm. Additionally, the choice of fluorogenic corn, pounds may help detect a specific enzyme from a related enzyme. One of the responsibilities of a forensic science laboratory may be the analysis of blood for genetically controlled polymorphic enzymes and protein markers. The genetic markers are said to be polymorphic because each exhibits types which can be differentiated and allows for the inclusion or exclusion of possible-donors of the blood. Each genetic marker can be separated into these recognizable types by electrophoresis, a technique which separates compounds based on electrical charges. Electrophoresis is conducted by placing a portion or extract of each bloodstain into a support medium which will conduct electricity. This is known as a plate or membrane. By controlling the pH of the buffer and the potential that is applied to the plate, the analyst can achieve separation of the types within an enzyme marker. The types appear as differing patterns of bands. Once the bloodstain has been subjected to electrophoresis, the enzymes must be visualized. This is generally best accomplished by using the specific activity of the enzyme. For the enzymes described in the present work, the visualization is performed by over-layering the plate with a piece of filter paper that 'has been saturated with the appropriate non-fluorescent substrate and buffer. The bands of enzyme, which is now in discrete patterns, will act upon the non-fluorescent substrate to create a fluorescent compound. The plate is then viewed with transmitted UV

  7. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  8. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression.

  9. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  10. Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fluorescence after polyelectrolyte caging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Krol, Silke; Campanini, Barbara; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    Discovery of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) constituted an important improvement for living cell studies on submicron resolution allowing in vivo fluorescence labeling. We studied the photo-physical properties of single GFP molecules incorporated in a charged polyelectrolyte environment by means of single molecule spectroscopy. The fluorescence characteristics change dramatically in terms of photo-stability,lifetime and blinking behavior so that the proteins scale up to quantum dots. The reported results highlight interesting applications in the design of fluorescent markers and in the development of optical data storage architectures.

  11. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Assay for Assessing LIM Domain-Peptide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Neil O; Shah, Manan; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2016-10-10

    We have developed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based experiments for measuring the binding affinity, off-rates, and inferred on-rates for interactions between a family of transcriptional regulators and their intrinsically disordered binding partners. It was difficult to evaluate these interactions previously, as the transcriptional regulators are obligate binding proteins that aggregate in the absence of a binding partner. The assays rely on fusion constructs where binding domains are linked by a flexible tether containing a specific protease site, with fluorescent proteins at either end that display FRET when the complex is formed. Loss of FRET is monitored after cutting the tether followed by dilution or competition with a non-fluorescent peptide. These methods allowed a wide range of binding affinities (10(-9) -10(-5)  m) to be determined. Our data indicate that interactions of closely related proteins can have surprisingly different binding properties.

  12. Polyamide fluorescent probes for visualization of repeated DNA sequences in living cells.

    PubMed

    Nozeret, Karine; Loll, François; Escudé, Christophe; Boutorine, Alexandre S

    2015-03-02

    DNA imaging in living cells usually requires transgenic approaches that modify the genome. Synthetic pyrrole-imidazole polyamides that bind specifically to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) represent an attractive approach for in-cell imaging that does not necessitate changes to the genome. Nine hairpin polyamides that target mouse major satellite DNA were synthesized. Their interactions with synthetic target dsDNA fragments were studied by thermal denaturation, gel-shift electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The polyamides had different affinities for the target DNA, and fluorescent labeling of the polyamides affected their affinity for their targets. We validated the specificity of the probes in fixed cells and provide evidence that two of the probes detect target sequences in mouse living cell lines. This study demonstrates for the first time that synthetic compounds can be used for the visualization of the nuclear substructures formed by repeated DNA sequences in living cells.

  13. The affine structure of gravitational theories: Symplectic groups and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2014-09-01

    We give a geometrical description of gravitational theories from the viewpoint of symmetries and affine structure. We show how gravity, considered as a gauge theory, can be consistently achieved by the nonlinear realization of the conformal-affine group in an indirect manner: due to the partial isomorphism between CA(3, 1) and the centrally extended Sp( 8), we perform a nonlinear realization of the centrally extended (CE)Sp( 8) in its semi-simple version. In particular, starting from the bundle structure of gravity, we derive the conformal-affine Lie algebra and then, by the nonlinear realization, we define the coset field transformations, the Cartan forms and the inverse Higgs constraints. Finally, we discuss the geometrical Lagrangians where all the information on matter fields and their interactions can be contained.

  14. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  15. A fast quantum algorithm for the affine Boolean function identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm (the one-query algorithm) can identify a completely specified linear Boolean function using a single query to the oracle with certainty. The first aim of the paper is to show that if the provided Boolean function is affine, then one more query to the oracle (the two-query algorithm) is required to identify the affinity of the function with certainty. The second aim of the paper is to show that if the provided Boolean function is incompletely defined, then the one-query and the two-query algorithms can be used as bounded-error quantum polynomial algorithms to identify certain classes of incompletely defined linear and affine Boolean functions respectively with probability of success at least 2/3.

  16. Enhancing Community Detection By Affinity-based Edge Weighting Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    Community detection refers to an important graph analytics problem of finding a set of densely-connected subgraphs in a graph and has gained a great deal of interest recently. The performance of current community detection algorithms is limited by an inherent constraint of unweighted graphs that offer very little information on their internal community structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to address this issue that weights the edges in a given graph based on recently proposed vertex affinity. The vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength, and therefore, it is ideal for graph analytics applications such as community detection. We also demonstrate that the affinity-based edge weighting scheme can improve the performance of community detection algorithms significantly.

  17. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity (EA) of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, using 2p electron full configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions expanded in a 6s5p3d2f Slater-type orbital basis. The best complete active space self-consistent field - multireference CI (CASSCF-MRCI) result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell correlation increases the computed EA to 1.290 at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. This study clearly establishes the synergistic effect between the higher excitations and basis set completeness on the electron affinity when the 2s electrons are correlated.

  18. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, at the full CI level using a 6s5p3d 2f Slater-type orbital basis and correlating only the 2p electrons. The best CASSCF-MRCI result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell coorelation increases the computed EA to 1.290 eV at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. The higher excitation contribution to the electron affinity is found to increase substantially with basis set completeness, especially when the 2s electrons are correlated. Relativistic effects are shown to make a small (less than 0.01 eV) change in the EA.

  19. AMPK beta subunits display isoform specific affinities for carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Koay, Ann; Woodcroft, Ben; Petrie, Emma J; Yue, Helen; Emanuelle, Shane; Bieri, Michael; Bailey, Michael F; Hargreaves, Mark; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Ralph, Stuart; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R

    2010-08-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimer of catalytic (alpha) and regulatory (beta and gamma) subunits with at least two isoforms for each subunit. AMPK beta1 is widely expressed whilst AMPK beta2 is highly expressed in muscle and both beta isoforms contain a mid-molecule carbohydrate-binding module (beta-CBM). Here we show that beta2-CBM has evolved to contain a Thr insertion and increased affinity for glycogen mimetics with a preference for oligosaccharides containing a single alpha-1,6 branched residue. Deletion of Thr-101 reduces affinity for single alpha-1,6 branched oligosaccharides by 3-fold, while insertion of this residue into the equivalent position in the beta1-CBM sequence increases affinity by 3-fold, confirming the functional importance of this residue.

  20. Overcoming the aggregation problem: A new type of fluorescent ligand for ConA-based glucose sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Brian M.; Li, Mingchien; Locke, Andrea K.; Birch, David J.S.; Vigh, Gyula; Coté, Gerard L.

    2016-01-01

    Competitive binding assays based on the lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) have displayed significant potential to serve in continuous glucose monitoring applications. However, to date, this type of fluorescent, affinity-based assay has yet to show the stable, glucose predictive capabilities that are required for such an application. This instability has been associated with the extensive crosslinking between traditionally-used fluorescent ligands (presenting multiple low-affinity moieties) and ConA (presenting multiple binding sites) in free solution. The work herein introduces the design and synthesis of a new type of fluorescent ligand that can avoid this aggregation and allow the assay to be sensitive across the physiologically relevant glucose concentration range. This fluorescent ligand (APTS–MT) presents a single high-affinity trimannose moiety that is recognized by ConA’s full binding site and a fluorophore that can effectively track the ligand’s equilibrium binding via fluorescent anisotropy. This is confirmed by comparing its measured fluorescent lifetime to experimentally-determined rotational correlation lifetimes of the free and bound populations. Using an assay comprised of 200 nM APTS–MT and 1 μM ConA, the fluorescence anisotropy capably tracks the concentration of monosaccharides that are known to bind to ConA’s primary binding site, and the assay displays a MARD of 6.5% across physiologically relevant glucose concentrations. Ultimately, this rationally-designed fluorescent ligand can facilitate the realization of the full potential of ConA-based glucose sensing assays and provide the basis for a new set of competing ligands to be paired with ConA. PMID:25058939