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Sample records for affinity kd values

  1. Effects of Moisture Content and Redox Potential on in situ Kd Values for Radiodine in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the processes that determine the solid-liquid partitioning (Kd value) of Se are of fundamental importance in assessing the risk associated with the disposal of radioselenium-containing waste. Using a mini-column approach, in-situ Kd values for 75Se were determined over time in relation...

  2. Distribution Coefficients (Kd Values) for Waste Resins Generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this study was to measure 14C, 129I, and 99Tc Kd values of spent resin generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities. The scope of the work was to conduct Kd measurements of resins combined in the ratio that they are disposed, 42:58 cation:anion. Because it was not known how these spent resins would be buried, it was necessary to measure the Kd values in such a manner as to simulate both trench and vault disposal. This was accomplished by using an acid-rain simulant (a standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol) and a cement leachate simulant .

  3. Recommended Partition Coefficient (Kd) Values for Nuclide Partitioning in the Presence of Cellulose Degradation Products

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2001-02-23

    This report documents the data analysis of the results of the described laboratory studies in order to recommend Kd values for use in Performance Assessment modeling of nuclide transport in the presence of CDP.

  4. VARIABILITY OF KD VALUES IN CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS AND SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.; Shine, E.

    2012-02-02

    Measured distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) for environmental contaminants provide input data for performance assessments (PA) that evaluate physical and chemical phenomena for release of radionuclides from wasteforms, degradation of engineered components and subsequent transport of radionuclides through environmental media. Research efforts at SRNL to study the effects of formulation and curing variability on the physiochemical properties of the saltstone wasteform produced at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) are ongoing and provide information for the PA and Saltstone Operations. Furthermore, the range and distribution of plutonium K{sub d} values in soils is not known. Knowledge of these parameters is needed to provide guidance for stochastic modeling in the PA. Under the current SRS liquid waste processing system, supernate from F & H Tank Farm tanks is processed to remove actinides and fission products, resulting in a low-curie Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS). At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), DSS is mixed with premix, comprised of blast furnace slag (BFS), Class F fly ash (FA), and portland cement (OPC) to form a grout mixture. The fresh grout is subsequently placed in SDF vaults where it cures through hydration reactions to produce saltstone, a hardened monolithic waste form. Variation in saltstone composition and cure conditions of grout can affect the saltstone's physiochemical properties. Variations in properties may originate from variables in DSS, premix, and water to premix ratio, grout mixing, placing, and curing conditions including time and temperature (Harbour et al. 2007; Harbour et al. 2009). There are no previous studies reported in the literature regarding the range and distribution of K{sub d} values in cementitious materials. Presently, the Savannah River Site (SRS) estimate ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values based on measurements of K{sub d} values made in sandy SRS sediments (Kaplan 2010). The actual

  5. Comparison of in situ uranium KD values with a laboratory determined surface complexation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Fox, P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Reactive solute transport simulations in groundwater require a large number of parameters to describe hydrologic and chemical reaction processes. Appropriate methods for determining chemical reaction parameters required for reactive solute transport simulations are still under investigation. This work compares U(VI) distribution coefficients (i.e. KD values) measured under field conditions with KD values calculated from a surface complexation model developed in the laboratory. Field studies were conducted in an alluvial aquifer at a former U mill tailings site near the town of Naturita, CO, USA, by suspending approximately 10 g samples of Naturita aquifer background sediments (NABS) in 17-5.1-cm diameter wells for periods of 3 to 15 months. Adsorbed U(VI) on these samples was determined by extraction with a pH 9.45 NaHCO3/Na2CO3 solution. In wells where the chemical conditions in groundwater were nearly constant, adsorbed U concentrations for samples taken after 3 months of exposure to groundwater were indistinguishable from samples taken after 15 months. Measured in situ K D values calculated from the measurements of adsorbed and dissolved U(VI) ranged from 0.50 to 10.6 mL/g and the KD values decreased with increasing groundwater alkalinity, consistent with increased formation of soluble U(VI)-carbonate complexes at higher alkalinities. The in situ K D values were compared with KD values predicted from a surface complexation model (SCM) developed under laboratory conditions in a separate study. A good agreement between the predicted and measured in situ KD values was observed. The demonstration that the laboratory derived SCM can predict U(VI) adsorption in the field provides a critical independent test of a submodel used in a reactive transport model. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In-situ Kd values and geochemical behavior for inorganic and organic constituents of concern at the TNX Outfall Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2000-02-11

    A series of tests were conducted to provide site-specific Kd values for constituents of concern at the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit. These Kd values can be used to calculate contaminant migration within the operable unit and are, at this time considered to be the most defensible values.

  7. Theoretical analysis of kinetic effects on the quantitative comparison of K(d) values and contaminant retardation factors.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Honeyman, Bruce D

    2010-10-21

    Distribution coefficients (K(d) values) describe contaminant partitioning between liquids and solids for linear sorption at equilibrium conditions. If experimentally-determined K(d) values do not represent sorption equilibria, errors are introduced in contaminant transport models. These errors may be further propagated when K(d) values are used to compare contaminant mobility under different chemical solution conditions. Our theoretical analysis based on pseudo-first order sorption kinetics shows that, independent if two systems have the same or different sorption kinetics, relative comparisons of K(d) values and retardation factors are always affected by sorption times under non-equilibrium conditions. The time-frames required for attaining constant K(d) values are not only dependent on kinetic sorption characteristics, but also the equilibrium K(d) values approached. The type of kinetic errors introduced is affected by the specific differences in sorption kinetics and equilibrium K(d) values between the two systems. For systems with the same sorption kinetics, relative increases or decreases in contaminant velocities are always underestimated. In case of different kinetics, either an under- or overestimation of relative differences seems possible. Experimental sorption times should aim to equilibrate the system with the highest K(d) value for systems with comparable kinetics, and the system with the slowest sorption kinetics for different kinetics. PMID:20864208

  8. Averaging principle for the KdV equation with a small initial value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The averaging principle with a small initial value is constructed for a Hamiltonian perturbed Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation under periodic boundary condition where the positive integer n 0 is not divisible by three and K 1 and K 2 are real analytic functions. More precisely, any action I with the small initial value \\parallel I(0){{\\parallel}{{\\tilde{\\mathop{\\ell} }s}}}≤slant \\varepsilon evolves slowly over a long time interval: where s is the index of some space.

  9. Kd Values for Agricultural and Surface Soils for Use in Hanford Site Farm, Residential, and River Shoreline Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2007-08-01

    This report provides best estimate Kd values and a minimum and maximum range of Kd values to be used for agricultural soils and Columbia River bank sediments that exist today or would exist in the future when portions of the Hanford Site are released for farming, residential, and recreational use after the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) completes clean up of defense waste on the site. The Kd values should be used to determine the fate and transport rates of contaminants and their availability for plant and animal uptake in selected non-groundwater scenarios included in Hanford Site environmental impact statements, risk assessments and specific facility performance assessments. This report describes scenarios such as a small farm where drilling of a well inadvertently goes through buried waste and brings waste to the surface, allowing the tailings to become available for direct human exposure or incorporation into garden crops and farm animals used for food by the farm family. The Kd values recommended in this report can also be used to calculate sediment-water partitioning factors used to predict plant and animal uptake from interaction with the contaminated soil.

  10. Recommended Distribution Coefficients, Kd Values, for Special Analysis Risk Calculations Related to Waste Disposal and Tank Closure on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D

    2005-08-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide a technically defensible list of distribution coefficients, or Kd values, for use in performance assessment (PA) and special analysis (SA) calculations on the SRS. Only Kd values for radionuclides that have new information related to them or that have recently been recognized as being important are discussed in this report. Some 150 Kd values are provided in this report for various waste-disposal or tank-closure environments: soil, corrosion in grout, oxidizing grout waste, gravel, clay, and reducing concrete environments. Documentation and justification for the selection of each Kd value is provided.

  11. REVISED GUIDELINES FOR USING CELLULOSE DEGRADATION PRODUCT-IMPACTED KD VALUES FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AND COMPOSITE ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-14

    Cellulosic materials include wood, paper, rags, and cardboard products. These materials are co-disposed with radiological waste at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF). Cellulosic materials readily degrade in the environment to form cellulose degradation products (CDP) that will partition to the sediment or remain mobile in the groundwater. Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has conducted studies to estimate the impact of CDP on radionuclide sorption to SRS sediments (Kd values). It was found that CDP impact on radionuclide sorption varies with radionuclide and CDP concentration. Furthermore, it was found that the amount of carbon (C) in the system could increase or decrease Kd values with respect to the base case of when no CDP was added. Throughout the expected pH range of the ELLWF, a low concentration of CDP in the system would increase Kd values (because C would sorb to the sediment and provide more exchange sites for radionuclides to sorb), whereas greater concentrations of CDP ({ge}20 mg/L C) would decrease Kd values (because C would remain in solution and complex the radionuclide and not permit the radionuclide to sorb to the sediment). A review of >230 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) groundwater concentrations in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS indicated that the average DOC concentration, a gross measure of CDP, was 5 mg/L C. At approximately this DOC concentration, the laboratory studies demonstrated that no anions (Tc, I, or Se) or cations (Ni, Sr, Ce, Eu, Zr, or Th) have decreased sorption in the presence of carbon (an analogue for CDP).

  12. Modelling radionuclide transport in fractured media with a dynamic update of Kd values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchero, Paolo; Painter, Scott; Ebrahimi, Hedieh; Koskinen, Lasse; Molinero, Jorge; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide transport in fractured crystalline rocks is a process of interest in evaluating long term safety of potential disposal systems for radioactive wastes. Given their numerical efficiency and the absence of numerical dispersion, Lagrangian methods (e.g. particle tracking algorithms) are appealing approaches that are often used in safety assessment (SA) analyses. In these approaches, many complex geochemical retention processes are typically lumped into a single parameter: the distribution coefficient (Kd). Usually, the distribution coefficient is assumed to be constant over the time frame of interest. However, this assumption could be critical under long-term geochemical changes as it is demonstrated that the distribution coefficient depends on the background chemical conditions (e.g. pH, Eh, and major chemistry). In this work, we provide a computational framework that combines the efficiency of Lagrangian methods with a sound and explicit description of the geochemical changes of the site and their influence on the radionuclide retention properties.

  13. Modelling radionuclide transport in fractured media with a dynamic update of Kd values

    DOE PAGES

    Trinchero, Paolo; Painter, Scott L.; Ebrahimi, Hedieh; Koskinen, Lasse; Molinero, Jorge; Selroos, Jan -Olof

    2015-10-13

    Radionuclide transport in fractured crystalline rocks is a process of interest in evaluating long term safety of potential disposal systems for radioactive wastes. Given their numerical efficiency and the absence of numerical dispersion, Lagrangian methods (e.g. particle tracking algorithms) are appealing approaches that are often used in safety assessment (SA) analyses. In these approaches, many complex geochemical retention processes are typically lumped into a single parameter: the distribution coefficient (Kd). Usually, the distribution coefficient is assumed to be constant over the time frame of interest. However, this assumption could be critical under long-term geochemical changes as it is demonstrated thatmore » the distribution coefficient depends on the background chemical conditions (e.g. pH, Eh, and major chemistry). In this study, we provide a computational framework that combines the efficiency of Lagrangian methods with a sound and explicit description of the geochemical changes of the site and their influence on the radionuclide retention properties.« less

  14. Bethe Ansatz and the Spectral Theory of Affine Lie algebra-Valued Connections II: The Non Simply-Laced Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Davide; Raimondo, Andrea; Valeri, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    We assess the ODE/IM correspondence for the quantum g -KdV model, for a non-simply laced Lie algebra g. This is done by studying a meromorphic connection with values in the Langlands dual algebra of the affine Lie algebra g^{(1)} , and constructing the relevant {Ψ} -system among subdominant solutions. We then use the {Ψ} -system to prove that the generalized spectral determinants satisfy the Bethe Ansatz equations of the quantum g -KdV model. We also consider generalized Airy functions for twisted Kac-Moody algebras and we construct new explicit solutions to the Bethe Ansatz equations. The paper is a continuation of our previous work on the ODE/IM correspondence for simply-laced Lie algebras.

  15. Effects of soil type, moisture content, redox potential and methyl bromide fumigation on Kd values of radio-selenium in soil.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, D J; Moore, J; Shaw, G

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the processes that determine the solid-liquid partitioning (K(d) value) of Se is of fundamental importance in assessing the risk associated with the disposal of radio-selenium-containing waste. Using a mini-column (rather than batch) approach, K(d) values for (75)Se were determined over time in relation to soil moisture content (field capacity or saturated), redox potential and methyl bromide fumigation (used to disrupt the soil microbial population) in three contrasting soil types: clay loam, organic and sandy loam. The K(d) values were generally in the range 50-500 L kg(-1), with mean soil K(d) increasing with increasing organic matter content. Saturation with water lowered the measured redox potentials in the soils. However, only in the sandy loam soil did redox potential become negative, and this led to an increase in (75)Se K(d) value in this soil. Comparison of the data with the Eh-pH stability diagram for Se suggested that such strong reduction may have been consistent with the formation of the insoluble Se species, selenide. These findings, coupled with the fact that methyl bromide fumigation had no discernible effect on (75)Se K(d) value in the sandy loam soil, suggest that geochemical, rather than microbial, processes controlled (75)Se partitioning. The inter-relations between soil moisture content, redox potential and Se speciation should be considered in the modelling and assessment of radioactive Se fate and transport in the environment. PMID:18328605

  16. Interpolation method for accurate affinity ranking of arrayed ligand-analyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Andree, Kiki C; van der Velde, Niels; van der Kooi, Alex; Stojanović, Ivan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-05-01

    The values of the affinity constants (kd, ka, and KD) that are determined by label-free interaction analysis methods are affected by the ligand density. This article outlines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging method that yields high-throughput globally fitted affinity ranking values using a 96-plex array. A kinetic titration experiment without a regeneration step has been applied for various coupled antibodies binding to a single antigen. Globally fitted rate (kd and ka) and dissociation equilibrium (KD) constants for various ligand densities and analyte concentrations are exponentially interpolated to the KD at Rmax = 100 RU response level (KD(R100)).

  17. RANGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TECHNETIUM KD VALUES IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D

    2008-10-28

    Performance assessments (PAs) are risk calculations used to estimate the amount of low-level radioactive waste that can be disposed at DOE sites. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) are input parameters used in PA calculations to provide a measure of radionuclide sorption to sediment; the greater the K{sub d} value, the greater the sorption and the slower the estimated movement of the radionuclide through sediment. Understanding and quantifying K{sub d} value variability is important for estimating the uncertainty of PA calculations. Without this information, it is necessary to make overly conservative estimates about the possible limits of K{sub d} values, which in turn may increase disposal costs. Finally, technetium is commonly found to be amongst the radionuclides posing potential risk at waste disposal locations because it is believed to be highly mobile in its anionic form (pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), it exists in relatively high concentrations in SRS waste, and it has a long half-life (213,000 years). The objectives of this laboratory study were to determine under SRS environmental conditions: (1) whether and to what extent TcO{sub 4}{sup -} sorbs to sediments, (2) the range of Tc K{sub d} values, (3) the distribution (normal or log-normal) of Tc K{sub d} values, and (4) how strongly Tc sorbs to SRS sediments through desorption experiments. Objective 3, to identify the Tc K{sub d} distribution is important because it provides a statistical description that influences stochastic modeling of estimated risk. The approach taken was to collect 26 sediments from a non-radioactive containing sediment core collected from E-Area, measure Tc K{sub d} values and then perform statistical analysis to describe the measured Tc K{sub d} values. The mean K{sub d} value was 3.4 {+-} 0.5 mL/g and ranged from -2.9 to 11.2 mL/g. The data did not have a Normal distribution (as defined by the Shapiro-Wilk's Statistic) and had a 95-percentile range of 2.4 to 4.4 m

  18. ESTIMATED NEPTUNIUM SEDIMENT SORPTION VALUES AS A FUNCTION OF PH AND MEASURED BARIUM AND RADIUM KD VALUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this document is to provide traceability and justification for a select few new geochemical data used in the Special Analysis entitled 'Special Analysis for the Dose Assessment of the Final Inventories in Center Slit Trenches One through Five'. Most values used in the Special Analysis came from the traditional geochemical data package, however, some recent laboratory measurements have made it possible to estimate barium K{sub d} values. Additionally, some recent calculations were made to estimate neptunium K{sub d} values as a function of pH. The assumptions, justifications, and calculations needed to generate these new values are presented in this document, and the values are summarized.

  19. UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT KD, VALUES, VOLUME III: AMERICIUM, ARSENIC, CURIUM, IODINE, NEPTUNIUM, RADIUM, AND TECHNETIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the conceptualization, measurement, and use of the partition (or distribution) coefficient, Kd, parameter, and the geochemical aqueous solution and sorbent properties that are most important in controlling adsorption/retardation behavior of selected contamin...

  20. Use of thermodynamic sorption models to derive radionuclide Kd values for performance assessment: Selected results and recommendations of the NEA sorption project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochs, M.; Davis, J.A.; Olin, M.; Payne, T.E.; Tweed, C.J.; Askarieh, M.M.; Altmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    For the safe final disposal and/or long-term storage of radioactive wastes, deep or near-surface underground repositories are being considered world-wide. A central safety feature is the prevention, or sufficient retardation, of radionuclide (RN) migration to the biosphere. To this end, radionuclide sorption is one of the most important processes. Decreasing the uncertainty in radionuclide sorption may contribute significantly to reducing the overall uncertainty of a performance assessment (PA). For PA, sorption is typically characterised by distribution coefficients (Kd values). The conditional nature of Kd requires different estimates of this parameter for each set of geochemical conditions of potential relevance in a RN's migration pathway. As it is not feasible to measure sorption for every set of conditions, the derivation of Kd for PA must rely on data derived from representative model systems. As a result, uncertainty in Kd is largely caused by the need to derive values for conditions not explicitly addressed in experiments. The recently concluded NEA Sorption Project [1] showed that thermodynamic sorption models (TSMs) are uniquely suited to derive K d as a function of conditions, because they allow a direct coupling of sorption with variable solution chemistry and mineralogy in a thermodynamic framework. The results of the project enable assessment of the suitability of various TSM approaches for PA-relevant applications as well as of the potential and limitations of TSMs to model RN sorption in complex systems. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag.

  1. General, Label-Free Method for Determining K(d) and Ligand Concentration Simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Yazdi, Farzad; Takahashi, Terry T; Roberts, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Some of the most commonly used affinity reagents (e.g., antibodies) are often developed and used in conditions where their input concentrations ([L]0) and affinities (K(d)) are not known. Here, we have developed a general approach to determine both [L]0 and K(d) values simultaneously for affinity reagents (small molecules, proteins, and antibodies). To do this, we perform quantitative equilibrium exclusion immunoassays with two different concentrations of target and fit the data simultaneously to determine K(d) and [L]0. The results give accurate and reproducible measures of both values compared to established methods. By performing detailed error analysis, we demonstrate that our fitting gives unique solutions and indicates where K(d) and [L]0 measures are reliable. Furthermore, we found that a divalent model of antibody binding gives accurate K(d) and [L]0 values in both the forward (antibody immobilized) and the reverse (target immobilized) assays-addressing the long-term problem of obtaining quantitative data from reverse assays.

  2. Food and value motivation: Linking consumer affinities to different types of food products.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Joop; Schösler, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    This study uses the consumer affinity concept to examine the multiple motives that may shape consumers' relationships with food. The concept was applied in a study on four broad product types in the Netherlands, which cover a wide range of the market and may each appeal to consumers with different affinities towards foods. These product types may be denoted as 'conventional', 'efficient', 'gourmet' and 'pure'. A comparative analysis, based on Higgins' Regulatory Focus Theory, was performed to examine whether food-related value motivations could explain different consumer affinities for these product types. The affinities of consumers were measured by means of a non-verbal, visual presentation of four samples of food products in a nationwide survey (n = 742) among consumers who were all involved in food purchasing and/or cooking. The affinities found could be predicted fairly well from a number of self-descriptions relating to food and eating, which expressed different combinations of type of value motivation and involvement with food. The analysis demonstrated the contrasting role of high and low involvement as well as the potential complementarity of promotion- and prevention-focused value motivation. It is suggested that knowledge of the relationships between product types, consumer affinities and value motivation can help improve the effectiveness of interventions that seek to promote healthy and sustainable diets in developed countries. PMID:27046434

  3. Food and value motivation: Linking consumer affinities to different types of food products.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Joop; Schösler, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    This study uses the consumer affinity concept to examine the multiple motives that may shape consumers' relationships with food. The concept was applied in a study on four broad product types in the Netherlands, which cover a wide range of the market and may each appeal to consumers with different affinities towards foods. These product types may be denoted as 'conventional', 'efficient', 'gourmet' and 'pure'. A comparative analysis, based on Higgins' Regulatory Focus Theory, was performed to examine whether food-related value motivations could explain different consumer affinities for these product types. The affinities of consumers were measured by means of a non-verbal, visual presentation of four samples of food products in a nationwide survey (n = 742) among consumers who were all involved in food purchasing and/or cooking. The affinities found could be predicted fairly well from a number of self-descriptions relating to food and eating, which expressed different combinations of type of value motivation and involvement with food. The analysis demonstrated the contrasting role of high and low involvement as well as the potential complementarity of promotion- and prevention-focused value motivation. It is suggested that knowledge of the relationships between product types, consumer affinities and value motivation can help improve the effectiveness of interventions that seek to promote healthy and sustainable diets in developed countries.

  4. Pleurotus giganteus (Berk.) Karunarathna & K.D. Hyde: Nutritional value and in vitro neurite outgrowth activity in rat pheochromocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs dedicated to alleviate neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s have always been associated with debilitating side effects. Medicinal mushrooms which harness neuropharmacological compounds offer a potential possibility for protection against such diseases. Pleurotus giganteus (formerly known as Panus giganteus) has been consumed by the indigenous people in Peninsular Malaysia for many years. Domestication of this wild mushroom is gaining popularity but to our knowledge, medicinal properties reported for this culinary mushroom are minimal. Methods The fruiting bodies P. giganteus were analysed for its nutritional values. Cytotoxicity of the mushroom’s aqueous and ethanolic extracts towards PC12, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line was assessed by using 3-[4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Neurite outgrowth stimulation assay was carried out with nerve growth factor (NGF) as control. To elucidate signaling mechanisms involved by mushroom extract-induced neurite outgrowth, treatment of specific inhibitor for MEK/ERK and PI3K signalling pathway was carried out. Results The fruiting bodies of P. giganteus were found to have high carbohydrate, dietary fibre, potassium, phenolic compounds and triterpenoids. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in a dose- and time-dependant manner with no detectable cytotoxic effect. At day 3, 25 μg/ml of aqueous extract and 15 μg/ml of ethanolic extract showed the highest percentage of neurite-bearing cells, i.e. 31.7 ± 1.1% and 33.3 ± 0.9%; respectively. Inhibition treatment results suggested that MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt are responsible for neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells stimulated by P. giganteus extract. The high potassium content (1345.7 mg/100 g) may be responsible for promoting neurite extension, too. Conclusions P. giganteus contains bioactive compounds that mimic NGF and are responsible for neurite

  5. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  6. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  7. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  8. The oxygen affinity of cytochrome bo' in Escherichia coli determined by the deoxygenation of oxyleghemoglobin and oxymyoglobin: Km values for oxygen are in the submicromolar range.

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, R; Hill, S; Poole, R K

    1995-01-01

    Apparent oxygen affinities for Escherichia coli cells and membranes containing a terminal oxidase with only one type of ligand-binding heme, cytochrome o', were measured with oxyleghemoglobin and oxymyoglobin as sensitive oxygen reporters. Two Km values (0.15 to 0.35 microM and 0.016 to 0.085 microM) were detected, well below values determined for the purified oxidase by insensitive electrode methods. PMID:7836332

  9. Spatial distribution of diuron sorption affinity as affected by soil, terrain and management practices in an intensively managed apple orchard.

    PubMed

    Umali, Beng P; Oliver, Danielle P; Ostendorf, Bertram; Forrester, Sean; Chittleborough, David J; Hutson, John L; Kookana, Rai S

    2012-05-30

    We investigated how the sorption affinity of diuron (3'-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimenthyl-urea), a moderately hydrophobic herbicide, is affected by soil properties, topography and management practices in an intensively managed orchard system. Soil-landscape analysis was carried out in an apple orchard which had a strong texture contrast soil and a landform with relief difference of 50 m. Diuron sorption (K(d)) affinity was successfully predicted (R(2)=0.79; p<0.001) using a mid-infrared - partial least squares model and calibrated against measured data using a conventional batch sorption technique. Soil and terrain properties explained 75% of the variance of diuron K(d) with TOC, pH(w), slope and WI as key variables. Mean diuron K(d) values were also significantly different (p<0.05) between alley and tree line and between the different management zones. Soil in the tree line generally had lower sorption capacity for diuron than soil in the alleys. Younger stands, which were found to have lower TOC than in the older stands, also had lower diuron K(d) values. In intensively managed orchards, sorption affinity of pesticides to soils was not only affected by soil properties and terrain attributes but also by management regime.

  10. Rationally manipulating aptamer binding affinities in a stem-loop molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Rachel E; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-15

    Single-stranded DNA sequences that are highly specific for a target ligand are called aptamers. While the incorporation of aptamer sequences into stem-loop molecular beacons has become an essential tool in optical biosensors, the design principles that determine the magnitude of binding affinity and its relationship to placement of the aptamer sequence in the stem-loop architecture are not well defined. By controlled placement of the aptamer along the loop region of the molecular beacon, it is observed that the binding affinity can be tuned over 4 orders of magnitude (1.3 nM - 203 μM) for the Huizenga and Szostak ATP DNA aptamer sequence. It is observed that the Kd is enhanced for the fully exposed sequence, with reduced binding affinity when the aptamer is part of the stem region of the beacon. Analysis of the ΔG values indicate a clear correlation between the aptamer hybridized length in the stem and its observed Kd. The use of a nanometal surface energy transfer probe method for monitoring ATP binding to the aptamer sequence allows the observation of negative cooperativity between the two ATP binding events. Maintenance of the high binding affinity of this ATP aptamer and the observation of two separate Kd's for ATP binding indicate NSET as an effective, nonmanipulative, optical method for tracking biomolecular changes.

  11. Stoichiometry and Substrate Affinity of the Mannitol Transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert; Scheek, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    Uptake and consecutive phosphorylation of mannitol in Escherichia coli is catalyzed by the mannitol permease EnzymeIImtl. The substrate is bound at an extracellular-oriented binding site, translocated to an inward-facing site, from where it is phosphorylated, and subsequently released into the cell. Previous studies have shown the presence of both a high- and a low-affinity binding site with KD-values in the nano- and micromolar range, respectively. However, reported KD-values in literature are highly variable, which casts doubts about the reliability of the measurements and data analysis. Using an optimized binding measurement system, we investigated the discrepancies reported in literature, regarding both the variability in KD-values and the binding stoichiometry. By comparing the binding capacity obtained with flow dialysis with different methods to determine the protein concentration (UV-protein absorption, Bradford protein detection, and a LDH-linked protein assay to quantify the number of phosphorylation sites), we proved the existence of only one mannitol binding site per dimeric species of unphosphorylated EnzymeIImtl. Furthermore, the affinity of EnzymeIImtl for mannitol appeared to be dependent on the protein concentration and seemed to reflect the presence of an endogenous ligand. The dependency could be simulated assuming that >50% of the binding sites were occupied with a ligand that shows an affinity for EnzymeIImtl in the same range as mannitol. PMID:15879478

  12. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  13. Identification of the maize amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein as a plastidic starch phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Mu, H H; Wasserman, B P; Carman, G M

    2001-01-01

    Amyloplast is the site of starch synthesis in the storage tissue of maize (Zea mays). The amyloplast stroma contains an enriched group of proteins when compared with the whole endosperm. Proteins with molecular masses of 76 and 85 kD have been identified as starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme IIb, respectively. A 112-kD protein was isolated from the stromal fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to tryptic digestion and amino acid sequence analysis. Three peptide sequences showed high identity to plastidic forms of starch phosphorylase (SP) from sweet potato, potato, and spinach. SP activity was identified in the amyloplast stromal fraction and was enriched 4-fold when compared with the activity in the whole endosperm fraction. Native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses showed that SP activity was associated with the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. In addition, antibodies raised against the potato plastidic SP recognized the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. The amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP was expressed in whole endosperm isolated from maize harvested 9 to 24 d after pollination. Results of affinity electrophoresis and enzyme kinetic analyses showed that the amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP preferred amylopectin over glycogen as a substrate in the synthetic reaction. The maize shrunken-4 mutant had reduced SP activity due to a decrease of the amyloplast stromal 112-kD enzyme.

  14. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  15. Interpolation of solid/liquid partition coefficients, K(d), for iodine in soils.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of K(d) is difficult for most radionuclides: a different value is expected for every different soil. This study explored a modification of the constituent-K(d) approach used to estimate K(d) in geological materials. Here we selected five soils of very different compositions, four were field soils and one was an artificial potting soil. The soils were blended together in ratios of 1:1, 1:3 and 1:1:2 for all possible (60) 2- and 3-soil combinations. The K(d) was measured for each soil and each of the combined soils using additions of stable iodine. Our hypothesis was that the weighted average of the K(d)s of the original, unblended soils, weighted by the blending ratios, would be a reasonable estimate of the measured K(d)s of the blended soils. The ratios of expected/measured K(d) values did not deviate significantly from unity (a geometric mean of 0.91) for the four field soils. This result suggests that K(d) in the combined field soils could be estimated by the weighted average K(d) for the constituent soils. The resulting variation is consistent with other estimation methods. The practical implication of this finding is that, with K(d) data for a few benchmark soils in a region, one could estimate K(d) for other soils. The potting soil did not conform, and there are several possible explanations for this.

  16. Bihamiltonian Cohomology of KdV Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlet, Guido; Posthuma, Hessel; Shadrin, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Using spectral sequences techniques we compute the bihamiltonian cohomology groups of the pencil of Poisson brackets of dispersionless KdV hierarchy. In particular, this proves a conjecture of Liu and Zhang about the vanishing of such cohomology groups.

  17. The KdV hierarchy in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, S. A. R.

    2016-08-01

    There is a well explored relationship between quantum mechanical scattering from a potential and the Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation of fluid dynamics: if the potential is ‘evolved’ according to the KdV equation then it will have the same reflectivity and transmissivity as a function of energy, for each snapshot in time. In this work we explore this connection in optics, where the permittivity plays the role of the potential. We begin by deriving the relationship between the Helmholtz equation and the KdV equation in terms of the current induced in a material when a permittivity profile is changed slightly. It is then shown that the KdV equation can be used to design a plethora of bounded complex potentials that are relfectionless from both sides for all angles of incidence, and planar periodic media that exhibit a real Bloch vector for all angles of propagation. Finally we apply the KdV equation to reduce the reflection of a wave from an interface between two media of differing refractive indices.

  18. The KdV hierarchy in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, S. A. R.

    2016-08-01

    There is a well explored relationship between quantum mechanical scattering from a potential and the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation of fluid dynamics: if the potential is ‘evolved’ according to the KdV equation then it will have the same reflectivity and transmissivity as a function of energy, for each snapshot in time. In this work we explore this connection in optics, where the permittivity plays the role of the potential. We begin by deriving the relationship between the Helmholtz equation and the KdV equation in terms of the current induced in a material when a permittivity profile is changed slightly. It is then shown that the KdV equation can be used to design a plethora of bounded complex potentials that are relfectionless from both sides for all angles of incidence, and planar periodic media that exhibit a real Bloch vector for all angles of propagation. Finally we apply the KdV equation to reduce the reflection of a wave from an interface between two media of differing refractive indices.

  19. Calcium ion gradients modulate the zinc affinity and antibacterial activity of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Hayden, Joshua A; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-31

    Calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein produced and released by neutrophils that inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering essential metal nutrients in the extracellular space. In this work, spectroscopic and thermodynamic metal-binding studies are presented to delineate the zinc-binding properties of CP. Unique optical absorption and EPR spectroscopic signatures for the interfacial His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of human calprotectin are identified by using Co(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Zinc competition titrations employing chromophoric Zn(II) indicators provide a 2:1 Zn(II):CP stoichiometry, confirm that the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of CP coordinate Zn(II), and reveal that the Zn(II) affinity of both sites is calcium-dependent. The calcium-insensitive Zn(II) competitor ZP4 affords dissociation constants of K(d1) = 133 ± 58 pM and K(d2) = 185 ± 219 nM for CP in the absence of Ca(II). These values decrease to K(d1) ≤ 10 pM and K(d2) ≤ 240 pM in the presence of excess Ca(II). The K(d1) and K(d2) values are assigned to the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites, respectively. In vitro antibacterial activity assays indicate that the metal-binding sites and Ca(II)-replete conditions are required for CP to inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Taken together, these data provide a working model whereby calprotectin responds to physiological Ca(II) gradients to become a potent Zn(II) chelator in the extracellular space. PMID:23082970

  20. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  1. Optical properties of KD*P modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Bhatia, S. S.

    1990-01-01

    Longitudinal KD*P modulators are used in ground-based solar magnetographs to eliminate seeing effects. Although the modulators can be used as variable retarders, the optical properties when zero voltage is applied influences the performance on instruments requiring very accurate polarization measurements. Measurements at the Marshall Space Flight Center are discussed in terms of the optical properties of KD*P modulators when zero voltage is applied. The measurements can be used to predict the modulation characteristics of the devices and to determine the polarization accuracy that can be expected from the vector magnetograph.

  2. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  3. Enhanced factor VIIIa stability of A2 domain interface variants results from an increased apparent affinity for the A2 subunit. Results from an increased apparent affinity for the A2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, M; Wakabayashi, H; Griffiths, A; Wintermute, J; Fay, P J

    2014-09-01

    Factor (F)VIIIa, a heterotrimer comprised of A1, A2, and A3C1C2 subunits, is labile due to the tendency of the A2 subunit to dissociate from the A1/A3C1C2 dimer. As dissociation of the A2 subunit inactivates FVIIIa activity, retention of A2 defines FVIIIa stability and thus, FXase activity. Earlier results showed that replacing residues D519, E665, and E1984 at the A2 domain interface with Ala or Val reduced rates of FVIIIa decay, increasing FXa and thrombin generation. We now show the enhanced FVIIIa stability of these variants results from increases in inter-A2 subunit affinity. Using a FVIIIa reconstitution assay to monitor inter-subunit affinity by activity regeneration, the apparent Kd value for the interaction of wild-type (WT) A2 subunit with WT A1/A3C1C2 dimer (43 ± 2 nM) was significantly higher than values observed for the A2 point mutants D519A/V, E665A/V, and E1984A/V which ranged from ~5 to ~19 nM. Val was determined to be the optimal hydrophobic residue at position 665 (apparent Kd = 5.1 ± 0.7 nM) as substitutions with Ile or Leu at this position increased the apparent Kd value by ~3- and ~7-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the double mutant (D519V/E665V) showed an ~47-fold lower apparent Kd value (0.9 ± 0.6 nM) than WT. Thus these hydrophobic mutations at the A2 subunit interfaces result in high binding affinities for the A2 subunit and correlate well with previously observed reductions in rates in FVIIIa decay. PMID:24899227

  4. Chemiluminescently labeled aptamers as the affinity probe for interaction analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yi; Deng, Qin-Pei; Zhang, De-Wen; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Aptamers are nucleic acid oligonucleotides, which can recognize targets with high affinity and specificity. Fluorescently labeled aptamers have been used as affinity probes in CE for interaction analysis. In this study, a method of labeling aptamers chemiluminescently with isoluminol isothiocyanate (ILITC) through covalent bonds was proposed and realized. The ILITC-labeled aptamers were characterized by HPLC-MS and purified by HPLC. After desalination, the ILITC-labeled aptamers were employed as the affinity probe for interaction analysis in CE coupled with chemiluminescence detection (CE-CL) by interface of end column reaction mode, the apparatus of which was home-designed and setup. CE-CL experiment conditions, including buffer pH, concentrations of horseradish peroxidase and H(2)O(2), were optimized first. The system of thrombin and its 29-mer aptamer was chosen as the model. Binding parameters, namely the dissociation constant (K(d)) and the binding site number (n), were calculated. The K(d) obtained was 124.0+/-6.9 nM in agreement with the reported values. Thus, interaction analysis method based on chemiluminescently labeled aptamers as the affinity probe in CE-CL has been established. This method can be widely applied due to the ease and universality of the labeling method, simplicity of CE-CL apparatus and combination with aptamers for a wide range of targets.

  5. Integrability properties of a coupled KdV system and its supersymmetric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Adrián; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2016-05-01

    We discuss several integrability properties of a coupled KdV system. We obtain a new generalization of the already known static solutions for the system. We then consider the supersymmetric extension of the coupled KdV system, it is a new integrable system. We show that for particular Grassmann algebras the system is the limit of a Clifford algebra valued system with nice stability properties. We briefly discuss the hamiltonian structures of this supersymmetric integrable system.

  6. Bethe Ansatz and the Spectral Theory of Affine Lie Algebra-Valued Connections I. The simply-laced Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Davide; Raimondo, Andrea; Valeri, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    We study the ODE/IM correspondence for ODE associated to {widehat{mathfrak{g}}}-valued connections, for a simply-laced Lie algebra {mathfrak{g}}. We prove that subdominant solutions to the ODE defined in different fundamental representations satisfy a set of quadratic equations called {Ψ}-system. This allows us to show that the generalized spectral determinants satisfy the Bethe Ansatz equations.

  7. Identification of the Maize Amyloplast Stromal 112-kD Protein as a Plastidic Starch Phosphorylase12

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Mu, Helen He; Wasserman, Bruce P.; Carman, George M.

    2001-01-01

    Amyloplast is the site of starch synthesis in the storage tissue of maize (Zea mays). The amyloplast stroma contains an enriched group of proteins when compared with the whole endosperm. Proteins with molecular masses of 76 and 85 kD have been identified as starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme IIb, respectively. A 112-kD protein was isolated from the stromal fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to tryptic digestion and amino acid sequence analysis. Three peptide sequences showed high identity to plastidic forms of starch phosphorylase (SP) from sweet potato, potato, and spinach. SP activity was identified in the amyloplast stromal fraction and was enriched 4-fold when compared with the activity in the whole endosperm fraction. Native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses showed that SP activity was associated with the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. In addition, antibodies raised against the potato plastidic SP recognized the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. The amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP was expressed in whole endosperm isolated from maize harvested 9 to 24 d after pollination. Results of affinity electrophoresis and enzyme kinetic analyses showed that the amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP preferred amylopectin over glycogen as a substrate in the synthetic reaction. The maize shrunken-4 mutant had reduced SP activity due to a decrease of the amyloplast stromal 112-kD enzyme. PMID:11154342

  8. Complex solitary waves and soliton trains in KdV and mKdV equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Subhrajit; Singh, Akhil Pratap; Panigrahi, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the existence of complex solitary wave and periodic solutions of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations. The solutions of the KdV (mKdV) equation appear in complex-conjugate pairs and are even (odd) under the simultaneous actions of parity (𝓟) and time-reversal (𝓣) operations. The corresponding localized solitons are hydrodynamic analogs of Bloch soliton in magnetic system, with asymptotically vanishing intensity. The 𝓟𝓣-odd complex soliton solution is shown to be iso-spectrally connected to the fundamental sech2 solution through supersymmetry. Physically, these complex solutions are analogous to the experimentally observed grey solitons of non-liner Schödinger equation, governing the dynamics of shallow water waves and hence may also find physical verification.

  9. Critical factors governing the difference in antizyme-binding affinities between human ornithine decarboxylase and antizyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Liu, Yi-Liang; Su, Jia-Yang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Both ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and its regulatory protein, antizyme inhibitor (AZI), can bind with antizyme (AZ), but the latter has a higher AZ-binding affinity. The results of this study clearly identify the critical amino acid residues governing the difference in AZ-binding affinities between human ODC and AZI. Inhibition experiments using a series of ODC mutants suggested that residues 125 and 140 may be the key residues responsible for the differential AZ-binding affinities. The ODC_N125K/M140K double mutant demonstrated a significant inhibition by AZ, and the IC(50) value of this mutant was 0.08 µM, three-fold smaller than that of ODC_WT. Furthermore, the activity of the AZ-inhibited ODC_N125K/M140K enzyme was hardly rescued by AZI. The dissociation constant (K(d)) of the [ODC_N125K/M140K]-AZ heterodimer was approximately 0.02 µM, which is smaller than that of WT_ODC by approximately 10-fold and is very close to the K(d) value of AZI_WT, suggesting that ODC_N125K/M140K has an AZ-binding affinity higher than that of ODC_WT and similar to that of AZI. The efficiency of the AZI_K125N/K140M double mutant in the rescue of AZ-inhibited ODC enzyme activity was less than that of AZI_WT. The K(d) value of [AZI_K125N/K140M]-AZ was 0.18 µM, nine-fold larger than that of AZI_WT and close to the K(d) value of ODC_WT, suggesting that AZI_K125N/K140M has an AZ-binding affinity lower than that of AZI_WT and similar to that of ODC. These data support the hypothesis that the differences in residues 125 and 140 in ODC and AZI are responsible for the differential AZ-binding affinities. PMID:21552531

  10. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening. PMID:27454185

  11. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening.

  12. Deriving the New Traveling Wave Solutions for the Nonlinear Dispersive Equation, KdV-ZK Equation and Complex Coupled KdV System Using Extended Simplest Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, K. Elboree

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the traveling wave solutions for the nonlinear dispersive equation, Korteweg-de Vries Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation and complex coupled KdV system by using extended simplest equation method, and then derive the hyperbolic function solutions include soliton solutions, trigonometric function solutions include periodic solutions with special values for double parameters and rational solutions. The properties of such solutions are shown by figures. The results show that this method is an effective and a powerful tool for handling the solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations (NLEEs) in mathematical physics.

  13. KdV Preserves White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quastel, Jeremy; Valkó, Benedek

    2008-02-01

    It is shown that white noise is an invariant measure for the Korteweg- deVries equation on {mathbb{T}} . This is a consequence of recent results of Kappeler and Topalov establishing the well-posedness of the equation on appropriate negative Sobolev spaces, together with a result of Cambronero and McKean that white noise is the image under the Miura transform (Ricatti map) of the (weighted) Gibbs measure for the modified KdV equation, proven to be invariant for that equation by Bourgain.

  14. Localization of the human 64kD autoantigen D1 to myofibrils in a subset of extraocular muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.; Fowler, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE. To evaluate the tissue-specific expression pattern of the 64kD human autoantigen D1, a tropomodulin-related protein that may be involved in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. METHODS. Recombinant 64kD human autoantigen D1 was generated in a bacterial expression system and used to immunize rabbits. Specific antibodies were affinity-purified and used for Western blots on normal and hyperthyroid rat and rabbit tissue, and immunofluorescence localization on cryosections of rat tissue. RESULTS. Anti-64kD human autoantigen D1 antibodies recognize specifically a approximately 70kD polypeptide in western blots of extraocular muscle, sternothyroid muscle, and smooth muscle. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrates that the 64kD human autoantigen D1 localizes to myofibrils in slow fibers from rat extraocular and sternothyroid muscle. The level of this protein is not altered in extraocular muscles from hyperthyroid rabbits. CONCLUSIONS. The 64kD human autoantigen D1 is expressed in slow fibers of extraocular and sternothyroid muscles as a component of myofibrils, and is not upregulated in conditions of hyperthyroidism.

  15. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  16. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  17. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J.; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in Kd (range 2.0–7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The Kd values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5–5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the Kd in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists. PMID:27293705

  18. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  19. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  20. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  1. Crossover behavior between KdV and mKdV equations in a cold plasma with negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Grecu, D.; Visinescu, Anca; Carstea, A.S.

    2004-10-04

    It is well known that the KdV equation describes the behavior of ion-acoustic waves in a cold plasma. In the presence of negative ions, if their concentration satisfies a certain condition (critical concentration) the relevant equation is the modified KdV equation. The transition between these two regimes is studied from several points of view. The multiple scales analysis is extended to higher order and the role played by the next equations in the corresponding hierarchies KdV and mKdV is discussed.

  2. Two bradykinin binding sites with picomolar affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, D.C.; Vavrek, R.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and related peptides exert a wide range of effects on several organ systems. We have attempted to sort out these effects by studying the binding interaction of (/sup 3/H)BK at the membrane level with in vitro receptor binding techniques. High specific activity (/sup 3/H)BK and an enzyme inhibitor cocktail has enabled us to label two BK binding sites with different affinity and peptide specificity in several guinea-pig tissues. In the guinea-pig ileum the high-affinity site has an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (/sup 3/H)BK of 13 pM and a maximal number of binding sites of 8.3 pmol/g of tissue wet weight. The low-affinity guinea-pig ileum site displays a Kd of 910 pM, a maximum number of binding sites of 14 pmol/g of tissue wet weight and shows a greater selectivity for BK analogs over Lysyl-BK analogs. Two similar sites can also be discriminated in kidney and heart. The potencies of a series of BK analogs at the high-affinity guinea-pig ileum site correlate well with their potencies in contracting ileal smooth muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)BK in the guinea-pig ileum is inhibited by physiological concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations.

  3. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  4. 7 CFR 29.1080 - Variegated dark red (KD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variegated dark red (KD). 29.1080 Section 29.1080..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1080 Variegated dark red (KD). A dark brownish-red discoloration... over extended periods of time. Any leaf of which 20 percent or more of its surface is dark...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1080 - Variegated dark red (KD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Variegated dark red (KD). 29.1080 Section 29.1080..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1080 Variegated dark red (KD). A dark brownish-red discoloration... over extended periods of time. Any leaf of which 20 percent or more of its surface is dark...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1080 - Variegated dark red (KD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Variegated dark red (KD). 29.1080 Section 29.1080..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1080 Variegated dark red (KD). A dark brownish-red discoloration... over extended periods of time. Any leaf of which 20 percent or more of its surface is dark...

  7. 7 CFR 29.1080 - Variegated dark red (KD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Variegated dark red (KD). 29.1080 Section 29.1080..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1080 Variegated dark red (KD). A dark brownish-red discoloration... over extended periods of time. Any leaf of which 20 percent or more of its surface is dark...

  8. 7 CFR 29.1080 - Variegated dark red (KD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Variegated dark red (KD). 29.1080 Section 29.1080..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1080 Variegated dark red (KD). A dark brownish-red discoloration... over extended periods of time. Any leaf of which 20 percent or more of its surface is dark...

  9. Low density and high affinity of platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Agneta; Sundblad-Elverfors, Charlotta; Landén, Mikael; Eriksson, Tomas; Eriksson, Elias

    2006-06-15

    Impaired serotonin transmission has been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa. As an indirect measure of brain serotonergic activity, the binding of tritiated ligands to platelet serotonin transporters has been studied in bulimia nervosa as well as in other putatively serotonin-related psychiatric disorders. In this study, the density and affinity of platelet serotonin transporters were assessed in 20 women meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa and in 14 controls without previous or ongoing eating disorder using [(3)H]paroxetine as a ligand. In comparison to controls, women with bulimia nervosa had a significantly reduced number of platelet binding sites (B(max) = 721 +/- 313 vs. 1145 +/- 293 fmol/mg protein) and an increase in the affinity for the ligand demonstrated by a lower dissociaton constant (K(d) = 33 +/- 10 vs. 44 +/- 10 pM). A significant correlation between B(max) and K(d) values was found in patients but not in controls. Our results support the notion that bulimia nervosa is associated with a reduction in platelet serotonin transporter density. In addition, our study is the first to report that this reduced transporter density in women with bulimia nervosa is accompanied by an increase in the affinity of the transporter for the ligand.

  10. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1990-11-15

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB-{sup 125}I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein.

  11. Rational Solutions for Lattice Potential KdV Equation and Two Semi-discrete Lattice Potential KdV Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Zhao, Songlin; Shi, Ying

    2016-02-01

    By imposing reduction conditions on rational solutions for a system involving the Hirota-Miwa equation, rational solutions for lattice potential KdV equation are constructed. Besides, the rational solutions for two semi-discrete lattice potential KdV equations are also considered. All these rational solutions are in the form of Schur function type.

  12. Improved generalized F-expansion method for the time fractional modified KdV(fmKdV) equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmezoglu, Abdullah

    2016-06-01

    In this article, an improved generalized F-expansion method is used for solving the time fractional modified KdV(fmKdV) equation. Using this approach new Jacobi elliptic function solutions are obtained. This method can be suitable for solving other nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  13. High kinetic stability of Zn(II) coordinated by the tris(histidine) unit of carbonic anhydrase towards solvolytic dissociation studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Solvolytic dissociation rate constants (kd) of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and its metallovariants (M-CAs, M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) were estimated by a ligand substitution reaction, which was monitored by affinity capillary electrophoresis to selectively detect the undissociated CAs in the reaction mixture. Using EDTA as the competing ligand for Zn-CA, the dissociation followed the unimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN1) mechanism with kd=1.0×10(-7)s(-1) (pH7.4, 25°C). The corresponding solvolysis half-life (t1/2) was 80days, showing the exceptionally high kinetic stability of t Zn-CA, in contrast to the highly labile [Zn(II)(H2O)6](2+), where the water exchange rate (kex) is high. This behavior is attributed to the tetrahedral coordination geometry supported by the tris(histidine) unit (His3) of CA. In the case of Co-CA, it showed a somewhat larger kd value (5.7×10(-7)s(-1), pH7.4, 25°C) even though it shares the same tetrahedral coordination environment with Zn-CA, suggesting that the d(7) electronic configuration of Co(II) in the transition state of the dissociation is stabilized by the ligand field. Among M-CAs, only Ni-CA showed a bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction path in its reaction with EDTA, implying that the large coordination number (6) of Ni(II) in Ni-CA allows EDTA to form an EDTA-Ni-CA intermediate. Overall, kd values roughly correlated with kex values among M-CAs, with the kd value of Zn-CA deviating strongly from the trend and highlighting the exceptionally high kinetic stabilization of Zn-CA by the His3 unit. PMID:27235274

  14. Purification of a 24-kD protease from apoptotic tumor cells that activates DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Wright, S C; Wei, Q S; Zhong, J; Zheng, H; Kinder, D H; Larrick, J W

    1994-12-01

    We report the purification of a protease from tumor cells undergoing apoptosis that is involved in activating DNA fragmentation. Initial studies revealed that two inhibitors of serine proteases, N-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethylchloromethyl ketone and carbobenzoxy-Ala-Ala-borophe (DK120), suppressed tumor necrosis factor or ultraviolet (UV) light-induced DNA fragmentation in the U937 histiocytic lymphoma as well as UV light-induced DNA fragmentation in the BT-20 breast carcinoma, HL-60 myelocytic leukemia, and 3T3 fibroblasts. The protease was purified by affinity chromatography with DK120 as ligand and showed high activity on a synthetic substrate preferred by elastase-like enzymes (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val p-nitroanilide), but was inactive on the trypsin substrate, N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester, or the chymotrypsin substrate, Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide. The activity of the DK120-binding protease purified from U937 cells undergoing apoptosis was increased approximately 10-fold over that recovered from normal cells. Further purification to homogeneity by heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a single band of 24 kD on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. In addition to protease activity, the purified enzyme induced DNA fragmentation into multiples of 180 basepairs in isolated U937 nuclei. These findings suggest the 24-kD protease is a novel enzyme that activates DNA fragmentation in U937 cells undergoing apoptosis. PMID:7964487

  15. Batroxobin binds fibrin with higher affinity and promotes clot expansion to a greater extent than thrombin.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Stafford, Alan R; Leslie, Beverly A; Kim, Paul Y; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2013-06-01

    Batroxobin is a thrombin-like serine protease from the venom of Bothrops atrox moojeni that clots fibrinogen. In contrast to thrombin, which releases fibrinopeptide A and B from the NH2-terminal domains of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen, respectively, batroxobin only releases fibrinopeptide A. Because the mechanism responsible for these differences is unknown, we compared the interactions of batroxobin and thrombin with the predominant γA/γA isoform of fibrin(ogen) and the γA/γ' variant with an extended γ-chain. Thrombin binds to the γ'-chain and forms a higher affinity interaction with γA/γ'-fibrin(ogen) than γA/γA-fibrin(ogen). In contrast, batroxobin binds both fibrin(ogen) isoforms with similar high affinity (Kd values of about 0.5 μM) even though it does not interact with the γ'-chain. The batroxobin-binding sites on fibrin(ogen) only partially overlap with those of thrombin because thrombin attenuates, but does not abrogate, the interaction of γA/γA-fibrinogen with batroxobin. Furthermore, although both thrombin and batroxobin bind to the central E-region of fibrinogen with a Kd value of 2-5 μM, the α(17-51) and Bβ(1-42) regions bind thrombin but not batroxobin. Once bound to fibrin, the capacity of batroxobin to promote fibrin accretion is 18-fold greater than that of thrombin, a finding that may explain the microvascular thrombosis that complicates envenomation by B. atrox moojeni. Therefore, batroxobin binds fibrin(ogen) in a manner distinct from thrombin, which may contribute to its higher affinity interaction, selective fibrinopeptide A release, and prothrombotic properties. PMID:23612970

  16. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  17. On third Poisson structure of KdV equation

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Marshakov, A.; Orlov, A.

    1995-12-01

    The third Poisson structure of the KdV equation in terms of canonical {open_quote}free fields{close_quote} and the reduced WZNW model is discussed. We prove that it is {open_quotes}diagonalized{close_quotes} in the Lagrange variables which were used before in the formulation of 2d gravity. We propose a quantum path integral for the KdV equation based on this representation.

  18. Combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and time-resolved luminescence for high affinity antibody-ligand interaction thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Meares, Claude F

    2012-02-01

    For experiments using synthetic ligands as probes for biological experiments, it is useful to determine the specificity and affinity of the ligands for their receptors. As ligands with higher affinities are developed (K(A)>10(8)M(-1); K(D)<10(-8)M), a new challenge arises: to measure these values accurately. Isothermal titration calorimetry measures heat produced or consumed during ligand binding, and also provides the equilibrium binding constant. However, as normally practiced, its range is limited. Displacement titration, where a competing weaker ligand is used to lower the apparent affinity of the stronger ligand, can be used to determine the binding affinity as well as the complete thermodynamic data for ligand-antibody complexes with very high affinity. These equilibrium data have been combined with kinetic measurements to yield the rate constants as well. We describe this methodology, using as an example antibody 2D12.5, which captures yttrium S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetate.

  19. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  20. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Indig, F E; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R; Shimmo, R

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized onto immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary, resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC (U87MG) column, and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08±0.49 and 0.0086±0.0006μM, respectively, consistent with previously reported values. Furthermore, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX, and rotenone. In addition, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC (U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  1. Simultaneous high-throughput determination of interaction kinetics for drugs and cyclodextrins by high performance affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caifen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiaonan; Liu, Botao; Xu, Xu; Sun, Lixin; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-25

    The individual determination of the apparent dissociation rate constant (kd,app) using high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tedious process requiring numerous separate tests and massive data fitting, unable to provide the apparent association rate constant (ka) and equilibrium binding constant (Ka). In this study, a HPAC with mass spectrometry detection (HPAC-MS/MS) was employed to determine the drug-cyclodextrin (CD) interaction kinetics with low sample loading quantity (<10 ng per injection for single compound) and high-throughput yield as twenty drugs determined in one injection. The kd,app measured by HPAC-MS/MS approach were 0.89 ± 0.07, 4.34 ± 0.01, 1.48 ± 0.01 and 7.77 ± 0.04 s(-1) for ketoprofen, trimethoprim, indapamide and acetaminophen, with kd,app for acetaminophen consistent with that from the HPAC method with UV detector in our previous studies. For twenty drugs with diverse structures and chemical properties, good correlationship was found between kd,app measured by single compound analysis method and high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach, with the correlation coefficient of 0.987 and the significance F less than 0.001. Comprehensive quantification of ka,app, kd,app and Ka values was further performed based on the measurement of kd,app by peak profiling method and Ka by the peak fitting method. And the investigation of the drug-CD interaction kinetics under different conditions indicated that the column temperature and mobile phase composition significantly affected the determination of ka,app, kd,app and Ka while also dependent on the acidity and basicity of drugs. In summary, the high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach has been demonstrated high efficiency in determination of the drug-CD primary interaction kinetic parameter, especially, kd,app, being proven as a novel tool in screening the right CD for the solubilization of the right drug. PMID:26851087

  2. Simultaneous high-throughput determination of interaction kinetics for drugs and cyclodextrins by high performance affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caifen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiaonan; Liu, Botao; Xu, Xu; Sun, Lixin; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-25

    The individual determination of the apparent dissociation rate constant (kd,app) using high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tedious process requiring numerous separate tests and massive data fitting, unable to provide the apparent association rate constant (ka) and equilibrium binding constant (Ka). In this study, a HPAC with mass spectrometry detection (HPAC-MS/MS) was employed to determine the drug-cyclodextrin (CD) interaction kinetics with low sample loading quantity (<10 ng per injection for single compound) and high-throughput yield as twenty drugs determined in one injection. The kd,app measured by HPAC-MS/MS approach were 0.89 ± 0.07, 4.34 ± 0.01, 1.48 ± 0.01 and 7.77 ± 0.04 s(-1) for ketoprofen, trimethoprim, indapamide and acetaminophen, with kd,app for acetaminophen consistent with that from the HPAC method with UV detector in our previous studies. For twenty drugs with diverse structures and chemical properties, good correlationship was found between kd,app measured by single compound analysis method and high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach, with the correlation coefficient of 0.987 and the significance F less than 0.001. Comprehensive quantification of ka,app, kd,app and Ka values was further performed based on the measurement of kd,app by peak profiling method and Ka by the peak fitting method. And the investigation of the drug-CD interaction kinetics under different conditions indicated that the column temperature and mobile phase composition significantly affected the determination of ka,app, kd,app and Ka while also dependent on the acidity and basicity of drugs. In summary, the high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach has been demonstrated high efficiency in determination of the drug-CD primary interaction kinetic parameter, especially, kd,app, being proven as a novel tool in screening the right CD for the solubilization of the right drug.

  3. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  4. Isolation of a 90-kD Microtubule-Associated Protein from Tobacco Membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Marc, J.; Sharkey, D. E.; Durso, N. A.; Zhang, M.; Cyr, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The organization and function of microtubules in plant cells are important in key developmental events, including the regulation of directional cellulose deposition. Bridges connecting microtubules to each other and to membranes and other organelles have been documented by electron microscopy; however, the biochemical and molecular nature of these linkages is not known. We have partitioned proteins from a suspension culture of tobacco into cytosolic and membrane fractions, solubilized the membrane fraction with a zwitterionic detergent, and then used affinity chromatography and salt elution to isolate tubulin binding proteins. Dark-field microscopy of in vitro-assembled microtubules showed that the eluted proteins from both fractions induce microtubule bundling and, in the presence of purified tubulin, promote microtubule elongation. Gel electrophoresis of the eluted proteins revealed two distinct sets of polypeptides. Those in the membrane eluate included unique bands with apparent molecular masses of 98, 90, and 75 kD in addition to bands present in both eluates. The cytosolic eluate, in contrast, typically included relatively smaller proteins. The eluted proteins also bound to taxol-stabilized microtubules. Initial immunological characterization using monoclonal antibodies raised against the 90-kD polypeptide showed that it is colocalized in situ with cortical microtubules in tobacco protoplast ghosts. PMID:12239375

  5. Biphasic regulation of development of the high-affinity saxitoxin receptor by innervation in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.J.; Catterall, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-saxitoxin (STX) was used to quantitate the density of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in developing rat skeletal muscle. In adult triceps surae, a single class of sites with a KD . 2.9 nM and a density of 21 fmol/mg wet wt was detected. The density of these high-affinity sites increased from 2.0 fmol/mg wet wt to the adult value in linear fashion during days 2-25 after birth. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 11 or 17 reduced final saxitoxin receptor site density to 10.4 or 9.2 fmol/mg wet wt, respectively, without changing KD. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 5 did not alter the subsequent development of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 5-9 and accelerated the increase of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 9-13. After day 13, saxitoxin receptor development abruptly ceased and the density of saxitoxin receptor sites declined to 11 fmol/wg wet wt. These results show that the regulation of high-affinity saxitoxin receptor site density by innervation is biphasic. During the first phase, which is independent of continuing innervation, the saxitoxin receptor density increases to 47-57% of the adult level. After day 11, the second phase of development, which is dependent on continuing innervation, gives rise to the adult density of saxitoxin receptors.

  6. Beyond the KdV: Post-explosion development.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, L; Pelinovsky, E; Shrira, V; Stepanyants, Y

    2015-09-01

    Several threads of the last 25 years' developments in nonlinear wave theory that stem from the classical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation are surveyed. The focus is on various generalizations of the KdV equation which include higher-order nonlinearity, large-scale dispersion, and a non-local integral dispersion. We also discuss how relatively simple models can capture strongly nonlinear dynamics and how various modifications of the KdV equation lead to qualitatively new, non-trivial solutions and regimes of evolution observable in the laboratory and in nature. As the main physical example, we choose internal gravity waves in the ocean for which all these models are applicable and have genuine importance. We also briefly outline the authors' view of the future development of the chosen lines of nonlinear wave theory. PMID:26428573

  7. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  8. [Expression of human LSB 32/67 KD gene in E. coli and analysis of its interactions with laminin].

    PubMed

    Siianova, E Iu

    1992-01-01

    Earlier we have cloned cDNA coding for a polypeptide that reacts with monoclonal antibodies specific for some cytoskeleton structures. This gene is homologous to the laminin receptor 67 KD. However, cDNA suffices only for a polypeptide of 32 Da, far smaller than the 67 rDa laminin receptor. We have constructed a vector that produces the fusion protein LBP-TrpE in the bacterial strain CAG-456. Our studies show that hybrid protein LBP-TrpE is able to interact with laminin. This result was confirmed by using following methods: immunoblotting, "ELISA" and affinity chromatography on laminin.

  9. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  10. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  11. Isomer-Specific Binding Affinity of Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) to Serum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Beesoon, Sanjay; Martin, Jonathan W

    2015-05-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are among the most prominent contaminants in human serum, and these were historically manufactured as technical mixtures of linear and branched isomers. The isomers display unique pharmacokinetics in humans and in animal models, but molecular mechanisms underlying isomer-specific PFOS and PFOA disposition have not previously been studied. Here, ultrafiltration devices were used to examine (i) the dissociation constants (Kd) of individual PFOS and PFOA isomers with human serum albumin (HSA) and (ii) relative binding affinity of isomers in technical mixtures spiked to whole calf serum and human serum. Measurement of HSA Kd's demonstrated that linear PFOS (Kd=8(±4)×10(-8) M) was much more tightly bound than branched PFOS isomers (Kd range from 8(±1)×10(-5) M to 4(±2)×10(-4) M). Similarly, linear PFOA (Kd=1(±0.9)×10(-4) M) was more strongly bound to HSA compared to branched PFOA isomers (Kd range from 4(±2)×10(-4) M to 3(±2)×10(-4) M). The higher binding affinities of linear PFOS and PFOA to total serum protein were confirmed when both calf serum and human serum were spiked with technical mixtures. Overall, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for the longer biological half-life of PFOS in humans, compared to PFOA, and for the higher transplacental transfer efficiencies and renal clearance of branched PFOS and PFOA isomers, compared to the respective linear isomer.

  12. KD4v: Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-07-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v.

  13. KD4v: comprehensible knowledge discovery system for missense variant

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D.; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v. PMID:22641855

  14. Modelling radionuclide transport in highly heterogeneous media and under variable hydrochemical conditions using a "dynamic Kd" approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchero, Paolo; Painter, Scott; Ebrahimi, Hedieh; Koskinen, Lasse; Molinero, jorge; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2015-04-01

    Due to the high heterogeneity of fractured media and the ubiquitous lack of a complete site characterization, deterministic simulations of radionuclide transport in fractured rocks are notoriously highly uncertain. This uncertainty is usually addressed using stochastic methods; e.g. the connectivity structure of the medium is described using multiple realizations of Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN), which are then combined to particle tracking simulations. In these formulations, many complex geochemical retention processes are typically lumped into a single parameter: the distribution coefficient (Kd). This approach relies on an important assumption: the Kd values are constant in time. This hypothesis is critical under long-term geochemical changes as it is known that the distribution coefficient depends on the pH, redox conditions and major chemistry of the system. In this work, we present a novel methodology that combines the robustness of stochastic methods with an explicit description of water-solute-rock interaction processes. The reconciliation of all these is achieved by using a dynamic Kd approach. The hydrogeochemical evolution of the site of study is first computed using long-term and large-scale mechanistic reactive transport simulations. The simulated hydrochemical conditions are then used to generate a complete database of Kd values, which represent the hydrochemical conditions in every position and time of the model domain. Then, MARFA (Painter and Mancillas, 2009) is used to carry out Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) simulations of radionuclide transport. In these simulations, Kd values are dynamically updated using the afore-mentioned database. The results (i.e. radionuclide breakthrough curves) bring the signature of the underlying changes in the background geochemistry.

  15. On the Convexity of the KdV Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappeler, Thomas; Maspero, Alberto; Molnar, Jan; Topalov, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by perturbation theory, we prove that the nonlinear part {H^{*}} of the KdV Hamiltonian {H^{kdv}}, when expressed in action variables {I = (In)_{n ≥slant 1}}, extends to a real analytic function on the positive quadrant {ℓ2+({N})} of {ℓ2({N})} and is strictly concave near {0}. As a consequence, the differential of {H^{*}} defines a local diffeomorphism near 0 of {ℓ_{{C}}2({N})}. Furthermore, we prove that the Fourier-Lebesgue spaces {{F}{L}^{s,p}} with {-1/2 ≤slant s ≤slant 0} and {2 ≤slant p < ∞}, admit global KdV-Birkhoff coordinates. In particular, it means that {ℓ2_+({N})} is the space of action variables of the underlying phase space {{F}{L}^{-1/2,4}} and that the KdV equation is globally in time {C0}-well-posed on {{F}{L}^{-1/2,4}}.

  16. The KdV equation on the half-line: the Dirichlet to Neumann map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    >Jonatan Lenells,

    2013-08-01

    We consider initial-boundary value problems for the KdV equation ut + ux + 6uux + uxxx = 0 on the half-line x ⩾ 0. For a well-posed problem, the initial data u(x, 0) as well as one of the three boundary values {u(0, t), ux(0, t), uxx(0, t)} can be prescribed; the other two boundary values remain unknown. We provide a characterization of the unknown boundary values for the Dirichlet as well as the two Neumann problems in terms of a system of nonlinear integral equations. The characterizations are effective in the sense that the integral equations can be solved perturbatively to all orders in a well-defined recursive scheme.

  17. Residual Symmetry and Explicit Soliton-Cnoidal Wave Interaction Solutions of the (2+1)-Dimensional KdV-mKdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wenguang; Li, Biao

    2016-04-01

    The truncated Painlevé method is developed to obtain the nonlocal residual symmetry and the Bäcklund transformation for the (2+1)-dimensional KdV-mKdV equation. The residual symmetry is localised after embedding the (2+1)-dimensional KdV-mKdV equation to an enlarged one. The symmetry group transformation of the enlarged system is computed. Furthermore, the (2+1)-dimensional KdV-mKdV equation is proved to be consistent Riccati expansion (CRE) solvable. The soliton-cnoidal wave interaction solution in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions and the third type of incomplete elliptic integral is obtained by using the consistent tanh expansion (CTE) method, which is a special form of CRE.

  18. Affinity maturation of an anti-V antigen IgG expressed in situ through adenovirus gene delivery confers enhanced protection against Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Van Blarcom, T J; Sofer-Podesta, C; Ang, J; Boyer, J L; Crystal, R G; Georgiou, G

    2010-07-01

    Genetic transfer of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has been shown to confer strong and persistent protection against bacterial and viral infectious agents. Although it is well established that for many exogenous neutralizing Abs increased antigen affinity correlates with protection, the effect of antigen affinity on Abs produced in situ after adenoviral gene transfer has not been examined. The mouse IgG2b monoclonal Ab, 2C12.4, recognizes the Yersinia pestis type III secretion apparatus protein, LcrV (V antigen), and confers protection in mice when administered as an IgG intraperitoneally or after genetic immunization with engineered, replication-defective serotype 5 human adenovirus (Ad). The 2C12.4 Ab was expressed as a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) in Escherichia coli and was shown to display an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D))=3.5 nM by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The 2C12.4 scFv was subjected to random mutagenesis, and variants with increased affinity were isolated by flow cytometry using the anchored periplasmic expression bacterial display system. After a single round of mutagenesis, variants displaying up to 35-fold lower K(D) values (H8, K(D)=100 pM) were isolated. The variable domains of the H8 scFv were used to replace those of the parental 2C12.4 IgG encoded in the Ad vector, AdalphaV, giving rise to AdalphaV.H8. The two adenoviral vectors resulted in similar titers of anti-V antigen Abs 3 days after immunization, with 10(9), 10(10) or 10(11) particle units (pu). After intranasal challenge with 363 LD(50) (lethal dose, 50%) of Y. pestis CO92, 54% of the mice immunized with 10(10) pu of AdalphaV.H8 survived through the 14 day end point compared with only 15% survivors for the group immunized with AdalphaV expressing the lower-affinity 2C12.4 (P<0.04; AdalphaV versus AdalphaV.H8). These results indicate that affinity maturation of a neutralizing Ab delivered by genetic transfer may confer increased protection not only for Y. pestis

  19. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  20. Affinity and folding properties both influence the selection of antibodies with the selectively infective phage (SIP) methodology.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzi, G; Schwesinger, F; Honegger, A; Krebber, C; Plückthun, A

    1997-10-01

    We investigated which molecules are selected from a model library by the selectively infective phage (SIP) methodology. As a model system, we used the fluorescein binding single-chain Fv fragment FITC-E2, and from a 3D-model, we identified 11 residues potentially involved in hapten binding and mutated them individually to alanines. The binding constant of each mutant was determined by fluorescence titration, and each mutant was tested individually as well as in competitive SIP experiments for infectivity. After three rounds of SIP, only molecules with KD values within a factor of 2 of the tightest binder remain, and among those, a mutant no longer carrying an unnecessary exposed tryptophan residue is preferentially selected. SIP is shown to select for the best overall properties of the displayed molecules, including folding behavior, stability and affinity.

  1. The Interaction Affinity between Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4) Analyzed by Quantitative FRET

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Han; Karmenyan, Artashes; Chiou, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), a member of integrin superfamily, interacts with its major counter ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and plays an important role in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and immunological synapse formation. However, irregular expressions of these proteins may also lead to several autoimmune diseases and metastasis cancer. Thus, quantifying the interaction affinity of the VCAM-1/VLA-4 interaction is of fundamental importance in further understanding the nature of this interaction and drug discovery. In this study, we report an ‘in solution’ steady state organic fluorophore based quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay to quantify this interaction in terms of the dissociation constant (Kd). We have used, in our FRET assay, the Alexa Fluor 488-VLA-4 conjugate as the donor, and Alexa Fluor 546-VCAM-1 as the acceptor. From the FRET signal analysis, Kd of this interaction was determined to be 41.82 ± 2.36 nM. To further confirm our estimation, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique to obtain Kd = 39.60 ± 1.78 nM, which is in good agreement with the result obtained by FRET. This is the first reported work which applies organic fluorophore based ‘in solution’ simple quantitative FRET assay to obtain the dissociation constant of the VCAM-1/VLA-4 interaction, and is also the first quantification of this interaction. Moreover, the value of Kd can serve as an indicator of abnormal protein-protein interactions; hence, this assay can potentially be further developed into a drug screening platform of VLA-4/VCAM-1 as well as other protein-ligand interactions. PMID:25793408

  2. Dopamine transporter oligomerization: Impact of combining protomers with differential cocaine analog binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Ali, Solav; Jones, Kymry T.; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies point to quaternary assembly of dopamine transporters (DATs) in oligomers. However, it is not clear whether the protomers function independently in the oligomer. Is each protomer an entirely separate unit that takes up dopamine and is inhibited by drugs known to block DAT function? In this work, human embryonic kidney 293 cells were co-transfected with DAT constructs possessing differential binding affinities for the phenyltropane cocaine analog, [3H]WIN35,428. It was assessed whether the binding properties in co-expressing cells capable of forming hetero-oligomers differ from those in preparations obtained from mixed singly transfected cells where such oligomers cannot occur. A method is described that replaces laborious “mixing” experiments with an in silico method predicting binding parameters from those observed for the singly expressed constructs. Among 5 pairs of constructs tested, statistically significant interactions were found between protomers of wild-type (WT) and D313N, WT and D345N, and WT and D436N. Compared with predicted Kd values of [3H]WIN35,428 binding to the non-interacting pairs, the observed affinity of the former pair was increased 1.7 fold while the latter two were reduced 2.2 and 4.1 fold, respectively. This is the first report of an influence of protomer composition on the properties of a DAT inhibitor, indicating cooperativity within the oligomer. PMID:25580950

  3. Hydrogen--deuterium exchange in KD2PO4

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S O; Felter, T E; Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J; Hamza, A V

    2003-11-04

    Depth profiles of {sup 1}H and {sup 2}D in rapidly-grown KD{sub 2x}H{sub 2(1-x)}PO{sub 4} (DKDP) single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis. Results show that, at ambient conditions, deuteration in the first {approx} 500 nm from the sample surface significantly decreases within the first several days after D{sub 2}O surface polishing. This effect is attributed to the deuterium-hydrogen exchange. The effective diffusion coefficient of this process is strongly dependent on both the degree of deuteration and sample growth conditions. Physical mechanisms of the D/H exchange are discussed.

  4. The Linear KdV Equation with an Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconinck, Bernard; Sheils, Natalie E.; Smith, David A.

    2016-10-01

    The interface problem for the linear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation in one-dimensional piecewise homogeneous domains is examined by constructing an explicit solution in each domain. The location of the interface is known and a number of compatibility conditions at the boundary are imposed. We provide an explicit characterization of sufficient interface conditions for the construction of a solution using Fokas's Unified Transform Method. The problem and the method considered here extend that of earlier papers to problems with more than two spatial derivatives.

  5. KdV-like equations for fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Speciale, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Main goal of the authors is to consider the generalized system of KdV equations ut+uxxx+2uux+2e1vvx+e2(uxv+uvx)+e3vxxx = 0 c1vt+vxxx+2vvx+c2vx+c3(e1(uxv+uvx)+2e2uux+e3uxxx) = 0 (1), and to construct the optimal system of one dimensional subalgebras. The reduction of the above system to ODEs through the optimal systems is performed and finally an application is shown.

  6. The Linear KdV Equation with an Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconinck, Bernard; Sheils, Natalie E.; Smith, David A.

    2016-07-01

    The interface problem for the linear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation in one-dimensional piecewise homogeneous domains is examined by constructing an explicit solution in each domain. The location of the interface is known and a number of compatibility conditions at the boundary are imposed. We provide an explicit characterization of sufficient interface conditions for the construction of a solution using Fokas's Unified Transform Method. The problem and the method considered here extend that of earlier papers to problems with more than two spatial derivatives.

  7. When is Mass Spectrometry Combined with Affinity Approaches Essential? A Case Study of Tyrosine Nitration in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Brînduşa-Alina; Ulrich, Martina; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Bernevic, Bogdan; Moise, Adrian; Döring, Gerd; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration in proteins occurs under physiologic conditions and is increased at disease conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease. Identification and quantification of tyrosine-nitrations are crucial for understanding nitration mechanism(s) and their functional consequences. Mass spectrometry (MS) is best suited to identify nitration sites, but is hampered by low stabilities and modification levels and possible structural changes induced by nitration. In this insight, we discuss methods for identifying and quantifying nitration sites by proteolytic affinity extraction using nitrotyrosine (NT)-specific antibodies, in combination with electrospray-MS. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by identification of specific nitration sites in two proteins in eosinophil granules from several biological samples, eosinophil-cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). Affinity extraction combined with Edman sequencing enabled the quantification of nitration levels, which were found to be 8 % and 15 % for ECP and EDN, respectively. Structure modeling utilizing available crystal structures and affinity studies using synthetic NT-peptides suggest a tyrosine nitration sequence motif comprising positively charged residues in the vicinity of the NT- residue, located at specific surface- accessible sites of the protein structure. Affinities of Tyr-nitrated peptides from ECP and EDN to NT-antibodies, determined by online bioaffinity- MS, provided nanomolar KD values. In contrast, false-positive identifications of nitrations were obtained in proteins from cystic fibrosis patients upon using NT-specific antibodies, and were shown to be hydroxy-tyrosine modifications. These results demonstrate affinity- mass spectrometry approaches to be essential for unequivocal identification of biological tyrosine nitrations.

  8. The university münster model surgery system for orthognathic surgery. Part II – KD-MMS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Model surgery is an integral part of the planning procedure in orthognathic surgery. Most concepts comprise cutting the dental cast off its socket. The standardized spacer plates of the KD-MMS provide for a non-destructive, reversible and reproducible means of maxillary and/or mandibular plaster cast separation. Methods In the course of development of the system various articulator types were evaluated with regard to their capability to provide a means of realizing the concepts comprised of the KD-MMS. Special attention was dedicated to the ability to perform three-dimensional displacements without cutting of plaster casts. Various utilities were developed to facilitate maxillary displacement in accordance to the planning. Objectives of this development comprised the ability to implement the values established in the course of two-dimensional ceph planning. Results The system - KD-MMS comprises a set of hardware components as well as a defined procedure. Essential hardware components are red spacer and blue mounting plates. The blue mounting plates replace the standard yellow SAM mounting elements. The red spacers provide for a defined leeway of 8 mm for three-dimensional movements. The non-destructive approach of the KD-MMS makes it possible to conduct different model surgeries with the same plaster casts as well as to restore the initial, pre-surgical situation at any time. Thereby, surgical protocol generation and gnathologic splint construction are facilitated. Conclusions The KD-MMS hardware components in conjunction with the defined procedures are capable of increasing efficiency and accuracy of model surgery and splint construction. In cases where different surgical approaches need to be evaluated in the course of model surgery, a significant reduction of chair time may be achieved. PMID:23289956

  9. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  10. A pseudo-spectral method for a non-local KdV-Burgers equation posed on R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Hoz, Francisco; Cuesta, Carlota M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new pseudo-spectral method to solve the initial value problem associated to a non-local KdV-Burgers equation involving a Caputo-type fractional derivative. The basic idea is, using an algebraic map, to transform the whole real line into a bounded interval where we can apply a Fourier expansion. Special attention is given to the correct computation of the fractional derivative in this setting.

  11. Multispecific Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1) from Bos taurus Has High Affinity and Slow Binding Kinetics towards Prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Garza, Denisse; Nigam, Sanjay K; Chang, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, SLC22A1), like many solute carrier 22 (SLC22) family members, is important for the disposition of clinically important drugs, metabolites and signaling molecules. Several studies suggest that SLC22 family (eg. organic anion transporters or OATs and OCTs) bind and possibly transport prostaglandins with relatively high affinity (submicromolar). The affinities of OCT1 and OATs toward PGE2 and PGF2a reported in these cell-based transport studies are considerably greater than for xenobiotics and natural metabolite substrates--in many cases over 100-fold higher. This raises the possibility that prostaglandins are key endogenous substrates and/or that they act on the transporter in a manner different from other substrates such as xenobiotics and lower affinity metabolites. To further investigate OCT1-prostaglandin interactions, we designed biophysical studies using purified bovine OCT1 (Bos taurus, btOCT1/SLC22A1) with PGE2 analogs, in fluorescently labeled and label-free formats. Using fluorescence polarization (FP), we detected a binding of btOCT1 to the PGE2-Rhodamine conjugate at submicromolar affinity, consistent with affinity data for PGE2 from cells over-expressing the related human OCT1. Using purified native btOCT1 as analyte and biotinylated PGE2 analog as ligand, our data from surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that btOCT1 specifically interacts to PGE2 with KD values in the hundred nanomolar range. BtOCT1 also demonstrated a slow association (ka) in the range of 103 M(-1) s(-1) and an even slower dissociation rate (kd) in the range of 10-4 s(-1) for PGE2, suggesting the possibility of a different mode of binding compared to other structurally unrelated transported substrates of low-affinity (eg. drugs, metabolites). Our results complement in vitro transport studies and provide direct evidence that OCT1--which is normally expressed in liver and other tissues--interacts with prostaglandin analogs. While it is not

  12. The M2 selective antagonist AF-DX 116 shows high affinity for muscarine receptors in bovine tracheal membranes.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; in't Hout, W G; de Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1987-05-01

    We have characterized the muscarine receptors in bovine tracheal and left ventricular membranes using 3H-dexetimide/pirenzepine and 3H-dexetimide/AF-DX 116 competition studies. Pirenzepine exhibited low (M2) affinity binding to both preparations; Kd was 590 nM in left ventricle and 463 nM in trachea. AF-DX 116 exhibited high (M2) affinity binding to left ventricle (Kd = 95.6 nM); in tracheal membranes it bound with high (M2) affinity (Kd = 40.7 nM) to 74% of the receptors and with low (M3) affinity (Kd = 2.26 microM) to 26% of the receptors. It is concluded that bovine tracheal muscle membranes contain a heterogeneous population of muscarine binding sites, the majority having M2 (heart) subtype characteristics and being located on the smooth muscle membranes; a minority having M3 (exocrine gland) subtype characteristics and presumed to be located in submucosal glands. This is the first report of high affinity binding of AF-DX 116 to non-cardiac peripheral muscarine receptors. PMID:3614390

  13. The gall bladder cholecystokinin receptor exists in two guanine nucleotide-binding protein-regulated affinity states

    SciTech Connect

    Molero, X.; Miller, L.J. )

    1991-02-01

    To study proximal events in cholecystokinin (CCK) action on bovine gall bladder smooth muscle, we used the hormone analogue D-Tyr-Gly-((N1e28,31)CCK-26-32)-phenethyl ester (OPE), which has unique biological properties. This fully efficacious agonist differs from native CCK by not expressing supramaximal inhibition of cell shortening, yet it clearly interacts with the same receptor molecule. This was demonstrated in binding and affinity labeling studies, where both peptides label the same Mr 70,000-85,000 protein and both fully compete for binding of the other ligand. Further, its relatively high affinity for the low affinity CCK receptor permits the clear demonstration of two affinity states of a CCK receptor on a membrane preparation and makes possible evaluation of the molecular basis of these affinity states and their regulation. Analysis of homologous and heterologous binding curves performed with both CCK and OPE peptides and radioligands demonstrated the presence of two affinity states, with CCK being able to distinguish them (Kd1 = 0.48 +/- 0.04 nM and Kd2 = 56.5 +/- 7.4 nM) and OPE recognizing them equally (Kd1 = 0.94 +/- 0.31 nM and Kd2 = 0.96 +/- 0.23 nM). In the presence of nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues, there was a shift in distribution of receptors toward the low affinity state, with the total number of receptors and their absolute affinities for each peptide remaining constant. Thus, the gall bladder CCK receptor is a single molecule capable of assuming two interconvertible affinity states, regulated by a guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Two full agonists are capable of interacting with this molecule to yield different biological responses via different molecular events.

  14. An averaging theorem for a perturbed KdV equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Huang

    2013-06-01

    We consider a perturbed KdV equation: \\begin{equation*} \\fl \\dot{u}+u_{xxx}-6uu_x=\\epsilon f(x,u(\\cdot)),\\quad x\\in {T},\\tqs\\int_{{T}} u \\,\\rmd x=0. \\end{equation*} For any periodic function u(x), let I(u)=(I_1(u),I_2(u),\\ldots)\\in{R}_+^{\\infty} be the vector, formed by the KdV integrals of motion, calculated for the potential u(x). Assuming that the perturbation ɛf(x, u(x)) defines a smoothing mapping u(x) ↦ f(x, u(x)) (e.g. it is a smooth function ɛ f(x), independent from u), and that solutions of the perturbed equation satisfy some mild a priori assumptions, we prove that for solutions u(t, x) with typical initial data and for 0 ⩽ t ≲ ɛ-1, the vector I(u (t)) may be well approximated by a solution of the averaged equation.

  15. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Ansari, M.S.; de Paulis, T.; Schmidt, D.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Manning, R.G.; Gillespie, D.; Ebert, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. Iodopride (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with (125I)iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, iclopride (KD 0.23 nM) and itopride (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, epidepride (KD 0.057 nM) and ioxipride (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8.

  16. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  17. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media.

  18. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media. PMID:27524303

  19. A 75 kd merozoite surface protein of Plasmodium falciparum which is related to the 70 kd heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Richman, S J; Reese, R T

    1987-01-01

    Proteins on the merozoite surface of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum are targets of the host's immune response. The merozoite surface location of p75, a 75 kd P. falciparum protein, was established by immunoelectron microscopy using antisera raised to the expressed product of a cDNA clone. Immunoprecipitation from protein extracts biosynthetically labeled during different periods of the asexual cycle showed that p75 is made continuously, although ring-stage parasites appear to synthesize larger quantities. p75 is conserved and invariant in size in eight isolates of P. falciparum. The 880 bp cDNA sequence encoding part of p75 reveals one open reading frame containing a repetitive sequence unit of four amino acids. The predicted reading frame is correct since antisera to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the repetitive region recognize p75 in immunoblots. The sequence of p75 is homologous with the sequences of proteins from the ubiquitous, highly conserved family of 70 kd heat-shock proteins, suggesting an important physiological function for p75. The cDNA fragment encoding part of p75 hybridizes with multiple genomic fragments, whose sizes are identical in DNA from nine P. falciparum strains, suggesting that the gene for p75 is well conserved and may be part of a gene family. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3556166

  20. Fine mapping of epitopes by intradomain Kd/Dd recombinants

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    11 intradomain recombinants between H-2Kd and H-2Dd were produced using an original technique based on in vivo recombination in Escherichia coli. After transfection into mouse L cells, all these recombinants were expressed at high levels on the cell surface. The specificities of 77 mAbs were examined on these cell lines. mAbs could be organized in 12 groups. In each group, a small number of amino acids participating in the recognized epitope(s) were identified. In a few instances, noncontinuous epitopes comprising amino acids belonging to different domains of the antigen were found. The data thus obtained are compatible with those produced in previous exon-shuffling experiments, but permit a much more precise definition of recognized epitope(s). PMID:2439641

  1. Competitive Inhibition of High-Affinity Oryzalin Binding to Plant Tubulin by the Phosphoric Amide Herbicide Amiprophos-Methyl.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, J. V.; Kim, H. H.; Hanesworth, V. R.; Hugdahl, J. D.; Morejohn, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Amiprophos-methyl (APM), a phosphoric amide herbicide, was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro polymerization of isolated plant tubulin (L.C. Morejohn, D.E. Fosket [1984] Science 224: 874-876), yet little other biochemical information exists concerning this compound. To characterize further the mechanism of action of APM, its interactions with tubulin and microtubules purified from cultured cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) were investigated. Low micromolar concentrations of APM depolymerized preformed, taxol-stabilized tobacco microtubules. Remarkably, at the lowest APM concentration examined, many short microtubules were redistributed into fewer but 2.7-fold longer microtubules without a substantial decrease in total polymer mass, a result consistent with an end-to-end annealing of microtubules with enhanced kinetic properties. Quasi-equilibrium binding measurements showed that tobacco tubulin binds [14C]oryzalin with high affinity to produce a tubulin-oryzalin complex having a dissociation constant (Kd) = 117 nM (pH 6.9; 23[deg]C). Also, an estimated maximum molar binding stoichiometry of 0.32 indicates pharamacological heterogeneity of tobacco dimers and may be related to structural heterogeneity of tobacco tubulin subunits. APM inhibits competitively the binding of [14C]oryzalin to tubulin with an inhibition constant (Ki) = 5 [mu]M, indicating the formation of a moderate affinity tubulin-APM complex that may interact with the ends of microtubules. APM concentrations inhibiting tobacco cell growth were within the threshold range of APM concentrations that depolymerized cellular microtubules, indicating that growth inhibition is caused by microtubules depolymerization. APM had no apparent effect on microtubules in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Because cellular microtubules were depolymerized at APM and oryzalin concentrations below their respective Ki and Kd values, both herbicides are proposed to depolymerize microtubules by a

  2. High-affinity lead binding proteins in rat kidney cytosol mediate cell-free nuclear translocation of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, P.; Lucier, G.W.; Fowler, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PbII binding characteristics of the previously reported PbII binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol were investigated further. Saturation and Scatchard analysis of /sup 203/Pb binding in whole cytosol and in 40% saturated ammonium sulfate precipitated fractions disclosed a class of relatively high-affinity sites with an apparent Kd of approximately 50 nM and binding capacities of approximately 41 and 9 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. Two /sup 203/Pb binding proteins with approximate molecular masses of 63K and 11.5K daltons and a high molecular weight component (greater than 200K) were isolated by Sepharose-6B column chromatography. The time course of association of /sup 203/Pb with cytosol and the 63K protein showed maximum binding at 18 hr which was stable up to 25 hr at 4 degrees C. The approximate half-time dissociation rate (T 1/2) of specifically bound /sup 203/Pb to the 63K protein was 100 min at 4 degrees C whereas the 11.5K protein showed little dissociation of specifically bound ligand at this temperature. Saturation analysis of the three isolated proteins disclosed low capacity, high-affinity sites with similar apparent Kd values to the cytosol assay. Sucrose density gradient analysis of kidney cytosol showed approximate sedimentation coefficients of 2S, 4.6S and 7S for the 11.5K, 63K and the high molecular weight proteins, respectively. Competitive binding studies with cytosol demonstrated displacement of /sup 203/Pb by PbII, CdII and ZnII ions but not CaII ions.

  3. Efficient Modelling of Radionuclide Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Media and Under Variable Hydrochemical Conditions Using an "Intelligent Kd" Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchero, P.; Painter, S. L.; Ebrahimi, H.; Koskinen, L.; Molinero, J.; Selroos, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the high heterogeneity of fractured media and the ubiquitous lack of a complete site characterization, deterministic simulations of radionuclide transport in fractured rocks are notoriously highly uncertain. This epistemic uncertainty is typically addressed using stochastic methods; e.g. the connectivity structure of the medium is described using one or multiple realizations of Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN), which are then combined to Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) simulations (e.g. Painter and Cvetkovic, 2005). In these formulations, many complex geochemical retention processes are usually lumped into a single parameter: the distribution coefficient (Kd). Although this approach is mathematically robust and numerically efficient, it relies on an important assumption: the Kd value of each radionuclide is constant in time. This assumption could be critical under long-term geochemical changes as it is demonstrated that the distribution coefficient depends on the pH, redox conditions and major chemistry of the system. In this work, we present a novel methodology that combines the robustness of stochastic methods with a sound and explicit description of water-solute-rock interaction processes. The reconciliation of all these is achieved by using an "intelligent Kd" approach. The hydrogeochemical evolution of the site of study is first computed using long-term and large-scale mechanistic reactive transport simulations. The simulated hydrochemical conditions are then used to generate a complete database of Kd values, which represent the hydrochemical conditions in every position and time of the model domain. Then, TDRW simulations, based on one or multiple DFN realizations, are fed with these data and the results (e.g. radionuclide breakthrough curves) implicitly bring the signature of the underlying changes in the background geochemistry.

  4. Distribution coefficients (Kd) of strontium and significance of oxides and organic matter in controlling its partitioning in coastal regions of Japan.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hyoe; Tagami, Keiko; Aono, Tatsuo; Uchida, Shigeo

    2014-08-15

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 resulted in the release of large quantities of a long-lived radioactive strontium (i.e. (90)Sr; half-life: 28.8 y) into the coastal areas of Japan. (90)Sr release was dispersed and mixed into the water column, and will eventually be deposited into sediment. Because factors controlling seawater-sediment partitioning in the coastal marine environments are not fully understood, we developed seawater-sediment distribution coefficients, Kd (L/kg), for Sr in coastal regions of Japan by means of sediment-water partitioning experiments. (85)Sr was used as a radiotracer and conditions were designed to mimic the environmental systems of the sampling sites as closely as possible. Experimentally determined Kd values (Kd-ex) varied between 0.3 and 3.3 L/kg (mean, 1.4 L/kg), and the variation in Kd-ex was attributed to the percentage of Sr in the exchangeable fraction in the sediment. Kd-ex values were used, along with the measured concentrations of (88)Sr, a stable naturally occurring Sr isotope in seawater and sediment, to estimate the concentrations of exchangeable Sr in the sediment. Estimates ranged from 2.1 to 24.3 μg/kg, or 1.3-15.7% of the total (88)Sr concentration in the sediment. Significant correlations existed between the estimated concentrations of exchangeable Sr, and the organic matter and the oxide/hydrous oxide contents. When organic contents were greater than 0.38%, Sr binds to organic surface sites more strongly than to the other sites. Results indicate that binding of Sr to the surface of sedimentary particles was influenced by grain size, iron and manganese oxides, and organic matter. Furthermore, the information presented here could be useful to estimate Kd values for anthropogenic (90)Sr in sediment in the coastal marine environment.

  5. On the continuous limits and integrability of a new coupled semidiscrete mKdV system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Zuonong; Zhao Haiqiong; Wu Xiaonan

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, we aim to get more insight on the relation between semidiscrete coupled mKdV system (where ''semidiscrete'' means that the system is discrete in the space variable and continuous in time) and the coupled mKdV equations; to this purpose, we propose a new coupled semidiscrete mKdV system. The Lax pairs, the Darboux transformation, soliton solutions and conservation laws for the coupled semidiscrete mKdV system are given. The coupled mKdV theory including the Lax pairs, the Darboux transformation, soliton solutions, and conservation laws is recovered through the continuous limits of corresponding theory for the new semidiscrete mKdV system.

  6. The photoinduced birefringence and mass transport in azo compound K-D-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klismeta, K.; Teteris, J.

    2015-06-01

    Azobenzene containing compounds are among light polarization sensitive materials - the moieties may align relative to the electric field vector of light, leading to anisotropy and birefringence in the sample. Another phenomenon which can be observed in azo compounds under influence of light is macroscopic movement of the material. In this work photoinduced processes in low molecular weight organic glass - bis-azobenzene containing compound K-D-2 were experimentally studied. Birefringence was induced with linearly polarized laser light (473, 532 and 635 nm) and measured at 633 nm wavelength. Polarization holography with recording beam configuration +45°/-45° was used to induce mass motion. Dependence of the surface relief depth on the recording laser wavelength in the visible spectrum (375 - 671 nm) was obtained. Formation of the SRG was observed with all used wavelengths and high birefringence values were obtained. Certain correlation between the absorption of the wavelength and photoinduced mass transport and birefringence is yet to be confirmed.

  7. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  8. Determination of the solid-water distribution coefficient (Kd) for pharmaceuticals, estrogens and musk fragrances in digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Carballa, Marta; Fink, Guido; Omil, Francisco; Lema, Juan M; Ternes, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This work determined the solid-water distribution coefficient (K(d)) and the organic carbon normalized distribution coefficient (K(oc)) of several pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, iopromide, sulfamethoxazole and roxithromycin), three estrogens (estrone, 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol) and two musk fragrances (HHCB and AHTN) in digested sludge. These sorption coefficients can be used to evaluate the fate of these substances during sludge treatment, thus avoiding the expensive and time-consuming analysis in the sludge phase. For determining the K(d) and K(oc) values of the target compounds in digested sludge, their concentrations were measured in the aqueous and solid phase of the effluent of an anaerobic digestion pilot plant run at several operational conditions. The results obtained were compared with the values modelled by using simple K(ow) approaches. The resulting log K(d) values ranged between 3.5 and 4.4 for the two musk fragrances (log K(oc) of 4.5-6.0), between 2.1 and 2.9 for estrogens (log K(oc) of 2.9-4.2) and between 0.8 and 1.9 for the remaining pharmaceuticals (log K(oc) of 1.8-3.5). These values are in the same range as those reported in the literature for primary and secondary sludge and no significant influence of the anaerobic digestion operational conditions was observed. For most compounds, the modelled K(oc) were close or within the lower range of the experimentally determined K(oc). Major deviations of the modelled K(oc) values were found for iopromide, sulfamethoxazole and roxithromycin, which were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the measured values.

  9. Labeling by ( sup 3 H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. )

    1991-02-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. (Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)). Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that ({sup 3}H)DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels.

  10. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  11. Pharmacologically distinct phenotypes of α1B-adrenoceptors: variation in binding and functional affinities for antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Uwada, Junsuke; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Umada, Hidenori; Hayashi, Ryoji; Kainoh, Mie; Masuoka, Takayoshi; Nishio, Matomo; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The pharmacological properties of particular receptors have recently been suggested to vary under different conditions. We compared the pharmacological properties of the α1B-adrenoceptor subtype in various tissue preparations and under various conditions. Experimental Approach [3H]-prazosin binding to α1B-adrenoceptors in rat liver (segments, dispersed hepatocytes and homogenates) was assessed and the pharmacological profiles were compared with the functional and binding profiles in rat carotid artery and recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors. Key Results In association and saturation-binding experiments with rat liver, binding affinity for [3H]-prazosin varied significantly between preparations (KD value approximately ten times higher in segments than in homogenates). The binding profile for various drugs in liver segments also deviated from the representative α1B-adrenoceptor profile observed in liver homogenates and recombinant receptors. L-765,314 and ALS-77, selective antagonists of α1B-adrenoceptors, showed high binding and antagonist affinities in liver homogenates and recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors. However, binding affinities for both ligands in the segments of rat liver and carotid artery were 10 times lower, and the antagonist potencies in α1B-adrenoceptor-mediated contractions of carotid artery were more than 100 times lower than the representative α1B-adrenoceptor profile. Conclusions and Implications In contrast to the consistent profile of recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors, the pharmacological profile of native α1B-adrenoceptors of rat liver and carotid artery varied markedly under various receptor environments, showing significantly different binding properties between intact tissues and homogenates, and dissociation between functional and binding affinities. In addition to conventional ‘subtype’ characterization, ‘phenotype’ pharmacology must be considered in native receptor evaluations in vivo and in future

  12. Sulfated Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls Are High-Affinity Ligands for the Thyroid Hormone Transport Protein Transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian A.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; He, Xianran; Robertson, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The displacement of l-thyroxine (T4) from binding sites on transthyretin (TTR) is considered a significant contributing mechanism in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced thyroid disruption. Previous research has discovered hydroxylated PCB metabolites (OH-PCBs) as high-affinity ligands for TTR, but the binding potential of conjugated PCB metabolites such as PCB sulfates has not been explored. Objectives: We evaluated the binding of five lower-chlorinated PCB sulfates to human TTR and compared their binding characteristics to those determined for their OH-PCB precursors and for T4. Methods: We used fluorescence probe displacement studies and molecular docking simulations to characterize the binding of PCB sulfates to TTR. The stability of PCB sulfates and the reversibility of these interactions were characterized by HPLC analysis of PCB sulfates after their binding to TTR. The ability of OH-PCBs to serve as substrates for human cytosolic sulfotransferase 1A1 (hSULT1A1) was assessed by OH-PCB–dependent formation of adenosine-3´,5´-diphosphate, an end product of the sulfation reaction. Results: All five PCB sulfates were able to bind to the high-affinity binding site of TTR with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd values) in the low nanomolar range (4.8–16.8 nM), similar to that observed for T4 (4.7 nM). Docking simulations provided corroborating evidence for these binding interactions and indicated multiple high-affinity modes of binding. All OH-PCB precursors for these sulfates were found to be substrates for hSULT1A1. Conclusions: Our findings show that PCB sulfates are high-affinity ligands for human TTR and therefore indicate, for the first time, a potential relevance for these metabolites in PCB-induced thyroid disruption. PMID:23584369

  13. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known.

  14. New solutions for conformable fractional Boussinesq and combined KdV-mKdV equations using Jacobi elliptic function expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasbozan, Orkun; Çenesiz, Yücel; Kurt, Ali

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the Jacobi elliptic function expansion method is proposed for the first time to construct the exact solutions of the time conformable fractional two-dimensional Boussinesq equation and the combined KdV-mKdV equation. New exact solutions are found. This method is based on Jacobi elliptic functions. The results obtained confirm that the proposed method is an efficient technique for analytic treatment of a wide variety of nonlinear conformable time-fractional partial differential equations.

  15. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  16. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier.

  17. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier. PMID:27100851

  18. The 67-kD elastin/laminin-binding protein is related to an enzymatically inactive, alternatively spliced form of beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed Central

    Hinek, A; Rabinovitch, M; Keeley, F; Okamura-Oho, Y; Callahan, J

    1993-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that a 67-kD cell surface elastin/laminin-binding protein (EBP) is responsible for cell adhesion to elastin and laminin and for mediating the process of elastin fiber assembly, but the nature of this protein was unknown. In this report we provide evidence that a 67-kD catalytically inactive form of beta-galactosidase produced by alternative splicing demonstrates immunological and functional similarity and sequence homology to the 67-kD EBP, suggesting that the two might be the same. Antibody prepared to a synthetic peptide, N-Ac-GSPSAQDEASPL, corresponding to a frame-shift-generated sequence unique to the alternatively spliced form of human beta-galactosidase, also recognized sheep EBP both on Western blotting and in aortic tissue. Furthermore, this synthetic peptide (S-GAL) binds to elastin and laminin, but not to fibronectin, collagen I, or collagen III. Moreover, both tropoelastin and laminin which bind to S-GAL peptide affinity columns can be specifically eluted from them with an excess of free S-GAL peptides. In addition, sequence homology among this splice variant of human beta-galactosidase, sheep EBP, and NH2-terminal sequences of some elastases suggests that these proteins share a common ligand-binding motif that has not been previously recognized. Images PMID:8383699

  19. Kd-Jump: a path-preserving stackless traversal for faster isosurface raytracing on GPUs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David M; Lim, Ik Soo

    2009-01-01

    Stackless traversal techniques are often used to circumvent memory bottlenecks by avoiding a stack and replacing return traversal with extra computation. This paper addresses whether the stackless traversal approaches are useful on newer hardware and technology (such as CUDA). To this end, we present a novel stackless approach for implicit kd-trees, which exploits the benefits of index-based node traversal, without incurring extra node visitation. This approach, which we term Kd-Jump, enables the traversal to immediately return to the next valid node, like a stack, without incurring extra node visitation (kd-restart). Also, Kd-Jump does not require global memory (stack) at all and only requires a small matrix in fast constant-memory. We report that Kd-Jump outperforms a stack by 10 to 20% and kd-restart by 100%. We also present a Hybrid Kd-Jump, which utilizes a volume stepper for leaf testing and a run-time depth threshold to define where kd-tree traversal stops and volume-stepping occurs. By using both methods, we gain the benefits of empty space removal, fast texture-caching and realtime ability to determine the best threshold for current isosurface and view direction. PMID:19834233

  20. Various methods for solving time fractional KdV-Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guner, Ozkan; Aksoy, Esin; Bekir, Ahmet; Cevikel, Adem C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the exact analytical solution of the (3+1)-dimensional time fractional KdV-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation with the help of the Kudryashov method, the exp-function method and the functional variable method. The fractional derivatives are described in Jumarie's sense.

  1. Local well-posedness for the fifth-order KdV equations on T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chulkwang

    2016-05-01

    This paper is a continuation of the paper Low regularity Cauchy problem for the fifth-order modified KdV equations on T[7]. In this paper, we consider the fifth-order equation in the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy as following:

  2. Complex and singular solutions of KdV and MKdV equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buti, B.; Rao, N. N.; Khadkikar, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (MKdV) equations are shown to have, besides the regular real solutions, exact regular complex as well as singular solutions. The singular solution for the KdV is real but for the MKdV it is pure imaginary. Implications of the complex solutions are discussed.

  3. Soluble low affinity adenosine A/sub 2/ binding site from human placenta: reconstitution and characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.; Prasad, M.; Fox, I.H.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have developed a vesicle reconstitution technique that allows for rapid vacuum filtration assay, and have characterized the soluble A/sub 2/ site from placental membranes. The overall yield of reconstituted binding is 60%. Competition analysis of membranes and reconstituted vesicles yields identical agonist potency orders and affinities: N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) (Kd-330 nM)>2-chloroadenosine (Kd=1.7 ..mu..M) > L-phenylisopropyladenosine (Kd > 1 mM). Equilibrium binding to membranes and reconstituted vesicles of (/sup 3/H)-NECA, an adenosine agonist, was not reduced by guanine nulceotides. HPLC gel permeation chromatography of extracts from membranes preincubated with 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ and 100 ..mu..M NECA revealed a peak of binding with kD of 0.07. Extracts prepared with either an antagonist or NECA and 100 ..mu..M guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate revealed a peak of binding with a kD of 0.09. These data suggest that the adenosine A/sub 2/ receptor retains its binding properties upon reconstitution and may couple to a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein.

  4. Mathematical model accurately predicts protein release from an affinity-based delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vulic, Katarina; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Sonthalia, Rohit; Ramachandran, Arun; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-01-10

    Affinity-based controlled release modulates the delivery of protein or small molecule therapeutics through transient dissociation/association. To understand which parameters can be used to tune release, we used a mathematical model based on simple binding kinetics. A comprehensive asymptotic analysis revealed three characteristic regimes for therapeutic release from affinity-based systems. These regimes can be controlled by diffusion or unbinding kinetics, and can exhibit release over either a single stage or two stages. This analysis fundamentally changes the way we think of controlling release from affinity-based systems and thereby explains some of the discrepancies in the literature on which parameters influence affinity-based release. The rate of protein release from affinity-based systems is determined by the balance of diffusion of the therapeutic agent through the hydrogel and the dissociation kinetics of the affinity pair. Equations for tuning protein release rate by altering the strength (KD) of the affinity interaction, the concentration of binding ligand in the system, the rate of dissociation (koff) of the complex, and the hydrogel size and geometry, are provided. We validated our model by collapsing the model simulations and the experimental data from a recently described affinity release system, to a single master curve. Importantly, this mathematical analysis can be applied to any single species affinity-based system to determine the parameters required for a desired release profile. PMID:25449806

  5. A simple three-step method for design and affinity testing of new antisense peptides: an example of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Štambuk, Nikola; Manojlović, Zoran; Turčić, Petra; Martinić, Roko; Konjevoda, Paško; Weitner, Tin; Wardega, Piotr; Gabričević, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide-receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense) nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope) as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense-antisense (epitope-paratope) peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s) could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:24865486

  6. Identification of selective, high affinity [125I]-angiotensin and [125I]-bradykinin binding sites in rat intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, H. M.; Munday, K. A.; Poat, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Specific [125I]-angiotensin II (AII) and [125I]-bradykinin (Bk) binding sites have been identified within epithelial membranes from rat jejunum and descending colon. These high affinity intestinal sites exhibited KD values of 0.64 +/- 0.16 nM for [125I]-AII and 0.69 +/- 0.13 nM for [125I]-Bk, which were similar to those for [125I]-AII (0.85 nM) and [125I]-Bk binding sites (1.03 nM) previously identified in renal cortex epithelia. Specific [125I]-AII binding capacity was only 19.77 +/- 2.74 fmol mg-1 in small intestine and 11.31 +/- 2.66 fmol mg-1 in descending colon epithelia while a larger population, 332.0 +/- 72.9 fmol-mg-1 of specific [125I]-Bk sites were identified in epithelial membranes from small intestine. Significant hydrolysis of both free [125I]-AII and [125I]-Bk was observed while membrane bound peptides remained relatively resistant to degradation. Whilst no corrections have been made to the observed values of KD and Bmax quoted above, one may assume that the calculated reductions in the free hormone concentration will result in a decrease of the KD value for both peptides. Loss of membrane bound peptide, particularly of [125I]-AII, may indicate that the calculated Bmax value is an underestimation. Despite the rapid degradation of unbound [125I]-AII and [125I]-Bk during incubations the kinetics of specific peptide binding were reversible and highly selective. The order of potency for specific [125I]-AII binding was [Sar1, Leu8]-AII greater than or equal to [Sar1, Thr8]-AII greater than or equal to AII greater than [Sar1, Ile8]-AII greater than or equal to [Des, Asp1, Ile8] AII greater than AIII. Specific [125I]-Bk binding was also highly selective, the order of potency being Phe8-Bk greater than or equal to Tyr8-Bk greater than or equal to Lys-Bk much greater than Des, Arg1-Bk. AII exhibited an IC50 of greater than 1mM for specific [125I]-Bk binding and likewise Phe8-Bk for specific [125I]-AII binding. PMID:2869810

  7. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Zaczek, R.; Pearsall, D.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1989-12-01

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of (125I)Tyro-ovine CRF ((125I)oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for (125I) oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, (125I)oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex.

  8. Affinity driven social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  9. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Elmlund, Louise; Söderberg, Pernilla; Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. PMID:25587414

  10. Histidine-rich Glycoprotein Binds Fibrin(ogen) with High Affinity and Competes with Thrombin for Binding to the γ′-Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Trang T.; Stafford, Alan R.; Leslie, Beverly A.; Kim, Paul Y.; Fredenburgh, James C.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an abundant protein that binds fibrinogen and other plasma proteins in a Zn2+-dependent fashion but whose function is unclear. HRG has antimicrobial activity, and its incorporation into fibrin clots facilitates bacterial entrapment and killing and promotes inflammation. Although these findings suggest that HRG contributes to innate immunity and inflammation, little is known about the HRG-fibrin(ogen) interaction. By immunoassay, HRG-fibrinogen complexes were detected in Zn2+-supplemented human plasma, a finding consistent with a high affinity interaction. Surface plasmon resonance determinations support this concept and show that in the presence of Zn2+, HRG binds the predominant γA/γA-fibrinogen and the γ-chain elongated isoform, γA/γ′-fibrinogen, with Kd values of 9 nm. Likewise, 125I-labeled HRG binds γA/γA- or γA/γ′-fibrin clots with similar Kd values when Zn2+ is present. There are multiple HRG binding sites on fibrin(ogen) because HRG binds immobilized fibrinogen fragment D or E and γ′-peptide, an analog of the COOH terminus of the γ′-chain that mediates the high affinity interaction of thrombin with γA/γ′-fibrin. Thrombin competes with HRG for γ′-peptide binding and displaces 125I-HRG from γA/γ′-fibrin clots and vice versa. Taken together, these data suggest that (a) HRG circulates in complex with fibrinogen and that the complex persists upon fibrin formation, and (b) by competing with thrombin for γA/γ′-fibrin binding, HRG may modulate coagulation. Therefore, the HRG-fibrin interaction may provide a novel link between coagulation, innate immunity, and inflammation. PMID:21757718

  11. Histidine-rich glycoprotein binds fibrin(ogen) with high affinity and competes with thrombin for binding to the gamma'-chain.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Stafford, Alan R; Leslie, Beverly A; Kim, Paul Y; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2011-09-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an abundant protein that binds fibrinogen and other plasma proteins in a Zn(2+)-dependent fashion but whose function is unclear. HRG has antimicrobial activity, and its incorporation into fibrin clots facilitates bacterial entrapment and killing and promotes inflammation. Although these findings suggest that HRG contributes to innate immunity and inflammation, little is known about the HRG-fibrin(ogen) interaction. By immunoassay, HRG-fibrinogen complexes were detected in Zn(2+)-supplemented human plasma, a finding consistent with a high affinity interaction. Surface plasmon resonance determinations support this concept and show that in the presence of Zn(2+), HRG binds the predominant γ(A)/γ(A)-fibrinogen and the γ-chain elongated isoform, γ(A)/γ'-fibrinogen, with K(d) values of 9 nm. Likewise, (125)I-labeled HRG binds γ(A)/γ(A)- or γ(A)/γ'-fibrin clots with similar K(d) values when Zn(2+) is present. There are multiple HRG binding sites on fibrin(ogen) because HRG binds immobilized fibrinogen fragment D or E and γ'-peptide, an analog of the COOH terminus of the γ'-chain that mediates the high affinity interaction of thrombin with γ(A)/γ'-fibrin. Thrombin competes with HRG for γ'-peptide binding and displaces (125)I-HRG from γ(A)/γ'-fibrin clots and vice versa. Taken together, these data suggest that (a) HRG circulates in complex with fibrinogen and that the complex persists upon fibrin formation, and (b) by competing with thrombin for γ(A)/γ'-fibrin binding, HRG may modulate coagulation. Therefore, the HRG-fibrin interaction may provide a novel link between coagulation, innate immunity, and inflammation.

  12. Induction of high-affinity GM-CSF receptors during all-trans retinoic acid treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Gentile, A; Toubert, M E; Dubois, C; Krawice, I; Schlageter, M H; Balitrand, N; Castaigne, S; Degos, L; Rain, J D; Najean, Y

    1994-10-01

    Differentiation of normal myeloid cells is accompanied by the increase of high-affinity GM-CSF receptors necessary for progenitor proliferation/differentiation and mature neutrophil function. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces terminal differentiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (AML3 subtype). We report in this study that AML3 cells, like other AML subtypes, harbor high-affinity GM-CSF R (n = 138.3 +/- 69.3 sites/cell, Kd = 76.9 +/- 68.8 pM). In all cases, incubation with ATRA induces either an increase in the number of affinity of GM-CSF R (n = 212.7 +/- 116.2 sites/cell, Kd = 43.2 +/- 22.5 pM). The data presented show that modulation of GM-CSF receptors cells is correlated to the degree of ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation but not to increased cell growth.

  13. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hanson, Charlotte; Sanford, Michael; Young, Howard A; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (KD of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 °C after 3 days under our experimental conditions, and sustainably inhibited the biological activity of interferon-γ. PMID:26690672

  14. Muscarinic receptors in rat nasal mucosa are predominantly of the low affinity agonist type.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; Scheres, H M; Salden, H J; Beld, A J; Klaassen, A B; Kuijpers, W

    1985-07-31

    Specific [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat nasal mucosa homogenates occurs to a homogeneous class of binding sites with Kd = 60 +/- 2 10(-12) M and Bmax = 8.1 +/- 2 pmol/g tissue. Binding is stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Pirenzepine inhibits [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding with low affinity (Ki = 5.0 10(-7) M), classifying the binding sites as muscarinic M2-receptors. Methylfurtrethonium and methacholine inhibit [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding following an almost sigmoid curve at high concentrations pointing to the presence of mainly low affinity agonist binding sites. PMID:3840092

  15. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  16. Generalized and improved (G'/G)-expansion method for (3+1)-dimensional modified KdV-Zakharov-Kuznetsev equation.

    PubMed

    Naher, Hasibun; Abdullah, Farah Aini; Akbar, M Ali

    2013-01-01

    The generalized and improved (G'/G)-expansion method is a powerful and advantageous mathematical tool for establishing abundant new traveling wave solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations. In this article, we investigate the higher dimensional nonlinear evolution equation, namely, the (3+1)-dimensional modified KdV-Zakharov-Kuznetsev equation via this powerful method. The solutions are found in hyperbolic, trigonometric and rational function form involving more parameters and some of our constructed solutions are identical with results obtained by other authors if certain parameters take special values and some are new. The numerical results described in the figures were obtained with the aid of commercial software Maple. PMID:23741355

  17. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  18. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  19. Adult human keratinocyte cultures express 40, 52, 58 and 67 KD keratins

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, R.S.; Chandrakasan, G.; Hussain, M.Z.; Enriquez, B.; Ryder, M.I.

    1986-03-01

    Keratins are complex fibrous proteins characteristic of epithelial cells. Although several different classes of keratins are known to occur in the epidermis, the expression of all keratins has not been observed in vitro. The authors have developed a procedure that allows us to culture and passage up to ten times, adult human kerationcytes, in the absence of mesenchymal substrates. EM examination of stratifying cultures showed the presence of numerous tonofilaments, desmosomes and keratohyaline granules. The expression of different classes of keratins was examined by immunofluorescence, radiolabeling, SDS-PAGE and Western blot, using mouse monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of water-insoluble proteins showed the presence of keratins of M.W. 40 kd, 50-52 kd, 56-57 kd and 65-67 kd. The expression of 40kd keratin is known to be associated with basal cells. In their culture system basal cells secrete a well-defined basement membrane on which they rest. These cells may be responsible for the 40kd keratin. The expression of 65-67kd keratins has not previously been observed in vitro. These keratins are considered to be markers for terminal differentiation of epidermal cells. These proteins are presumed to be synthesized in their cultures by sloughing layers of rough, granular cells.

  20. Chlamydial disease pathogenesis. The 57-kD chlamydial hypersensitivity antigen is a stress response protein

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection of humans is commonly a localized inflammation that can result in infertility, blindness, and perhaps arthritis. The pathogenic process(es) that cause these sequelae are thought to be immunological. A 57-kD protein that is common among Chlamydia elicits ocular inflammation when introduced onto the conjunctivae of guinea pigs or nonhuman primates previously sensitized by chlamydial infection. This protein is thought to mediate the immunopathology that follows chlamydial infection. To more thoroughly characterize this chlamydial component, we cloned its gene from a C. psittaci strain and identified a particular recombinant that produced the 57-kD polypeptide. The recombinant gene product was immunoreactive with a monospecific anti-57-kD serum, and elicited an ocular inflammation similar to that produced by the 57-kD antigen isolated from chlamydiae. Sequencing identified two ORFs that encode polypeptides of 11.2 and 58.1 kD and are co-transcribed. These two polypeptides show homology with Escherichia coli groE and Coxiella burnetii htp heat-shock proteins. Striking homology (greater than 50%) was found between the 57-kD protein and the HtpB, GroEL, 65-k Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Hsp60 proteins. Thus, the 57-kD chlamydial protein, previously implicated as mediating a deleterious immunologic response to chlamydial infections, is a stress-induced protein similar to those that occur universally in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:2571668

  1. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  2. Comparison of Performance of Docking, LIE, Metadynamics and QSAR in Predicting Binding Affinity of Benzenesulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Raškevičius, Vytautas; Kairys, Visvaldas

    2015-01-01

    The design of inhibitors specific for one relevant carbonic anhydrase isozyme is the major challenge in the new therapeutic agents development. Comparative computational chemical structure and biological activity relationship studies on a series of carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors, benzenesulfonamide derivatives, bearing pyrimidine moieties are reported in this paper using docking, Linear Interaction Energy (LIE), Metadynamics and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) methods. The computed binding affinities were compared with the experimental data with the goal to explore strengths and weaknesses of various approaches applied to the investigated carbonic anhydrase/inhibitor system. From the tested methods initially only QSAR showed promising results (R2=0.83-0.89 between experimentally determined versus predicted pKd values.). Possible reasons for this performance were discussed. A modification of the LIE method was suggested which used an alternative LIE-like equation yielding significantly improved results (R2 between the experimentally determined versus the predicted ΔG(bind) improved from 0.24 to 0.50).

  3. Evaluation of crocin and curcumin affinity on mushroom tyrosinase using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sushama; Srinivas, Sistla; Jadhav, Jyoti

    2014-04-01

    Tyrosinase inhibitors have potential applications in the cosmetics and food industries for preventing browning reactions and also as therapeutic drugs for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's. In this article, crocin and curcumin were evaluated as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors. Results showed that, both compounds strongly inhibited the diphenolase activity than monophenolase. The IC50 values for diphenolase activity were estimated to be 0.11 mM and 0.18 mM for crocin and curcumin respectively. The binding kinetics of crocin and curcumin was studied with mushroom tyrosinase using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tyrosinase was immobilized on the gold surface of a Biacore sensor chip through amine coupling. Binding of inhibitors was analyzed by SPR without the need to further modify the surface or the use of other reagents. The binding constant KD (M) for mushroom tyrosinase obtained was 1.21×10(-4) M for crocin and 1.64×10(-4) M for curcumin, while showing a higher affinity for L-DOPA 1.95×10(-8) M, a substrate for tyrosinase (positive control). The study reveals the SPR sensor's ability to detect binding of the inhibitors.

  4. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  5. Evaluation of crocin and curcumin affinity on mushroom tyrosinase using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sushama; Srinivas, Sistla; Jadhav, Jyoti

    2014-04-01

    Tyrosinase inhibitors have potential applications in the cosmetics and food industries for preventing browning reactions and also as therapeutic drugs for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's. In this article, crocin and curcumin were evaluated as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors. Results showed that, both compounds strongly inhibited the diphenolase activity than monophenolase. The IC50 values for diphenolase activity were estimated to be 0.11 mM and 0.18 mM for crocin and curcumin respectively. The binding kinetics of crocin and curcumin was studied with mushroom tyrosinase using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tyrosinase was immobilized on the gold surface of a Biacore sensor chip through amine coupling. Binding of inhibitors was analyzed by SPR without the need to further modify the surface or the use of other reagents. The binding constant KD (M) for mushroom tyrosinase obtained was 1.21×10(-4) M for crocin and 1.64×10(-4) M for curcumin, while showing a higher affinity for L-DOPA 1.95×10(-8) M, a substrate for tyrosinase (positive control). The study reveals the SPR sensor's ability to detect binding of the inhibitors. PMID:24444880

  6. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  7. Nonlocal Symmetry Reductions, CTE Method and Exact Solutions for Higher-Order KdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo; Liu, Xi-Zhong; Liu, Ping

    2015-02-01

    The nonlocal symmetries for the higher-order KdV equation are obtained with the truncated Painlevé method. The nonlocal symmetries can be localized to the Lie point symmetries by introducing suitable prolonged systems. The finite symmetry transformations and similarity reductions for the prolonged systems are computed. Moreover, the consistent tanh expansion (CTE) method is applied to the higher-order KdV equation. These methods lead to some novel exact solutions of the higher-order KdV system.

  8. Dopamine transporter oligomerization: impact of combining protomers with differential cocaine analog binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Ali, Solav; Jones, Kymry T; Reith, Maarten E A

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies point to quaternary assembly of dopamine transporters (DATs) in oligomers. However, it is not clear whether the protomers function independently in the oligomer. Is each protomer an entirely separate unit that takes up dopamine and is inhibited by drugs known to block DAT function? In this work, human embryonic kidney 293 cells were co-transfected with DAT constructs possessing differential binding affinities for the phenyltropane cocaine analog, [³H]WIN35,428. It was assessed whether the binding properties in co-expressing cells capable of forming hetero-oligomers differ from those in preparations obtained from mixed singly transfected cells where such oligomers cannot occur. A method is described that replaces laborious 'mixing' experiments with an in silico method predicting binding parameters from those observed for the singly expressed constructs. Among five pairs of constructs tested, statistically significant interactions were found between protomers of wild-type (WT) and D313N, WT and D345N, and WT and D436N. Compared with predicted Kd values of [³H]WIN35,428 binding to the non-interacting pairs, the observed affinity of the former pair was increased 1.7 fold while the latter two were reduced 2.2 and 4.1 fold, respectively. This is the first report of an influence of protomer composition on the properties of a DAT inhibitor, indicating cooperativity within the oligomer. The dopamine transporter (DAT) can exist as an oligomer but it is unknown whether the protomers function independently. The present results indicate that protomers that are superpotent or deficient in cocaine analog binding can confer enhanced or reduced potency to the oligomer, respectively. In this respect, positive or negative cooperativity is revealed in the DAT oligomer. PMID:25580950

  9. Simultaneous recording of calcium transients in skeletal muscle using high- and low-affinity calcium indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M G; Simon, B J; Szucs, G; Schneider, M F

    1988-01-01

    To monitor cytosolic [Ca2+] over a wide range of concentrations in functioning skeletal muscle cells, we have used simultaneously the rapid but relatively low affinity calcium indicator antipyrylazo III (AP III) and the slower but higher affinity indicator fura-2 in single frog twitch fibers cut at both ends and voltage clamped with a double vaseline gap system. When both dyes were added to the end pool solution the cytosolic fura-2 concentration reached a steady level equal to the end pool concentration within approximately 2.5 h, a time when the AP III concentration was still increasing. For depolarizing pulses of increasing amplitude, the fura-2 fluorescence signal approached saturation when the simultaneously recorded AP III absorbance change was far from saturation. Comparison of simultaneously recorded fura-2 and AP III signals indicated that the mean values of the on and off rate constants for calcium binding to fura-2 in 18 muscle fibers were 1.49 x 10(8) M-1 s-1 and 11.9 s-1, respectively (mean KD = 89 nM), if all AP III in the fiber is assumed to behave as in calibrating solution and to be in instantaneous equilibrium with [Ca2+]. [Ca2+] transients calculated from the fura-2 signals using these rate constants were consistent with the [Ca2+] transients calculated from the AP III signals. Resting [Ca2+] or small changes in [Ca2+] which could not be reliably monitored with AP III could be monitored with fura-2 with little or no interference from changes in [Mg2+] or from intrinsic signals. The fura-2 signal was also less sensitive to movement artifacts than the AP III signal. After a [Ca2+] transient the fura-2 signal demonstrated a relatively small elevation of [Ca2+] that was maintained for many seconds. PMID:3395664

  10. Multiple mode of binding of phencyclidines: high affinity association between phencyclidine receptors in rat brain and a monovalent ion-sensitive polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Haring, R.; Kloog, Y.; Harshak-Felixbrodt, N.A.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-30

    Two populations of phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites are shown to exist in the rat brain: a high-affinity monovalent ion-sensitive site (Kd of 10-14 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP, (/sup 3/H)N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine), which exists in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, and a lower affinity site (Kd of 80-130 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP) which is found in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The nature of the interactions between the ion-binding sites and the high affinity PCP receptors depend on both ligand structure (PCP or TCP) and the ion involved (K or Na). The high-affinity sites are associated with an Mr 90,000 polypeptide whose labeling by (/sup 3/H)azido phencyclidine is selectively inhibited by monovalent ions.

  11. Hodograph solutions of the dispersionless coupled KdV hierarchies, critical points and the Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelchenko, B.; Martínez Alonso, L.; Medina, E.

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that the hodograph solutions of the dispersionless coupled KdV (dcKdV) hierarchies describe critical and degenerate critical points of a scalar function which obeys the Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation. Singular sectors of each dcKdV hierarchy are found to be described by solutions of higher genus dcKdV hierarchies. Concrete solutions exhibiting shock-type singularities are presented.

  12. Rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of 47KD protein accompanies serotonin secretion in human platelets challenged with endotoxic glycolipid-bearing Salmonella minnesota Re595

    SciTech Connect

    Grabarek, J.; Timmons, S.; Hawiger, J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors studied the mechanism through which human platelets interact with gram-negative bacteria possessing a well-defined structure of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. Mutant Re595 of S. minnesota, with endotoxic glycolipid composed of Lipid A and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate but lacking other constituents of lipopolysaccharide, induced secretion of /sup 3/H-serotonin. Secretion was preceded by phosphorylation of a platelet protein of Mr 47,000 (47kD) that is associated with protein kinase C activation and that has been shown to accompany secretory response of platelets to thrombin and phorbol ester. Myosin light chain (20kD) was phosphorylated to a lesser degree. Phosphorylation of both proteins rapidly peaked at 1 min. and was promptly followed by dephosphorylation. During this period, secretion of /sup 3/H-serotonin was gradually increasing to reach maximal value at 20 min. These changes in phosphorylation of phosphoproteins, 47kD and 20kD, were not observed when platelets were challenged with parent strain S218 of S. minnesota. Thus, activation of protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase and subsequent activation of phosphatase(s) represent early steps in the response of human platelets to endotoxic glycolipid associated with mutant Re595 of S. minnesota.

  13. Age-related changes in the induction of tyrosine aminotransferase by dexamethasone: correlation with the low-affinity glucocorticoid binding sites.

    PubMed

    Chirino, R; Fernández, L; López-Guerra, A; Valerón, P F; Navarro, D; Díaz-Chico, J C; Díaz-Chico, B N

    1994-09-01

    Rat liver membranes contain Low-affinity glucocorticoid binding sites (LAGS), capable of binding with low affinity (Kd approximately 100 nM) endogenous glucocorticoids. Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the LAGS level undergoes abrupt changes throughout life. The investigation of these changes may be useful in determining whether the LAGS are involved in the cellular response to glucocorticoids. For this purpose, we have studied glucocorticoid induction of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), and its relationship with the LAGS level in adrenalectomized and fasted rats of different ages. No significant differences in the GR level, or in its Kd and activation, were observed among rats of 1, 3, and 12 months of age. On the other hand, the LAGS level showed an important variation with age, from almost undetectable in 1-month-old rats, to a maximum value in 3-month-old rats. With respect to TAT activity, an increase with age in the threshold of response to dexamethasone (DEX) administration was observed. The smallest dose of DEX capable of provoking a significant TAT induction rose from 0.1 microgram/kg body wt. in 1-month-old rats to 10 micrograms/kg body wt. in 12-month-old rats. However, the smallest dose of DEX able to elicit the maximal response was 10 micrograms/kg body wt. in all the assayed ages. This dose provoked a 40% decrease in the GR level, but did not significantly modify the LAGS content. From these results, we conclude that there is an age-related change in the threshold of response to DEX that cannot be explained by the GR-glucocorticoid interaction. The possibility that the LAGS modulate the cell response to glucocorticoids arises from the coincidence of this change with that observed in the LAGS concentration throughout life.

  14. Alternative splicing in the 5' moiety of the H-2Kd gene transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Transy, C; Lalanne, J L; Kourilsky, P

    1984-01-01

    The H-2Kd gene, which encodes a mouse major transplantation antigen, was transfected into L TK- mouse fibroblasts. Two transcripts of the gene were detected by S1 nuclease mapping analysis. They correspond to two previously characterized cDNA clones isolated from DBA/2 mouse liver RNA, leading to the conclusion that the H-2Kd gene gives rise to two distinct transcripts through an alternate use of splicing sites. The non-canonical RNA potentially encodes a so far undescribed H-2Kd-like molecule. It is present in all tissues tested (liver, spleen, thymus, kidney) albeit in lower amounts (approximately 10-fold less) than the canonical RNA coding for H-2Kd. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6094182

  15. Compressive and rarefactive DIA solitons beyond the KdV limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Deeba, F.

    2012-04-15

    The modified Gardner equation (MGE), showing the existence of compressive and rarefactive dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitons in a nonplanar dusty plasma (containing inertial ions, Boltzmann electrons, and negatively charged stationary dust) beyond the KdV Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) limit, is derived and numerically solved. The basic features of the compressive and rarefactive cylindrical and spherical DIA solitons, which are found to exist beyond the KdV limit, i.e., exist for {mu} {approx} 2/3 (where {mu} = Z{sub n}n{sub d0}/n{sub i0}, z{sub d} is the number of electrons residing onto the dust grain surface, n{sub d0}(n{sub i0}) is the dust (ion) number density at equilibrium, and {mu} {approx} 2/3 means that {mu} is not equal to 2/3, but it is around 2/3) are identified. These solitons (which can be referred to as DIA Gardner solitons (DIA-GSs)) are completely different from the KdV solitons because {mu} = 2/3 corresponds to the vanishing of the nonlinear coefficient of the KdV equation, and {mu} {approx} 2/3 corresponds to extremely large amplitude KdV solitons for which the validity of the reductive perturbation method breaks down. It is also shown that the properties of the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) DIA-GSs are significantly different from those of the one dimensional planar ones.

  16. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  17. Affinity Is an Important Determinant of the Anti-Trypanosome Activity of Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Stijlemans, Benoît; Saerens, Dirk; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Muyldermans, Serge; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of Nanobodies (Nbs) with a direct toxic activity against African trypanosomes is a recent advancement towards a new strategy against these extracellular parasites. The anti-trypanosomal activity relies on perturbing the highly active recycling of the Variant-specific Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) that occurs in the parasite's flagellar pocket. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we expand the existing panel of Nbs with anti-Trypanosoma brucei potential and identify four categories based on their epitope specificity. We modified the binding properties of previously identified Nanobodies Nb_An05 and Nb_An33 by site-directed mutagenesis in the paratope and found this to strongly affect trypanotoxicity despite retention of antigen-targeting properties. Affinity measurements for all identified anti-trypanosomal Nbs reveal a strong correlation between trypanotoxicity and affinity (KD), suggesting that it is a crucial determinant for this activity. Half maximal effective (50%) affinity of 57 nM was calculated from the non-linear dose-response curves. In line with these observations, Nb humanizing mutations only preserved the trypanotoxic activity if the KD remained unaffected. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals that the binding properties of Nanobodies need to be compatible with achieving an occupancy of >95% saturation of the parasite surface VSG in order to exert an anti-trypanosomal activity. As such, Nb-based approaches directed against the VSG target would require binding to an accessible, conserved epitope with high affinity. PMID:23166849

  18. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    PubMed

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors.

  19. The relative contribution of affinity and efficacy to agonist activity: organ selectivity of noradrenaline and oxymetazoline with reference to the classification of drug receptors.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, T P

    1984-01-01

    Oxymetazoline demonstrated a pronounced organ selectivity, when compared to noradrenaline, by being a potent full agonist in rat anococcygeus muscle and a partial agonist in rat vas deferens. Responses of rat anococcygeus muscles to oxymetazoline were relatively more sensitive to antagonism by phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) an alkylating alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. Therefore, although oxymetazoline was more potent than noradrenaline in this tissue, after Pbz (0.3 microM for 10 min), the responses to oxymetazoline were completely inhibited while those to noradrenaline were only partially inhibited. Schild analysis with phentolamine, corynanthine, prazosin and yohimbine indicated no alpha-adrenoceptor heterogeneity within the rat anococcygeus muscle or between this tissue and rat vas deferens. Measurement of agonist Kd values and Schild analysis of oxymetazoline antagonism of responses to noradrenaline (after alkylation) confirmed the homogeneity of alpha-adrenoceptors with respect to these two agonists. The above profiles of activity would be predicted if oxymetazoline had a higher affinity but lower efficacy than noradrenaline. Experimentally this was confirmed when it was found that oxymetazoline had 5 times the affinity but 0.2 to 0.3 times the efficacy of noradrenaline. These results serve as a caveat to the use of selective receptor desensitization and/or selective receptor alkylation (or protection from alkylation) as means of differentiating drug receptors. Theoretical modelling and these experimental results indicate that high affinity/low efficacy agonists are much more sensitive to receptor coupling. The implications for therapeutic selectivity could be important in that high affinity/low efficacy agonists theoretically have a much greater potential for organ selectivity.

  20. Certain photooxidized derivatives of tryptophan bind with very high affinity to the Ah receptor and are likely to be endogenous signal substances

    SciTech Connect

    Rannug, A.; Rannug, U.; Rosenkranz, H.S.; Winqvist, L.; Westerholm, R.; Agurell, E.; Grafstroem, A.K.

    1987-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation of amino acids produces compounds with affinity for the Ah receptor. Aqueous solutions of L-tryptophan were exposed to radiation from an unfiltered high-pressure mercury lamp. The photoproducts formed were solvent-extracted or concentrated on Sep-Pak C18 cartridges. The concentrated extracts or eluants were treated for their ability to compete with /sup 3/H-labeled 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Binding was assayed in liver cytosolic preparations from Sprague-Dawley rats using a technique based on hydroxylapatite separation. Photoproducts with receptor affinity were formed in a time-dependent manner. Histidine and tryptamine also gave products upon UV irradiation that competed with TCDD. Commercial tryptophan, at least aged, contained trace amounts of impurities with receptor affinity. Analysis by TLC and high-pressure liquid chromatography of the photo-products of tryptophan showed a minimum of three different binding compounds. Two of the products were studied in greater detail. One of them, showing UV absorbance and yellow fluorescence, gave a molecular ion (M+) of 284 and the other gave M+ 312 but showed little UV absorption and fluorescence. The concentration, based on mass spectrometry quantifications, of the two compounds that displaced more than 50% of TCDD was found to be extremely low, giving Kd values of 0.44 nM (M+ 312) and 0.07 nM (M+ 284). The existence of high affinity receptors for oxidized amino acids is postulated and their possible role in the proliferative cellular responses to TCDD and tryptophan is discussed briefly.

  1. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily Kara

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  2. Identification of a 46-kD latex protein allergen in health care workers.

    PubMed Central

    Beezhold, D H; Sussman, G L; Kostyal, D A; Chang, N S

    1994-01-01

    Latex allergy is an occupational hazard for health care workers. Extractable latex proteins are known to be allergenic, but most latex allergens have not been specifically identified. The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgE response of latex-allergic patients to latex proteins and to identify common protein allergens. Serum was obtained from 40 individuals who were skin test-positive to latex; 85% were health care workers. Western blots for IgE reactivity were performed using both ammoniated (AL) and non-ammoniated (NAL) latex proteins and IgE-reactive NAL proteins were analysed by microsequence analysis. The patients were grouped according to common patterns of reactivity. Pattern 1, the most common pattern of reactivity (9/40 patients) recognized two protein bands in both NAL and AL at 46 and 110 kD. A second, heterogeneous pattern of reactivity (pattern 2) recognized a diffuse pattern of polypeptides in the AL preparation. The n-terminal amino acid sequences for allergens at 14, 18, 29, 46 and 110 kD were determined. Sequence analysis identified the 14-kD and 18-kD allergens as the hevein proprotein. The 46-kD and 110-kD had identical sequences which were unique from known latex proteins. We conclude that multiple latex proteins are allergens with hevein preprotein and a previously unidentified 46/110-kD protein being commonly recognized in health care workers. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7994905

  3. Contiguous Genomic DNA Sequence Comprising the 19-kD Zein Gene Family from Maize1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rentao; Messing, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    A new approach has been undertaken to analyze the sequences and linear organization of the 19-kD zein genes in maize (Zea mays). A high-coverage, large-insert genomic library of the inbred line B73 based on bacterial artificial chromosomes was used to isolate a redundant set of clones containing members of the 19-kD zein gene family, which previously had been estimated to consist of 50 members. The redundant set of clones was used to create bins of overlapping clones that represented five distinct genomic regions. Representative clones containing the entire set of 19-kD zein genes were chosen from each region and sequenced. Seven bacterial artificial chromosome clones yielded 1,160 kb of genomic DNA. Three of them formed a contiguous sequence of 478 kb, the longest contiguous sequenced region of the maize genome. Altogether, these DNA sequences provide the linear organization of 25 19-kD zein genes, one-half the number previously estimated. It is suggested that the difference is because of haplotypes exhibiting different degrees of gene amplification in the zein multigene family. About one-half the genes present in B73 appear to be expressed. Because some active genes have only been duplicated recently, they are so conserved in their sequence that previous cDNA sequence analysis resulted in “unigenes” that were actually derived from different gene copies. This analysis also shows that the 22- and 19-kD zein gene families shared a common ancestor. Although both ancestral genes had the same incremental gene amplification, the 19-kD zein branch exhibited a greater degree of far-distance gene translocations than the 22-kD zein gene family. PMID:12481046

  4. Development of an AlphaScreen assay for discovery of inhibitors of low-affinity glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Yegorova, Svetlana; Chavaroche, Anais E; Rodriguez, Maria C; Minond, Dmitriy; Cudic, Mare

    2013-08-15

    The development of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays with increased sensitivity for the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of galectins has been hampered by the weak binding affinities between galectins and their carbohydrate ligands. To circumvent this obstacle, we have developed an AlphaScreen assay for a 384-well plate format in a competitive binding configuration for discovery of new inhibitors of galectin-3. His-tagged galectin-3 was bound to nickel chelate acceptor beads, whereas biotinylated asialofetuin (biotin-ASF), a galectin-3 nanomolar binding partner, was bound to streptavidin-coated donor beads. Inhibitors of the carbohydrate-galectin interaction lead to a reduction of the AlphaScreen signal by competing with the biotin-ASF. The obtained IC50 values for known carbohydrate ligands of galectin-3 are in good agreement with the Kd values reported and measured for galectin-3 by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Thus, the developed AlphaScreen assay in a competitive binding configuration offers several advantages over the existing screening assays for inhibitors of glycan-lectin interactions. In addition, the assay format for the galectin-3/ASF pair could be easily applied in screening for glycan- and/or small molecule-based inhibitors of other members of the galectin family.

  5. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed.

  6. Identification and analysis of transient waves in shallow water using the KdV-based nonlinear Fourier transform (KdV-NLFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brühl, Markus; Oumeraci, Hocine

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of nonlinear waves in shallow water causes nonlinear wave-wave interactions that might significantly modify the observed free surface. For the elementary understanding of the underlying processes in wave propagation and the wave interactions it is essential to separate the underlying wave components and their nonlinear interactions. Since 2008 a KdV-based nonlinear Fourier transform (KdV-NLFT) is implemented and successfully applied at Leichtweiß-Institute (LWI) that solves the Korteweg-deVries equation by application of a cnoidal basis for the spectral decomposition of the original data. Therefore, the KdV-NLFT is adaptive within the cnoidal wave limit and the free surface is decomposed into cnoidal waves that span the whole range of possible wave forms in shallow water from linear over slightly and strongly nonlinear waves up to solitons. The number and type of the components depend on the original data. For linear data the KdV-NLFT provides the same results as the conventional Fourier transform. Furthermore, the nonlinear wave-wave interactions are explicitly separated from the underlying basic cnoidal wave components and can be displayed and analysed separately. The KdV-NLFT is successfully applied to different shallow water problems such as the fission of solitons over submerged reefs, the harmonic generation, the problem of bound and free harmonics and the transformation of long linear waves into asymmetric waves and finally their disintegration into a train of solitons (as shown by Zabusky and Kruskal, 1965). The analysis results show that for some applications the conventional concepts that have been developed based on the results of the linear conventional Fourier transform are not sufficient to explain the ongoing nonlinear processes. In contrast, by application of the KdV-NLFT the observed processes in soliton fission, harmonic generation, bound and free harmonics and the transformation of long waves in shallow water can easily be

  7. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  8. [Cell-ELA-based determination of binding affinity of DNA aptamer against U87-EGFRvIII cell].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Liang, Huiyu; Wu, Xidong; Gao, Yubo; Zhang, Xingmei

    2013-05-01

    A15, a DNA aptamer with binding specificity for U87 glioma cells stably overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (U87-EGFRvIII), was generated by cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) using a random nucleotide library. Subsequently, we established a cell enzyme-linked assay (cell-ELA) to detect the affinity of A15 compared to an EGFR antibody. We used A15 as a detection probe and cultured U87-EGFRvIII cells as targets. Our data indicate that the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) for A15 were below 100 nmol/L and had similar affinity compared to an EGFR antibody for U87-EGFRvIII. We demonstrated that the cell-ELA was a useful method to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) of aptamers generated by cell-SELEX.

  9. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  10. New analytical exact solutions of time fractional KdV–KZK equation by Kudryashov methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S Saha, Ray

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new exact solutions of the time fractional KdV–Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov (KdV–KZK) equation are obtained by the classical Kudryashov method and modified Kudryashov method respectively. For this purpose, the modified Riemann–Liouville derivative is used to convert the nonlinear time fractional KdV–KZK equation into the nonlinear ordinary differential equation. In the present analysis, the classical Kudryashov method and modified Kudryashov method are both used successively to compute the analytical solutions of the time fractional KdV–KZK equation. As a result, new exact solutions involving the symmetrical Fibonacci function, hyperbolic function and exponential function are obtained for the first time. The methods under consideration are reliable and efficient, and can be used as an alternative to establish new exact solutions of different types of fractional differential equations arising from mathematical physics. The obtained results are exhibited graphically in order to demonstrate the efficiencies and applicabilities of these proposed methods of solving the nonlinear time fractional KdV–KZK equation.

  11. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  12. Estimation of Kd of lead and (210)Po in 11 soils from India.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sukanta; Pandit, G G

    2014-12-01

    The fate of contaminant transport is often estimated using the distribution (partition) coefficient, Kd. It is a measure of sorption of contaminants to soil. As Kd is element, soil type and ground water dependent, chemical characterization of soil and ground water of the particular site is essential. In this study, soil and ground water samples from different locations around India were collected. The soil samples were physically characterized and pH, CaCO3, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter and organic carbon were determined. Equilibration time for lead and (210)Po were estimated with respect to contact time and were found to be 28 and 72 h respectively. The Kd of lead varied from 6700 to 31,000 L/kg with a geometric mean of 15,200 L/kg, and for (210)Po from 1400 to 8700 L/kg with a geometric mean of 3700 L/kg.

  13. A reliable algorithm for KdV equations arising in warm plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Amit; Singh, Jagdev; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to propose a simple and reliable algorithm namely homotopy perturbation transform method (HPTM) for KdV equations in warm plasma. The homotopy perturbation transform method is a combined form of the Laplace transform method with the homotopy perturbation method. In this method, the solution is calculated in the form of a convergent series with an easily computable compact. To illustrate the simplicity and reliability of the method, several examples are provided. In this paper, the homotopy perturbation transform method has been applied to obtain the solution of the KdV, mKdV, K(2, 2) and K(3,3) equations. We compared our solutions with the exact solutions. Results illustrate the applicability, efficiency and accuracy of HPTM to solve nonlinear equations despite needlessness to any linearization or perturbation. It is predicted that the proposed algorithm can be widely applied to other nonlinear problems in science and engineering.

  14. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Regulation of N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor affinity and function on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Y H; Marasco, W A; Lopez, A F; Vadas, M A

    1988-01-01

    Preincubation of neutrophils with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rH TNF-alpha) enhanced the subsequent release of superoxide anion in response to various concentrations of N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP). Enhanced superoxide anion production was evident by 5 min and had reached a plateau by 15 min. Not only was the total amount of superoxide anion released greater, but the rate of release was also enhanced threefold by rH TNF-alpha. In contrast, rH TNF-alpha reduced or abolished neutrophil locomotion under agarose in response to a gradient of FMLP. Binding studies of f-Met-Leu-[3H]Phe to purified human neutrophils revealed a heterogeneous binding to unstimulated cells. The high affinity component consisted of approximately 2,000 sites per cell and had an average Kd of 2 +/- 0.7 nM (n = 4). The low affinity component consisted of approximately 40,000 sites per cell and had an average Kd of 180 +/- 50 nM (n = 4). rH TNF-alpha caused conversion to a linear Scatchard plot showing no significant change in total binding sites but a single Kd of 40 +/- 10 nM (n = 4). These data indicate that rH TNF-alpha may influence neutrophil responses to FMLP by regulating the affinity of FMLP receptors. PMID:2830314

  15. Relative binding affinities of bisphosphonates for human bone and relationship to antiresorptive efficacy.

    PubMed

    Leu, Chih-Tai; Luegmayr, Eva; Freedman, Leonard P; Rodan, Gideon A; Reszka, Alfred A

    2006-05-01

    Potent bisphosphonates (BPs) preferentially bind bone at sites of active osteoclastic bone resorption, where they are taken up by the osteoclast and inhibit resorption. We tested the hypothesis that BP affinity to human bone affects antiresorptive potency. [(1)(4)C]-Alendronate binding to human bone was saturable and reversible with an apparent Kd of 72 microM by Scatchard analysis. In competition binding assays, unlabeled alendronate (Ki: 61 microM) was slightly more potent than pyrophosphate (Ki = 156 microM) in blocking [(1)(4)C]-alendronate binding. Likewise, most tested BPs, including etidronate (Ki: 91 microM), ibandronate (116 microM), pamidronate (83 microM), risedronate (85 microM) and zoledronate (81 microM), showed comparable affinities. Interestingly, tiludronate (173 microM; P < 0.05 vs. all other BPs) and especially clodronate (806 microM; P > 0.0001 vs. all other BPs) displayed significantly weaker affinity for bone. The weak affinity of clodronate translated into a requirement for 10-fold higher dosing in in vitro bone resorption assays when bone was pretreated with BP and subsequently washed prior to adding osteoclasts. In stark contrast, neither alendronate nor risedronate lost any efficacy after washing the bone surface. These findings suggest that most clinically tested BPs may have similar affinities for human bone. For those with reduced affinity, this may translate into lower potency that necessitates higher dosing.

  16. Lax representations and integrable time discretizations of the DDKdV, DDmKdV, and DDHOKdV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zuonong; Huang, Hongci; Xue, Weimin

    1999-02-01

    From a proper 2 × 2 discrete isospectral problem, a new differential-difference integrable equation in Lax sense is proposed by a discrete zero curvature equation. The DDKdV (differential-difference DdV equation) proposed by Ohta and Hirota and DDCDGKS (DD Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Kotera-Sawada equation) are rederived. Some other new discrete KdV equations, discrete mKdV equations and discrete high order KdV equations which converge to the corresponding continuous soliton equations in the continuum limit are obtained. Integrable time discretizations of the DDKdV, DDmKdV (differential-difference mKdV equation) and DDHOKdV (differential-difference high order KdV equations) are given.

  17. KD-tree based clustering algorithm for fast face recognition on large-scale data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Yaping; Yang, Junfeng

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes an acceleration method for large-scale face recognition system. When dealing with a large-scale database, face recognition is time-consuming. In order to tackle this problem, we employ the k-means clustering algorithm to classify face data. Specifically, the data in each cluster are stored in the form of the kd-tree, and face feature matching is conducted with the kd-tree based nearest neighborhood search. Experiments on CAS-PEAL and self-collected database show the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  18. Soliton solutions of the KdV equation with higher-order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with higher-order corrections is examined. We studied the KdV equation with first-order correction and that with second-order correction that include the terms of the fifth-order Lax, Sawada-Kotera and Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon equations. The simplified form of the bilinear method was used to show the integrability of the first-order models and therefore to obtain multiple soliton solutions for each one. The obstacles to integrability of some of the models with second-order corrections are examined as well.

  19. Quantification of the Effects of Ionic Strength, Viscosity, and Hydrophobicity on Protein–Ligand Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In order to quantify the interactions between molecules of biological interest, the determination of the dissociation constant (Kd) is essential. Estimation of the binding affinity in this way is routinely performed in “favorable” conditions for macromolecules. Crucial data for ligand–protein binding elucidation is mainly derived from techniques (e.g., macromolecular crystallography) that require the addition of high concentration of salts and/or other additives. In this study we have evaluated the effect of temperature, ionic strength, viscosity, and hydrophobicity on the Kd of three previously characterized protein–ligand systems, based on variation in their binding sites, in order to provide insight into how these often overlooked unconventional circumstances impact binding affinity. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) increasing solvent viscosity in general is detrimental to ligand binding, (2) moderate increases in temperature have marginal effects on the dissociation constant, and (3) the degree of hydrophobicity of the ligand and the binding site determines the extent of the influence of cosolvents and salt concentration on ligand binding affinity. PMID:25147617

  20. A larger number of L chains (Tac) enhance the association rate of interleukin 2 to the high affinity site of the interleukin 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The IL-2-R is composed of at least two proteins, that is, a 55-kD protein (p55, the L chain, or Tac) and a 75-kD protein (p75, the H chain, or converter). The high affinity binding of IL-2 results in the formation of the ternary complex consisting of IL-2, and the L and H chains. To distinguish the affinity conversion model and the binary complex model we have carried out kinetic studies on the IL-2 binding to the high affinity IL-2-R on T lymphocytes expressing various numbers of L chains and a relatively constant number of H chains. We found that expression of a larger number of L chains accelerated the association of IL-2 to the high affinity receptor. The results are not compatible with the binary complex model that assumes a fixed number of high affinity sites determined by the numbers of a limiting chain. Instead, the results are consistent with the prediction of the affinity conversion model that assumes association of IL-2 to the L chain as the first step of the ternary complex formation and they indicate that the possible role of excess L chains is to accelerate the formation of the ternary complex. The reaction rate constants calculated from the affinity conversion model were reasonably constant. PMID:3263463

  1. Key KdSOC1 gene expression profiles during plantlet morphogenesis under hormone, photoperiod, and drought treatments.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Zhu, C; Zeng, H M

    2016-01-01

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana utilizes plantlet formation between its zigzag leaf margins as its method of asexual reproduction. In this study, K. daigremontiana SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (KdSOC1), a key intermediate in the transition from vegetative to asexual growth, was cloned. Furthermore, its expression profiles during plantlet formation under different environmental and hormone induction conditions were analyzed. The full-KdSOC1 cDNA sequence length was 1410 bp with 70% shared homology with Carya cathayensis SOC1. The conserved domain search of KdSOC1 showed the absence of I and C domains, which might indicate novel biological functions in K. daigremontiana. The full-KdSOC1 promoter sequence was 1401 bp long and contained multiple-hormone-responsive cis-acting elements. Hormone induction assays showed that gibberellins and salicylic acid mainly regulated KdSOC1 expression. The swift change from low to high KdSOC1 expression levels during long-day induction was accompanied by the rapid emergence of plantlets. Drought stress stimulated KdSOC1 expression in leaves both with and without plantlet formation. Together, the results suggested that KdSOC1 was closely involved in environmental stimulation signal perception and the transduction of K. daigremontiana plantlet formation. Therefore, future identification of KdSOC1 functions might reveal key information that will help elucidate the transition network between embryogenesis and organogenesis during plantlet formation. PMID:26909971

  2. Lie Symmetry Analysis and Explicit Solutions of the Time Fractional Fifth-Order KdV Equation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang wei; Xu, Tian zhou; Feng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, using the Lie group analysis method, we study the invariance properties of the time fractional fifth-order KdV equation. A systematic research to derive Lie point symmetries to time fractional fifth-order KdV equation is performed. In the sense of point symmetry, all of the vector fields and the symmetry reductions of the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are obtained. At last, by virtue of the sub-equation method, some exact solutions to the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are provided. PMID:24523885

  3. Method of Multiple Scales and Travelling Wave Solutions for (2+1)-Dimensional KdV Type Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayhan, Burcu; Özer, M. Naci; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we applied the method of multiple scales for Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) type equations and we derived nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) type equations. So we get a relation between KdV type equations and NLS type equations. In addition, exact solutions were found for KdV type equations. The ( G'} over G )-expansion methods and the ( {G'} over G, {1 over G}} )-expansion methods were proposed to establish new exact solutions for KdV type differential equations. We obtained periodic and hyperbolic function solutions for these equations. These methods are very effective for getting travelling wave solutions of nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs).

  4. Lie symmetry analysis and explicit solutions of the time fractional fifth-order KdV equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Wei; Xu, Tian Zhou; Feng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, using the Lie group analysis method, we study the invariance properties of the time fractional fifth-order KdV equation. A systematic research to derive Lie point symmetries to time fractional fifth-order KdV equation is performed. In the sense of point symmetry, all of the vector fields and the symmetry reductions of the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are obtained. At last, by virtue of the sub-equation method, some exact solutions to the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are provided. PMID:24523885

  5. Isolation of a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody. Preliminary evaluation of its possible applications in serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, C H; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M; Durante de Isola, E; Fossati, C A; Margni, R A

    1990-01-01

    By affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody (163B6), obtained in our laboratory, we have isolated a T. cruzi antigen which could be useful for differential diagnosis of Chagas' disease from leishmaniasis. This antigen, a 52-kD protein, reacted with all sera from Chagas' disease patients tested but not with sera from patients with leishmania, in ELISA. The 52-kD antigen is widely distributed in the Trypanosoma genus since the 163B6 monoclonal antibody reacts with T. rangeli and 8 strains and a clone of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2119921

  6. Korteweg-deVries-Burgers (KdVB) equation in a five component cometary plasma with kappa described electrons and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Manesh; Willington, Neethu T.; Jayakumar, Neethu; Sebastian, Sijo; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the existence of ion-acoustic shock waves in a five component cometary plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged oxygen ions, kappa described hydrogen ions, hot solar electrons, and slightly colder cometary electrons. The KdVB equation has been derived for the system, and its solution plotted for different kappa values, oxygen ion densities, as well as the temperature ratios for the ions. It is found that the amplitude of the shock wave decreases with increasing kappa values. The strength of the shock profile decreases with increasing temperatures of the positively charged oxygen ions and densities of negatively charged oxygen ions.

  7. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  8. Fragment screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meiby, Elinor; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M; Ohlson, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a new strategy for drug discovery where lead compounds are evolved from small molecules. These fragments form low affinity interactions (dissociation constant (K(D)) = mM - μM) with protein targets, which require fragment screening methods of sufficient sensitivity. Weak affinity chromatography (WAC) is a promising new technology for fragment screening based on selective retention of fragments by a drug target. Kinases are a major pharmaceutical target, and FBDD has been successfully applied to several of these targets. In this work, we have demonstrated the potential to use WAC in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for fragment screening of a kinase target-cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK). One hundred seventy fragments were selected for WAC screening by virtual screening of a commercial fragment library against the ATP-binding site of five different proteins. GAK protein was immobilized on a capillary HPLC column, and compound binding was characterized by frontal affinity chromatography. Compounds were screened in sets of 13 or 14, in combination with MS detection for enhanced throughput. Seventy-eight fragments (46 %) with K(D) < 200 μM were detected, including a few highly efficient GAK binders (K(D) of 2 μM; ligand efficiency = 0.51). Of special interest is that chiral screening by WAC may be possible, as two stereoisomeric fragments, which both contained one chiral center, demonstrated twin peaks. This ability, in combination with the robustness, sensitivity, and simplicity of WAC makes it a new method for fragment screening of considerable potential. PMID:22918538

  9. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  10. Kelley Direct (KD) Toolkit: Toward the Development of Innovative Pedagogical Tools for Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magjuka, Richard J.; Liu, Xiaojing; Lee, Seung-Hee

    2006-01-01

    KD Toolkit shows a representative synthesis of the best practices learned by world-renowned instructors in a top ranked online MBA program in the United States. This article will share and discuss the pedagogical implications of this learning technology and the leadership and innovative effort of the program that afforded the development of KD…

  11. Stationary problems for equation of the KdV type and dynamical r-matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, P. P.; Rauch-Wojciechowski, S.; Tsiganov, A. V.

    1996-07-01

    We study a new quite general family of dynamical r-matrices for an auxiliary loop algebra L(su(2)) related to restricted flows for equations of the KdV type. This underlying r-matrix structure allows us to reconstruct Lax representations and to find variables of separation for a wide set of the integrable natural Hamiltonian systems.

  12. Spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-16kb and ASASSN-16kd as highly reddened Galactic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, J. L.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Morrell, N.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    Optical spectra (range 3300-9500 Angstroms) of ASASSN-16kb (see ASAS-SN transient page and ASASSN-16kd/PNVJ17225112-3158349 (ATel #9469) were obtained on UT Sep 8 with the B & C spectrograph mounted on the du Pont 2.5m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory.

  13. Confirmation of ASASSN-16kd as a classical nova in the optically thick stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlsen, T.

    2016-09-01

    I report optical spectroscopic followup on the nova candidate ASASSN-16kd reported in ATEL #9469. The spectra, obtained with a LISA spectrograph (R= ~1500) mounted on a C11 reflector from Armidale NSW through light clouds, were obtained on 2016 Sept.

  14. The k-d Tree: A Hierarchical Model for Human Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandendorpe, Mary M.

    This paper discusses a model of information storage and retrieval, the k-d tree (Bentley, 1975), a binary, hierarchical tree with multiple associate terms, which has been explored in computer research, and it is suggested that this model could be useful for describing human cognition. Included are two models of human long-term memory--networks and…

  15. Singular solutions of the KdV equation and the inverse scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Arkad'ev, V.A.; Pogrebkov, A.K.; Polivanov, M.K.

    1985-12-20

    The paper is devoted to the construction of singular solutions of the KdV equation. The presentation is based on a variant of the inverse scattering method for singular solutions of nonlinear equations developed in previous works of the authors.

  16. A Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Complex Modified KdV Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenting; Jiang Kun

    2010-09-30

    In this paper, we develop a local discontinuous Galerkin(LDG) method for solving complex modified KdV(CMKdV) equation. The LDG method has the flexibility for arbitrary h and p adaptivity. We prove the L{sup 2} stability for general solutions.

  17. Analytical integrability and physical solutions of d-KdV equation

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, P.K.; Dwivedi, C.B.

    2006-03-15

    A new idea of electron inertia-induced ion sound wave excitation for transonic plasma equilibrium has already been reported. In such unstable plasma equilibrium, a linear source driven Korteweg-de Vries (d-KdV) equation describes the nonlinear ion sound wave propagation behavior. By numerical techniques, two distinct classes of solution (soliton and oscillatory shocklike structures) are obtained. Present contribution deals with the systematic methodological efforts to find out its (d-KdV) analytical solutions. As a first step, we apply the Painleve method to test whether the derived d-KdV equation is analytically integrable or not. We find that the derived d-KdV equation is indeed analytically integrable since it satisfies Painleve property. Hirota's bilinearization method and the modified sine-Gordon method (also termed as sine-cosine method) are used to derive the analytical results. Perturbative technique is also applied to find out quasistationary solutions. A few graphical plots are provided to offer a glimpse of the structural profiles obtained by different methods applied. It is conjectured that these solutions may open a new scope of acoustic spectroscopy in plasma hydrodynamics.

  18. The sodium ion affinities of asparagine, glutamine, histidine and arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2008-01-01

    The sodium ion affinities of the amino acids Asn, Gln, His and Arg have been determined by experimental and computational approaches (for Asn, His and Arg). Na+-bound heterodimers with amino acid and peptide ligands (Pep1, Pep2) were produced by electrospray ionization. From the dissociation kinetics of these Pep1-Na+-Pep2 ions to Pep1-Na+ and Pep2-Na+, determined by collisionally activated dissociation, a ladder of relative affinities was constructed and subsequently converted to absolute affinities by anchoring the relative values to known Na+ affinities. The Na+ affinities of Asn, His and Arg, were calculated at the MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//MP2/6-31G(d) level of ab initio theory. The resulting experimental and computed Na+ affinities are in excellent agreement with one another. These results, combined with those of our previous studies, yield the sodium ion affinities of 18 out of the 20 [alpha]-amino acids naturally occurring in peptides and proteins of living systems.

  19. A cDNA clone containing the entire coding sequence of a mouse H-2Kd histocompatibility antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lalanne, Jean-Louis; Delarbre, Christiane; Gachelin, Gabriel; Kourilsky, Philippe

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone carrying a 1560 bp long insert which contains the entire coding and 3′ untranslated regions of an H-2Kd mouse histocompatibility antigen. Its sequence and overal features are described. They point to the existence of unique properties of DNA sequences associated with the H-2Kd antigen. PMID:6298749

  20. Downregulation of the H-2Kd gene by siRNA affects the cytotoxicity of murine LAK cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the H-2Kd gene on the lymphocyte membrane, we constructed a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets the H-2Kd gene and compared the cytotoxicity of mouse lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells with different H-2Kd expression states. H-2Kd-targeting siRNA was transfected into spleen lymphocytes of BALB/C mice. Flow cytometry (FCM) was then performed to examine the expression of the H-2Kd gene in the transfected and control cells. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the transfected cells toward the H22 and K562 cell lines was evaluated in vitro using the LDH release assay. H-2Kd-targeting siRNA significantly reduced the expression levels of the target protein, whereas pure transMessenger and non-silencing siRNA did not inhibit H-2Kd expression at the concentrations tested. The cytotoxicity of siRNA-treated LAK cells toward H22 and K562 cells was reduced significantly. The knockdown of H-2Kd gene expression by siRNA may be associated with LAK cell cytotoxicity toward neoplasm cell lines. PMID:24206544

  1. Cesium cation affinities and basicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Jean-François; Maria, Pierre-Charles; Massi, Lionel; Mayeux, Charly; Burk, Peeter; Tammiku-Taul, Jaana

    2007-11-01

    This review focuses on the quantitative data related to cesium cation interaction with neutral or negatively charged ligands. The techniques used for measuring the cesium cation affinity (enthalpies, CCA), and cesium cation basicities (Gibbs free energies, CCB) are briefly described. The quantum chemical calculations methods that were specifically designed for the determination of cesium cation adduct structures and the energetic aspects of the interaction are discussed. The experimental results, obtained essentially from mass spectrometry techniques, and complemented by thermochemical data, are tabulated and commented. In particular, the correlations between cesium cation affinities and lithium cation affinities for the various kinds of ligands (rare gases, polyatomic neutral molecules, among them aromatic compounds and negative ions) serve as a basis for the interpretation of the diverse electrostatic modes of interaction. A brief account of some recent analytical applications of ion/molecule reactions with Cs+, as well as other cationization approaches by Cs+, is given.

  2. Selection is more intelligent than design: improving the affinity of a bivalent ligand through directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Kareem M; Xiao, Yi; Soh, H Tom

    2012-12-01

    Multivalent molecular interactions can be exploited to dramatically enhance the performance of an affinity reagent. The enhancement in affinity and specificity achieved with a multivalent construct depends critically on the effectiveness of the scaffold that joins the ligands, as this determines their positions and orientations with respect to the target molecule. Currently, no generalizable design rules exist for construction of an optimal multivalent ligand for targets with known structures, and the design challenge remains an insurmountable obstacle for the large number of proteins whose structures are not known. As an alternative to such design-based strategies, we report here a directed evolution-based method for generating optimal bivalent aptamers. To demonstrate this approach, we fused two thrombin aptamers with a randomized DNA sequence and used a microfluidic in vitro selection strategy to isolate scaffolds with exceptionally high affinities. Within five rounds of selection, we generated a bivalent aptamer that binds thrombin with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) <10 pM, representing a ∼200-fold improvement in binding affinity over the monomeric aptamers and a ∼15-fold improvement over the best designed bivalent construct. The process described here can be used to produce high-affinity multivalent aptamers and could potentially be adapted to other classes of biomolecules.

  3. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  4. Affinity labeling and binding of nitrobenzylthionosine (NBTI) to a membrane fraction (MF) of cultured cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Woffendin, C.; Plagemann, P.G.W.

    1986-05-01

    Equilibrium binding identified high affinity NBTI binding sites (K/sub D/ = 1-3 nM) on the MF's of L929, L1210, P388, S49 and CHO cells. High affinity NBTI binding sites are associated with the nucleoside transporter since none were present in a MF of a transport-deficient mutant of S49 cells (AE1). MF's of Novikoff cells, like intact Novikoff cells, also lacked high affinity NBTI binding sites. MF's of the cell lines were equilibrium labeled with (/sup 3/H)NBTI using photoaffinity conditions and analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Radioactivity was specifically incorporated covalently into a 50-70 Kd protein fraction, but the labeled proteins from CHO and L929 cells had a higher apparent molecular weight than those from S49 and P388 cells. In addition, in MF's from some cell lines lower molecular weight components became photoaffinity labeled. Maximum photoaffinity labeling of the MF proteins was observed with much higher (/sup 3/H)NBTI concentrations (100-200 nM) than those saturating the nucleoside transporter. This finding is explained by a reduced affinity of the photoactivated NBTI intermediate(s) for the transporter. When detergent solubilized MF's from cultured cells were chromotographed on a DEAE cellulose column, only 5-10% of the protein, but practically all high affinity NBTI sites, were recovered in the flow through fraction.

  5. In vitro affinity screening of protein and peptide binders by megavalent bead surface display.

    PubMed

    Diamante, Letizia; Gatti-Lafranconi, Pietro; Schaerli, Yolanda; Hollfelder, Florian

    2013-10-01

    The advent of protein display systems has provided access to tailor-made protein binders by directed evolution. We introduce a new in vitro display system, bead surface display (BeSD), in which a gene is mounted on a bead via strong non-covalent (streptavidin/biotin) interactions and the corresponding protein is displayed via a covalent thioether bond on the DNA. In contrast to previous monovalent or low-copy bead display systems, multiple copies of the DNA and the protein or peptide of interest are displayed in defined quantities (up to 10(6) of each), so that flow cytometry can be used to obtain a measure of binding affinity. The utility of the BeSD in directed evolution is validated by library selections of randomized peptide sequences for binding to the anti-hemagglutinin (HA) antibody that proceed with enrichments in excess of 10(3) and lead to the isolation of high-affinity HA-tags within one round of flow cytometric screening. On-bead K(d) measurements suggest that the selected tags have affinities in the low nanomolar range. In contrast to other display systems (such as ribosome, mRNA and phage display) that are limited to affinity panning selections, BeSD possesses the ability to screen and rank binders by their affinity in vitro, a feature that hitherto has been exclusive to in vivo multivalent cell display systems (such as yeast display).

  6. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  7. Characterization of a low molecular weight protein of the ATP synthetase complex from beef heart and rat liver mitochondria with a high affinity monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Woldegiorgis, G; Contreras, L; Shrago, E

    1990-06-15

    A monoclonal antibody raised against beef heart mitochondria elicited a strong reaction on Western Blot with a 16 kD protein in preparations of beef heart mitochondria, ammonia particles, oligomycin sensitive ATPase and Complex V, in addition to showing a lesser affinity for the partially purified 30 kD ADP/ATP carrier. The antibody also reacted with a 17 kD protein in rat liver mitochondria and an enriched membrane vesicle fraction. The N-terminal sequence of the first twenty amino acids of both the beef heart and rat liver proteins contained significant homology. Comparison with results in the literature indicate that the proteins represent the delta subunit of the ATP synthetase complex. Further evidence suggests that the epitope for the antibody may reside at the C-terminal 30-40 amino acid residues of both proteins.

  8. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  9. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  10. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and

  11. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  12. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell.

    PubMed

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-04-20

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [(3)H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element.

  13. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  14. A multiplexed three-dimensional paper-based electrochemical impedance device for simultaneous label-free affinity sensing of total and glycated haemoglobin: The potential of using a specific single-frequency value for analysis.

    PubMed

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Chailapakul, Orawon; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2016-09-14

    A novel three-dimensional paper-based electrochemical impedance device (3D-PEID) is first introduced for measuring multiple diabetes markers. Herein, a simple 3D-PEID composed of a dual screen-printed electrode on wax-patterned paper coupled with a multilayer of magnetic paper was fabricated for label-free electrochemical detection. The results clearly demonstrated in a step-wise manner that the haptoglobin (Hp)-modified and 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)-modified eggshell membranes (ESMs) were highly responsive to a clinically relevant range of total (0.5-20 g dL(-1); r(2) = 0.989) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (2.3%-14%; r(2) = 0.997) levels with detection limits (S/N = 3) of 0.08 g dL(-1) and 0.21%, respectively. The optimal binding frequencies of total haemoglobin and HbA1c to their specific recognition elements were 5.18 Hz and 9.99 Hz, respectively. The within-run coefficients of variation (CV) were 1.84%, 2.18%, 1.72%, and 2.01%, whereas the run-to-run CVs were 2.11%, 2.41%, 2.08%, and 2.21%, when assaying two levels of haemoglobin and HbA1c, respectively. The CVs for the haemoglobin and HbA1c levels measured on ten independently fabricated paper-based sheets were 1.96% and 2.10%, respectively. These results demonstrated that our proposed system achieved excellent precision for the simultaneous detection of total haemoglobin and HbA1c, with an acceptable reproducibility of fabrication. The long-term stability of the Hp-modified eggshell membrane (ESM) was 98.84% over a shelf-life of 4 weeks, enabling the possibility of storage or long-distance transport to remote regions, particularly in resource-limited settings; however, for the APBA-modified ESM, the stability was 92.35% over a one-week period. Compared with the commercial automated method, the results demonstrated excellent agreement between the techniques (p-value < 0.05), thus permitting the potential application of 3D-PEID for the monitoring of the glycaemic status in diabetic

  15. A multiplexed three-dimensional paper-based electrochemical impedance device for simultaneous label-free affinity sensing of total and glycated haemoglobin: The potential of using a specific single-frequency value for analysis.

    PubMed

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Chailapakul, Orawon; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2016-09-14

    A novel three-dimensional paper-based electrochemical impedance device (3D-PEID) is first introduced for measuring multiple diabetes markers. Herein, a simple 3D-PEID composed of a dual screen-printed electrode on wax-patterned paper coupled with a multilayer of magnetic paper was fabricated for label-free electrochemical detection. The results clearly demonstrated in a step-wise manner that the haptoglobin (Hp)-modified and 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)-modified eggshell membranes (ESMs) were highly responsive to a clinically relevant range of total (0.5-20 g dL(-1); r(2) = 0.989) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (2.3%-14%; r(2) = 0.997) levels with detection limits (S/N = 3) of 0.08 g dL(-1) and 0.21%, respectively. The optimal binding frequencies of total haemoglobin and HbA1c to their specific recognition elements were 5.18 Hz and 9.99 Hz, respectively. The within-run coefficients of variation (CV) were 1.84%, 2.18%, 1.72%, and 2.01%, whereas the run-to-run CVs were 2.11%, 2.41%, 2.08%, and 2.21%, when assaying two levels of haemoglobin and HbA1c, respectively. The CVs for the haemoglobin and HbA1c levels measured on ten independently fabricated paper-based sheets were 1.96% and 2.10%, respectively. These results demonstrated that our proposed system achieved excellent precision for the simultaneous detection of total haemoglobin and HbA1c, with an acceptable reproducibility of fabrication. The long-term stability of the Hp-modified eggshell membrane (ESM) was 98.84% over a shelf-life of 4 weeks, enabling the possibility of storage or long-distance transport to remote regions, particularly in resource-limited settings; however, for the APBA-modified ESM, the stability was 92.35% over a one-week period. Compared with the commercial automated method, the results demonstrated excellent agreement between the techniques (p-value < 0.05), thus permitting the potential application of 3D-PEID for the monitoring of the glycaemic status in diabetic

  16. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  17. Chlamydial disease pathogenesis. Ocular hypersensitivity elicited by a genus-specific 57-kD protein

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Recurrent or persistent infections with Chlamydia trachomatis are thought to provide the antigenic stimulus for the chronic inflammation associated with blinding trachoma. We used the guinea pig model of inclusion conjunctivitis to identify chlamydial antigens that may be involved in this deleterious immune response. We purified from chlamydial elementary bodies a genus-specific 57-kD protein that elicited an ocular hypersensitivity response when placed topically onto the conjunctiva of ocular immune guinea pigs. This response was characterized by a predominantly mononuclear macrophage and lymphocyte cellular infiltrate of the submucosal epithelium. The clinical and histological findings were consistent with those of a delayed hypersensitivity response. These data demonstrated that the 57-kD chlamydial protein was a potent stimulator of ocular delayed hypersensitivity. Our findings may be critical to understanding the pathogenesis of the debilitating chlamydial diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as trachoma and many urogenital syndromes. PMID:2926323

  18. Primitive potentials and bounded solutions of the KdV equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, S.; Zakharov, D.; Zakharov, V.

    2016-10-01

    We construct a broad class of bounded potentials of the one-dimensional Schrödinger operator that have the same spectral structure as periodic finite-gap potentials, but that are neither periodic nor quasi-periodic. Such potentials, which we call primitive, are non-uniquely parametrized by a pair of positive Hölder continuous functions defined on the allowed bands. Primitive potentials are constructed as solutions of a system of singular integral equations, which can be efficiently solved numerically. Simulations show that these potentials can have a disordered structure. Primitive potentials generate a broad class of bounded non-vanishing solutions of the KdV hierarchy, and we interpret them as an example of integrable turbulence in the framework of the KdV equation.

  19. Building Generalized Lax Integrable KdV and MKdV Equations with Spatiotemporally Varying Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, M.; Choudhury, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    We present a technique based on extended Lax Pairs to derive variable-coefficient generalizations of various Lax-integrable NLPDE hierarchies. As illustrative examples, we consider generalized KdV equations, and three variants of generalized MKdV equations. It is demonstrated that the technique yields Lax- or S-integrable NLPDEs with both time- AND space-dependent coefficients which are thus more general than almost all cases considered earlier via other methods such as the Painlevé Test, Bell Polynomials, and various similarity methods. Some solutions are also presented for the generalized KdV equation derived here by the use of the Painlevé singular manifold method. Current and future work is centered on generalizing other integrable hierarchies of NLPDEs similarly, and deriving various integrability properties such as solutions, Backlund Transformations, and hierarchies of conservation laws for these new integrable systems with variable coefficients.

  20. On the problem of periodicity and hidden solitons for the KdV model.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Salupere, Andrus

    2005-03-01

    In continuum limit, the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam lattice is modeled by a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. It is shown that the long-time behavior of a KdV soliton train emerging from a harmonic excitation has a regular periodicity of right- and left-going trajectories. In a soliton train not all the solitons are visible, the solitons with smaller amplitude are hidden and their influence is seen through the changes of phase shifts of larger solitons. In the case of an external harmonic force several resonance schemes are revealed where both visible and hidden solitons have important roles. The weak, moderate, strong, and dominating fields are distinguished and the corresponding solution types presented. PMID:15836291

  1. The origin of gauge symmetries in integrable systems of the KdV type

    SciTech Connect

    Bakas, I.; Depireux, D.A. )

    1992-03-30

    Generalized systems of integrable nonlinear differential equations of the KdV type are considered from the point of view of self-dual Yang-Mills theory in space-times with signature. This paper presents a systematic method for embedding the rth flows of the SL(N) KdV hierarchy with N {ge} 2 and r {lt} N in the dimensionally reduced self-dual system using SL(N) as a gauge group. We also find that for r {gt} N the corresponding equations can be described in a similar fashion, provided that (in general) the rank of the gauge group increases accordingly. Certain connections of this formalism with W{sub N} algebras are also discussed. Finally the authors obtain a new class of nonlinear systems in two dimensions by introducing self-dual Ansatze associated with the W{sup (l)} {sub N} algebras of Bershadsky and Polyakov.

  2. An Algebraic Construction of the First Integrals of the Stationary KdV Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Masatomo; Ohmiya, Mayumi

    2009-09-01

    The stationary KdV hierarchy is constructed using a kind of recursion operator called Λ-operator. The notion of the maximal solution of the n-th stationary KdV equation is introduced. Using this maximal solution, a specific differential polynomial with the auxiliary spectral parameter called the spectral M-function is constructed as the quadratic form of the fundamental system of the eigenvalue problem for the 2-nd order linear ordinary differential equation which is related to the linearizing operator of the hierarchy. By calculating a perfect square condition of the quadratic form by an elementary algebraic method, the complete set of first integrals of this hierarchy is constructed.

  3. Loss of high-affinity prostacyclin receptors in platelets and the lack of prostaglandin-induced inhibition of platelet-stimulated thrombin generation in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, N N; Bauman, W A; Sinha, A K

    1996-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of death in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, platelets of those with SCI (n = 30) showed neither increased aggregation nor resistance to the antiaggregatory effects of prostacyclin when compared with normal controls (n = 30). Prostanoid-induced cAMP synthesis was similar in both groups. In contrast, prostacyclin, which completely inhibited the platelet-stimulated thrombin generation in normal controls, failed to do so in those with SCI. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]prostaglandin E1, used as a prostacyclin receptor probe, showed the presence of one high-affinity (Kd1 = 8.11 +/- 2.80 nM; n1 = 172 +/- 32 sites per cell) and one low-affinity (Kd2 = 1.01 +/- 0.3 microM; n2 = 1772 +/- 226 sites per cell) prostacyclin receptor in normal platelets. In contrast, the same analysis in subjects with SCI showed significant loss (P < 0.001) of high-affinity receptor sites (Kd1 = 6.34 +/- 1.91 nM; n1 = 43 +/- 10 sites per cell) with no significant change in the low affinity-receptors (Kd2 = 1.22 +/- 0.23; n2 = 1820 +/- 421). Treatment of these platelets with insulin, which has been demonstrated to restore both of the high- and low-affinity prostaglandin receptor numbers to within normal ranges in coronary artery disease, increased high-affinity receptor numbers and restored the prostacyclin effect on thrombin generation. These results demonstrate that the loss of the inhibitory effect of prostacyclin on the stimulation of thrombin generation was due to the loss of platelet high-affinity prostanoid receptors, which may contribute to atherogenesis in individuals with chronic SCI. PMID:8552614

  4. From Euler's elastica to the mKdV hierarchy, through the Faber polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Shigeki; Previato, Emma

    2016-08-01

    The modified Korteweg-de Vries hierarchy (mKdV) is derived by imposing isometry and isoenergy conditions on a moduli space of plane loops. The conditions are compared to the constraints that define Euler's elastica. Moreover, the conditions are shown to be constraints on the curvature and other invariants of the loops which appear as coefficients of the generating function for the Faber polynomials.

  5. Liverpool Telescope Spectrum of Nova Sco 2016 No. 2 (ASASSN-16kd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum of Nova Sco 2016 No. 2 (ASASSN-16kd; see ATel #9469, #9477, #9478, #9479, #9480, CBET 4320) with the FRODOSpec spectrograph (Barnsley et al. 2012) on the 2.0m Liverpool Telescope (Steele et al. 2004) on 2016 September 9.84 UT. The spectrum was taken using the higher resolution mode, which gives a wavelength coverage of 3900 to 5100 & Aring and 5900 to 8000 & Aring, with a resolution of R ~ 5400.

  6. KdV-Burgers equation in the modified continuum model considering anticipation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaqing; Zheng, Pengjun; Zhu, Keqiang; Ge, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    The new continuum model mentioned in this paper is developed based on optimal velocity car-following model, which takes the drivers' anticipation effect into account. The critical condition for traffic flow is derived, and nonlinear analysis shows density waves occur in traffic flow because of the small disturbance. Near the neutral stability line, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived and one of the solutions is given. Numerical simulation is carried out to show the local cluster described by the model.

  7. Boundary conditions for General Relativity on AdS3 and the KdV hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Alfredo; Tempo, David; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that General Relativity with negative cosmological constant in three spacetime dimensions admits a new family of boundary conditions being labeled by a nonnegative integer k. Gravitational excitations are then described by "boundary gravitons" that fulfill the equations of the k-th element of the KdV hierarchy. In particular, k = 0 corresponds to the Brown-Henneaux boundary conditions so that excitations are described by chiral movers. In the case of k = 1, the boundary gravitons fulfill the KdV equation and the asymptotic symmetry algebra turns out to be infinite-dimensional, abelian and devoid of central extensions. The latter feature also holds for the remaining cases that describe the hierarchy ( k > 1). Our boundary conditions then provide a gravitational dual of two noninteracting left and right KdV movers, and hence, boundary gravitons possess anisotropic Lifshitz scaling with dynamical exponent z = 2 k + 1. Remarkably, despite spacetimes solving the field equations are locally AdS, they possess anisotropic scaling being induced by the choice of boundary conditions. As an application, the entropy of a rotating BTZ black hole is precisely recovered from a suitable generalization of the Cardy formula that is compatible with the anisotropic scaling of the chiral KdV movers at the boundary, in which the energy of AdS spacetime with our boundary conditions depends on z and plays the role of the central charge. The extension of our boundary conditions to the case of higher spin gravity and its link with different classes of integrable systems is also briefly addressed.

  8. [76Br]BMK-152, a non-peptide analogue, with high affinity and low non-specific binding for the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptor (CRF1 receptor)

    PubMed Central

    Jagoda, Elaine M.; Lang, Lixin; McCullough, Karen; Contoreggi, Carlo; Kim, B. Moon; Ma, Ying; Rice, Kenner C.; Szajek, Lawrence P; Eckelman, William C.; Kiesewetter, Dale O.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, regulates endocrine and autonomic responses to stress through G-protein coupled receptors, CRF1 or CRF2. A PET ligand able to monitor changes in CRF1 receptor occupancy in vivo would aid in understanding the pathophysiology of stress related diseases as well as in the clinical development of non-peptide antagonists with therapeutic value. We have radiolabeled the CRF1 receptor ligand, BMK-152 ([8-(4-bromo-2,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-α][1,3,5]triazin-4-yl]-N,N-bis-(2-methoxyethyl)amine; ClogP= 2.6), at both the 3 and 4 position with [76Br]. Using in vitro autoradiography saturation studies the 4-[76Br]BMK-152 exhibited high affinity binding to both rat (Kd = 0.23 ± 0.07 nM; n=3) and monkey frontal cortex (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.08 nM; n=3) consistent with CRF1 receptor regional distribution whereas with the 3-[76Br]BMK-152, the Kd's could not be determined due to high non-specific binding. In vitro autoradiography competition studies using [125I]Tyr0-o-CRF confirmed that 3-Br-BMK-152 (Ki = 24.4 ± 4.9 nM; n=3) had lower affinity (70 fold) than 4-Br-BMK-152 (Ki = 0.35 ± 0.07 nM; n=3) in monkey frontal cortex and similiar studies using [125I]Sauvagine confirmed CRF1 receptor selectivity. In vivo studies with P-glycoprotein (PGP) knockout mice (KO) and their wildtype littermates (WT) showed that the brain uptake of 3-[76Br]BMK/4-[76Br]BMK was increased < 2 fold in KO vs WT indicating that 3-[76Br]BMK-152/4-[76Br]BMK was not a Pgp substrate. Rat brain uptakes of 4-[76Br] BMK-152 from ex vivo autoradiography studies showed regional localization consistent with known published CRF1 receptor distribution and potential as a PET ligand for in vivo imaging of CRF1 receptors. PMID:21308801

  9. Effect of hyperoxaluria on the inhibitory activity of a 45-kD urinary protein.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Ramasamy; Balakrishnan, Selvakumar; Kalaiselvi, Periandavan

    2002-02-01

    Proteins are thought to play a major role in stone formation and structurally abnormal proteins have been reported to be present in the urine of stone formers. This study was aimed to determine whether hyperoxaluria modifies the kinetic properties of urinary inhibitory proteins. Hyperoxaluria was induced by feeding 1% ethylene glycol to rats. Oxalate, uric acid and calcium excretion were increased progressively during hyperoxaluria, while magnesium level was decreased. Urinary proteins were separated on a DEAE-cellulose column by eluting with stepwise increasing salt concentration in 0.05 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0). Each protein fraction was studied for its crystallization inhibitory potential by the spectrophotometric method. The protein eluted in 0.3 M NaCl containing buffer had the maximal nucleation as well as inhibitory activity. The protein had a molecular weight of 45 kD. In hyperoxaluria, the urinary excretion of this protein significantly increased. In the crystal growth assay, the control rat 45-kD protein inhibited nucleation by 75% and aggregation by 100%. In contrast, it is very interesting to note that the protein derived from 28th day hyperoxaluric urine, behaved as a promoter of nucleation (-113%, percentage inhibition) and weak inhibitor of aggregation (28%). A significantly high negative correlation (r = -0.97) between oxalate excretion and the inhibitory activity of the 45-kD protein was observed suggesting a modification of the protein by oxalate. PMID:11818706

  10. 60 kD Ro and nRNP A Frequently Initiate Human Lupus Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha D.; McClain, Micah T.; Ritterhouse, Lauren L.; Bruner, Benjamin F.; Edgerton, Colin C.; Keith, Michael P.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous, humoral autoimmune disorder. The unifying feature among SLE patients is the production of large quantities of autoantibodies. Serum samples from 129 patients collected before the onset of SLE and while in the United States military were evaluated for early pre-clinical serologic events. The first available positive serum sample frequently already contained multiple autoantibody specificities (65%). However, in 34 SLE patients the earliest pre-clinical serum sample positive for any detectable common autoantibody bound only a single autoantigen, most commonly 60 kD Ro (29%), nRNP A (24%), anti-phospholipids (18%) or rheumatoid factor (15%). We identified several recurrent patterns of autoantibody onset using these pre-diagnostic samples. In the serum samples available, anti-nRNP A appeared before or simultaneously with anti-nRNP 70 K in 96% of the patients who had both autoantibodies at diagnosis. Anti-60 kD Ro antibodies appeared before or simultaneously with anti-La (98%) or anti-52 kD Ro (95%). The autoantibody response in SLE patients begins simply, often binding a single specific autoantigen years before disease onset, followed by epitope spreading to additional autoantigenic specificities that are accrued in recurring patterns. PMID:20224770

  11. Compound Galactosylceramidase Gene (GALC) Heterozygosity in a Boy with Infantile Krabbe Disease (KD).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor

    2015-01-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) (globoid cell leukodystrophy) is a degenerative, lysosomal storage disease, caused by a severe loss of galactocerebrosidase (GALC) enzymatic activity. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. KD affects the white matter of the central and peripheral nervous systems. We present a 3 year old boy in whom the disease had an 'infantile' or 'classic' presentation, with spasticity, irritability, and developmental delay. In addition the boy showed progressive severe motor and mental deterioration, difficulties in swallowing and decerebration. Molecular analysis revealed that the child is a compound heterozygote: p.Asp187Val (c.560A>T) and p.Ile250Thr (c.749T>C). The father was the carrier of p.Asp187Val (c.560A>T), while the mother was the carrier of the p.Ile250Thr (c.749T>C) in exon 6 of the GALC gene. The clinical course in this compound heterozygote is severe and the patient passed away at the age of 3 years. Genotype-phenotype relations are discussed in this Macedonian patient with KD. PMID:27442402

  12. Estimation of Kd of lead and (210)Po in 11 soils from India.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sukanta; Pandit, G G

    2014-12-01

    The fate of contaminant transport is often estimated using the distribution (partition) coefficient, Kd. It is a measure of sorption of contaminants to soil. As Kd is element, soil type and ground water dependent, chemical characterization of soil and ground water of the particular site is essential. In this study, soil and ground water samples from different locations around India were collected. The soil samples were physically characterized and pH, CaCO3, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter and organic carbon were determined. Equilibration time for lead and (210)Po were estimated with respect to contact time and were found to be 28 and 72 h respectively. The Kd of lead varied from 6700 to 31,000 L/kg with a geometric mean of 15,200 L/kg, and for (210)Po from 1400 to 8700 L/kg with a geometric mean of 3700 L/kg. PMID:24787466

  13. Structure of the Λ (1405 ) and the K-d →π Σ n reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Shota; Ikeda, Yoichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    The Λ (1405 ) resonance production reaction is investigated within the framework of the coupled-channels Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas (AGS) equations. We perform full three-body calculations for the K ¯N N -π Y N amplitudes on the physical real energy axis and investigate how the signature of the Λ (1405 ) appears in the cross sections of the K-d →π Σ n reactions, also in view of the planned E31 experiment at J-PARC. Two types of meson-baryon interaction models are considered: an energy-dependent interaction based on chiral S U (3 ) effective field theory, and an energy-independent version that has been used repeatedly in phenomenological approaches. These two models have different off-shell properties that imply correspondingly different behavior in the three-body system. We investigate how these features show up in differential cross sections of K-d →π Σ n reactions. Characteristic patterns distinguishing between the two models are found in the invariant mass spectrum of the final π Σ state. The K-d →π Σ n reaction, with different (π±Σ∓ and π0Σ0 ) charge combinations in the final state, is thus demonstrated to be a useful tool for investigating the subthreshold behavior of the K ¯N interaction.

  14. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications.

  15. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CDw150) is homophilic but self-associates with very low affinity.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, N; Mason, D W; Atkinson, P D; Evans, E J; Gilbert, R J; Stuart, D I; Fennelly, J A; Barclay, A N; Davis, S J; Brown, M H

    2000-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activating molecule ((SLAM) CDw150) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is expressed on the surface of activated T- and B-cells. It has been proposed that SLAM is homophilic and required for bidirectional signaling during T- and B-cell activation. Previous work has suggested that the affinity of SLAM self-association might be unusually high, undermining the concept that protein interactions mediating transient cell-cell contacts, such as those involving leukocytes, have to be weak in order that such contacts are readily reversible. Using surface plasmon resonance-based methods and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), we confirm that SLAM is homophilic. However, we also establish a new theoretical treatment of surface plasmon resonance-derived homophilic binding data, which indicates that SLAM-SLAM interactions (solution K(d) approximately 200 micrometer) are in fact considerably weaker than most other well characterized protein-protein interactions at the cell surface (solution K(d) approximately 0.4-20 micrometer), a conclusion that is supported by the AUC analysis. Whereas further analysis of the AUC data imply that SLAM could form "head to head" dimers spanning adjacent cells, the very low affinity raises important questions regarding the physiological role and/or properties of such interactions. PMID:10831600

  16. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element from the bovine leukemia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, F Zehra; Babalola, Kathlene; Summers, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5'-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (K(d)=136±21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369-U399, K(d)=67±8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism.

  17. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CDw150) is homophilic but self-associates with very low affinity.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, N; Mason, D W; Atkinson, P D; Evans, E J; Gilbert, R J; Stuart, D I; Fennelly, J A; Barclay, A N; Davis, S J; Brown, M H

    2000-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activating molecule ((SLAM) CDw150) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is expressed on the surface of activated T- and B-cells. It has been proposed that SLAM is homophilic and required for bidirectional signaling during T- and B-cell activation. Previous work has suggested that the affinity of SLAM self-association might be unusually high, undermining the concept that protein interactions mediating transient cell-cell contacts, such as those involving leukocytes, have to be weak in order that such contacts are readily reversible. Using surface plasmon resonance-based methods and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), we confirm that SLAM is homophilic. However, we also establish a new theoretical treatment of surface plasmon resonance-derived homophilic binding data, which indicates that SLAM-SLAM interactions (solution K(d) approximately 200 micrometer) are in fact considerably weaker than most other well characterized protein-protein interactions at the cell surface (solution K(d) approximately 0.4-20 micrometer), a conclusion that is supported by the AUC analysis. Whereas further analysis of the AUC data imply that SLAM could form "head to head" dimers spanning adjacent cells, the very low affinity raises important questions regarding the physiological role and/or properties of such interactions.

  18. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of [125I]MRS1898, a high-affinity, selective radioligand for the rat A3 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Teng, Bao; Wu, Haitao; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Griffiths, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    A known selective agonist of the A3 adenosine receptors (AR), MRS1898 [(1′R,2′R,3′S,4′R,5′S)-4-{2-chloro-6-[(3-iodophenylmethyl)amino]purin-9-yl}-1-(methylaminocarbonyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol], was synthesized in radioactive form and characterized pharmacologically. This agonist ligand series, based on nucleoside analogues containing a rigid, bicyclic ring system in place of the ribose moiety, was selected for radiolabeling due to its high A3AR affinity across species, with nanomolar binding at both rat and human A3ARs. The radioiodination of MRS1898 on its N6–3-iodobenzyl substituent was accomplished in 76% radiochemical yield by iododestannylation of a 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzyl precursor. [125I]MRS1898 bound to the rat A3AR with a Kd value of 0.17 ± 0.04 nM and a Bmax value of 0.66 ± 0.15 pmol/mg protein. The competition binding profiles for other agonists and antagonists obtained with this radioligand are similar to those previously obtained with other radioligands. The advantages of [125I]MRS1898 compared with previously used radioligands are primarily its high selectivity and affinity for the rat A3AR and also its facile synthesis and radiochemical stability; however, a relatively high level of nonspecific binding presents a limitation. Thus, we have introduced the first selective radioligand for the rat A3AR. PMID:18528782

  19. DNA with Damage in Both Strands as Affinity Probes and Nucleotide Excision Repair Substrates.

    PubMed

    Lukyanchikova, N V; Petruseva, I O; Evdokimov, A N; Silnikov, V N; Lavrik, O I

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process of recognition and elimination of a wide spectrum of damages that cause significant distortions in DNA structure, such as UV-induced damage and bulky chemical adducts. A series of model DNAs containing new bulky fluoro-azidobenzoyl photoactive lesion dC(FAB) and well-recognized nonnucleoside lesions nFlu and nAnt have been designed and their interaction with repair proteins investigated. We demonstrate that modified DNA duplexes dC(FAB)/dG (probe I), dC(FAB)/nFlu+4 (probe II), and dC(FAB)/nFlu-3 (probe III) have increased (as compared to unmodified DNA, umDNA) structure-dependent affinity for XPC-HR23B (Kdum > KdI > KdII ≈ KdIII) and differentially crosslink to XPC and proteins of NER-competent extracts. The presence of dC(FAB) results in (i) decreased melting temperature (ΔTm = -3°C) and (ii) 12° DNA bending. The extended dC(FAB)/dG-DNA (137 bp) was demonstrated to be an effective NER substrate. Lack of correlation between the affinity to XPC-HR23B and substrate properties of the model DNA suggests a high impact of the verification stage on the overall NER process. In addition, DNAs containing closely positioned, well-recognized lesions in the complementary strands represent hardly repairable (dC(FAB)/nFlu+4, dC(FAB)/nFlu-3) or irreparable (nFlu/nFlu+4, nFlu/nFlu-3, nAnt/nFlu+4, nAnt/nFlu-3) structures. Our data provide evidence that the NER system of higher eukaryotes recognizes and eliminates damaged DNA fragments on a multi-criterion basis. PMID:27262196

  20. Kinetic analysis of a high-affinity antibody/antigen interaction performed by multiple Biacore users.

    PubMed

    Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Navratilova, Iva; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Fan, Linsey; Thornton, Kevin; Zhu, Mingde; Bos, Tim Vanden; Forte, Carla; Friend, Della; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Tavares, Gisele; Whatley, John; Shi, Ergang; Widom, Angela; Lindquist, Kevin C; Klakamp, Scott; Drake, Andrew; Bohmann, David; Roell, Marina; Rose, Larry; Dorocke, Jill; Roth, Bruce; Luginbühl, Béatrice; Myszka, David G

    2006-05-15

    To explore the reliability of Biacore-based assays, 22 study participants measured the binding of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a monoclonal antibody (mAb). Each participant was provided with the same reagents and a detailed experimental protocol. The mAb was immobilized on the sensor chip at three different densities and a two-step assay was used to determine the kinetic and affinity parameters of the PSA/mAb complex. First, PSA was tested over a concentration range of 2.5-600 nM to obtain k(a) information. Second, to define the k(d) of this stable antigen/antibody complex accurately, the highest PSA concentration was retested with the dissociation phase of each binding cycle monitored for 1h. All participants collected data that could be analyzed to obtain kinetic parameters for the interaction. The association and the extended-dissociation data derived from the three antibody surfaces were globally fit using a simple 1:1 interaction model. The average k(a) and k(d) for the PSA/mAb interaction as calculated from the 22 analyses were (4.1+/-0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and (4.5+/-0.6) x 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. Overall, the experimental standard errors in the rate constants were only approximately 14%. Based on the kinetic rate constants, the affinity (K(D)) of the PSA/mAb interaction was 1.1+/-0.2 nM.

  1. Two-component coupled KdV equations and its connection with the generalized Harry Dym equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popowicz, Ziemowit

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that three different Lax operators in the Dym hierarchy produce three generalized coupled Harry Dym equations. These equations transform, via the reciprocal link, to the coupled two-component Korteweg de Vries (KdV) system. The first equation gives us known integrable two-component KdV system, while the second reduces to the known symmetrical two-component KdV equation. The last one reduces to the Drienfeld-Sokolov equation. This approach gives us new Lax representation for these equations.

  2. A new high-order spectral problem of the mKdV and its associated integrable decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jie; Yao, Yu-Qin; Yu, Jing; Liu, Yu-Qing

    2007-02-01

    A new approach to formulizing a new high-order matrix spectral problem from a normal 2×2 matrix modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) spectral problem is presented. It is found that the isospectral evolution equation hierarchy of this new higher-order matrix spectral problem turns out to be the well-known mKdV equation hierarchy. By using the binary nonlinearization method, a new integrable decomposition of the mKdV equation is obtained in the sense of Liouville. The proof of the integrability shows that r-matrix structure is very interesting.

  3. Two-component coupled KdV equations and its connection with the generalized Harry Dym equations

    SciTech Connect

    Popowicz, Ziemowit

    2014-01-15

    It is shown that three different Lax operators in the Dym hierarchy produce three generalized coupled Harry Dym equations. These equations transform, via the reciprocal link, to the coupled two-component Korteweg de Vries (KdV) system. The first equation gives us known integrable two-component KdV system, while the second reduces to the known symmetrical two-component KdV equation. The last one reduces to the Drienfeld-Sokolov equation. This approach gives us new Lax representation for these equations.

  4. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off PMID:2853303

  5. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off

  6. Effectors of hemoglobin. Separation of allosteric and affinity factors.

    PubMed Central

    Marden, M C; Bohn, B; Kister, J; Poyart, C

    1990-01-01

    The relative contributions of the allosteric and affinity factors toward the change in p50 have been calculated for a series of effectors of hemoglobin (Hb). Shifts in the ligand affinity of deoxy Hb and the values for 50% ligand saturation (p50) were obtained from oxygen equilibrium data. Because the high-affinity parameters (liganded conformation) are poorly determined from the equilibrium curves, they were determined from kinetic measurements of the association and dissociation rates with CO as ligand. The CO on-rates were obtained by flash photolysis measurements. The off-rates were determined from the rate of oxidation of HbCO by ferricyanide, or by replacement of CO with NO. The partition function of fully liganded hemoglobin for oxygen and CO is only slightly changed by the effectors. Measurements were made in the presence of the effectors 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG), inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP), bezafibrate (Bzf), and two recently synthesized derivatives of Bzf (LR16 and L35). Values of p50 change by over a factor of 60; the on-rates decrease by nearly a factor of 8, with little change in the off-rates for the liganded conformation. The data indicate that both allosteric and affinity parameters are changed by the effectors; the changes in ligand affinity represent the larger contribution toward shifts in p50. PMID:2306490

  7. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  8. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  9. The presence of high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β binding in rainbow trout scale indicates a possible endocrine route for the regulation of scale resorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persson, Petra; Shrimpton, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2000-01-01

    High-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β (E2) binding is present in rainbow trout scale. The Kd and Bmax of the scale E2 binding are similar to those of the liver E2 receptor (Kd is 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.4 ± 0.1 nM, and Bmax is 9.1 ± 1.2 and 23.1 ± 2.2 fmol x mg protein-1, for scale and liver, respectively), but different from those of the high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding in plasma (Kd is 4.0 ± 0.4 nM and Bmax is 625.4 ± 63.1 fmol x mg protein-1). The E2 binding in scale was displaced by testosterone, but not by diethylstilbestrol. Hence, the ligand binding specificity is different from that of the previously characterized liver E2 receptor, where E2 is displaced by diethylstilbestrol, but not by testosterone. The putative scale E2 receptor thus appears to bind both E2 and testosterone, and it is proposed that the increased scale resorption observed during sexual maturation in both sexes of several salmonid species may be mediated by this receptor. No high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding could be detected in rainbow trout gill or skin.

  10. Increased Antibody Affinity Confers Broad In Vitro Protection against Escape Mutants of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Mridula; Bolles, Meagan; Donaldson, Eric F.; Van Blarcom, Thomas; Baric, Ralph; Iverson, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Even though the effect of antibody affinity on neutralization potency is well documented, surprisingly, its impact on neutralization breadth and escape has not been systematically determined. Here, random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling of the single-chain variable fragment of the neutralizing antibody 80R followed by bacterial display screening using anchored periplasmic expression (APEx) were used to generate a number of higher-affinity variants of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-neutralizing antibody 80R with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) as low as 37 pM, a >270-fold improvement relative to that of the parental 80R single-chain variable fragment (scFv). As expected, antigen affinity was shown to correlate directly with neutralization potency toward the icUrbani strain of SARS-CoV. Additionally, the highest-affinity antibody fragment displayed 10-fold-increased broad neutralization in vitro and completely protected against several SARS-CoV strains containing substitutions associated with antibody escape. Importantly, higher affinity also led to the suppression of viral escape mutants in vitro. Escape from the highest-affinity variant required reduced selective pressure and multiple substitutions in the binding epitope. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that engineered antibodies with picomolar dissociation constants for a neutralizing epitope can confer escape-resistant protection. PMID:22696652

  11. Estimation of the Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient KdPAR Using MERIS Satellite Reflections for European Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulquin, Bertand; Hamdi, Anouar; Populus, Jacques; Loutier, Romain; Demaria, Julien; Mangin, Antoine; D'Andon, Odile Fanton

    2010-12-01

    Accurate estimations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient is critical to understand physical processes such as the heat transfer in the upper layer of the ocean and also biological processes such as phytoplankton photosynthesis in the ocean euphotic zone. Light availability in the water column and the seabed determine the euphotic zone and constraints the type and distribution of the algae species. The EuSeaMap project's aim is to characterize at a resolution of 250m the European infralitoral benthic zone, according to biology, physic and geology criteriums and using observations and models. Satellite observations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient of the downwelling spectral irradiance at wavelength 490 nm (Kd490) or the diffuse attenuation coefficient for the downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (KdPAR) is an effective method to provide large scale maps of these parameters at high spatial and temporal resolution. Several empirical and semi-analytical models are commonly used to derive the Kd490 and KdPAR maps from ocean colour satellite sensors such as the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Instrument (MERIS), the Sea- viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Most of these existing empirical or semi- analytical models have been calibrated on open ocean waters and provide good results in these areas, but tend to underestimate the attenuation of light in coastal waters, our area of interest. We propose here a new estimation of the euphotic depth and the KdPAR for coastal European waters using MERIS reflectances at the resolution of 1km and 250 m. First, a semi-analytical model is used to estimate the Kd490, and in a second step, two relationships have been developed between the KdPAR and the Kd490 for respectively clear and turbid waters. Satellite-derived fields of Kd490 and the deduced KdPAR are validated using matchups collected over the world. Distribution maps of seabed

  12. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  13. Water Wave Solutions of the Coupled System Zakharov-Kuznetsov and Generalized Coupled KdV Equations

    PubMed Central

    Seadawy, A. R.; El-Rashidy, K.

    2014-01-01

    An analytic study was conducted on coupled partial differential equations. We formally derived new solitary wave solutions of generalized coupled system of Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) and KdV equations by using modified extended tanh method. The traveling wave solutions for each generalized coupled system of ZK and KdV equations are shown in form of periodic, dark, and bright solitary wave solutions. The structures of the obtained solutions are distinct and stable. PMID:25374940

  14. Water wave solutions of the coupled system Zakharov-Kuznetsov and generalized coupled KdV equations.

    PubMed

    Seadawy, A R; El-Rashidy, K

    2014-01-01

    An analytic study was conducted on coupled partial differential equations. We formally derived new solitary wave solutions of generalized coupled system of Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) and KdV equations by using modified extended tanh method. The traveling wave solutions for each generalized coupled system of ZK and KdV equations are shown in form of periodic, dark, and bright solitary wave solutions. The structures of the obtained solutions are distinct and stable. PMID:25374940

  15. Crystal structure of the 500 kD yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases1–6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope7,8. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250 kD, multi-domain enzymes and function as homo-dimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80 kD central region that shares no homology with other proteins. While the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known1,9–14, currently there is no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500 kD holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is strikingly different from those of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes explain why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A15,16 and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just prior to the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. PMID:26458104

  16. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered. PMID:26938582

  17. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  18. A generalized Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV system: Darboux transformations and reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lingling; Liu, Q. P.; Wang, Dengshan

    2016-08-01

    A Darboux transformation is constructed for the generalized Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV system and the result is compared with the recent work of Geng and his collaborators [X. G. Geng et al., Phys. Rev. E 79, 056602 (2009) and X. G. Geng and G. L. He, J. Math. Phys. 51, 033514 (2010)]. It is shown that our Darboux transformation may be applied to three interesting reductions of the general system. In addition, the iteration of this Darboux transformation is worked out, and some solutions to the associated systems are obtained.

  19. Measuring the in situ Kd of a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor.

    PubMed

    Park, J Genevieve; Palmer, Amy E

    2015-01-05

    The use of genetically encoded Ca(2+) sensors (GECIs) for long-term monitoring of intracellular Ca(2+) has become increasingly common in the last decade. Emission-ratiometric GECIs, such as those in the Yellow Cameleon family, can be used to make quantitative measurements, meaning that their fluorescence signals can be converted to free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]free). This conversion is only as accurate as the sensor's apparent dissociation constant for Ca(2+) (K'd), which depends on temperature, pH, and salt concentration. This protocol describes a method for performing a titration, in living cells (in situ), of cytosolic, nuclear, or mitochondrial sensors.

  20. Adler{endash}Kostant{endash}Symes construction, bi-Hamiltonian manifolds, and KdV equations

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, P. |

    1997-10-01

    This paper focuses a relation between Adler{endash}Kostant{endash}Symes (AKS) theory applied to Fordy{endash}Kulish scheme and bi-Hamiltonian manifolds. The spirit of this paper is closely related to Casati{endash}Magri{endash}Pedroni work on Hamiltonian formulation of the KP equation. Here the KdV equation is deduced via the superposition of the Fordy{endash}Kulish scheme and AKS construction on the underlying current algebra C{sup {infinity}}(S{sup 1},g{circle_times}{bold C}[[{lambda}

  1. Liouville Correspondence Between the Modified KdV Hierarchy and Its Dual Integrable Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jing; Liu, Xiaochuan; Olver, Peter J.; Qu, Changzheng

    2016-02-01

    We study an explicit correspondence between the integrable modified KdV hierarchy and its dual integrable modified Camassa-Holm hierarchy. A Liouville transformation between the isospectral problems of the two hierarchies also relates their respective recursion operators and serves to establish the Liouville correspondence between their flows and Hamiltonian conservation laws. In addition, a novel transformation mapping the modified Camassa-Holm equation to the Camassa-Holm equation is found. Furthermore, it is shown that the Hamiltonian conservation laws in the negative direction of the modified Camassa-Holm hierarchy are both local in the field variables and homogeneous under rescaling.

  2. Approximate Symmetry Reduction Approach: Infinite Series Reductions to the KdV-Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaoyu; Yao, Ruoxia; Zhang, Shunli; Lou, Sen Y.

    2009-11-01

    For weak dispersion and weak dissipation cases, the (1+1)-dimensional KdV-Burgers equation is investigated in terms of approximate symmetry reduction approach. The formal coherence of similarity reduction solutions and similarity reduction equations of different orders enables series reduction solutions. For the weak dissipation case, zero-order similarity solutions satisfy the Painlevé II, Painlevé I, and Jacobi elliptic function equations. For the weak dispersion case, zero-order similarity solutions are in the form of Kummer, Airy, and hyperbolic tangent functions. Higher-order similarity solutions can be obtained by solving linear variable coefficients ordinary differential equations.

  3. Solubilization and partial characterization of a microsomal high affinity GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicchitta, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    Isolated rat liver microsomes release sequestered Ca/sup 2 +/ following addition of GTP. In contrast to permeabilized cells, GTP dependent microsomal Ca/sup 2 +/ release requires low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG). They have identified a microsomal, PEG-sensitive high affinity GTPase which shares a number of characteristics with the GTP-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ release system. To aid in further characterization of this activity they have initiated studies on the solubilization and purification of the microsomal GTPases. When microsomes are solubilized under the following conditions (150 mM NaCl, 5 mg protein/ml, 1% Triton X-114) PEG sensitive GTPase activity selectively partitions into the detergent rich phase of the Triton X-114 extract. As observed in intact microsomal membranes the Triton X-114 soluble GTPase is maximally stimulated by 3% PEG. Half maximal stimulation is observed at 1% PEG. PEG increases the Vmax of this activity; no effects on Km were observed. The Km for GTP of the detergent soluble GTPase is 5 ..mu..M. This GTPase is sensitive to inhibition by sulfhydryl reagents. PEG-sensitive GTPase activity was completely inhibited in the presence of 25 ..mu..M p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB); half maximal inhibition was observed at 5 ..mu..M. Labeling of the Triton X-114 extract with the photosensitive compound (/sup 32/P) 8-azido GTP indicated the presence of two prominent GTP binding proteins of approximate molecular weights 17 and 54 kD.

  4. [The effect of blood serum polyreactive immunoglobulins on serum antibody affinity determination].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2010-01-01

    The presence of polyreactive immunoglobulins in sera may substantially influence on the accuracy of antibody affinity determination. In order to obtain precise values of antibody affinity one should apply one of two following ways. First, one should block polyreactive immunoglobulins with high concentration of Twin 20 and high concentration of any antigen which does not interact with studying antibody. After this antibody affinity may be determined by traditional methods. Another way is the application of the method suggested by us earlier, which allow determining affinity of two antibodies in a mixture and the relation of their concentrations.

  5. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kwon; Jung, Kyung-Sik; Son, Cagdas D; Kim, Heejung; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  6. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  7. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.

    2014-09-24

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  8. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  9. A high-affinity estrogen-binding protein in rat placental trophoblast.

    PubMed

    McCormack, S A; Glasser, S R

    1976-09-01

    A high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-binding molecule (RE) has been demonstrated in the basal zone trophoblast (BZT) of the pregnant rat. On day 11 of pregnancy (day 0 = first sperm-positive day) RE is present in BZT cytosol, where it has a ka of 1.2 X 10(6)M-1 sec-1, t1/2 = 12.7 min, at 20 C. The Kd, under similar conditions, consists of 2 components, 1.3 X 10(-4) sec-1, t1/2 = 90 min, and 5.9 X 10(-5) sec-1, t1/2 = 196 min. When one uses the faster component, the equilibrium constant, Kd, obtained from kd/ka is 1.1 X 10(-10)M, in close agreement with that obtained from Scatchard analysis of specific estradiol (E2) binding at 20 C. On day 11 there were approximately 12,000 sites/cell in BZT cytosol. Scatchard analysis of nuclear RE on day 11 indicated a Kd of 1.85 X 10(-10)M and approximately 21,000 sites/nucleus, but, in day 15 BZT, nuclear RE was undetectable. Neither cytosol nor nuclei prepared from placental labyrinthine zone (LZT) tissue (fetal placenta) showed evidence of high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding. Sucrose density gradient analysis on 5-20% linear gradients showed the cytosol RE to be approximately 4S whether in high or low-salt conditions. When measured against binding by 3H-labeled estradiol (*E2), the cytosol BTZ RE was competed for strongly (80-90%) by estrone, estriol, diethylstilbestrol, and estradiol-17alpha at 200 times excess. Nafoxidine-HCl, also at 200X excess, competed to approximately 50%. Corticosterone, progesterone, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and pregnenolone did not compete. The hormone specificity of nuclear BZT RE was similar to that of the comparable cytosol RE with the exception that nafoxidine did not compete. This was probably due to differences in kinetics, nafoxidine requiring a longer time to reach equilibrium than the other estrogens. The size of the nuclear RE by sucrose density gradient analysis was approximately 2S by KCl extraction (which was inefficient) or 4S by trypsin extraction. We conclude that

  10. K-D Decision Tree: An Accelerated and Memory Efficient Nearest Neighbor Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Wada, Toshikazu

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for Nearest Neighbor (NN) classifier. NN classification is a well-known method of pattern classification having the following properties: * it performs maximum-margin classification and achieves less than twice the ideal Bayesian error, * it does not require knowledge of pattern distributions, kernel functions or base classifiers, and * it can naturally be applied to multiclass classification problems. Among the drawbacks are A) inefficient memory use and B) ineffective pattern classification speed. This paper deals with the problems A and B. In most cases, NN search algorithms, such as k-d tree, are employed as a pattern search engine of the NN classifier. However, NN classification does not always require the NN search. Based on this idea, we propose a novel algorithm named k-d decision tree (KDDT). Since KDDT uses Voronoi-condensed prototypes, it consumes less memory than naive NN classifiers. We have confirmed that KDDT is much faster than NN search-based classifier through a comparative experiment (from 9 to 369 times faster than NN search based classifier). Furthermore, in order to extend applicability of the KDDT algorithm to high-dimensional NN classification, we modified it by incorporating Gabriel editing or RNG editing instead of Voronoi condensing. Through experiments using simulated and real data, we have confirmed the modified KDDT algorithms are superior to the original one.

  11. Ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2) binds with high affinity to the C-terminal region of TDP-43 and modulates TDP-43 levels in H4 cells: characterization of inhibition by nucleic acids and 4-aminoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Cassel, Joel A; Reitz, Allen B

    2013-06-01

    Recently, it was reported that mutations in the ubiquitin-like protein ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2) are associated with X-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and that both wild-type and mutant UBQLN2 can co-localize with aggregates of C-terminal fragments of TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43). Here, we describe a high affinity interaction between UBQLN2 and TDP-43 and demonstrate that overexpression of both UBQLN2 and TDP-43 reduces levels of both exogenous and endogenous TDP-43 in human H4 cells. UBQLN2 bound with high affinity to both full length TDP-43 and a C-terminal TDP-43 fragment (261-414 aa) with KD values of 6.2nM and 8.7nM, respectively. Both DNA oligonucleotides and 4-aminoquinolines, which bind to TDP-43, also inhibited UBQLN2 binding to TDP-43 with similar rank order affinities compared to inhibition of oligonucleotide binding to TDP-43. Inhibitor characterization experiments demonstrated that the DNA oligonucleotides noncompetitively inhibited UBQLN2 binding to TDP-43, which is consistent with UBQLN2 binding to the C-terminal region of TDP-43. Interestingly, the 4-aminoquinolines were competitive inhibitors of UBQLN2 binding to TDP-43, suggesting that these compounds also bind to the C-terminal region of TDP-43. In support of the biochemical data, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both TDP-43 and UBQLN2 interact in human neuroglioma H4 cells. Finally, overexpression of UBQLN2 in the presence of overexpressed full length TDP-43 or C-terminal TDP-43 (170-414) dramatically lowered levels of both full length TDP-43 and C-terminal TDP-43 fragments (CTFs). Consequently, these data suggest that UBQLN2 enhances the clearance of TDP-43 and TDP-43 CTFs and therefore may play a role in the development of TDP-43 associated neurotoxicity.

  12. Affinity isolation and characterization of cytochrome P450 102 (BM-3) from barbiturate-induced Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Black, S D; Linger, M H; Freck, L C; Kazemi, S; Galbraith, J A

    1994-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 102 (BM-3) is a catalytically self-sufficient enzyme from Bacillus megaterium that is presently accepted as an important model of the mammalian microsomal P450 monooxygenase system. We have developed a novel affinity approach to purify P450 102 in a single chromatographic step and have studied the spectroscopic, catalytic, nucleotide binding, and crystallization properties of the highly purified enzyme. B. megaterium ATCC 14581 was grown to high cell density, and P450 102 was purified rapidly and in high yield by chromatography on adenosine-2',5'-diphosphate agarose from crude cell-free extract. The cytochrome bound to the column with remarkable avidity, in contrast to the significantly weaker binding observed for NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Chromatographic behavior also showed that the cytochrome bound NADP(+)-type nucleotides more tightly than any other cellular polypeptide. The purified protein was electrophoretically homogeneous and had essentially theoretical contents of FAD, FMN, and heme. Optical spectra showed the expected heme and flavin absorption bands, and three previously undescribed charge-transfer-type absorptions were characterized. Molar extinction coefficients in the oxidized, fully reduced, and ferrous carbonyl states have been determined; notable is the large soret extinction in the ferrous carbonyl state (epsilon 449 nm = 143,500 M-1 cm-1). Final preparations were active in the oxidation of a wide variety of substrates. Of the C14 alkyl compounds studied, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide showed the highest substrate-dependent oxidation of NADPH, followed by myristate and myristyl alcohol; however, myristate exhibited the lowest Km value. Activities were tightly coupled to NADPH oxidation (> 97%). Phenobarbital, benzphetamine, cocaine, cyclohexane, methanol, ethanol, retinoic acid, benzoate, heptaflourobutyrate, and 7-ethoxycoumarin were not substrates. NADP+ titrations showed, as expected, that the coenzyme was bound

  13. Charge-Disproportionation Symmetry Breaking Creates a Heterodimeric Myoglobin Complex with Enhanced Affinity and Rapid Intracomplex Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Trana, Ethan N; Nocek, Judith M; Woude, Jon Vander; Span, Ingrid; Smith, Stephen M; Rosenzweig, Amy C; Hoffman, Brian M

    2016-09-28

    We report rapid photoinitiated intracomplex electron transfer (ET) within a "charge-disproportionated" myoglobin (Mb) dimer with greatly enhanced affinity. Two mutually supportive Brownian Dynamics (BD) interface redesign strategies, one a new "heme-filtering" approach, were employed to "break the symmetry" of a Mb homodimer by pairing Mb constructs with complementary highly positive and highly negative net surface charges, introduced through D/E → K and K → E mutations, respectively. BD simulations using a previously developed positive mutant, Mb(+6) = Mb(D44K/D60K/E85K), led to construction of the complementary negative mutant Mb(-6) = Mb(K45E, K63E, K95E). Simulations predict the pair will form a well-defined complex comprising a tight ensemble of conformations with nearly parallel hemes, at a metal-metal distance ∼18-19 Å. Upon expression and X-ray characterization of the partners, BD predictions were verified through ET photocycle measurements enabled by Zn-deuteroporphyrin substitution, forming the [ZnMb(-6), Fe(3+)Mb(+6)] complex. Triplet ET quenching shows charge disproportionation increases the binding constant by no less than ∼5 orders of magnitude relative to wild-type Mb values. All progress curves for charge separation (CS) and charge recombination (CR) are reproduced by a generalized kinetic model for the interprotein ET photocycle. The intracomplex ET rate constants for both CS and CR are increased by over 5 orders of magnitude, and their viscosity independence is indicative of true interprotein ET, rather than dynamic gating as seen in previous studies. The complex displays an unprecedented timecourse for CR of the CS intermediate I. After a laser flash, I forms through photoinduced CS, accumulates to a maximum concentration, then dies away through CR. However, before completely disappearing, I reappears without another flash and reaches a second maximum before disappearing completely. PMID:27646786

  14. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  15. Engineering antibody affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Webster, D M; Roberts, S; Cheetham, J C; Griest, R; Rees, A R

    1988-01-01

    A combination of ab initio calculations, "knowledge-based prediction", molecular graphics and site-directed mutagenesis has enabled us to probe the molecular details of antibody:antigen recognition and binding and to alter the affinity and specificity of an antibody for its antigen. The significance of electrostatic hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic/hydrophobic patch matching and van der Waals interactions as well as CDR:CDR interactions are discussed in relation to the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the anti-lysozyme antibody Gloop2. The ability to generate reconstructed antibodies, chimeric antibodies, catalytic antibodies and the use of modelled antibodies for the design of drugs is discussed. PMID:3209295

  16. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  17. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  18. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  19. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  20. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  1. Affinity and specificity requirements for the first Src homology 3 domain of the Crk proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, B S; Zheng, J; Feller, S M; Mayer, J P; Burrell, S K; Cowburn, D; Hanafusa, H

    1995-01-01

    The specificity of SH3 domain complex formation plays an important role in determining signal transduction events. We have previously identified a highly specific interaction between the first CrkSH3 domain [CrkSH3(1)] and proline-rich sequences in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor C3G. A 10 amino acid peptide derived from the first proline-rich sequence (P3P4P5A6L7P8P9K10K11R12) bound with a Kd of 1.89 +/- 0.06 microM and fully retained the high affinity and unique selectivity for the CrkSH3(1) domain. Mutational analysis showed that P5, P8, L7 and K10 are critical for high affinity binding. A conservative mutation, K10R, significantly decreased the affinity for the CrkSH3(1) domain while increasing the affinity for Grb2. Comparative binding studies with the K10R and K10A mutant peptides to c-Crk and v-Crk further suggested that K10 binds via a charge-dependent and a charge-independent interaction to the RT loop of the CrkSH3(1) domain. Besides determining important structural features necessary for high affinity and specificity binding to the CrkSH3(1) domain, our results also demonstrate that a conservative mutation in a single amino acid can significantly alter the specificity of an SH3 binding peptide. Images PMID:7774577

  2. The C2 domains of granuphilin are high-affinity sensors for plasma membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Lyakhova, Tatyana A; Knight, Jefferson D

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-targeting proteins are crucial components of many cell signaling pathways, including the secretion of insulin. Granuphilin, also known as synaptotagmin-like protein 4, functions in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane prior to exocytosis. Granuphilin docks to insulin secretory vesicles through interaction of its N-terminal domain with vesicular Rab proteins; however, the mechanisms of granuphilin plasma membrane targeting and release are less clear. Granuphilin contains two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, that interact with the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. The goal of this study was to determine membrane-binding mechanisms, affinities, and kinetics of both granuphilin C2 domains using fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that both C2A and C2B bind anionic lipids in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. The C2A domain binds liposomes containing a physiological mixture of lipids including 2% PI(4,5)P2 or PI(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity (apparent K(d, PIPx) of 2-5 nM), and binds nonspecifically with moderate affinity to anionic liposomes lacking phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIPx) lipids. The C2B domain binds with sub-micromolar affinity to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 but does not have a measurable affinity for background anionic lipids. Both domains can be competed away from their target lipids by the soluble PIPx analog inositol-(1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate (IP6), which is a positive regulator of insulin secretion. Potential roles of these interactions in the docking and release of granuphilin from the plasma membrane are discussed.

  3. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  4. Non-affine deformations in polymer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qi; Basu, Anindita; Janmey, Paul A.; Yodh, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Most theories of soft matter elasticity assume that the local strain in a sample after deformation is identical everywhere and equal to the macroscopic strain, or equivalently that the deformation is affine. We discuss the elasticity of hydrogels of crosslinked polymers with special attention to affine and non-affine theories of elasticity. Experimental procedures to measure non-affine deformations are also described. Entropic theories, which account for gel elasticity based on stretching out individual polymer chains, predict affine deformations. In contrast, simulations of network deformation that result in bending of the stiff constituent filaments generally predict non-affine behavior. Results from experiments show significant non-affine deformation in hydrogels even when they are formed by flexible polymers for which bending would appear to be negligible compared to stretching. However, this finding is not necessarily an experimental proof of the non-affine model for elasticity. We emphasize the insights gained from experiments using confocal rheoscope and show that, in addition to filament bending, sample micro-inhomogeneity can be a significant alternative source of non-affine deformation. PMID:23002395

  5. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  6. Development of high-affinity single chain Fv against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Goo; Jeong, Gu Min; Yim, Sung Sun; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2016-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is caused by the FMD virus (FMDV) and results in severe economic losses in livestock farming. For rapid FMD diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, an effective antibody against FMDV is needed. Here, we developed a high-affinity antibody against FMDV by FACS-based high throughput screening of a random library. With the FITC-conjugated VP1 epitope of FMDV and high-speed FACS sorting, we screened the synthetic antibody (scFv) library in which antibody variants are displayed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody fragment (#138-scFv) against the VP1 epitope of FMDV. Next, to improve its affinity, a mutation library of #138-scFV was constructed by error-prone PCR and screened by FACS. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody (AM-32 scFv), which has a higher binding affinity (KD=42.7nM) than that of the original #138-scFv. We also confirmed that it specifically binds to whole inactivated FMDV. PMID:26827774

  7. Purification of Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase by Affinity Chromatography: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, C. Larry; Kuhns, Jennifer J.; Rowlett, Roger

    1998-08-01

    We have developed a rapid and inexpensive experiment utilizing affinity chromatography to isolate carbonic anhydrase (CA) from bovine blood. The more specific an affinity gel is the better the purification, but the greater the cost. Some costs would be prohibitive in the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. Less specific resins may be more affordable but may bind a number of closely related proteins. One alternative would be to couple a specific ligand to an inexpensive resin such as an ion exchanger. We describe a simple procedure for preparing a sulfonamide-coupled resin which specifically binds CA from a blood hemolysate. The CA is eluted and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). It was found that only a single band of 31 kD was obtained. The instructor can readily prepare the affinity gel prior to the lab, and the students, beginning with packed red blood cells can carry out the lysis, binding to the gel, elution, enzymatic assays, and electrophoresis.

  8. Affinity purification of a siderophore that exhibits an antagonistic effect against soft rot bacterium.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mohamed; Baddar, Doa; El'Masry, Mohamed Hisham

    2008-07-01

    Bacterial colonies were isolated from different Egyptian soil samples. From these isolates, one bacterial species was found to produce siderophore. Using classical and biochemical identification methods, the siderophore producing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Based on the affinity of siderophores for metal ions, an affinity chromatography system was designed for the purification of the siderophore in one step. It was possible to isolate 25 mg siderophore per liter of culture media. The purified siderophore was found to exist in two forms of approximately 30 and 90 kD. They are believed to be polymers of several siderophore molecules. Both forms were found to be active against the pathogen Erwinia carotovora var. carotovora, the causal bacteria of soft rot disease on potato tubers. The advantage of this method over other purification methods is that it uses metal ion so it can be applied for the purification of the known types of siderophores. Moreover, the purification is based on affinity chromatography, so the siderophore purity state permits several biotechnological applications without further treatments. PMID:18707585

  9. A structure-based benchmark for protein-protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L; Moal, Iain H; Hwang, Howook; Weng, Zhiping; Bates, Paul A; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Janin, Joël

    2011-03-01

    We have assembled a nonredundant set of 144 protein-protein complexes that have high-resolution structures available for both the complexes and their unbound components, and for which dissociation constants have been measured by biophysical methods. The set is diverse in terms of the biological functions it represents, with complexes that involve G-proteins and receptor extracellular domains, as well as antigen/antibody, enzyme/inhibitor, and enzyme/substrate complexes. It is also diverse in terms of the partners' affinity for each other, with K(d) ranging between 10(-5) and 10(-14) M. Nine pairs of entries represent closely related complexes that have a similar structure, but a very different affinity, each pair comprising a cognate and a noncognate assembly. The unbound structures of the component proteins being available, conformation changes can be assessed. They are significant in most of the complexes, and large movements or disorder-to-order transitions are frequently observed. The set may be used to benchmark biophysical models aiming to relate affinity to structure in protein-protein interactions, taking into account the reactants and the conformation changes that accompany the association reaction, instead of just the final product.

  10. Weak affinity chromatography as a new approach for fragment screening in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Meiby, Elinor; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2011-07-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is currently being implemented in drug discovery, creating a demand for developing efficient techniques for fragment screening. Due to the intrinsic weak or transient binding of fragments (mM-μM in dissociation constant (K(D))) to targets, methods must be sensitive enough to accurately detect and quantify an interaction. This study presents weak affinity chromatography (WAC) as an alternative tool for screening of small fragments. The technology was demonstrated by screening of a selected 23-compound fragment collection of documented binders, mostly amidines, using trypsin and thrombin as model target protease proteins. WAC was proven to be a sensitive, robust, and reproducible technique that also provides information about affinity of a fragment in the range of 1 mM-10 μM. Furthermore, it has potential for high throughput as was evidenced by analyzing mixtures in the range of 10 substances by WAC-MS. The accessibility and flexibility of the technology were shown as fragment screening can be performed on standard HPLC equipment. The technology can further be miniaturized and adapted to the requirements of affinity ranges of the fragment library. All these features of WAC make it a potential method in drug discovery for fragment screening. PMID:21352794

  11. Affinity functions: recognizing essential parameters in fuzzy connectedness based image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2009-02-01

    Fuzzy connectedness (FC) constitutes an important class of image segmentation schemas. Although affinity functions represent the core aspect (main variability parameter) of FC algorithms, they have not been studied systematically in the literature. In this paper, we present a thorough study to fill this gap. Our analysis is based on the notion of equivalent affinities: if any two equivalent affinities are used in the same FC schema to produce two versions of the algorithm, then these algorithms are equivalent in the sense that they lead to identical segmentations. We give a complete characterization of the affinity equivalence and show that many natural definitions of affinity functions and their parameters used in the literature are redundant in the sense that different definitions and values of such parameters lead to equivalent affinities. We also show that two main affinity types - homogeneity based and object feature based - are equivalent, respectively, to the difference quotient of the intensity function and Rosenfeld's degree of connectivity. In addition, we demonstrate that any segmentation obtained via relative fuzzy connectedness (RFC) algorithm can be viewed as segmentation obtained via absolute fuzzy connectedness (AFC) algorithm with an automatic and adaptive threshold detection. We finish with an analysis of possible ways of combining different component affinities that result in non equivalent affinities.

  12. Transient radiation effects in D.O.I. optical materials: KD{sup *}P

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons-Potter, K.

    1998-07-01

    Department of Energy and Defense Programs systems are becoming increasingly reliant on the use of optical technologies that must perform under a range of ionizing radiation environments. In particular, the radiation response of materials under consideration for applications in direct optical initiation (D.O.I.) schemes must be well characterized. In this report, transient radiation effects observed in a KD*P crystal are characterized. Under gamma exposure with 2 MeV photons in a 20--30 nsec pulse, the authors observe induced absorption at 1.06 {micro}m that causes a peak decrease in overall sample transmittance of only 10%. This induced loss is seen to recover fully within the first 30 {micro}sec.

  13. Medical image collection indexing: shape-based retrieval using KD-trees.

    PubMed

    Robinson, G P; Tagare, H D; Duncan, J S; Jaffe, C C

    1996-01-01

    The capacity to retrieve images containing objects with shapes similar to a query shape is desirable in medical image databases. We propose a similarity measure and an indexing mechanism for non-rigid comparison of shape which adds this capability to image databases. The (dis-)similarity measure is based on the observations that: (1) the geometry of the same organ in different subjects is not related by a strictly rigid transformation; and (2) the orientation of the organ plays a key role in comparing shape. We propose a similarity measure that computes a non-rigid mapping between curves and uses this mapping to compare oriented shape. We also show how KD-trees can index curves so that retrieval with our similarity measure is efficient. Experiments with real-world data from a database of magnetic resonance images are provided.

  14. On Lie symmetries, exact solutions and integrability to the KdV-Sawada-Kotera-Ramani equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pan-Li; Tian, Shou-Fu; Zhang, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Xing-Yong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the KdV-Sawada-Kotera-Ramani equation is investigated, which is used to describe the resonances of solitons in one-dimensional space. By using the Lie symmetry analysis method, the vector field and optimal system of the equation are derived, respectively. The optimal system is further used to study the symmetry reductions and exact solutions. Furthermore, the exact analytic solutions of the equation can be obtained by considering the power series theory. Finally, the complete integrability of the equation is systematically presented by using binary Bell's polynomials, which includes the bilinear representation, bilinear Bäcklund transformation, Lax pair and infinite conservation laws. Based on its bilinear representation, the N-soliton solutions of the equation are also constructed with exact analytic expression.

  15. Tau Function and Virasoro Action for the n × n KdV Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terng, Chuu-Lian; Uhlenbeck, Karen

    2016-02-01

    This is the third in a series of papers attempting to describe a uniform geometric framework in which many integrable systems can be placed. A soliton hierarchy can be constructed from a splitting of an infinite dimensional group L as positive and negative subgroups {L_±} and a commuting sequence in the Lie algebra {{L}_+} of {L_+}. Given {fin L_-}, there is a formal inverse scattering solution u f of the hierarchy. When there is a 2 co-cycle on {{L}} that vanishes on both {{L}_+ and {L}_-}, Wilson constructed for each {fin L_-} a tau function {τ_f} for the hierarchy. In this third paper, we prove the following results for the n × n KdV hierarchy: (1) The second partials of {lnτ_f} are differential polynomials of the formal inverse scattering solution u f . Moreover, {u_f} can be recovered from the second partials of {lnτ_f}.

  16. A hybrid LDG-HWENO scheme for KdV-type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongmi; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2016-05-01

    A hybrid LDG-HWENO scheme is proposed for the numerical solution of KdV-type partial differential equations. It evolves the cell averages of the physical solution and its moments (a feature of Hermite WENO) while discretizes high order spatial derivatives using the local DG method. The new scheme has the advantages of both LDG and HWENO methods, including the ability to deal with high order spatial derivatives and the use of a small number of global unknown variables. The latter is independent of the order of the scheme and the spatial order of the underlying differential equations. One and two dimensional numerical examples are presented to show that the scheme can attain the same formal high order accuracy as the LDG method.

  17. On loop equations in KdV exactly solvable string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dalley, S. . Joseph Henry Labs.)

    1992-05-10

    In this paper, the non-perturbative behavior of macroscopic loop amplitudes in the exactly solvable string theories based on the KdV hierarchies is considered. Loop equations are presented for the real non-perturbative solutions living on the spectral half-line, allowed by the most general string equation ({bar P}, Q) = Q, where {bar P} generates scale transformations. In general the end of the half-line (the wall) is a non-perturbative parameter whose role is that of boundary cosmological constant. The properties are compared with the perturbative behavior and solutions of (P,Q) = 1. Detailed arguments are given for the (2,2m {minus} 1) models while generalization to the other (p,q) minimal models and c = 1 is briefly addressed.

  18. The Gardner category and nonlocal conservation laws for N=1 Super KdV

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea, S.; Restuccia, A.; Sotomayor, A.

    2005-10-01

    The nonlocal conserved quantities of the N=1 Super KdV are obtained using a Gardner map. A fermionic substitution semigroup and the resulting Gardner category are defined and several propositions concerning their algebraic structure are obtained. This algebraic framework makes it possible to define general transformations between different nonlinear SUSY differential equations. A SUSY ring extension is then introduced to deal with the nonlocal conserved quantities of SKdV. The algebraic version of the nonlocal conserved quantities is solved in terms of the exponential function applied to the D{sup -1} of the local conserved quantities of SKdV. Finally the same formulas are shown to work for rapidly decreasing superfields.

  19. A Haar wavelet collocation method for coupled nonlinear Schrödinger-KdV equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruç, Ömer; Esen, Alaattin; Bulut, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, to obtain accurate numerical solutions of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger-Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations a Haar wavelet collocation method is proposed. An explicit time stepping scheme is used for discretization of time derivatives and nonlinear terms that appeared in the equations are linearized by a linearization technique and space derivatives are discretized by Haar wavelets. In order to test the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method L2, L∞ error norms and conserved quantities are used. Also obtained results are compared with previous ones obtained by finite element method, Crank-Nicolson method and radial basis function meshless methods. Error analysis of Haar wavelets is also given.

  20. Two kinds of peaked solitary waves of the KdV, BBM and Boussinesq equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, ShiJun

    2012-12-01

    It is well-known that the celebrated Camassa-Holm equation has the peaked solitary waves, which have been not reported for other mainstream models of shallow water waves. In this letter, the closed-form solutions of peaked solitary waves of the KdV equation, the BBM equation and the Boussinesq equation are given for the first time. All of them have either a peakon or an anti-peakon. Each of them exactly satisfies the corresponding Rankine-Hogoniot jump condition and could be understood as weak solution. Therefore, the peaked solitary waves might be common for most of shallow water wave models, no matter whether or not they are integrable and/or admit breaking-wave solutions.

  1. X-ray and radio emission from the luminous supernova 2005kd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Reddy, R.; Bauer, F. E.

    2016-10-01

    SN 2005kd is among the most luminous supernovae (SNe) to be discovered at X-ray wavelengths. We have re-analysed all good angular resolution (better than 20 arcsec full width at half-maximum point spread function) archival X-ray data for SN 2005kd. The data reveal an X-ray light curve that decreases as t-1.62±0.06. Our modelling of the data suggests that the early evolution is dominated by emission from the forward shock in a high-density medium. Emission from the radiative reverse shock is absorbed by the cold dense shell formed behind the reverse shock. Our results suggest a progenitor with a mass-loss rate towards the end of its evolution of ≥4.3 × 10^{-4} {M_{{⊙}}} yr^{-1}, for a wind velocity of 10 km s-1, at 4.0 × 1016 cm. This mass-loss rate is too high for most known stars, except perhaps hypergiant stars. A higher wind velocity would lead to a correspondingly higher mass-loss rate. A luminous blue variable star undergoing a giant eruption could potentially fulfill this requirement, but would need a high mass-loss rate lasting for several hundred years, and need to explain the plateau observed in the optical light curve. The latter could perhaps be due to the ejecta expanding in the dense circum-stellar material at relatively small radii. These observations are consistent with the fact that Type IIn SNe appear to expand into high-density and high mass-loss rate environments, and also suggest rapid variability in the wind mass-loss parameters within at least the last 5000 yr of stellar evolution prior to core-collapse.

  2. Traveling Wave Solutions of the Gardner Equation and Motion of Plane Curves Governed by the mKdV Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, V. M.; Djondjorov, P. A.; Hadzhilazova, M. Ts.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2011-11-29

    The Gardner equation is well-known in the mathematical literature since the late sixties of 20th century. Initially, it appeared in the context of the construction of local conservation laws admitted by the KdV equation. Later on, the Gardner equation was generalized and found to be applicable in various branches of physics (solid-state and plasma physics, fluid dynamics and quantum field theory). In this paper, we examine the travelling wave solutions of the Gardner equation and derive the full set of solutions to the corresponding reduced equation in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobi elliptic functions. Then, we use the travelling wave solutions of the focusing mKdV equation and obtain in explicit analytic form exact solutions of a special type of plane curve flow, known as the mKdV flow.

  3. Plant α-glucan phosphatases SEX4 and LSF2 display different affinity for amylopectin and amylose.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Casper; Auger, Kyle D; Anderson, Nolan T; Meekins, David A; Raththagala, Madushi; Abou Hachem, Maher; Payne, Christina M; Gentry, Matthew S; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    The plant glucan phosphatases Starch EXcess 4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2) apply different starch binding mechanisms. SEX4 contains a carbohydrate binding module, and LSF2 has two surface binding sites (SBSs). We determined KDapp for amylopectin and amylose, and KD for β-cyclodextrin and validated binding site mutants deploying affinity gel electrophoresis (AGE) and surface plasmon resonance. SEX4 has a higher affinity for amylopectin; LSF2 prefers amylose and β-cyclodextrin. SEX4 has 50-fold lower KDapp for amylopectin compared to LSF2. Molecular dynamics simulations and AGE data both support long-distance mutual effects of binding at SBSs and the active site in LSF2. PMID:26763114

  4. Omega-conotoxin GVIA binding to a high-affinity receptor in brain: characterization, calcium sensitivity, and solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Snowman, A.M.; Biswas, A.; Olivera, B.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    We describe unique, high-affinity binding sites for omega(/sup 125/I)conotoxin GVIA in membranes from rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglia which appear to be primarily associated with N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The dissociation constant (KD) for the toxin in rat brain membranes is 60 pM. Physiologic extracellular concentrations of calcium inhibit toxin binding noncompetitively (IC50 = 0.2 mM). The regional distribution of the binding sites in rat brain differs markedly from that of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist receptors associated with L-type calcium channels. In detergent-solubilized brain membranes, toxin binding retains the same affinity, specificity, and ionic sensitivity as in particulate preparations.

  5. Structural basis of clade-specific HIV-1 neutralization by humanized anti-V3 monoclonal antibody KD-247

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Karen A.; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Laughlin, Thomas G.; Chiang, Leslie A.; Pan, Yun; Moran, Jennifer L.; Marchand, Bruno; Singh, Kamalendra; Gallazzi, Fabio; Quinn, Thomas P.; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Toshio; Matsushita, Shuzo; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    Humanized monoclonal antibody KD-247 targets the Gly312-Pro313-Gly314-Arg315 arch of the third hypervariable (V3) loop of the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein. It potently neutralizes many HIV-1 clade B isolates, but not of other clades. To understand the molecular basis of this specificity, we solved a high-resolution (1.55 Å) crystal structure of the KD-247 antigen binding fragment and examined the potential interactions with various V3 loop targets. Unlike most antibodies, KD-247 appears to interact with its target primarily through light chain residues. Several of these interactions involve Arg315 of the V3 loop. To evaluate the role of light chain residues in the recognition of the V3 loop, we generated 20 variants of KD-247 single-chain variable fragments with mutations in the antigen-binding site. Purified proteins were assessed for V3 loop binding using AlphaScreen technology and for HIV-1 neutralization. Our data revealed that recognition of the clade-specificity defining residue Arg315 of the V3 loop is based on a network of interactions that involve TyrL32, TyrL92, and AsnL27d that directly interact with Arg315, thus elucidating the molecular interactions of KD-247 with its V3 loop target.—Kirby, K. A., Ong, Y. T., Hachiya, A., Laughlin, T. G., Chiang, L. A., Pan, Y., Moran, J. L., Marchand, B., Singh, K., Gallazzi, F., Quinn, T. P., Yoshimura, K., Murakami, T., Matsushita, S., Sarafianos, S. G. Structural basis of clade-specific HIV-1 neutralization by humanized anti-V3 monoclonal antibody KD-247. PMID:25351987

  6. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  7. Amyloid Precursor-like Protein 2 Increases the Endocytosis, Instability, and Turnover of the H2-Kd MHC Class I Molecule1

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Amit; Sharma, Mahak; McIlhaney, Mary M.; Talmadge, James E.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2008-01-01

    The defense against the invasion of viruses and tumors relies on the presentation of viral and tumor-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes by cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Previously, we showed that the ubiquitously expressed protein amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) associates with the folded form of the MHC class I molecule Kd. In the current study, APLP2 was found to associate with folded Kd molecules following their endocytosis and to increase the amount of endocytosed Kd. In addition, increased expression of APLP2 was shown to decrease Kd surface expression and thermostability. Correspondingly, Kd thermostability and surface expression were increased by down-regulation of APLP2 expression. Overall, these data suggest that APLP2 modulates the stability and endocytosis of Kd molecules. PMID:18641335

  8. Riccati-type Bäcklund transformations of nonisospectral and generalized variable-coefficient KdV equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yun-Qing; Wang, Yun-Hu; Li, Xin; Cheng, Xue-Ping

    2014-03-01

    We extend the method of constructing Bäcklund transformations for integrable equations through Riccati equations to the nonisospectral and the variable-coefficient equations. By taking nonisospectral and generalized variable-coefficient Korteweg—de Vries (KdV) equations as examples, their Bäcklund transformations are obtained under a more generalized constrain condition. In addition, the Lax pairs and infinite numbers of conservation laws of these equations are given. Especially, some classical equations such as the cylindrical KdV equation are just the special cases of the constrain condition.

  9. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  10. The Lectin Frontier Database (LfDB), and data generation based on frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Tateno, Hiroaki; Shikanai, Toshihide; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are a large group of carbohydrate-binding proteins, having been shown to comprise at least 48 protein scaffolds or protein family entries. They occur ubiquitously in living organisms-from humans to microorganisms, including viruses-and while their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, their main underlying actions are thought to mediate cell-cell and cell-glycoconjugate interactions, which play important roles in an extensive range of biological processes. The basic feature of each lectin's function resides in its specific sugar-binding properties. In this regard, it is beneficial for researchers to have access to fundamental information about the detailed oligosaccharide specificities of diverse lectins. In this review, the authors describe a publicly available lectin database named "Lectin frontier DataBase (LfDB)", which undertakes the continuous publication and updating of comprehensive data for lectin-standard oligosaccharide interactions in terms of dissociation constants (Kd's). For Kd determination, an advanced system of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is used, with which quantitative datasets of interactions between immobilized lectins and >100 fluorescently labeled standard glycans have been generated. The FAC system is unique in its clear principle, simple procedure and high sensitivity, with an increasing number (>67) of associated publications that attest to its reliability. Thus, LfDB, is expected to play an essential role in lectin research, not only in basic but also in applied fields of glycoscience. PMID:25580689

  11. Feature Matching with Affine-Function Transformation Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongsheng; Huang, Xiaolei; Huang, Junzhou; Zhang, Shaoting

    2014-12-01

    Feature matching is an important problem and has extensive uses in computer vision. However, existing feature matching methods support either a specific or a small set of transformation models. In this paper, we propose a unified feature matching framework which supports a large family of transformation models. We call the family of transformation models the affine-function family, in which all transformations can be expressed by affine functions with convex constraints. In this framework, the goal is to recover transformation parameters for every feature point in a template point set to calculate their optimal matching positions in an input image. Given pairwise feature dissimilarity values between all points in the template set and the input image, we create a convex dissimilarity function for each template point. Composition of such convex functions with any transformation model in the affine-function family is shown to have an equivalent convex optimization form that can be optimized efficiently. Four example transformation models in the affine-function family are introduced to show the flexibility of our proposed framework. Our framework achieves 0.0 percent matching errors for both CMU House and Hotel sequences following the experimental setup in [6]. PMID:26353148

  12. King-Devick Test reference values and associations with balance measures in high school American football players.

    PubMed

    Alsalaheen, B; Haines, J; Yorke, A; Diebold, J

    2016-02-01

    The King-Devick test appears to be a promising tool in screening for concussions. However, limited evidence exists on the baseline associations between the K-D test and age and baseline screening tools used after concussion. Additionally, there are no published reference values for the K-D test in high school football players. The K-D test, the Balance Error Scoring System, and the Limits of Stability (LOS) test were administered to 157 high school football players. Additionally, a subsample of 62 participants completed the test twice to examine the reliability of K-D test. There was no relationship between the K-D test and the BESS, or the reaction time and directional control of LOS test. Students aged between 16 and 18 years demonstrated faster K-D test performance compared to students between 13 and 15 years of age. However, there was no association between K-D test and history of concussion. The reliability of the K-D test was (ICC2,1 = 0.89), and the minimal detectable change was 6.10 s. Normative reference values for high school football players are presented in this study. PMID:26648587

  13. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  14. [3H]-RS-45041-190: a selective high-affinity radioligand for I2 imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, A. C.; Redfern, W. S.; Brown, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. RS-45041-190 (4-chloro-2-(imidazolin-2-yl)isoindoline) is an I2 imidazoline receptor ligand with the highest affinity and selectivity so far described; [3H]-RS-45041-190 has a tritium atom attached to the 7-position on the isoindoline ring. 2. [3H]-RS-45041-190 binding to rat kidney membranes was saturable (Bmax = 223.1 +/- 18.4 fmol mg-1 protein) and of high affinity (Kd = 2.71 +/- 0.59 nM). Kinetic studies revealed that the binding was rapid and reversible, with [3H]-RS-45041-190 interacting with two sites or two affinity states. 3. Competition studies showed that 60-70% of [3H]-RS-45041-190 binding (1 nM) was specifically to imidazoline binding sites of the I2 subtype, characterized by high affinity for idazoxan (pIC50 7.85 +/- 0.03) and cirazoline (pIC50 8.16 +/- 0.05). The remaining 30-40% was displaced specifically by the monoamine oxidase A inhibitors, clorgyline and pargyline. 4. alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor, I1 imidazoline, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or dopamine receptor ligands had low affinity suggesting that [3H]-RS-45041-190 did not label receptors of these classes. 5. In autoradiography studies, [3H]-RS-45041-190 labelled discrete regions of rat brain corresponding to the distribution of I2 subtypes, notably the subfornical organ, arcuate nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, medial habenular nucleus and lateral mammillary nucleus, and additional sites in the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus. 6. [3H]-RS-45041-190 therefore labels I2 receptors with high affinity, and an additional site which has high affinity for some monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8528552

  15. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  16. Multiple GPCR conformations and signalling pathways: implications for antagonist affinity estimates

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Antagonist affinity measurements have traditionally been considered important in characterizing the cell-surface receptors present in a particular cell or tissue. A central assumption has been that antagonist affinity is constant for a given receptor–antagonist interaction, regardless of the agonist used to stimulate that receptor or the downstream response that is measured. As a consequence, changes in antagonist affinity values have been taken as initial evidence for the presence of novel receptor subtypes. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that receptors can possess multiple binding sites and the same receptor can show different antagonist affinity measurements under distinct experimental conditions. Here, we discuss several mechanisms by which antagonists have different affinities for the same receptor as a consequence of allosterism, coupling to different G proteins, multiple (but non-interacting) receptor sites, and signal-pathway-dependent pharmacology (where the pharmacology observed varies depending on the signalling pathway measured). PMID:17629959

  17. GEMAS: prediction of solid-solution phase partitioning coefficients (Kd) for oxoanions and boric acid in soils using mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janik, Leslie J; Forrester, Sean T; Soriano-Disla, José M; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J; Reimann, Clemens

    2015-02-01

    The authors' aim was to develop rapid and inexpensive regression models for the prediction of partitioning coefficients (Kd), defined as the ratio of the total or surface-bound metal/metalloid concentration of the solid phase to the total concentration in the solution phase. Values of Kd were measured for boric acid (B[OH]3(0)) and selected added soluble oxoanions: molybdate (MoO4(2-)), antimonate (Sb[OH](6-)), selenate (SeO4(2-)), tellurate (TeO4(2-)) and vanadate (VO4(3-)). Models were developed using approximately 500 spectrally representative soils of the Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural Soils of Europe (GEMAS) program. These calibration soils represented the major properties of the entire 4813 soils of the GEMAS project. Multiple linear regression (MLR) from soil properties, partial least-squares regression (PLSR) using mid-infrared diffuse reflectance Fourier-transformed (DRIFT) spectra, and models using DRIFT spectra plus analytical pH values (DRIFT + pH), were compared with predicted log K(d + 1) values. Apart from selenate (R(2)  = 0.43), the DRIFT + pH calibrations resulted in marginally better models to predict log K(d + 1) values (R(2)  = 0.62-0.79), compared with those from PSLR-DRIFT (R(2)  = 0.61-0.72) and MLR (R(2)  = 0.54-0.79). The DRIFT + pH calibrations were applied to the prediction of log K(d + 1) values in the remaining 4313 soils. An example map of predicted log K(d + 1) values for added soluble MoO4(2-) in soils across Europe is presented. The DRIFT + pH PLSR models provided a rapid and inexpensive tool to assess the risk of mobility and potential availability of boric acid and selected oxoanions in European soils. For these models to be used in the prediction of log K(d + 1) values in soils globally, additional research will be needed to determine if soil variability is accounted on the calibration.

  18. PET studies with low and high affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands: Effects of 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB)

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Fowler, J.S.; Dewey, S.

    1994-05-01

    D2 radioligands of varying affinities have been developed as PET and SPECT radiotracers, but no consensus has been reached on the abilities of these tracers to quantify D2 receptor concentrations in vivo. Amongst other differences, competition of the radioligand with endogenous DA is expected to depend on affinity for the D2 receptor, so that changes in DA might confound estimates of Bmax. We examined the uptake and kinetics if C-11 raclopride (RAC; Kd = 1.2 nM) and C-11 N-methylspiperone (NMS); Kd = 75 pM in baboon striatum after pretreatment with 4HB (200 mg/Kg, i/v) which inhibits DA release by nigrostriatal nerve terminals. While 4HB diminished uptake (%ID/g) of NMS, it prolonged tissue retention of RAC, confirming previous observations in rodent models. Logan (for RAC) and Patlak (for NMS) plots gave changes of +24% and -20%, respectively, between control and 4HB treated animals. Since decreased competition with DA should increase uptake of NMS as well as RAC the paradoxical decrease in NMS uptake could be due to a second synaptic effect of DA, such as a decrease in agonist mediated internalization of NMS. Alternatively, it could result from an independent effect of 4HB, perhaps related to this drug`s ability to induce anesthesia and to depress cerebral glucose utilization. Although previous work in the rat suggests that 4HB does not alter brain blood flow, we found O-15 water that baboon striatal blood flow was decreased 22% and 42% at 30 and 60 minutes, respectively, after 4HB. Smaller changes were seen in cerebellar blood flow. Though a 4HB induced decrease in blood flow does not rule out a DA mediated alteration in D2 receptor Bmax or Kd for NMS, or other factor, it is unnecessary to invoke this to account for our results.

  19. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  20. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets. PMID:25715324

  1. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets.

  2. Subunit affinities and stoichiometries of the human papillomavirus type 11 E1:E2:DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Chao, S F; Rocque, W J; Daniel, S; Czyzyk, L E; Phelps, W C; Alexander, K A

    1999-04-01

    The association between the papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins is an important regulatory interaction, imparting coordinated control of viral transcription and replication. Using fluorescence polarization, we have characterized the interactions between HPV-11 E1, HPV-11 E2, and DNA in solution at equilibrium. For these studies, two double-stranded fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotides were prepared. The first fluorescent oligonucleotide, designated Fl-E2BS and containing a single E2 binding-site palindrome (ACCGN6CGGT), was used to determine the affinity of E2 for its DNA binding site. HPV-11 E2 bound Fl-E2BS with an apparent Kd of 0.84 nM. Binding was saturable and consistent with a single class of noninteracting sites. The second oligonucleotide, designated Fl-E1E2BS, contained both E1 and E2 sites in sequence derived directly from the HPV-11 origin of replication. Under titration conditions identical to those used for Fl-E2BS, the E2 protein exhibited reduced affinity for Fl-E1E2BS (Kd > 100 nM). E1 binding to Fl-E1E2BS was of very low affinity. Addition of excess HPV-11 E1 to Fl-E1E2BS lowered the dissociation constant for the E2:Fl-E1E2BS interaction to 2 nM. This effect was not dependent upon ATP or magnesium ion. Fluorescence polarization and other data suggest formation of a complex containing six E1 molecules and a single dimer of E2 bound to a single Fl-E1E2BS oligonucleotide; E2 dissociation from the final complex did not occur. In summary, physical interaction between E1 and E2 increases the DNA binding affinity of each. The role of this energy coupling may be to promote origin-specific binding of both E1 and E2 to DNA.

  3. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Marine Bacterium Phaeodactylibacter xiamenensis Strain KD52, Isolated from the Phycosphere of Microalga Phacodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangran; Lei, Xueqian; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jingyan; Zhang, Huajun; Yang, Luxi; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Phaeodactylibacter xiamenensis KD52 is a novel bacterium isolated from a culture of the alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum in Xiamen, Fujian Province, China. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide an opportunity to further understand the functional genes related to signing for nutrition from the host algae and the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial properties. PMID:25502677

  5. Painlevé analysis, nonlocal symmetry and explicit interaction solutions for supersymmetric mKdVB equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The N = 1 supersymmetric mKdVB system is transformed to a coupled bosonic system by using the bosonization approach. By a singularity structure analysis, the bosonized supersymmetric mKdVB (BSmKdVB) equation admits the Painlevé property. Starting from the standard truncated Painlevé method, the nonlocal symmetry for the BSmKdVB equation is obtained. To solve the first Lie's principle related with the nonlocal symmetry, the nonlocal symmetry is localized to the Lie point symmetry by introducing multiple new fields. Thanks to localization processes, similarity reductions for the prolonged systems are studied by the Lie point symmetry method. The interaction solutions among solitons and other complicated waves including Painlevé II waves and periodic cnoidal waves are given through the reduction theorems. The soliton-cnoidal wave interaction solutions are explicitly given by using the mapping and deformation method. The concrete soliton-cnoidal interaction solutions are displayed both in analytical and graphical ways.

  6. Correlation functions of the KdV hierarchy and applications to intersection numbers over M bar g , n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Marco; Dubrovin, Boris; Yang, Di

    2016-07-01

    We derive an explicit generating function of correlation functions of an arbitrary tau-function of the KdV hierarchy. In particular applications, our formulation gives closed formulæ of a new type for the generating series of intersection numbers of ψ-classes as well as of mixed ψ- and κ-classes in full genera.

  7. Semiempirical Theories of the Affinities of Negative Atomic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, John W.

    1961-01-01

    The determination of the electron affinities of negative atomic ions by means of direct experimental investigation is limited. To supplement the meager experimental results, several semiempirical theories have been advanced. One commonly used technique involves extrapolating the electron affinities along the isoelectronic sequences, The most recent of these extrapolations Is studied by extending the method to Include one more member of the isoelectronic sequence, When the results show that this extension does not increase the accuracy of the calculations, several possible explanations for this situation are explored. A different approach to the problem is suggested by the regularities appearing in the electron affinities. Noting that the regular linear pattern that exists for the ionization potentials of the p electrons as a function of Z, repeats itself for different degrees of ionization q, the slopes and intercepts of these curves are extrapolated to the case of the negative Ion. The method is placed on a theoretical basis by calculating the Slater parameters as functions of q and n, the number of equivalent p-electrons. These functions are no more than quadratic in q and n. The electron affinities are calculated by extending the linear relations that exist for the neutral atoms and positive ions to the negative ions. The extrapolated. slopes are apparently correct, but the intercepts must be slightly altered to agree with experiment. For this purpose one or two experimental affinities (depending on the extrapolation method) are used in each of the two short periods. The two extrapolation methods used are: (A) an isoelectronic sequence extrapolation of the linear pattern as such; (B) the same extrapolation of a linearization of this pattern (configuration centers) combined with an extrapolation of the other terms of the ground configurations. The latter method Is preferable, since it requires only experimental point for each period. The results agree within

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates glomerular mesangial cell synthesis of the 72-kd type IV collagenase.

    PubMed Central

    Marti, H. P.; Lee, L.; Kashgarian, M.; Lovett, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is generally considered to exert positive effects on the accumulation of extracellular matrices. These occur as the net result of enhanced matrix protein synthesis, diminished matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) synthesis, and augmented production of specific inhibitors, including the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1). Given that glomerular TGF-beta 1 synthesis is induced by inflammation, the effects of this cytokine on synthesis of the 72-kd type IV collagenase and TIMP-1 by cultured human mesangial cells were evaluated. Concentrations of TGF-beta 1 of 5 ng/ml and above specifically stimulated the synthesis of the 72-kd type IV collagenase. This effect was independent of the stimulatory effect of TGF-beta 1 on TIMP-1 synthesis, which was maximal in a lower concentration range (0.1 to 1 ng/ml). Most significantly, the net effect at the higher concentrations of TGF-beta 1 was an excess of enzyme over the TIMP-1 inhibitor. Northern blot analysis of TGF-beta 1-stimulated human mesangial cells demonstrated a specific increase in the abundance of the 3.1 kb mRNA transcript encoding the 72-kd type IV collagenase, presumably mediated by a direct stimulation of 72-kd type IV collagenase mRNA transcription observed as early as 3 hours after exposure to TGF-beta 1. These studies were extended to an analysis of the expression of TGF-beta 1 and 72-kd type IV collagenase mRNAs in normal and nephritic rats. In normal animals, basal TGF-beta 1 and 72-kd type IV collagenase mRNA expression was observed in a strictly mesangial distribution. After induction of acute immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, there was a major increase in TGF-beta 1 and 72-kd type IV collagenase mRNA expression, which was strictly limited to the expanded, hypercellular mesangial compartment. Enhanced synthesis of the mesangial type IV collagenase in response to TGF-beta 1 released during glomerular inflammatory processes could have an important

  9. DNA-binding affinity and sequence permutation preference of the telomere protein from Euplotes crassus

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takahito; McKenzie, Margaret; Ott, Elizabeth; Ilkun, Olesya; Horvath, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    Telomere end binding proteins from diverse organisms use various forms of an ancient protein structure to recognize and bind with single strand DNA found at the ends of telomeres. To further understand the biochemistry and evolution of these proteins we have characterized the DNA-binding properties of the telomere end binding protein from Euplotes crassus (EcTEBP). EcTEBP and its predicted amino-terminal DNA-binding domain, EcTEBP-N, were expressed in E. coli and purified. Each protein formed stoichiometric (1:1) complexes with single strand DNA oligos derived from the precisely defined d(TTTTGGGGTTTTGG) sequence found at DNA termini in Euplotes. Dissociation constants for DNA•EcTEBP and DNA•EcTEBP-N were comparable, with KD-DNA = 38 ± 2 nM for the full-length protein and KD-DNA = 60 ± 4 nM for the N-terminal domain, indicating that the N-terminal domain retains high affinity for DNA even in the absence of potentially stabilizing moieties located in the C-terminal domain. Rate constants for DNA association and DNA dissociation corroborated a slightly improved DNA binding performance for the full-length protein (ka = 45 ± 4 μM-1 s-1, kd = 0.10 ± 0.02 s-1) relative to the N-terminal domain (ka = 18 ± 1 μM-1 s-1, kd = 0.15 ± 0.01 s-1). Equilibrium dissociation constants measured for sequence permutations of the telomere repeat spanned a 55 – 1400 nM range, with EcTEBP and EcTEBP-N binding most tightly to d(TTGGGGTTTTGG) — the sequence corresponding with that of mature DNA termini. Additionally, competition experiments showed that EcTEBP recognizes and binds the telomere-derived 14-nucleotide DNA in preference to shorter 5′ -truncation variants. Compared with multi-subunit complexes assembled with telomere single strand DNA from Oxytricha nova, our results highlight the relative simplicity of the Euplotes crassus system where a telomere end binding protein has biochemical properties indicating one protein subunit caps the single strand DNA. PMID

  10. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  11. A general method for greatly improving the affinity of antibodies by using combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rajpal, Arvind; Beyaz, Nurten; Haber, Lauric; Cappuccilli, Guido; Yee, Helena; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Lerner, Richard A.; Crea, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Look-through mutagenesis (LTM) is a multidimensional mutagenesis method that simultaneously assesses and optimizes combinatorial mutations of selected amino acids. The process focuses on a precise distribution within one or more complementarity determining region (CDR) domains and explores the synergistic contribution of amino acid side-chain chemistry. LTM was applied to an anti-TNF-α antibody, D2E7, which is a challenging test case, because D2E7 was highly optimized (Kd = 1 nM) by others. We selected and incorporated nine amino acids, representative of the major chemical functionalities, individually at every position in each CDR and across all six CDRs (57 aa). Synthetic oligonucleotides, each introducing one amino acid mutation throughout the six CDRs, were pooled to generate segregated libraries containing single mutations in one, two, and/or three CDRs for each VH and VL domain. Corresponding antibody libraries were displayed on the cell surface of yeast. After positive binding selection, 38 substitutions in 21 CDR positions were identified that resulted in higher affinity binding to TNF-α. These beneficial mutations in both VH and VL were represented in two combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis libraries and selected by FACS to produce a convergence of variants that exhibit between 500- and 870-fold higher affinities. Importantly, these enhanced affinities translate to a 15- to 30-fold improvement in in vitro TNF-α neutralization in an L929 bioassay. Thus, this LTM/combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis strategy generates a comprehensive energetic map of the antibody-binding site in a facile and rapid manner and should be broadly applicable to the affinity maturation of antibodies and other proteins. PMID:15939870

  12. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  13. Molecular basis for the wide range of affinity found in Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Diarra dit Konté, Nana; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-04-01

    The carbon storage regulator/regulator of secondary metabolism (Csr/Rsm) type of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is widespread throughout bacteria and acts by sequestering the global translation repressor protein CsrA/RsmE from the ribosome binding site of a subset of mRNAs. Although we have previously described the molecular basis of a high affinity RNA target bound to RsmE, it remains unknown how other lower affinity targets are recognized by the same protein. Here, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structures of five separate GGA binding motifs of the sRNA RsmZ of Pseudomonas fluorescens in complex with RsmE. The structures explain how the variation of sequence and structural context of the GGA binding motifs modulate the binding affinity for RsmE by five orders of magnitude (∼10 nM to ∼3 mM, Kd). Furthermore, we see that conformational adaptation of protein side-chains and RNA enable recognition of different RNA sequences by the same protein contributing to binding affinity without conferring specificity. Overall, our findings illustrate how the variability in the Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition allows a fine-tuning of the competition between mRNAs and sRNAs for the CsrA/RsmE protein.

  14. Current concepts. I. High affinity receptors for bombesin/GRP-like peptides on human small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, T.W.; Carney, D.N.; Cuttitta, F.; Quattrocchi, K.; Minna, J.D.

    1985-07-15

    The binding of a radiolabeled bombesin analogue to human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines was investigated. (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 4/)bombesin bound with high affinity (Kd = 0.5 nM) to a single class of sites (2000/cell) using SCLC line NCI-H446. Binding was reversible, saturable and specific. The pharmacology of binding was investigated, using NCI-H466 and SCLC line NCI-H345. Bombesin and structurally related peptides, such as gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), but not other peptides, such as substance P or vasopressin, inhibited high affinity (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 4/)BN binding activity. Finally, the putative receptor, a 78,000 dalton polypeptide, was identified by purifying radiolabeled cell lysates on bombesin or GRP affinity resins and then displaying the bound polypeptides on sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gels. Because SCLC both produces bombesin/GRP-like peptides and contains high affinity receptors for these peptides, they may function as important autocrine regulatory factors for human SCLC. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  16. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  17. Atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide coatings on KD-II silicon carbide fibers and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shiyi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    To provide oxidation protection and/or to act as an interfacial coating, titanium oxide (TiO2) coatings were deposited on KD-II SiC fibers by employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water (H2O) as precursors. The average deposition rate was about 0.08 nm per cycle, and the prepared coatings were smooth, uniform and conformal, shielding the fibers entirely. The as-deposited coatings were amorphous regardless of the coating thickness, and changed to anatase and rutile crystal phase after annealing at 600 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. The oxidation measurement suggests that the TiO2 coating enhanced the oxidation resistance of SiC fibers obviously. SiC fibers coated with a 70-nm-thick TiO2 layer retained a relatively high tensile strength of 1.66 GPa even after exposition to air at 1400 °C for 1 h, and thick silica layer was not observed. In contrast, uncoated SiC fibers were oxidized dramatically through the same oxidation treatment, covered with a macro-cracked thick silica film, and the tensile strength was not measurable due to interfilament adhesion. The above results indicate that TiO2 films deposited by ALD are a promising oxidation resistance coating for SiC fibers.

  18. Fast focal zooming scheme for direct drive fusion implemented by inserting KD2PO4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zheqiang; Hu, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    The highly required uniformity of target in direct-drive fusion is difficult to achieve and maintain during the entire laser fusion implosion. To mitigate the increasing nonuniformity, the fast focal zooming scheme implemented by inserting an electro-optic (EO) crystal in the front end of beamline has been proposed. Functioning as a phase plate, the specifically designed EO crystal may add the induced spherical wavefront to the laser beam and alter its focusing characteristics. However, in order to zoom out the focal spot by half, the required voltage for KD2PO4 (DKDP) with single pair of electrodes is relatively high. In order to decrease the voltage while maintaining the zooming performance, the DKDP cylinder with multi pairs of electrodes has been presented. The continuous phase plate (CPP) is designed according to both the injected beam and the output field. However, the conventional CPP is designed based on the assumption of an injected beam without wavefront distortion, which would zoom in the focal spot variation in the focal zooming scheme. In order to zoom out the focal spot, a redesigned CPP has been proposed by adding a spherical wavefront to the phase variation of the conventional CPP and further optimizing. On the basis, the focusing characteristics of laser beam during the fast focal zooming process have been analyzed. Results indicate that the focal spot size decreases with the increasing voltage on DKDP crystal, meanwhile the uniformity maintains high during the focal zooming process.

  19. Cluster Segmentation of Thermal Image Sequences Using kd-Tree Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świta, R.; Suszyński, Z.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents optimization methods for the K-means segmentation algorithm for a sequence of thermal images. Images of the sample response in the frequency domain to the thermal stimulation with a known spectrum were subjected to cluster segmentation, grouping pixels with similar frequency characteristics. Compared were all pixel characteristics in the function of the frame number and grouped using the minimal sum of deviations of the pixels from their segment mean for all the frames of the processed image sequence. A new initialization method for the K-means algorithm, using density information, was used. A K-means algorithm with a kd-tree structure C# implementation was tested for speed and accuracy. This algorithm divides the set of pixels to the subspaces in the hierarchy of a binary tree. This allows skipping the calculation of distances of pixels to some centroids and pruning a set of centroid clusters through the hierarchy tree. Results of the segmentation were compared with the K-means and FCM algorithm MATLAB implementations.

  20. Deceleration of the small solitons in the soliton lattice: KdV-type framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurgalina, Ekaterina; Gorshkov, Konstantin; Talipova, Tatiana; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    As it is known the solitary waves (solitons) in the KdV-systems move with speed which exceeds the speed of propagation of long linear waves (sound speed). Due to interaction between them, solitons do not lose their individuality (elastic interaction). Binary interaction of neigborough solitons is the major contribution in the dynamics of soliton gas. Taking into account the integrability of the classic and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations the process of the soliton interaction can be analyzed in the framework of the rigorous analytical two-soliton solutions. Main physical conclusion from this solution is the phase shift which is positive for large solitons and negative for small solitons. This fact influences the average velocity of individual soliton in the soliton lattice or soliton gas. We demonstrate that soliton of relative small amplitude moves in soliton gas in average in opposite (negative) direction, meanwhile a free soliton moves always in the right direction. Approximated analytical theory is created for the soliton motion in the periodic lattice of big solitons of the same amplitudes, and the critical amplitude of the small soliton changed its averaged speed is found. Numerical simulation is conducted for a statistical assembly of solitons with random amplitudes and phases. The application of developed theory to the long surface and internal waves is discussed.

  1. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-05-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses.

  2. Stability of discontinuity structures described by a generalized KdV-Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugainova, A. P.; Shargatov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The stability of discontinuities representing solutions of a model generalized KdV-Burgers equation with a nonmonotone potential of the form φ( u) = u 4- u 2 is analyzed. Among these solutions, there are ones corresponding to special discontinuities. A discontinuity is called special if its structure represents a heteroclinic phase curve joining two saddle-type special points (of which one is the state ahead of the discontinuity and the other is the state behind the discontinuity).The spectral (linear) stability of the structure of special discontinuities was previously studied. It was shown that only a special discontinuity with a monotone structure is stable, whereas special discontinuities with a nonmonotone structure are unstable. In this paper, the spectral stability of nonspecial discontinuities is investigated. The structure of a nonspecial discontinuity represents a phase curve joining two special points: a saddle (the state ahead of the discontinuity) and a focus or node (the state behind the discontinuity). The set of nonspecial discontinuities is examined depending on the dispersion and dissipation parameters. A set of stable nonspecial discontinuities is found.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic measurement of Mn2+ binding affinities to the hammerhead ribozyme and correlation with cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Horton, T E; Clardy, D R; DeRose, V J

    1998-12-22

    Efficient phosphodiester bond cleavage activity by the hammerhead ribozyme requires divalent cations. Toward understanding this metal ion requirement, the Mn2+-binding properties of hammerhead model ribozymes have been investigated under dilute solution conditions, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) to detect free Mn2+ in the presence of added ribozyme. Numbers and affinities of bound Mn2+ were obtained at pH 7.8 (5 mM triethanolamine) in the presence of 0, 0.1, and 1.0 M NaCl for an RNA-DNA model consisting of a 13-nucleotide DNA "substrate" hybridized to a 34-nucleotide RNA "enzyme" [Pley, H. W., Flaherty, K. M., and McKay, D. B. (1994) Nature 372, 68-74]. In 0.1 M NaCl, two classes of Mn2+ sites are found with n1 = 3.7 +/- 0.4, Kd(1) = 4 +/- 1 microM (type 1) and n2 = 5.2 +/- 0.4, Kd(2) = 460 +/- 130 microM (type 2). The high-affinity type 1 sites are confirmed for an active RNA-RNA hybrid (34-nucleotide RNA enzyme:13-nucleotide RNA substrate) by EPR measurements at low Mn2+ concentrations. Decreasing NaCl concentration results in an increased number of bound Mn2+ per hammerhead. By contrast, a binding titration in 1 M NaCl indicates that a single Mn2+ site with apparent Kd approximately 10 microM is populated in low concentrations of Mn2+, and apparent cooperative effects at higher Mn2+ concentrations result in population of a similar total number of Mn2+ sites (n1 = 8-10) as found in 0.1 M NaCl. Mn2+-dependent activity profiles are similar for the active RNA-RNA hybrid in 0.1 and 1 M NaCl. Correlation with binding affinities determined by EPR indicates that hammerhead activity in 0.1 M NaCl is only observed after all four of the high-affinity Mn2+ sites are occupied, rises with population of the type 2 sites, and is independent of Mn2+ concentrations corresponding to > 8-9 Mn2+ bound per hammerhead. Equivalent measurements in 1 M NaCl demonstrate a rise in activity with the cooperative transition observed in the Mn2+ binding curve. These

  4. Isotope shift in the electron affinity of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-12-21

    Very accurate electron affinity (EA) calculations of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li (and {sup {infinity}L}i) have been performed using explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and a variational approach that explicitly includes the nuclear motion in the calculations (i.e., the approach that does not assume the Born-Oppenheimer approximation). The leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the electron affinities were also calculated. The results are the most accurate theoretical values obtained for the studied systems to date. Our best estimates of the {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li EAs are 4984.9842(30) and 4984.9015(30) cm{sup -1}, respectively, and of the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li EA isotope shift is 0.0827 cm{sup -1}.

  5. Isotope shift in the electron affinity of lithium.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-12-21

    Very accurate electron affinity (EA) calculations of (6)Li and (7)Li (and (infinity)Li) have been performed using explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and a variational approach that explicitly includes the nuclear motion in the calculations (i.e., the approach that does not assume the Born-Oppenheimer approximation). The leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the electron affinities were also calculated. The results are the most accurate theoretical values obtained for the studied systems to date. Our best estimates of the (7)Li and (6)Li EAs are 4984.9842(30) and 4984.9015(30) cm(-1), respectively, and of the (7)Li/(6)Li EA isotope shift is 0.0827 cm(-1).

  6. O-tert-Butyltyrosine, an NMR tag for high-molecular-weight systems and measurements of submicromolar ligand binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Kuppan, Kekini Vahini; Lee, Michael David; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Huber, Thomas; Otting, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    O-tert-Butyltyrosine (Tby) is an unnatural amino acid that can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins using established orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA systems. Here we show that the tert-butyl group presents an outstanding NMR tag that can readily be observed in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectra without any isotope labeling. Owing to rapid bond rotations and the chemical equivalence of the protons of a solvent-exposed tert-butyl group from Tby, the singlet resonance from the tert-butyl group generates an easily detectable narrow signal in a spectral region with limited overlap with other methyl resonances. The potential of the tert-butyl (1)H NMR signal in protein research is illustrated by the observation and assignment of two resonances in the Bacillus stearothermophilus DnaB hexamer (320 kDa), demonstrating that this protein preferentially assumes a 3-fold rather than 6-fold symmetry in solution, and by the quantitative measurement of the submicromolar dissociation constant Kd (0.2 μM) of the complex between glutamate and the Escherichia coli aspartate/glutamate binding protein (DEBP, 32 kDa). The outstanding signal height of the (1)H NMR signal of the Tby tert-butyl group allows Kd measurements using less concentrated protein solutions than usual, providing access to Kd values 1 order of magnitude lower than established NMR methods that employ direct protein detection for Kd measurements. PMID:25789794

  7. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  8. Molecular modeling of oscillating GHz electric field influence on the kinesin affinity to microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R. Saeidi, H.; S. Setayandeh, S.; Lohrasebi, A.

    2015-08-01

    Kinesin is a microtubule-associated motor protein which can respond to the external electric field due to its polarity. Using a molecular dynamics simulation method, the effect of such a field on the affinity of kinesin to the αβ-tubulin is investigated in this study. To consider kinesin affinity, the system is exposed to an electric field of 0.03 V/nm with frequency values of 1, 2, …, 9, and 10 GHz. It is found that the applied electric field can change kinesin affinity to the microtubule. These changes could perturb the normal operation of kinesin, such as the processive motility of kinesin on the microtubule.

  9. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  10. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  11. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  12. Designing Chaotic Systems by Piecewise Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Li, Qingdu; Yang, Xiao-Song

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of homoclinic orbits in a class of three-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, two chaotic generators are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  13. The 12 kD FK 506 binding protein FKBP12 is released in the male reproductive tract and stimulates sperm motility.

    PubMed Central

    Walensky, L. D.; Dawson, T. M.; Steiner, J. P.; Sabatini, D. M.; Suarez, J. D.; Klinefelter, G. R.; Snyder, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 12 kD FK506 binding protein FKBP12 is a cytosolic receptor for the immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and rapamycin. In addition to its critical role in drug-induced T-cell immunosuppression, FKBP12 associates physiologically with ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, regulating their ability to flux calcium. We investigated a role for FKBP12 in male reproductive physiology on the basis of our identification of extremely high levels of [3H]FK506 binding in male reproductive tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: [3H]FK506 binding studies were performed to identify tissues enriched with FK506 binding sites. The abundant [3H]FK506 binding sites identified in the male reproductive tract were localized by [3H]FK506 autoradiography. FK506 affinity chromatography was employed to purify FKBP from epididymal fluid. Anti-FKBP12 Western analysis was used to confirm the identity of the purified FKBP. The binding of exogenous FKBP12 to sperm was evaluated by [32P]FKBP12 binding studies and [33P]FKBP12 autoradiography. The effect of recombinant FKBP12 on sperm motility was investigated using a Hamilton Thorne motility analyzer. RESULTS: Male reproductive tissues contained high levels of [3H]FK506 binding. The localization of [3H]FK506 binding sites to the tubular epithelium of the caput epididymis and the lumen of the cauda and vas deferens suggested that FKBP is released in the male reproductive tract. FKBP12 was purified from epididymal plasma by FK506 affinity chromatography. Radiolabeled FKBP12 specifically bound to immature but not mature sperm. In sperm motility studies, FKBP12-treated caput sperm exhibited double the curvilinear velocity of untreated controls. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of FKBP12 are released in the male reproductive tract and specifically associate with maturing sperm. Recombinant FKBP12 enhances the curvilinear velocity of immature sperm, suggesting a role for FKBP12 in motility initiation. The highest concentrations of soluble

  14. Observed drug-receptor association rates are governed by membrane affinity: the importance of establishing "micro-pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships" at the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David A; Parry, Cheryl; Reilly, John; Wright, Penny; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    Current pharmacological models for determining affinity and kinetics of drugs for membrane receptors assume the interacting molecules are homogeneously distributed in the bulk aqueous phase. The phospholipid membrane can, however, provide a second compartment into which drugs can partition, particularly lipophilic/basic compounds. In this study we measured the phospholipid affinity and receptor binding kinetics of several clinically relevant β2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists and demonstrated that the degree of phospholipid interaction directly affects the observed kinetic association rate (k on) and dissociation constant (Kd), but not the dissociation rate (k off) from the target, by concentrating drug in the local environment around the receptor. When the local drug concentration was accounted for, the k on was comparable across the cohort and the corrected Kd was directly related to the k off. In conclusion, we propose a new approach to determining the pharmacology of drugs for membrane targets that accounts for differences in local drug concentration brought about by direct affinity for phospholipids, establishing "micro-pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships" for drugs.

  15. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  16. Head-on collision and overtaking collision between an envelope solitary wave and a KdV solitary wave in a dusty plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Duan, Wen-Shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Head-on collision and overtaking collision between a KdV solitary wave and an envelope solitary wave are first studied in present paper by using Particle-in-cell (PIC) method in a dusty plasma. There are phase shifts of the KdV solitary wave in both head-on collision and the overtaking collision, while no phase shift is found for the envelop solitary wave in any cases. The remarkable difference between head-on collision and the overtaking collision is that the phase shift of KdV solitary wave increases as amplitude of KdV solitary wave increases in head-on collision, while it decreases as amplitude of the KdV solitary wave increases in the overtaking collision. It is found that the maximum amplitude during the collision process is less than sum of two amplitudes of both solitary waves, but is larger than either of the amplitude. PMID:26868526

  17. Head-on collision and overtaking collision between an envelope solitary wave and a KdV solitary wave in a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Duan, Wen-Shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Head-on collision and overtaking collision between a KdV solitary wave and an envelope solitary wave are first studied in present paper by using Particle-in-cell (PIC) method in a dusty plasma. There are phase shifts of the KdV solitary wave in both head-on collision and the overtaking collision, while no phase shift is found for the envelop solitary wave in any cases. The remarkable difference between head-on collision and the overtaking collision is that the phase shift of KdV solitary wave increases as amplitude of KdV solitary wave increases in head-on collision, while it decreases as amplitude of the KdV solitary wave increases in the overtaking collision. It is found that the maximum amplitude during the collision process is less than sum of two amplitudes of both solitary waves, but is larger than either of the amplitude.

  18. Head-on collision and overtaking collision between an envelope solitary wave and a KdV solitary wave in a dusty plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Duan, Wen-Shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Head-on collision and overtaking collision between a KdV solitary wave and an envelope solitary wave are first studied in present paper by using Particle-in-cell (PIC) method in a dusty plasma. There are phase shifts of the KdV solitary wave in both head-on collision and the overtaking collision, while no phase shift is found for the envelop solitary wave in any cases. The remarkable difference between head-on collision and the overtaking collision is that the phase shift of KdV solitary wave increases as amplitude of KdV solitary wave increases in head-on collision, while it decreases as amplitude of the KdV solitary wave increases in the overtaking collision. It is found that the maximum amplitude during the collision process is less than sum of two amplitudes of both solitary waves, but is larger than either of the amplitude. PMID:26868526

  19. Analysis of free drug fractions in human serum by ultrafast affinity extraction and two-dimensional affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast affinity extraction and a two-dimensional high performance affinity chromatographic system were used to measure the free fractions for various drugs in serum and at typical therapeutic concentrations. Pooled samples of normal serum or serum from diabetic patients were utilized in this work. Several drug models (i.e., quinidine, diazepam, gliclazide, tolbutamide, and acetohexamide) were examined that represented a relatively wide range of therapeutic concentrations and affinities for human serum albumin (HSA). The two-dimensional system consisted of an HSA microcolumn for the extraction of a free drug fraction, followed by a larger HSA analytical column for the further separation and measurement of this fraction. Factors that were optimized in this method included the flow rates, column sizes, and column switching times that were employed. The final extraction times used for isolating the free drug fractions were 333-665 ms or less. The dissociation rate constants for several of the drugs with soluble HSA were measured during system optimization, giving results that agreed with reference values. In the final system, free drug fractions in the range of 0.7-9.5% were measured and gave good agreement with values that were determined by ultrafiltration. Association equilibrium constants or global affinities were also estimated by this approach for the drugs with soluble HSA. The results for the two-dimensional system were obtained in 5-10 min or less and required only 1-5 μL of serum per injection. The same approach could be adapted for work with other drugs and proteins in clinical samples or for biomedical research. PMID:26462924

  20. Affinity maturation of T-cell receptor-like antibodies for Wilms tumor 1 peptide greatly enhances therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Hasan, Aisha; Kuo, Tzu-Yun; Guo, Hong-fen; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    WT1126 (RMFPNAPYL) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) restricted peptide derived from Wilms tumor protein (WT1), which is widely expressed in a broad spectrum of leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. A novel T-cell-receptor (TCR)-like single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody specific for the T cell epitope consisting of the WT1/HLA-A2 complex was isolated from a human scFv phage library. This scFv was affinity-matured by mutagenesis combined with yeast display, and structurally analyzed using a homology model. This monovalent scFv showed a 100-fold affinity improvement (dissociation constant [KD]= 3nM) and exquisite specificity towards its targeted epitope or HLA-A2+/WT1+ tumor cells. Bivalent scFv-huIgG1-Fc fusion protein demonstrated an even higher avidity (KD = 2pM) binding to the T cell epitope and to tumor targets, and was capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or tumor lysis by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing human T or NK-92-MI transfected cells. This antibody demonstrated specific and potent cytotoxicity in vivo towards WT1-positive leukemia xenograft that was HLA-A2 restricted. In summary, T cell epitopes can provide novel targets for antibody-based therapeutics. By combining phage and yeast displays and scFv-Fc fusion platforms, a strategy for developing high affinity TCR-like antibodies could be rapidly explored for potential clinical development. PMID:25987253

  1. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  2. High affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal yeloid lineage without HSC toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C; Feng, Yang; Schutsky, Keith; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here, we isolated a high affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific scFv (2.48nM KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T-cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ+ AML in vitro and in vivo compared to a low affinity (LA) FRβ CAR (54.3nM KD). Using the HA-FRβ IgG, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T-cells lysed mature CD14+ monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T-cells retained effective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T-cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity. PMID:26898190

  3. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association.

  4. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  5. Pulse length dependence of laser conditioning and bulk damage in KD2PO4

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J J; Weiland, T L; Stanley, J R; Sell, W D; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L; Hackel, R P

    2004-11-10

    An experimental technique has been developed to measure the damage density {rho}({phi}) variation with fluence from scatter maps of bulk damage sites in plates of KD{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (DKDP) crystals combined with calibrated images of the damaging beam's spatial profile. Unconditioned bulk damage in tripler-cut DKDP crystals has been studied using 351 nm (3 {omega}) light at pulse lengths of 0.055, 0.091, 0.30, 0.86, 2.6, and 10 ns. It is found that there is less scatter due to damage at fixed fluence for longer pulse lengths. The results also show that for all the pulse lengths the scatter due to damage is a strong function of the damaging fluence. It is determined that the pulse length scaling for bulk damage scatter in unconditioned DKDP material varies as {tau}{sup 0.24 {+-} 0.05} over two orders of magnitude of pulse lengths. The effectiveness of 3 {omega} laser conditioning at pulse lengths of 0.055, 0.096, 0.30, 0.86, 3.5, and 23 ns is analyzed in term of damage density {rho}({phi}) at 3 {omega}, 2.6 ns. The 860 ps conditioning to a peak irradiance of 7 GW/cm{sup 2} had the best performance under 3 {omega}, 2.6 ns testing. It is shown that the optimal conditioning pulse length appears to lies in the range from 0.3 to 1 ns with a low sensitivity of 0.5 J/cm{sup 2}/ns to the exact pulse length.

  6. The presence of high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β binding in rainbow trout scale indicates a possible endocrine route for the regulation of scale resorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persson, Petra; Shrimpton, J. Mark; McCormick, Stephen D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2000-01-01

    High-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β (E2) binding is present in rainbow trout scale. The Kd and Bmax of the scale E2 binding are similar to those of the liver E2 receptor (Kd is 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.4 ± 0.1 nM, and Bmax is 9.1 ± 1.2 and 23.1 ± 2.2 fmol × mg protein-1, for scale and liver, respectively), but different from those of the high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding in plasma (Kd is 4.0 ± 0.4 nM and Bmax is 625.4 ± 63.1 fmol × mg protein−1). The E2 binding in scale was displaced by testosterone, but not by diethylstilbestrol. Hence, the ligand binding specificity is different from that of the previously characterized liver E2 receptor, where E2 is displaced by diethylstilbestrol, but not by testosterone. The putative scale E2 receptor thus appears to bind both E2 and testosterone, and it is proposed that the increased scale resorption observed during sexual maturation in both sexes of several salmonid species may be mediated by this receptor. No high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding could be detected in rainbow trout gill or skin.

  7. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  8. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher's attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with Kd 56±7.3nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  9. A high-affinity, radioiodinatable neuropeptide FF analogue incorporating a photolabile p-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Bray, Lauriane; Moulédous, Lionel; Tafani, Jean A M; Germanier, Maryse; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-15

    A new radioiodinated photoaffinity compound, [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFNH2, derived from a peptide present in the rat neuropeptide FF (NPFF) precursor was synthesized, and its binding characteristics were investigated on a neuroblastoma clone, SH-SY5Y, stably expressing rat NPFF2 receptors tagged with the T7 epitope. The binding of the probe was saturable and revealed a high-affinity interaction (KD=0.24nM) with a single class of binding sites. It was also able to affinity label NPFF2 receptor in a specific and efficient manner given that 38% of the bound radioligand at saturating concentration formed a wash-resistant binding after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Photoaffinity labeling with [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide showed two molecular forms of NPFF2 receptor with apparent molecular weights of 140 and 95kDa in a 2:1 ratio. The comparison of the results between photoaffinity labeling and Western blot analysis suggests that all receptor forms bind the probe irreversibly with the same efficiency. On membranes of mouse olfactory bulb, only the high molecular weight form of NPFF2 receptor is observed. [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide is an excellent radioiodinated peptidic ligand for direct and selective labeling of NPFF2 receptors in vitro.

  10. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  11. MCDHF calculation of electron affinities of Group I and Group IB atomic anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junqin; Zhao, Zilong; Zhang, Xuemei

    2014-08-01

    The affinities of negative ions for elements of Group I and Group IB have been calculated using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method. The difference between the total energy of the ground state of the atom and that of its anion is used to obtain the electron affinity. The theoretical results for these elements agree well with measured values, and have a deviation less than 0.5% with respect to measured values for most of the elements. With a systematic calculation method, this work gives a high-accuracy theoretical value for the electron affinities of the elements of Group I and Group IB. For element Fr, there is no experimental value.

  12. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  13. Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data

  14. Engineering GCaMP affinity and kinetics for improved tracking of neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan Richard

    Fluorescent calcium indicator proteins (FCIPs) are powerful tools for monitoring neural activity. However, they still have significant performance limitations compared with synthetic indicators based on the small-molecule chelator BAPTA. Because of high cooperativity originating from a calmodulin-based recombinant calcium sensor, a given GECI is only sensitive to a small part of a neuron's likely calcium concentration range, which can span a range of 0.1-10 microM. GECIs also have up to 100-fold slower reponse kinetics than BAPTA-based indicators. Overcoming limitations in range and kinetics is a key step toward monitoring spike times and firing rates in cell-type-specific brain circuits. We are engaged in structure-based design to vary the affinity and accelerate the response kinetics of a widely used GECI, GCaMP3. We have designed more than 50 novel variants by targeted mutation of GCaMP3's calmodulin (CaM) domain and its intraprobe peptide partner, RS20. In our cuvet characterizations of purified protein, we have attained a nearly 40-fold (0.16-6 microM) range of KD without impairing per-molecule brightness. In stopped-flow biochemical measurements, off-responses to sharp decreases in calcium are more than 10 times faster than any other published GECI. Most of the gap in off-response speed between G-CaMP3 and BAPTA-based indicators could be closed without perturbing KD. In Drosophila antennal nerve axons, sensory stimulation-evoked fluorescence responses were significantly enhanced in speed and amplitude in two novel GECIs. With our biophysical measurements, we discovered that the N-lobe of the bilobular CaM domain is required for the high-fluorescence state and the C-lobe contributes to high affinity Ca2+ binding. To account for our observations, we propose a molecular dynamics model of GCaMP3 with two kinetic pathways leading to a high-fluorescence state. First, small amounts of Ca 2+ activate a slow "C-like" pathway through sequential binding to the C

  15. Humanized Affinity-matured Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Has Potent Antitumor Activity and Binds to FG Loop of Tumor Antigen B7-H3.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Goldgur, Yehuda; Cheal, Sarah M; Guo, Hong-fen; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-kong V

    2015-12-11

    B7-H3 (CD276) is both an inhibitory ligand for natural killer cells and T cells and a tumor antigen that is widely expressed among human solid tumors. Anti-B7-H3 mouse monoclonal antibody 8H9 has been successfully used for radioimmunotherapy for patients with B7-H3(+) tumors. We present the humanization, affinity maturation, and epitope mapping of 8H9 based on structure determination, modeling, and yeast display methods. The crystal structure of ch8H9 Fab fragment was solved to 2.5-Å resolution and used as a template for humanization. By displaying the humanized 8H9 single chain Fv (scFv) on the surface of yeast, the affinity was matured by sequential random mutagenesis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Six mutations (three in the complementarity-determining region and three in the framework regions) were identified and incorporated into an affinity-matured humanized 8H9 construct (hu8H9-6m) and an affinity-matured chimeric 8H9 construct (ch8H9-6m). The hu8H9-6m scFv had a 160-fold improvement in affinity (0.9 nm KD) compared with parental hu8H9 scFv (144 nm KD). The IgG formats of ch8H9-6m and hu8H9-6m (nanomolar to subnanomolar KD) had 2-9-fold enhancements in affinity compared with their parental forms, potent in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (0.1-0.3 μg/ml EC50), and high tumor uptake in mouse xenografts. Based on in silico docking studies and experimental validation, the molecular epitope of 8H9 was determined to be dependent on the FG loop of B7-H3, a region critical to its function in immunologic blockade and unique among anti-B7-H3 antibodies published to date. PMID:26487718

  16. Development of a large field-of-view KD potassium di-deuterium phosphate modulator: Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetographs, which measure polarized light, allow solar astronomers to infer the magnetic field intensity on the Sun. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Vector Magnetograph is such an imaging instrument. The instrument requires rapid modulation between polarization states to minimize seeing effects. The accuracy of those polarization measurements is dependent on stable modulators with small field-of-view errors. Although these devices are very important in ground-based telescopes, extending the field of view of electro-optical crystals such as KD*Ps (potassium di-deuterium phosphate) could encourage the development of these devices for other imaging applications. The work that was done at MSFC as part of the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to reduce the field-of-view errors of instruments that use KD*P modulators in their polarimeters is described.

  17. Time-fractional KdV equation for plasma of two different temperature electrons and stationary ion

    SciTech Connect

    El-Wakil, S. A.; Abulwafa, Essam M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, Abeer A.

    2011-09-15

    Using the time-fractional KdV equation, the nonlinear properties of small but finite amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves are studied in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma. This plasma consists of cold electrons fluid, non-thermal hot electrons, and stationary ions. Employing the reductive perturbation technique and the Euler-Lagrange equation, the time-fractional KdV equation is derived and it is solved using variational method. It is found that the time-fractional parameter significantly changes the soliton amplitude of the electron-acoustic solitary waves. The results are compared with the structures of the broadband electrostatic noise observed in the dayside auroral zone.

  18. Synthesis and NMDA receptor affinity of fluorinated dioxadrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ashutosh; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-06-01

    A series of dioxadrol analogues with fluorine substituents in position 4 of the piperidine ring has been synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated. The key step in the synthesis was the fluorination of diastereomeric piperidones 6a and 6c as well as diastereomeric alcohols 9a and 9c with DAST. The reaction of the alcohols 9a and 9c took place with inversion of configuration. After removal of the Cbz-protective group, the NMDA receptor affinities of the resulting secondary amines 8a, 8c, 12b, and 12d were investigated in receptor binding studies. It was shown that the like-configuration of the ring junction was crucial for high NMDA receptor affinity. An axially oriented fluorine atom in position 4 led to 2-(2,2-diphenyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)-4-fluoropiperidine (12d, WMS-2517) with a K(i)-value of 27nM. The NMDA receptor affinity of 8c (WMS-2513) with an additional fluorine atom in equatorial 4-position was slightly reduced (K(i)=81 nM). Both fluorinated dioxadrol derivatives 8c and 12d showed high selectivity against sigma(1) and sigma(2) receptors as well as the polyamine binding site of NR2B receptors.

  19. GENERAL Pseudopotentials, Lax Pairs and Bäcklund Transformations for Generalized Fifth-Order KdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yun-Qing; Chen, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Based on the method developed by Nucci, the pseudopotentials, Lax pairs and the singularity manifold equations of the generalized fifth-order KdV equation are derived. By choosing different coefficient, the corresponding results and the Bäcklund transformations can be obtained on three conditioners which include Caudrey—Dodd—Gibbon—Sawada—Kotera equation, the Lax equation and the Kaup-kupershmidt equation.

  20. Proton Affinity of Isomeric Dipeptides Containing Lysine and Non-Proteinogenic Lysine Homologues.

    PubMed

    Batoon, Patrick; Ren, Jianhua

    2016-08-18

    Conformational effects on the proton affinity of oligopeptides have been studied using six alanine (A)-based acetylated dipeptides containing a basic probe that is placed closest to either the C- or the N-terminus. The basic probe includes Lysine (Lys) and two nonproteinogenic Lys-homologues, ornithine (Orn) and 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The proton affinities of the peptides have been determined using the extended Cooks kinetic method in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Computational studies have been carried out to search for the lowest energy conformers and to calculate theoretical proton affinities as well as various molecular properties using the density functional theory. The dipeptides containing a C-terminal probe, ALys, AOrn, and ADap, were determined to have a higher proton affinity by 1-4 kcal/mol than the corresponding dipeptides containing an N-terminal probe, LysA, OrnA, and DapA. For either the C-probe peptides or the N-probe peptides, the proton affinity reduces systematically as the side-chain of the probe residue is shortened. The difference in the proton affinities between isomeric peptides is largely associated with the variation of the conformations. The peptides with higher values of the proton affinity adopt a relatively compact conformation such that the protonated peptides can be stabilized through more efficient internal solvation. PMID:27459294

  1. Estimating the Underwater Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient with a Low-Cost Instrument: The KdUINO DIY Buoy.

    PubMed

    Bardaji, Raul; Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Simon, Carine; Wernand, Marcel R; Piera, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    A critical parameter to assess the environmental status of water bodies is the transparency of the water, as it is strongly affected by different water quality related components (such as the presence of phytoplankton, organic matter and sediment concentrations). One parameter to assess the water transparency is the diffuse attenuation coefficient. However, the number of subsurface irradiance measurements obtained with conventional instrumentation is relatively low, due to instrument costs and the logistic requirements to provide regular and autonomous observations. In recent years, the citizen science concept has increased the number of environmental observations, both in time and space. The recent technological advances in embedded systems and sensors also enable volunteers (citizens) to create their own devices (known as Do-It-Yourself or DIY technologies). In this paper, a DIY instrument to measure irradiance at different depths and automatically calculate the diffuse attenuation Kd coefficient is presented. The instrument, named KdUINO, is based on an encapsulated low-cost photonic sensor and Arduino (an open-hardware platform for the data acquisition). The whole instrument has been successfully operated and the data validated comparing the KdUINO measurements with the commercial instruments. Workshops have been organized with high school students to validate its feasibility. PMID:26999132

  2. A DNA replication origin and a replication fork barrier used in vivo in the circular plasmid pKD1.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, L; Irene, C; Aragona, M; Newlon, C S

    2001-10-01

    As in other yeasts, ARS-containing plasmids can be maintained extrachromosomally in Kluyveromyces lactis. Although some fragments of K. lactis DNA have ARS activity in both K. lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it appears that the sequences required for ARS activity in the two yeasts are different. As an approach to a better understanding of ARS structure and function in K. lactis, we analyzed the replication of the circular plasmid pKD1. We identified a 159-bp sequence able to promote autonomous replication of pKD1 in both yeasts; this fragments contains both a sequence related to the S. cerevisiae ARS consensus sequence and a region of 53% identity to the 40-bp sequence essential for K. lactis KARS101 function. By the analysis of in vivo replication intermediates we provide the first direct evidence that DNA replication initiates at or near the K. lactis ARS element. Replication terminates at the cisacting stability locus of pKD1, which functions as a replication fork barrier (RFB) and is necessary for proper plasmid segregation. RFB activity requires the pKDI gene products that are important for plasmid segregation, suggesting a link between DNA replication termination and plasmid segregation in a eukaryotic organism.

  3. [Expression and cloning of cDNA encoding 43 kD rubber particle membrane protein of Hevea brasiliensis].

    PubMed

    Peng, Shi-Qing; Chen, Shou-Cai

    2004-06-01

    A rubber particle protein with apparent molecular mass of 43 kD as determined by SDS-PAGE was purified. A degenerate oligonucleotide primer based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of this purified protein was used to amplify a 1385 bp cDNA by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'RACE). The cDNA contains five repeats in a head-to-tail arrangement without intervening sequences, each encoding a ubiquitin unit of 76 amino acids. The last ubiquitin unit is followed by an extraphenylanaline residue at the carboxyl-terminal end. The structure of the cDNA is consistent with the structure of other known polyubiquitin genes. Western blot demonstrated that 43 kD rubber particle protein might be a polyubiquitin. Southern blot analysis revealed that there were multiple copies of gene encoding 43 kD rubber particle protein in Hevea brasiliensis. The results of Northern blot analysis indicated that the gene was expressed in latex, young leaves and bark tissue. PMID:15599030

  4. Integrin-associated protein: a 50-kD plasma membrane antigen physically and functionally associated with integrins

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Phagocytosis by monocytes or neutrophils can be enhanced by interaction with several proteins or synthetic peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. Recently we showed that an mAb, B6H12, specifically inhibited this enhancement of neutrophil phagocytosis by inhibiting Arg-Gly-Asp binding to the leukocyte response integrin (Gresham, H. D., J. L. Goodwin, P. M. Allen, D. C. Anderson, and E. J. Brown. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:1935-1943). Now, we have purified the antigen recognized by B6H12 to homogeneity. Surprisingly, it is a 50-kD molecule that is expressed on the plasma membranes of all hematopoietic cells, including erythrocytes, which express no known integrins. On platelets and placenta, but not on erythrocytes, this protein is associated with an integrin that can be recognized by an anti-beta 3 antibody. In addition, both the anti-beta 3 and several mAbs recognizing the 50-kD protein inhibit Arg-Gly-Asp stimulation of phagocytosis. These data demonstrate an association between integrins and the 50-kD protein on several cell types. For this reason, we call it Integrin-associated Protein (IAP). We hypothesize that IAP may play a role in signal transduction for enhanced phagocytosis by Arg-Gly-Asp ligands. PMID:2277087

  5. Estimating the Underwater Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient with a Low-Cost Instrument: The KdUINO DIY Buoy

    PubMed Central

    Bardaji, Raul; Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Simon, Carine; Wernand, Marcel R.; Piera, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    A critical parameter to assess the environmental status of water bodies is the transparency of the water, as it is strongly affected by different water quality related components (such as the presence of phytoplankton, organic matter and sediment concentrations). One parameter to assess the water transparency is the diffuse attenuation coefficient. However, the number of subsurface irradiance measurements obtained with conventional instrumentation is relatively low, due to instrument costs and the logistic requirements to provide regular and autonomous observations. In recent years, the citizen science concept has increased the number of environmental observations, both in time and space. The recent technological advances in embedded systems and sensors also enable volunteers (citizens) to create their own devices (known as Do-It-Yourself or DIY technologies). In this paper, a DIY instrument to measure irradiance at different depths and automatically calculate the diffuse attenuation Kd coefficient is presented. The instrument, named KdUINO, is based on an encapsulated low-cost photonic sensor and Arduino (an open-hardware platform for the data acquisition). The whole instrument has been successfully operated and the data validated comparing the KdUINO measurements with the commercial instruments. Workshops have been organized with high school students to validate its feasibility. PMID:26999132

  6. The type III secretion system of biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens KD targets the phytopathogenic Chromista Pythium ultimum and promotes cucumber protection.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Binder, Christian; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2005-09-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is used by Proteobacteria for pathogenic or symbiotic interaction with plant and animal hosts. Recently, TTSS genes thought to originate from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were evidenced in Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, which protects cucumber from the oomycete Pythium ultimum (kingdom Chromista/Stramenopila). However, it is not known whether the TTSS contributes to plant protection by the bacterium and, if so, whether it targets the plant or the phytopathogen. Inactivation of TTSS gene hrcV following the insertion of an omega cassette strongly reduced the biocontrol activity of the pseudomonad against P. ultimum on cucumber when compared with the wild type, but had no effect on its root-colonization ability. Analysis of a plasmid-based transcriptional hrpJ'-inaZ reporter fusion revealed that expression in strain KD of the operon containing hrcV was strongly stimulated in vitro and in situ by the oomycete and not by the plant. In vitro, both strain KD and its hrcV mutant reduced the activity level of the pectinase polygalacturonase (a key pathogenicity factor) from P. ultimum, but the reduction was much stronger with the wild type. Together, these results show that the target range of bacterial TTSS is not restricted to plants and animals but also can include members of Chromista/Stramenopila, and suggest that virulence genes acquired horizontally from phytopathogenic bacteria were functionally recycled in biocontrol saprophytic Pseudomonas spp., resulting in enhanced plant protection by the latter.

  7. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  8. BC(50): a generalized, unifying affinity descriptor.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Alberto; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Assessing binding affinities is an unavoidable step that we come across any time interactions between binding species are investigated. A quantitative evaluation of binding affinities relies on the determination of binding constants but, whilst the binding constant fully defines the affinity of a reagent for a ligand when only one complex species is formed, the same is not true when the interacting partners form more than one complex of different stoichiometry, because all complexes contribute to the overall binding affinity. Unfortunately, this situation is the rule rather than the exception in chemical systems, but a generally accepted solution for this issue has not yet been settled. In this Personal Account, we describe the evolution, from the initial idea to a fully developed stage, of a binding descriptor that has been developed with the aim of filling this gap, thereby providing scientists in all fields of chemistry with a unifying tool for the assessment of binding affinities based on the knowledge of the binding constants in systems that involve any number of complex species.

  9. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  10. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  11. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binds independently to both sites of the IgG homodimer with identical affinity

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Yeung, Yik Andy; Chaparro-Riggers, Javier; Barman, Ishita; Strop, Pavel; Chin, Sherman Michael; Pham, Amber; Bolton, Gary; McDonough, Dan; Lindquist, Kevin; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is expressed by cells of epithelial, endothelial and myeloid lineages and performs multiple roles in adaptive immunity. Characterizing the FcRn/IgG interaction is fundamental to designing therapeutic antibodies because IgGs with moderately increased binding affinities for FcRn exhibit superior serum half-lives and efficacy. It has been hypothesized that 2 FcRn molecules bind an IgG homodimer with disparate affinities, yet their affinity constants are inconsistent across the literature. Using surface plasmon resonance biosensor assays that eliminated confounding experimental artifacts, we present data supporting an alternate hypothesis: 2 FcRn molecules saturate an IgG homodimer with identical affinities at independent sites, consistent with the symmetrical arrangement of the FcRn/Fc complex observed in the crystal structure published by Burmeister et al. in 1994. We find that human FcRn binds human IgG1 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 760 ± 60 nM (N = 14) at 25°C and pH 5.8, and shows less than 25% variation across the other human subtypes. Human IgG1 binds cynomolgus monkey FcRn with a 2-fold higher affinity than human FcRn, and binds both mouse and rat FcRn with a 10-fold higher affinity than human FcRn. FcRn/IgG interactions from multiple species show less than a 2-fold weaker affinity at 37°C than at 25°C and appear independent of an IgG's variable region. Our in vivo data in mouse and rat models demonstrate that both affinity and avidity influence an IgG's serum half-life, which should be considered when choosing animals, especially transgenic systems, as surrogates. PMID:25658443

  12. Valuing Essays: Essaying Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badley, Graham

    2010-01-01

    The essay regularly comes under attack. It is criticised for being rigidly linear rather than flexible and reflective. I first challenge this view by examining reasons why the essay should be valued as an important genre. Secondly, I propose that in using the essay form students and academics necessarily exemplify their own critical values. Essays…

  13. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same time,…

  14. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  15. Affinity enhancement by dendritic side chains in synthetic carbohydrate receptors.

    PubMed

    Destecroix, Harry; Renney, Charles M; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Carter, Tom S; Stewart, Patrick F N; Crump, Matthew P; Davis, Anthony P

    2015-02-01

    Dendritic side chains have been used to modify the binding environment in anthracene-based synthetic carbohydrate receptors. Control of length, charge, and branching enabled the positioning of side-chain carboxylate groups in such a way that they assisted in binding substrates rather than blocking the cavity. Conformational degeneracy in the dendrimers resulted in effective preorganization despite the flexibility of the system. Strong binding was observed to glucosammonium ions in water, with Ka values up to 7000 M(-1) . Affinities for uncharged substrates (glucose and N-acetylglucosamine) were also enhanced, despite competition from solvent and the absence of electrostatic interactions. PMID:25645064

  16. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-01-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  17. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-06-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  18. Determination of protein binding affinities within hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs).

    PubMed

    EL-Sharif, Hazim F; Hawkins, Daniel M; Stevenson, Derek; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs) were prepared for several proteins (haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase) using a family of acrylamide-based monomers. Protein affinity towards the HydroMIPs was investigated under equilibrium conditions and over a range of concentrations using specific binding with Hill slope saturation profiles. We report HydroMIP binding affinities, in terms of equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) within the micro-molar range (25 ± 4 μM, 44 ± 3 μM, 17 ± 2 μM for haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase respectively within a polyacrylamide-based MIP). The extent of non-specific binding or cross-selectivity for non-target proteins has also been assessed. It is concluded that both selectivity and affinity for both cognate and non-cognate proteins towards the MIPs were dependent on the concentration and the complementarity of their structures and size. This is tentatively attributed to the formation of protein complexes during both the polymerisation and rebinding stages at high protein concentrations. We have used atomic force spectroscopy to characterize molecular interactions in the MIP cavities using protein-modified AFM tips. Attractive and repulsive force curves were obtained for the MIP and NIP (non-imprinted polymer) surfaces (under protein loaded or unloaded states). Our force data suggest that we have produced selective cavities for the template protein in the MIPs and we have been able to quantify the extent of non-specific protein binding on, for example, a non-imprinted polymer (NIP) control surface.

  19. Yeast 3',5'-bisphosphate nucleotidase: an affinity tag for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Jianhui; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yanxing; Yang, Ling; Sun, Meihao

    2014-05-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most popular methods for protein purification. Each tag method has its advantages and disadvantages, and combination of different tags and developing of new tags had been proposed and performed. Yeast 3',5'-bisphosphate nucleotidase, also known as HAL2, hydrolyzes 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate (PAP) with submicromolar Km, which indicated the tight interactions between HAL2 and PAP. In order to explore the feasibility of HAL2 as a protein purification affinity tag, HAL2 was further characterized with PAP as substrate. Results demonstrated that KmPAP and kcatPAP were ∼0.3μM and ∼11s(-)(1), respectively. Kd for PAP was 0.008μM in the presence of Ca(2+). pH was also found to affect interactions between HAL2 and PAP, with tightest binding (Kd∼8nM) at pH 7.5 and 8. The purification protocol was rationally designed based on nanomolar affinity to PAP agarose in the presence of Ca(2+), which could satisfy the metal requirement for PAP binding, prevent hydrolysis of immobilized PAP and could be chelated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) for elution. A series of expression vectors were further constructed and Escherichia coli adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) was prokaryotically expressed, purified and characterized. Ready to use expression vector with eight commonly used restriction enzyme recognition sites in multiple cloning site was subsequently constructed. By comparing with current popular tags, HAL2 was found to be an efficient and economical tag for prokaryotic protein expression and purification. PMID:24613729

  20. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca2+ Probe D4ER

    PubMed Central

    Greotti, Elisa; Wong, Andrea; Pozzan, Tullio; Pendin, Diana; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents the major intracellular Ca2+ store and the free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) within its lumen ([Ca2+]ER) can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca2+ sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca2+ probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd) for Ca2+, low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca2+] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca2+ affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca2+] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca2+]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer’s Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2). The lower Ca2+ affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca2+ content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls. PMID:27598166

  1. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca(2+) Probe D4ER.

    PubMed

    Greotti, Elisa; Wong, Andrea; Pozzan, Tullio; Pendin, Diana; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents the major intracellular Ca(2+) store and the free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within its lumen ([Ca(2+)]ER) can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca(2+) sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca(2+) probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd) for Ca(2+), low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca(2+)] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca(2+) affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca(2+)] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca(2+)]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer's Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2). The lower Ca(2+) affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca(2+) content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls. PMID:27598166

  2. Characterization of specific high affinity receptors for human tumor necrosis factor on mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, P.E.; Hotchkiss, A.; Mohler, M.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1985-10-05

    Mouse L-929 fibroblasts, an established line of cells, are very sensitive to lysis by human lymphotoxin (hTNF-beta). Specific binding of a highly purified preparation of hTNF-beta to these cells was examined. Recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was radiolabeled with (TH)propionyl succinimidate at the lysine residues of the molecule to a specific activity of 200 microCi/nmol of protein. (TH)hTNF-beta was purified by high performance gel permeation chromatography and the major fraction was found to be monomeric by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The labeled hTNF-beta was fully active in causing lysis of L-929 fibroblasts and bound specifically to high affinity binding sites on these cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 6.7 X 10(-11) M and a capacity of 3200 binding sites/cell. Unlabeled recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was found to be approximately 5-fold more effective competitive inhibitor of binding than the natural hTNF-beta. The binding of hTNF-beta to these mouse fibroblasts was also correlated with the ultimate cell lysis. Neutralizing polyclonal antibodies to hTNF-beta efficiently inhibited the binding of (TH)hTNF-beta to the cells. The authors conclude that the specific high affinity binding site is the receptor for hTNF-beta and may be involved in lysis of cells.

  3. Determination of protein binding affinities within hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs).

    PubMed

    EL-Sharif, Hazim F; Hawkins, Daniel M; Stevenson, Derek; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs) were prepared for several proteins (haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase) using a family of acrylamide-based monomers. Protein affinity towards the HydroMIPs was investigated under equilibrium conditions and over a range of concentrations using specific binding with Hill slope saturation profiles. We report HydroMIP binding affinities, in terms of equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) within the micro-molar range (25 ± 4 μM, 44 ± 3 μM, 17 ± 2 μM for haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase respectively within a polyacrylamide-based MIP). The extent of non-specific binding or cross-selectivity for non-target proteins has also been assessed. It is concluded that both selectivity and affinity for both cognate and non-cognate proteins towards the MIPs were dependent on the concentration and the complementarity of their structures and size. This is tentatively attributed to the formation of protein complexes during both the polymerisation and rebinding stages at high protein concentrations. We have used atomic force spectroscopy to characterize molecular interactions in the MIP cavities using protein-modified AFM tips. Attractive and repulsive force curves were obtained for the MIP and NIP (non-imprinted polymer) surfaces (under protein loaded or unloaded states). Our force data suggest that we have produced selective cavities for the template protein in the MIPs and we have been able to quantify the extent of non-specific protein binding on, for example, a non-imprinted polymer (NIP) control surface. PMID:24950144

  4. Structural Basis of the High Affinity Interaction between the Alphavirus Nonstructural Protein-3 (nsP3) and the SH3 Domain of Amphiphysin-2.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Aitio, Olli; Hellman, Maarit; Saksela, Kalle; Permi, Perttu

    2016-07-29

    We show that a peptide from Chikungunya virus nsP3 protein spanning residues 1728-1744 binds the amphiphysin-2 (BIN1) Src homology-3 (SH3) domain with an unusually high affinity (Kd 24 nm). Our NMR solution complex structure together with isothermal titration calorimetry data on several related viral and cellular peptide ligands reveal that this exceptional affinity originates from interactions between multiple basic residues in the target peptide and the extensive negatively charged binding surface of amphiphysin-2 SH3. Remarkably, these arginines show no fixed conformation in the complex structure, indicating that a transient or fluctuating polyelectrostatic interaction accounts for this affinity. Thus, via optimization of such dynamic electrostatic forces, viral peptides have evolved a superior binding affinity for amphiphysin-2 SH3 compared with typical cellular ligands, such as dynamin, thereby enabling hijacking of amphiphysin-2 SH3-regulated host cell processes by these viruses. Moreover, our data show that the previously described consensus sequence PXRPXR for amphiphysin SH3 ligands is inaccurate and instead define it as an extended Class II binding motif PXXPXRpXR, where additional positive charges between the two constant arginine residues can give rise to extraordinary high SH3 binding affinity.

  5. European and international collaboration in affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    In affinity proteomics, specific protein-binding molecules (a.k.a. binders), principally antibodies, are applied as reagents in proteome analysis. In recent years, advances in binder technologies have created the potential for an unprecedented view on protein expression and distribution patterns in plasma, cells and tissues and increasingly on protein function. Particular strengths of affinity proteomics methods include detecting proteins in their natural environments of cell or tissue, high sensitivity and selectivity for detection of low abundance proteins and exploiting binding actions such as functional interference in living cells. To maximise the use and impact of affinity reagents, it will be essential to create comprehensive, standardised binder collections. With this in mind, the EU FP7 programme AFFINOMICS (http://www.affinomics.org), together with the preceding EU programmes ProteomeBinders and AffinityProteome, aims to extend affinity proteomics research by generating a large-scale resource of validated protein-binding molecules for characterisation of the human proteome. Activity is directed at producing binders to about 1000 protein targets, primarily in signal transduction and cancer, by establishing a high throughput, coordinated production pipeline. An important aspect of AFFINOMICS is the development of highly efficient recombinant selection methods, based on phage, cell and ribosome display, capable of producing high quality binders at greater throughput and lower cost than hitherto. The programme also involves development of innovative and sensitive technologies for specific detection of target proteins and their interactions, and deployment of binders in proteomics studies of clinical relevance. The need for such binder generation programmes is now recognised internationally, with parallel initiatives in the USA for cancer (NCI) and transcription factors (NIH) and within the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). The papers in this volume of New

  6. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  7. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. > The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. > Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. > f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy theories to

  8. Affine Invariant Character Recognition by Progressive Removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamura, Masakazu; Horimatsu, Akira; Niwa, Ryo; Kise, Koichi; Uchida, Seiichi; Omachi, Shinichiro

    Recognizing characters in scene images suffering from perspective distortion is a challenge. Although there are some methods to overcome this difficulty, they are time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a set of affine invariant features and a new recognition scheme called “progressive removing” that can help reduce the processing time. Progressive removing gradually removes less feasible categories and skew angles by using multiple classifiers. We observed that progressive removing and the use of the affine invariant features reduced the processing time by about 60% in comparison to a trivial one without decreasing the recognition rate.

  9. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  10. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  11. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  12. High affinity P2x-purinoceptor binding sites for [35S]-adenosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate] in rat vas deferens membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, A. D.; Humphrey, P. P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding sites labelled by [35S]-adenosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate]([35S]-ATP gamma S) at 4 degrees C in rat vas deferens membranes were studied and compared to the sites labelled by [3H]-alpha,beta-methylene ATP ([3H]-alpha beta meATP) to ascertain whether [35S]-ATP gamma S can be used to label the P2x purinoceptor. 2. In the presence of 4 mM CaCl2, the binding of 0.2 nM [35S]-ATP gamma S to vas deferens membranes was increased 3.4 fold, when compared to studies performed in the absence of calcium. However, binding did not appear to be solely to P2x purinoceptors since [35S]-ATP gamma S labelled a heterogeneous population of sites and about 72% of the sites possessed high affinity (pIC50 = 7.5) for guanosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate] (GTP gamma S). Even in the presence of 1 microM GTP gamma S, to occlude the sites with high affinity for GTP gamma S, the binding of [35S]-ATP gamma S was heterogeneous and since there was also evidence of extensive metabolism of ATP in the presence of calcium, the binding of [35S]-ATP gamma S under these conditions was not studied further. 3. In the absence of calcium ions, [35S]-ATP gamma S bound to a single population of sites (pKD = 9.23; Bmax = 4270 fmol mg-1 protein). Binding reached steady state within 3 h (t1/2 = 38 min), was stable for a further 4 h and was readily reversible upon addition of 10 microM unlabelled ATP gamma S (t1/2 = 45 min). In competition studies the binding of 0.2 nM [35S]-ATP gamma S was inhibited by a number of P2x purinoceptor agonists and antagonists, but not by adenosine receptor agonists, staurosporine (1 microM) or several ATPase inhibitors. The rank order of agonist affinity estimates (pIC50 values) in competing for the [35S]-ATP gamma S binding sites was: ATP (9.01), 2-methylthio- ATP (8.79), ATP gamma S (8.73), alpha beta meATP (7.57), ADP (7.24), beta, gamma-methylene ATP (7.18), L-beta, gamma-methylene ATP (5.83), alpha, beta-methylene ADP (4.36). 4. Affinity estimates (pIC50 values) for

  13. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  14. A membrane-bound form of glutamate dehydrogenase possesses an ATP-dependent high-affinity microtubule-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rajas, F; Rousset, B

    1993-01-01

    We previously identified a 50 kDa membrane protein which bound to in vitro assembled microtubules [Mithieux and Rousset (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 4664-4668]. This protein exhibited the expected properties for mediating the ATP-dependent association of vesicles with microtubules [Mithieux, Audebet and Rousset (1988) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 969, 121-130]. The 50 kDa membrane protein (MP50), initially extracted in very low amount from isolated pig thyroid lysosomes/endosomes, has now been purified from membrane preparations of crude vesicle fractions from pig liver and brain. MP50 was isolated from detergent-solubilized membrane protein by affinity chromatography on immobilized ATP; 3-5 mg of MP50 was obtained from 100 g of liver tissue. Phase partitioning in Triton X-114 indicated that MP50 is a peripheral membrane protein. Radioiodinated liver MP50 bound to microtubules assembled in vitro. The binding was inhibited by ATP (Ki = 0.76 mM) and displaced by unlabelled liver or brain MP50. Equilibrium binding studies yielded KD values of 1.8 x 10(-7) M. By N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, MP50 was identified as glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), by comparison of V8 protease peptide maps of MP50 with purified liver GDH. Liver MP50 exhibited a low GDH activity; 4-5 units/mg compared with 18 and 34 units/mg for purified bovine and rat liver GDH respectively. Bovine and rat liver GDH yielded six spots from pI 5.7 to 7.2 when analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; in contrast, MP50 gave one main spot (corresponding to spot 2 of liver GDH) with a pI of approx. 6.5. Soluble liver GDH from commercial sources exhibited a very low or no microtubule-binding activity. In conclusion, we have found a membrane-bound form of GDH capable of specific and nucleotide-sensitive interaction with microtubules. Our data suggest that GDH isoproteins, the number of which has been undervalued up to now, could have cellular functions other than that of an enzyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 3

  15. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  16. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  17. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  18. Induction of monocyte expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha by the 30-kD alpha antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and synergism with fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Aung, H; Toossi, Z; Wisnieski, J J; Wallis, R S; Culp, L A; Phillips, N B; Phillips, M; Averill, L E; Daniel, T M; Ellner, J J

    1996-01-01

    Native 30-kD antigen, also known as alpha antigen, is a fibronectin-binding protein that is secreted by live Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This antigen may play an important biological role in the host-parasite interaction since it elicits delayed type hypersensitivity response and protective immunity in vivo and T lymphocyte blastogenesis and IFN-gamma production in vitro. In the present study, we show that, TNF-alpha protein is produced in monocyte culture supernatants in response to 30-kD antigen and the level is as high as that to purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis. This stimulatory effect was not due to contamination with either bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan. The preincubation of monocytes with plasma fibronectin significantly enhanced the release of TNF-alpha into the culture supernatants in response to 30-kD antigen. This effect was blocked by polygonal antibody to plasma fibronectin. In contrast, the monocytic cell line U937 failed to release TNF-alpha protein in the culture supernatants in response to 30-kD antigen with or without preincubation with plasma fibronectin. To determine whether this observation was due to differential binding of the 30-kD to fibronectin on these cells, a cell based ELISA was used. Pretreatment of monocytes with fibronectin enhanced their binding of the 30-kD antigen. U937 cells bound the 30-kD antigen weakly with or without fibronectin pretreatment. These results indicate that 30-kD antigen which is a known secretary antigen of M. tuberculosis is a stimulus for human monocytes to express TNF-alpha and that stimulatory effect may be mediated through plasma fibronectin. PMID:8787690

  19. Metal ion blockage of tritium incorporation into gamma-carboxyglutamic acid of prothrombin. Stoichiometry of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to Gd3+ for the high affinity sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, S.P.; Saini, R.; Katz, A.; Cai, G.Z.; Maki, S.L.; Brodsky, G.L.

    1988-07-15

    Prothrombin possesses two high affinity and four low affinity gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-dependent gadolinium binding sites. Earlier work has shown that tritium can be specifically incorporated at the gamma-carbon of Gla in proteins at pH 5. In the present work we show that inclusion of saturating concentrations of Ca2+ in nondenaturing buffer systems ranging from pH 5.5 to 8.5 prevents the exchange of tritium into all 10 Gla residues of prothrombin. Similarly, saturating concentrations of Gd3+ prevent tritium incorporation into Gla at pH 5.5. Positive cooperativity was observed for the binding of Gd3+ to human prothrombin (at pH 5.5) for the two high affinity sites (Kd congruent to 35 nM). The four low affinity sites bind Gd3+ with a Kd congruent to 5 microM. Incubation of prothrombin ranging in concentrations from 10 to 40 microM with 2 eq of Gd3+ at pH 5.5 prevents 5.7 (average of seven determinations) Gla residues from tritium incorporation. Sedimentation velocity experiments conducted at pH 5.5 indicate that prothrombin in the presence of saturating concentrations of Gd3+ polymerizes, most likely, to a trimer. Further, in the presence of 2 eq of Gd3+, calculated percent weight average concentration of monomer prothrombin is congruent to 100% at 10 microM, approximately equal to 95% at 20 microM, and congruento to 80% at 40 microM protein concentration. Thus, it appears that under conditions in which prothrombin primarily exists as a monomer, occupancy of the initial two metal binding sites by Gd3+ involves six Gla residues.

  20. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments.

  1. Structure-Guided Design of IACS-9571, a Selective High-Affinity Dual TRIM24-BRPF1 Bromodomain Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Wylie S; Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Liu, Gang; Petrocchi, Alessia; Reyna, Naphtali; Subramanian, Govindan; Theroff, Jay; Yau, Anne; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Bardenhagen, Jennifer P; Leo, Elisabetta; Shepard, Hannah E; Tieu, Trang N; Shi, Xi; Zhan, Yanai; Zhao, Shuping; Barton, Michelle C; Draetta, Giulio; Toniatti, Carlo; Jones, Philip; Geck Do, Mary; Andersen, Jannik N

    2016-02-25

    The bromodomain containing proteins TRIM24 (tripartite motif containing protein 24) and BRPF1 (bromodomain and PHD finger containing protein 1) are involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and have been implicated in human cancer. Overexpression of TRIM24 correlates with poor patient prognosis, and BRPF1 is a scaffolding protein required for the assembly of histone acetyltransferase complexes, where the gene of MOZ (monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) was first identified as a recurrent fusion partner in leukemia patients (8p11 chromosomal rearrangements). Here, we present the structure guided development of a series of N,N-dimethylbenzimidazolone bromodomain inhibitors through the iterative use of X-ray cocrystal structures. A unique binding mode enabled the design of a potent and selective inhibitor 8i (IACS-9571) with low nanomolar affinities for TRIM24 and BRPF1 (ITC Kd = 31 nM and ITC Kd = 14 nM, respectively). With its excellent cellular potency (EC50 = 50 nM) and favorable pharmacokinetic properties (F = 29%), 8i is a high-quality chemical probe for the evaluation of TRIM24 and/or BRPF1 bromodomain function in vitro and in vivo.

  2. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments. PMID:9807828

  3. A high-affinity receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator on human keratinocytes: characterization and potential modulation during migration.

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, H; Jensen, P J

    1990-01-01

    Low passage cultures of normal human keratinocytes produce several components of the plasminogen activator/plasmin proteolytic cascade, including urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and two specific inhibitors. Studies here presented demonstrate that these cells also contain a high-affinity (Kd = 3 x 10(-10) M) plasma membrane-binding site for uPA. High molecular weight uPA, either as the single-chain precursor or two-chain activated form, bound to the receptor; however, low molecular weight (33 kD) uPA, tPA, or epidermal growth factor did not compete for binding, demonstrating specificity. Acid treatment, which removed endogenous uPA from the receptor, was required to detect maximal binding (45,000 sites per cell). To investigate the possibility that the uPA receptor on keratinocytes may be involved in epithelial migration during wound repair, cultures were wounded and allowed to migrate into the wounded site. Binding sites for uPA were localized by autoradiographic analysis of 125I-uPA binding as well as by immunocytochemical studies using anti-uPA IgG. With both techniques uPA binding sites were detected selectively on the plasma membrane of cells at the leading edge of the migrating epithelial sheet. This localization pattern suggests that uPA receptor expression on keratinocytes may be coupled to cell migration during cutaneous wounding. Images PMID:1965151

  4. High affinity ( sup 3 H)glibenclamide binding sites in rat neuronal and cardiac tissue: Localization and developmental characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Velayo, N.L.; Dage, R.C.; Rampe, D. )

    1991-01-01

    We examined the binding of the antidiabetic sulfonylurea (3H) glibenclamide to rat brain and heart membranes. High affinity binding was observed in adult rat forebrain (Kd = 137.3 pM, maximal binding site density = 91.8 fmol/mg of protein) and ventricle (Kd = 77.1 pM, maximal binding site density = 65.1 fmol/mg of protein). Binding site density increased approximately 250% in forebrain membranes during postnatal development but was constant in ventricular membranes. Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the regional distribution of (3H) glibenclamide binding sites in sections from rat brain, spinal cord and heart. The greatest density of binding in adult brain was found in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, whereas the other areas displayed heterogenous binding. In agreement with the membrane binding studies, 1-day-old rat brain had significantly fewer (3H)glibenclamide binding sites than adult brain. Additionally, the pattern of distribution of these sites was qualitatively different from that of the adult. In adult rat spinal cord, moderate binding densities were observed in spinal cord gray and displayed a rostral to caudal gradient. In adult rat heart, moderate binding densities were observed and the sites were distributed homogeneously. In conclusion, significant development of (3H)glibenclamide binding sites was seen in the brain but not the heart during postnatal maturation. Furthermore, a heterogeneous distribution of binding sites was observed in both the brain and spinal cord of adult rats.

  5. Methyl cation affinities of neutral and anionic maingroup-element hydrides: trends across the periodic table and correlation with proton affinities.

    PubMed

    Mulder, R Joshua; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-07-22

    We have computed the methyl cation affinities in the gas phase of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using ZORA-relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide the methyl cation affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of all anionic (XH(n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (i.e., group 18) along the periods 2-6. The cation affinity of the bases decreases from H(+) to CH(3)(+). To understand this trend, we have carried out quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). Quantitative correlations are established between the MCA and PA values.

  6. Methyl cation affinities of neutral and anionic maingroup-element hydrides: trends across the periodic table and correlation with proton affinities.

    PubMed

    Mulder, R Joshua; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-07-22

    We have computed the methyl cation affinities in the gas phase of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using ZORA-relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide the methyl cation affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of all anionic (XH(n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (i.e., group 18) along the periods 2-6. The cation affinity of the bases decreases from H(+) to CH(3)(+). To understand this trend, we have carried out quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). Quantitative correlations are established between the MCA and PA values. PMID:20575582

  7. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  8. Rogue waves in electronegative space plasmas: The link between the family of the KdV equations and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the likelihood of the ion-acoustic rogue waves propagation in a non-Maxwellian electronegative plasma in the framework of the family of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations (KdV/modified KdV/Extended KdV equation). For this purpose, we use the reductive perturbation technique to carry out this study. It is known that the family of the KdV equations have solutions of distinct structures such as solitons, shocks, kinks, cnoidal waves, etc. However, the dynamics of the nonlinear rogue waves is governed by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Thus, the family of the KdV equations is transformed to their corresponding NLSE developing a weakly nonlinear wave packets. We show the possible region for the existence of the rogue waves and define it precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. We investigate numerically the effects of relevant physical parameters, namely, the negative ion relative concentration, the nonthermal parameter, and the mass ratio on the propagation of the rogue waves profile. The present study should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the nonlinear structures such as, ion-acoustic solitary waves, shock waves, and rogue waves in space and in laboratory plasma where two distinct groups of ions, i.e. positive and negative ions, and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons are present.

  9. Identification and Affinity-Quantification of ß-Amyloid and α-Synuclein Polypeptides Using On-Line SAW-Biosensor-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamnoiu, Stefan; Vlad, Camelia; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Moise, Adrian; Lindner, Kathrin; Engel, Nicole; Vilanova, Mar; Diaz, Mireia; Karreman, Christiaan; Leist, Marcel; Ciossek, Thomas; Hengerer, Bastian; Vilaseca, Marta; Przybylski, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Bioaffinity analysis using a variety of biosensors has become an established tool for detection and quantification of biomolecular interactions. Biosensors, however, are generally limited by the lack of chemical structure information of affinity-bound ligands. On-line bioaffinity-mass spectrometry using a surface-acoustic wave biosensor (SAW-MS) is a new combination providing the simultaneous affinity detection, quantification, and mass spectrometric structural characterization of ligands. We describe here an on-line SAW-MS combination for direct identification and affinity determination, using a new interface for MS of the affinity-isolated ligand eluate. Key element of the SAW-MS combination is a microfluidic interface that integrates affinity-isolation on a gold chip, in-situ sample concentration, and desalting with a microcolumn for MS of the ligand eluate from the biosensor. Suitable MS- acquisition software has been developed that provides coupling of the SAW-MS interface to a Bruker Daltonics ion trap-MS, FTICR-MS, and Waters Synapt-QTOF- MS systems. Applications are presented for mass spectrometric identifications and affinity (KD) determinations of the neurodegenerative polypeptides, ß-amyloid (Aß), and pathophysiological and physiological synucleins (α- and ß-synucleins), two key polypeptide systems for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Moreover, first in vivo applications of αSyn polypeptides from brain homogenate show the feasibility of on-line affinity-MS to the direct analysis of biological material. These results demonstrate on-line SAW-bioaffinity-MS as a powerful tool for structural and quantitative analysis of biopolymer interactions.

  10. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  11. F-Expansion Method and New Exact Solutions of the Schrödinger-KdV Equation

    PubMed Central

    Filiz, Ali; Ekici, Mehmet; Sonmezoglu, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    F-expansion method is proposed to seek exact solutions of nonlinear evolution equations. With the aid of symbolic computation, we choose the Schrödinger-KdV equation with a source to illustrate the validity and advantages of the proposed method. A number of Jacobi-elliptic function solutions are obtained including the Weierstrass-elliptic function solutions. When the modulus m of Jacobi-elliptic function approaches to 1 and 0, soliton-like solutions and trigonometric-function solutions are also obtained, respectively. The proposed method is a straightforward, short, promising, and powerful method for the nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics. PMID:24672327

  12. F-expansion method and new exact solutions of the Schrödinger-KdV equation.

    PubMed

    Filiz, Ali; Ekici, Mehmet; Sonmezoglu, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    F-expansion method is proposed to seek exact solutions of nonlinear evolution equations. With the aid of symbolic computation, we choose the Schrödinger-KdV equation with a source to illustrate the validity and advantages of the proposed method. A number of Jacobi-elliptic function solutions are obtained including the Weierstrass-elliptic function solutions. When the modulus m of Jacobi-elliptic function approaches to 1 and 0, soliton-like solutions and trigonometric-function solutions are also obtained, respectively. The proposed method is a straightforward, short, promising, and powerful method for the nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics. PMID:24672327

  13. A meshless method using radial basis functions for numerical solution of the two-dimensional KdV-Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabihi, F.; Saffarian, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this article is to obtain the numerical solution of the two-dimensional KdV-Burgers equation. We construct the solution by using a different approach, that is based on using collocation points. The solution is based on using the thin plate splines radial basis function, which builds an approximated solution with discretizing the time and the space to small steps. We use a predictor-corrector scheme to avoid solving the nonlinear system. The results of numerical experiments are compared with analytical solutions to confirm the accuracy and efficiency of the presented scheme.

  14. Novel Kac-Moody-type affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Bœhm, Céline; Twarock, Reidun

    2012-07-01

    Motivated by recent results in mathematical virology, we present novel asymmetric {Z}[\\tau ]-integer-valued affine extensions of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H2, H3 and H4 derived in a Kac-Moody-type formalism. In particular, we show that the affine reflection planes which extend the Coxeter group H3 generate (twist) translations along two-, three- and five-fold axes of icosahedral symmetry, and we classify these translations in terms of the Fibonacci recursion relation applied to different start values. We thus provide an explanation of previous results concerning affine extensions of icosahedral symmetry in a Coxeter group context, and extend this analysis to the case of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H2 and H4. These results will enable new applications of group theory in physics (quasicrystals), biology (viruses) and chemistry (fullerenes).

  15. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  16. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  17. Two measured completely different electron affinities for atomic Eu?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the electron affinity (EA) of atomic Eu was measured to be 0.116?eV. This value is in outstanding agreement with the theoretically calculated values using the Regge pole and MCDF-RCI methods. Previously, the EA of Eu was measured to be 1.053 eV. In an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between the two measured values, we have adopted the complex angular momentum (CAM) method and investigated in the electron energy range 0.11 eV value of 2.63 eV as the EA of Eu. This leads us to conclude that neither the claimed measured EA of Eu correspond to the actual EA of Eu. We conclude that the EA in corresponds to the BE of an excited (metastable) state of the Euanion and that in to a shape resonance. We have also investigated the EA of atomic Nd and found the value of 1.88 eV, consistent with the measurement. These significant EA values of Eu and Nd could be important in the use of their negative ions in catalyzing the oxidation of water to peroxide and of methane to methanol without CO2 emission. These new results call for immediate experimental and theoretical verification.

  18. Human Lin28 Forms a High-Affinity 1:1 Complex with the 106~363 Cluster miRNA miR-363.

    PubMed

    Peters, Daniel T; Fung, Herman K H; Levdikov, Vladimir M; Irmscher, Tobias; Warrander, Fiona C; Greive, Sandra J; Kovalevskiy, Oleg; Isaacs, Harry V; Coles, Mark; Antson, Alfred A

    2016-09-13

    Lin28A is a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression that interacts with and negatively regulates the biogenesis of let-7 family miRNAs. Recent data suggested that Lin28A also binds the putative tumor suppressor miR-363, a member of the 106~363 cluster of miRNAs. Affinity for this miRNA and the stoichiometry of the protein-RNA complex are unknown. Characterization of human Lin28's interaction with RNA has been complicated by difficulties in producing stable RNA-free protein. We have engineered a maltose binding protein fusion with Lin28, which binds let-7 miRNA with a Kd of 54.1 ± 4.2 nM, in agreement with previous data on a murine homologue. We show that human Lin28A binds miR-363 with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with a similar, if not higher, affinity (Kd = 16.6 ± 1.9 nM). Further analysis suggests that the interaction of the N-terminal cold shock domain of Lin28A with RNA is salt-dependent, supporting a model in which the cold shock domain allows the protein to sample RNA substrates through transient electrostatic interactions. PMID:27559824

  19. Binding of L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine to a single class of high affinity sites in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lippiello, P.M.; Fernandes, K.G.

    1986-05-01

    The binding of optically pure L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine to rat brain membrane preparations was studied using a rapid filtration method. The binding properties observed depended on the method used for tissue isolation. The most consistent results were obtained with membranes prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors, without divalent cations. Binding was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of high affinity sites with an average KD of 2 nM and a Bmax of approximately 200 fmol/mg of protein. The Hill coefficient was near unity. The KD calculated from the kinetic rate constants for association (k1 = 0.012 min-1 nM-1) and dissociation (k-1 = 0.04 min-1) was around 3 nM, in good agreement with the dissociation constant determined from equilibrium binding. In competition studies, cholinergic agonists were generally the most effective in inhibiting L-(/sup 3/H)nicotine binding, whereas antagonists were relatively ineffective. The D-isomer of nicotine was about 60-fold less potent than the L-isomer in inhibiting binding. The results were unaffected by temperature, with the exception that Bmax was somewhat lower at 37 degrees. The equilibrium binding properties of these sites were essentially identical in adult male and female brain. However, Bmax was lower in fetal brain tissue. The present findings are consistent with the idea that there is a single class of high affinity nicotinic binding sites in rat brain with cholinoceptive properties.

  20. Cloning of a murine IL-11 receptor alpha-chain; requirement for gp130 for high affinity binding and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, D J; Hilton, A A; Raicevic, A; Rakar, S; Harrison-Smith, M; Gough, N M; Begley, C G; Metcalf, D; Nicola, N A; Willson, T A

    1994-01-01

    An adult mouse liver cDNA library was screened with oligonucleotides corresponding to the conserved WSXWS motif of the haemopoietin receptor family. Using this method, cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor were isolated. The new receptor, named NR1, was most similar in sequence and predicted structure to the alpha-chain of the IL-6 receptor and mRNA was expressed in the 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytic cell line and in a range of primary tissues. Expression of NR1 in the factor-dependent haemopoietic cell line Ba/F3 resulted in the generation of low affinity receptors for IL-11 (Kd approximately 10 nM). The capacity to bind IL-11 with high affinity (Kd = 300-800 pM) appeared to require coexpression of both NR1 and gp130, the common subunit of the IL-6, leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptors. The expression of both NR1 and gp130 was also necessary for Ba/F3 cells to proliferate and M1 cells to undergo macrophage differentiation in response to IL-11. Images PMID:7957045

  1. Fluorogenic Assay for Inhibitors of HIV-1 Protease with Sub-picomolar Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Ian W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-08-01

    A fluorogenic substrate for HIV-1 protease was designed and used as the basis for a hypersensitive assay. The substrate exhibits a kcat of 7.4 s-1, KM of 15 μM, and an increase in fluorescence intensity of 104-fold upon cleavage, thus providing sensitivity that is unmatched in a continuous assay of HIV-1 protease. These properties enabled the enzyme concentration in an activity assay to be reduced to 25 pM, which is close to the Kd value of the protease dimer. By fitting inhibition data to Morrison’s equation, Ki values of amprenavir, darunavir, and tipranavir were determined to be 135, 10, and 82 pM, respectively. This assay, which is capable of measuring Ki values as low as 0.25 pM, is well-suited for characterizing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  2. Smooth big bounce from affine quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Hervé; Dapor, Andrea; Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Małkiewicz, Przemysław

    2014-04-01

    We examine the possibility of dealing with gravitational singularities on a quantum level through the use of coherent state or wavelet quantization instead of canonical quantization. We consider the Robertson-Walker metric coupled to a perfect fluid. It is the simplest model of a gravitational collapse, and the results obtained here may serve as a useful starting point for more complex investigations in the future. We follow a quantization procedure based on affine coherent states or wavelets built from the unitary irreducible representation of the affine group of the real line with positive dilation. The main issue of our approach is the appearance of a quantum centrifugal potential allowing for regularization of the singularity, essential self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian, and unambiguous quantum dynamical evolution.

  3. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  4. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Béhar, Ghislaine; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized. PMID:25647098

  5. Permeability of self-affine rough fractures

    PubMed

    Drazer; Koplik

    2000-12-01

    The permeability of two-dimensional fractures with self-affine fractal roughness is studied via analytic arguments and numerical simulations. The limit where the roughness amplitude is small compared with average fracture aperture is analyzed by a perturbation method, while in the opposite case of narrow aperture, we use heuristic arguments based on lubrication theory. Numerical simulations, using the lattice Boltzmann method, are used to examine the complete range of aperture sizes, and confirm the analytic arguments. PMID:11138092

  6. Theoretical study for the electron affinities of negative ions with the MCDHF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junqin; Zhao, Zilong; Andersson, Martin; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Chongyang

    2012-08-01

    Systematic theoretical calculations based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method have been carried out for the electron affinities of anions of the elements of group III (B, Al, Ga, In and Tl), group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn and Pb), group V (N, P and As), group VI (O, S, Se, Te and Po) and group VII (F, Cl, Br, I and At) by studying the ground energies of neutral atoms and their corresponding negative ions. The differences between the calculated total energies of the neutral atom and its anion were used to obtain the electron affinities. We discuss in detail the effects of configuration interaction, investigate the importance of including different types of correlations and check the impact of the higher order relativistic corrections on electron affinities. Our calculated electron affinities are compared with experimental and other available theoretical results. The present studies are the first systematic studies of all these elements. We give the first theoretical values for the affinities of elements Se, Te, Po and At; thereinto, there is no experimental value for elements Po and At.

  7. [The (German) Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Wolf, U; Barnes, B; Bertz, J; Haberland, J; Laudi, A; Stöcker, M; Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K; Kurth, B-M

    2011-11-01

    Cancer represents the second most common cause of death in Germany. The country's federal states operate regional population-based cancer registries that collect and analyze data on cancer patients. This provides an essential basis for describing the cancer burden in the German population. In order to obtain valid and reliable information on cancer incidence at the national level, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) set up the Federal Cancer Surveillance Unit in 1983 as a central institution for evaluating this cancer registry data. In August 2009, when the Federal Cancer Registry Data Act (BKRG) came into force, the Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the RKI took over the work of the Cancer Surveillance Unit with a broader remit. In the future, it will also regularly publish findings on survival, prevalence, and tumor stage distribution. A newly established record linkage process will help identify multiple submissions from the federal states. Further innovations and new tasks of the ZfKD include expanding an interactive Internet platform and encouraging a more intensive use of cancer registry data for epidemiological research by providing datasets to external scientists. The range of information available to the interested public is also to be expanded. PMID:22015795

  8. [The (German) Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Wolf, U; Barnes, B; Bertz, J; Haberland, J; Laudi, A; Stöcker, M; Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K; Kurth, B-M

    2011-11-01

    Cancer represents the second most common cause of death in Germany. The country's federal states operate regional population-based cancer registries that collect and analyze data on cancer patients. This provides an essential basis for describing the cancer burden in the German population. In order to obtain valid and reliable information on cancer incidence at the national level, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) set up the Federal Cancer Surveillance Unit in 1983 as a central institution for evaluating this cancer registry data. In August 2009, when the Federal Cancer Registry Data Act (BKRG) came into force, the Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the RKI took over the work of the Cancer Surveillance Unit with a broader remit. In the future, it will also regularly publish findings on survival, prevalence, and tumor stage distribution. A newly established record linkage process will help identify multiple submissions from the federal states. Further innovations and new tasks of the ZfKD include expanding an interactive Internet platform and encouraging a more intensive use of cancer registry data for epidemiological research by providing datasets to external scientists. The range of information available to the interested public is also to be expanded.

  9. Adhalin, the 50 kD dystrophin associated protein, is not the locus for severe childhood autosomal recessive dystrophy (SCARMD)

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, E.M.; Selig, S.; Kunkel, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the carboxyl-terminus in dystrophin are normally sufficient to produce severely dystrophic muscle. This portion of dystrophin binds a complex of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins (DAGs). The genes encoding these DAGs are candidate genes for causing neuromuscular disease. Immunoreactivity for adhalin, the 50 kD DAG, is absent in muscle biopsies from patients with SCARMD, a form of dystrophy clinically similar Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Prior linkage analysis in SCARMD families revealed that the disease gene segregates with markers on chromosome 13. To determine the molecular role that adhalin may play in SCARMD, human cDNA and genomic sequences were isolated. Primers were designed based on predicted areas of conservation in rabbit adhalin and used in RT-PCR with human skeletal and cardiac muscle. RT-PCR products were confirmed by sequence as human adhalin and then used as probes for screening human cDNA and genomic libraries. Human and rabbit adhalin are 90% identical, and among the cDNAs, a novel splice form of adhalin was seen which may encode part of the 35 kD component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. To our surprise, only human/rodent hybrids containing human chromosome 17 amplified adhalin sequences in a PCR analysis. FISH analysis with three overlapping genomic sequences confirmed the chromosome 17 location and further delineated the map position to 17q21. Therefore, adhalin is excluded as the gene causing SCARMD.

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of a approximately 66 kD glycosylated phosphoprotein during development of the embryonic chick tibia.

    PubMed

    Bruder, S P; Caplan, A I; Gotoh, Y; Gerstenfeld, L C; Glimcher, M J

    1991-06-01

    Localization of a approximately 66 kD glycosylated phosphoprotein during morphogenesis of the embryonic chick tibia has been accomplished using immunohistochemistry. Although initial expression of the tibial osteoblast phenotype is detected as early as stage 28.5, with the deposition of osteoid matrix beginning at stage 30, little or no immunoreactivity against the approximately 66 kD glycosylated phosphoprotein is observed in pre-osteoblasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes, or in the uncalcified osteoid matrix during the early events of tibia development. Immunoreactivity was first observed at stage 32 when mineralization of the osteoid matrix is initiated. At this and all later stages, the phosphoprotein is located almost exclusively in the extracellular matrix at the mineralization front with essentially no detectable staining in the adjacent unmineralized osteoid matrix. Similarly, no cellular staining is observed when even the lightly mineralized extracellular matrix is strongly immunoreactive. Only scant immunostaining is present over the heavily mineralized regions, although demineralization of these areas with EDTA exposes a low intensity, punctate staining pattern. Additionally, cryosections of developing calvaria stained with this antiserum only display reactivity in regions of bone matrix undergoing mineralization. These localization studies support the hypothesis that this phosphoprotein is intimately associated with the process of bone matrix mineralization in the developing chick long bone.

  11. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  12. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field.

  13. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field. PMID:16792079

  14. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  15. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  16. Trematode hemoglobins show exceptionally high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Kiger, L; Rashid, A K; Griffon, N; Haque, M; Moens, L; Gibson, Q H; Poyart, C; Marden, M C

    1998-08-01

    Ligand binding studies were made with hemoglobin (Hb) isolated from trematode species Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gc), Paramphistomum epiclitum (Pe), Explanatum explanatum (Ee), parasitic worms of water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, and Isoparorchis hypselobagri (Ih) parasitic in the catfish Wallago attu. The kinetics of oxygen and carbon monoxide binding show very fast association rates. Whereas oxygen can be displaced on a millisecond time scale from human Hb at 25 degrees C, the dissociation of oxygen from trematode Hb may require a few seconds to over 20 s (for Hb Pe). Carbon monoxide dissociation is faster, however, than for other monomeric hemoglobins or myoglobins. Trematode hemoglobins also show a reduced rate of autoxidation; the oxy form is not readily oxidized by potassium ferricyanide, indicating that only the deoxy form reacts rapidly with this oxidizing agent. Unlike most vertebrate Hbs, the trematodes have a tyrosine residue at position E7 instead of the usual distal histidine. As for Hb Ascaris, which also displays a high oxygen affinity, the trematodes have a tyrosine in position B10; two H-bonds to the oxygen molecule are thought to be responsible for the very high oxygen affinity. The trematode hemoglobins display a combination of high association rates and very low dissociation rates, resulting in some of the highest oxygen affinities ever observed.

  17. Affinity chromatography and affinity labeling of rat liver succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ball, D J; Nishimura, J S

    1980-11-25

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from rat liver. The key step in the purification procedure involved adsorption on a GDP dialdehyde (dial-GDP)-adipic dihydrazide-Sepharose 4B column and elution by GDP-Mg2+. Like the pig heart enzyme (Brownie, E. R., and Bridger, W. A. (1972) Can. J. Biochem. 50, 719--724), the rat liver enzyme was an alpha beta heterodimer and only the alpha subunit was phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]GTP. The A 280(0.1%) of the enzyme was determined to be 0.5. Amino acid analyses revealed significant similarities in 50% of the amino acid residues of rat liver and Escherichia coli succinyl-CoA synthetases. However, immunodiffusion analysis failed to reveal any antigenic identity between the two enzymes. Incubation with the affinity label, dial-GDP, in the presence of Mg2+ resulted in a biphasic inactivation of the enzyme. The extent of the rapid phase of inactivation appeared to be related to the extent of dephosphorylation of the enzyme and was prevented by preincubation of the enzyme with GTP-Mg2+. The presence of GDP-Mg2+ in the incubation medium prevented the slow phase of the inactivation and retarded the rapid phase. Dephosphorylated enzyme was approximately 2 orders of magnitude more susceptible to inactivation by dial-GDP than phosphorylated enzyme. Labeling of succinyl-CoA synthetase with [3H]dial-GDP gave a linear relationship between inactivation and incorporation of radioactivity with an extrapolated value of less than 1.2 mol of analog/mol of enzyme at 100% inactivation. The distribution of the label in enzyme that was inactivated 40% was approximately 60% in the alpha subunit and 40% in the beta subunit. Thus, while phosphorylation of the enzyme occurs exclusively in the alpha subunit, the nucleotide binding site appears to include components from both alpha and beta subunits. PMID:7430155

  18. Associations of Teacher Credibility and Teacher Affinity with Learning Outcomes in Health Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, DeLeon L.; Anderman, Eric M.; O'Connell, Ann A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study (N = 633), we examine the role of teacher credibility and teacher affinity in classrooms. We explore the relations among these two characteristics and student gains in knowledge and valuing of learning about HIV and pregnancy prevention across high school classrooms. Results marshaled support for the notion that teacher…

  19. Effects of whole-body irradiation on antibody affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, G; Adorini, L; Boraschi, D; Di Michele, A; Doria, G

    1977-01-01

    Mice exposed to a sublethal dose of X-rays were immunized with alum-precipitated DNP-KLH (dinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet haemocyanin) and B. pertussis either before or after irradiation. The primary anti-DNP antibody response was evaluated during 8 weeks after immunization by the equilibrium dialysis technique using ammonium sulphate- precipitated serum globulins and the ligand 3H-labelled xi-DNP-L-Lysine. The serum concentrations of antibody sites in mice immunized 1-5 days before or 2 h-8 weeks after 450 rad were below the values in unirradiated controls at all bleeding times. Antibody affinity, however, was found to be up to 20 fold higher in irradiated mice than in control mice when antigen was injected before, or 3-8 weeks after, irradiation. Spleen cells from mice exposed to 450 rad 1-9 weeks before killing were stimulated in vitro with PHA, ConA, or LPS. Recovery profiles of mitotic responsiveness suggest that enhancement of antibody affinity in irradiated mice could result from relative lack of suppressor T Cells. PMID:198358

  20. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  1. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  2. cap alpha. /sub 2/-Adrenergic receptors in platelet membranes of depressed patients: no change in number of /sup 3/H-yohimbine affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Daiguji, M.I.; Meltzer, H.Y.; Tong, C.; U'Pritchard, D.C.; Young, M.; Kravitz, H.

    1981-11-16

    The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor density in platelet membranes from normal controls and depressed patients was studied using /sup 3/H-yohimbine, a potent ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, as a radioligand. The KD values of /sup 3/H-yohimbine in control and depressed patient samples were 0.92 +/- 0.07 nM and 0.97 +/- 0.06 nM, respectively. The Bmax values of controls and depressed patients were 240 +/- 19 fmoles/mg protein (125 +/- 13 receptor/platelet, R/PL) and 204 +/- 20 fmoles/mg protein (130 +/- 14 R/PL), respectively. There were no significant differences between the KD and Bmax values of the two groups.

  3. Antibody response dynamics to the Plasmodium falciparum conserved vaccine candidate antigen, merozoite surface protein-1 C-terminal 19kD (MSP1-19kD), in Peruvians exposed to hypoendemic malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Katherine J; Clark, Eva H; Hernandez, Jean N; Soto-Cornejo, Katherine E; Gamboa, Dionicia; Branch, OraLee H

    2008-01-01

    Background In high-transmission areas, developing immunity to symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infections requires 2–10 years of uninterrupted exposure. Delayed malaria-immunity has been attributed to difficult-to-develop and then short-lived antibody responses. Methods In a study area with <0.5 P. falciparum infections/person/year, antibody responses to the MSP1-19kD antigen were evaluated and associations with P. falciparum infections in children and adults. In months surrounding and during the malaria seasons of 2003–2004, 1,772 participants received ≥6 active visits in one study-year. Community-wide surveys were conducted at the beginning and end of each malaria season, and weekly active visits were completed for randomly-selected individuals each month. There were 79 P. falciparum infections with serum samples collected during and approximately one month before and after infection. Anti-MSP1-19kD IgG levels were measured by ELISA. Results The infection prevalence during February-July was similar in children (0.02–0.12 infections/person/month) and adults (0.03–0.14 infections/person/month) and was negligible in the four-month dry season. In children and adults, the seroprevalence was maintained in the beginning (children = 28.9%, adults = 61.8%) versus ending malaria-season community survey (children = 26.7%, adults = 64.6%). Despite the four-month non-transmission season, the IgG levels in Plasmodium-negative adults were similar to P. falciparum-positive adults. Although children frequently responded upon infection, the transition from a negative/low level before infection to a high level during/after infection was slower in children. Adults and children IgG-positive before infection had reduced symptoms and parasite density. Conclusion Individuals in low transmission areas can rapidly develop and maintain αMSP1-19kD IgG responses for >4 months, unlike responses reported in high transmission study areas. A greater immune capacity might contribute

  4. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  5. Probing the affinity of SecA for signal peptide in different environments.

    PubMed

    Musial-Siwek, Monika; Rusch, Sharyn L; Kendall, Debra A

    2005-10-25

    SecA, the peripheral subunit of the Escherichia coli preprotein translocase, interacts with a number of ligands during export, including signal peptides, membrane phospholipids, and nucleotides. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we studied the interactions of wild-type (WT) and mutant SecAs with IAEDANS-labeled signal peptide, and how these interactions are modified in the presence of other transport ligands. We find that residues on the third alpha-helix in the preprotein cross-linking domain (PPXD) are important for the interaction of SecA and signal peptide. For SecA in aqueous solution, saturation binding data using FRET analysis fit a single-site binding model and yielded a Kd of 2.4 microM. FRET is inhibited for SecA in lipid vesicles relative to that in aqueous solution at a low signal peptide concentration. The sigmoidal nature of the binding curve suggests that SecA in lipids has two conformational states; our results do not support different oligomeric states of SecA. Using native gel electrophoresis, we establish signal peptide-induced SecA monomerization in both aqueous solution and lipid vesicles. Whereas the affinity of SecA for signal peptide in an aqueous environment is unaffected by temperature or the presence of nucleotides, in lipids the affinity decreases in the presence of ADP or AMP-PCP but increases at higher temperature. The latter finding is consistent with SecA existing in an elongated form while inserting the signal peptide into membranes.

  6. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests. PMID:24832237

  7. Estimation of αL, velocity, Kd and confidence limits from tracer injection test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broermann, James; Bassett, R.L.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Borgstrom, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Bromide and boron were used as tracers during an injection experiment conducted at an artificial recharge facility near Stanton, Texas. The Ogallala aquifer at the Stanton site represents a heterogeneous alluvial environment and provides the opportunity to report scale dependent dispersivities at observation distances of 2 to 15 m in this setting. Values of longitudinal dispersivities are compared with other published values. Water samples were collected at selected depths both from piezometers and from fully screened observation wells at radii of 2, 5, 10 and 15 m. An exact analytical solution is used to simulate the concentration breakthrough curves and estimate longitudinal dispersivities and velocity parameters. Greater confidence can be placed on these data because the estimated parameters are error bounded using the bootstrap method. The non-conservative behavior of boron transport in clay rich sections of the aquifer were quantified with distribution coefficients by using bromide as a conservative reference tracer.

  8. Fast-onset lidocaine block of rat NaV1.4 channels suggests involvement of a second high-affinity open state.

    PubMed

    Gingrich, Kevin J; Wagner, Larry E

    2016-06-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) block resting, open, and inactivated states of voltage-gated Na(+) channels where inactivated states are thought to bind with highest affinity. However, reports of fast-onset block occurring over milliseconds hint at high-affinity block of open channels. Movement of voltage-sensor domain IV-segment 4 (DIVS4) has been associated with high affinity LA block termed voltage-sensor block (VSB) that also leads to a second open state. These observations point to a second high-affinity open state that may underlie fast-onset block. To test for this state, we analyzed the modulation of Na(+) currents by lidocaine and its quaternary derivative (QX222) from heterologously expressed (Xenopus laevis oocytes) rat skeletal muscle μ1 NaV1.4 (rSkM1) with β1 (WT-β1), and a mutant form (IFM-QQQ mutation in the III-IV interdomain, QQQ) lacking fast inactivation, in combination with Markov kinetic gating models. 100 μM lidocaine induced fast-onset (τonset≈2 ms), long-lived (τrecovery≈120 ms) block of WT-β1 macroscopic currents. Lidocaine blocked single-channel and macroscopic QQQ currents in agreement with our previously described mechanism of dual, open-channel block (DOB mechanism). A DOB kinetic model reproduced lidocaine effects on QQQ currents. The DOB model was extended to include trapping fast-inactivation and activation gates, and a second open state (OS2); the latter arising from DIVS4 translocation that precedes inactivation and exhibits high-affinity, lidocaine binding (apparent Kd=25 μM) that accords with VSB (DOB-S2VSB mechanism). The DOB-S2VSB kinetic model predicted fast-onset block of WT-β1. The findings support the involvement of a second, high-affinity, open state in lidocaine modulation of Na(+) channels.

  9. Increasing the molecular contacts between maurotoxin and Kv1.2 channel augments ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Chagot, Benjamin; Andreotti, Nicolas; Visan, Violeta; Mansuelle, Pascal; Grissmer, Stephan; Marrakchi, Mohamed; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Sampieri, François; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad; De Waard, Michel; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2005-08-15

    Scorpion toxins interact with their target ion channels through multiple molecular contacts. Because a "gain of function" approach has never been described to evaluate the importance of the molecular contacts in defining toxin affinity, we experimentally examined whether increasing the molecular contacts between a toxin and an ion channel directly impacts toxin affinity. For this purpose, we focused on two scorpion peptides, the well-characterized maurotoxin with its variant Pi1-like disulfide bridging (MTX(Pi1)), used as a molecular template, and butantoxin (BuTX), used as an N-terminal domain provider. BuTX is found to be 60-fold less potent than MTX(Pi1) in blocking Kv1.2 (IC(50) values of 165 nM for BuTX versus 2.8 nM for MTX(Pi1)). Removal of its N-terminal domain (nine residues) further decreases BuTX affinity for Kv1.2 by 5.6-fold, which is in agreement with docking simulation data showing the importance of this domain in BuTX-Kv1.2 interaction. Transfer of the BuTX N-terminal domain to MTX(Pi1) results in a chimera with five disulfide bridges (BuTX-MTX(Pi1)) that exhibits 22-fold greater affinity for Kv1.2 than MTX(Pi1) itself, in spite of the lower affinity of BuTX as compared to MTX(Pi1). Docking experiments performed with the 3-D structure of BuTX-MTX(Pi1) in solution, as solved by (1)H-NMR, reveal that the N-terminal domain of BuTX participates in the increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicate that acting on molecular contacts between a toxin and a channel is an efficient strategy to modulate toxin affinity.

  10. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Özçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J.; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P.; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO22+), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 109 (13.7 nM) however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  11. Probing the affinity of polyanions for acidic fibroblast growth factor by unfolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mach, H; Middaugh, C R

    1994-02-15

    The relationship between ligand-protein affinity and the extent of protein stabilization induced by such interactions has been investigated using the binding of polyanions to acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) as a model system. It was found that the experimentally observed unfolding rate constant of aFGF consists of two components: one equal to the unfolding rate constant of the aFGF-ligand complex and the other the product of the unfolding rate constant of free aFGF, the aFGF-ligand dissociation constant (Kd), and the reciprocal of the molar ligand concentration. This reflects the presence of two possible unfolding pathways: at high ligand excess dissociation is suppressed and slow unfolding of the aFGF-ligand complex itself prevails. When lower concentrations of ligand allows equilibrium-driven appearance of free aFGF, a more rapid unfolding of dissociated protein predominates. Existence of a steady state of dissociated aFGF undergoing unfolding was demonstrated by computer simulation of the elementary events, using experimentally determined rate constants. The potential applications of such simulations are outlined. An equation allowing estimation of dissociation constants from equilibrium denaturation curves obtained in the presence of a varying amount of ligand is also proposed. In addition, determination of initial unfolding rates in the presence of excess protein permits the the stoichiometry of the interaction to be determined.

  12. Calculation of the Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities for Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiqiang; Krieger, J. B.; Iafrate, G. J.; Savin, A.

    1998-03-01

    The method employing the self-interaction-corrected correlation energy functional obtained from the homogeneous electron gas with a gap is extended to atoms and ions with non-zero spin polarization. As in the case for atoms and ions with ζ=3D0, the error in the calculated Ec is significantly smaller than in the LSD approximation with zero gap for atoms and ions with Z<=18. Comparison of the resulting ionization potentials and electron affinities with experimental values will also be presented. Finally, we will discuss the possibility of obtaining saturation for Ec for the He, Li, N, O, F and Ne isoelectronic series, but a divergent Ec for the Be, B and C isoelectronic series, in the large Z limit.

  13. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  14. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  15. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  16. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  17. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  18. Affinities and densities of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-09-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using (/sup 3/H)muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. [Affine transformation-based automatic registration for peripheral digital subtraction angiography (DSA)].

    PubMed

    Kong, Gang; Dai, Dao-Qing; Zou, Lu-Min

    2008-07-01

    In order to remove the artifacts of peripheral digital subtraction angiography (DSA), an affine transformation-based automatic image registration algorithm is introduced here. The whole process is described as follows: First, rectangle feature templates are constructed with their centers of the extracted Harris corners in the mask, and motion vectors of the central feature points are estimated using template matching technology with the similarity measure of maximum histogram energy. And then the optimal parameters of the affine transformation are calculated with the matrix singular value decomposition (SVD) method. Finally, bilinear intensity interpolation is taken to the mask according to the specific affine transformation. More than 30 peripheral DSA registrations are performed with the presented algorithm, and as the result, moving artifacts of the images are removed with sub-pixel precision, and the time consumption is less enough to satisfy the clinical requirements. Experimental results show the efficiency and robustness of the algorithm.

  20. Work function and electron affinity of the fluorine-terminated (100) diamond surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietwyk, K. J.; Wong, S. L.; Cao, L.; O'Donnell, K. M.; Ley, L.; Wee, A. T. S.; Pakes, C. I.

    2013-03-01

    The work function and electron affinity of fluorine-terminated (100) diamond surfaces prepared by exposure to dissociated XeF2 have been determined using synchrotron-based photoemission. After vacuum annealing to 350 °C a clean, monofluoride terminated C(100):F surface was obtained for which an electron affinity of 2.56 eV was measured. This is the highest electron affinity reported for any diamond surface termination so far, and it exceeds the value predicted by recent density functional theory calculations by 0.43 eV. The work function of 7.24 eV measured for the same surface places the Fermi energy of 0.79 eV above the valence band maximum.