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Sample records for affinity ligand binding

  1. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  2. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known.

  3. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  4. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  5. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  6. Blind prediction of charged ligand binding affinities in a model binding site

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Fischer, Marcus; Fish, Inbar; Mobley, David L.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting absolute protein-ligand binding affinities remains a frontier challenge in ligand discovery and design. This becomes more difficult when ionic interactions are involved, because of the large opposing solvation and electrostatic attraction energies. In a blind test, we examined whether alchemical free energy calculations could predict binding affinities of 14 charged and 5 neutral compounds previously untested as ligands for a cavity binding site in Cytochrome C Peroxidase. In this simplified site, polar and cationic ligands compete with solvent to interact with a buried aspartate. Predictions were tested by calorimetry, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Of the 15 compounds predicted to bind, 13 were experimentally confirmed, while four compounds were false negative predictions. Predictions had an RMSE of 1.95 kcal/mol to the experimental affinities, and predicted poses had an average RMSD of 1.7 Å to the crystallographic poses. This test serves as a benchmark for these thermodynamically rigorous calculations at predicting binding affinities for charged compounds, and gives insights into the existing sources of error, which are primarily electrostatic interactions inside proteins. Our experiments also provide a useful set of ionic binding affinities in a simplified system for testing new affinity prediction methods. PMID:23896298

  7. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein–ligand binding affinities and structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D.; Clark, Jordan J.; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein–ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23 269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  8. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  9. Computational protocol for predicting the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun; Jayaram, B

    2007-06-01

    Zinc is one of the most important metal ions found in proteins performing specific functions associated with life processes. Coordination geometry of the zinc ion in the active site of the metalloprotein-ligand complexes poses a challenge in determining ligand binding affinities accurately in structure-based drug design. We report here an all atom force field based computational protocol for estimating rapidly the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes, considering electrostatics, van der Waals, hydrophobicity, and loss in conformational entropy of protein side chains upon ligand binding along with a nonbonded approach to model the interactions of the zinc ion with all the other atoms of the complex. We examined the sensitivity of the binding affinity predictions to the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters, partial atomic charges, and dielectric treatments adopted for system preparation and scoring. The highest correlation obtained was R2 = 0.77 (r = 0.88) for the predicted binding affinity against the experiment on a heterogenous dataset of 90 zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes consisting of five unique protein targets. Model validation and parameter analysis studies underscore the robustness and predictive ability of the scoring function. The high correlation obtained suggests the potential applicability of the methodology in designing novel ligands for zinc-metalloproteins. The scoring function has been web enabled for free access at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/bapplz.jsp as BAPPL-Z server (Binding Affinity Prediction of Protein-Ligand complexes containing Zinc metal ions).

  10. Protein-ligand binding affinity by nonequilibrium free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Cossins, Benjamin P; Foucher, Sebastien; Edge, Colin M; Essex, Jonathan W

    2008-11-27

    Nonequilibrium (NE) free energy methods are embarrassingly parallel and may be very conveniently run on desktop computers using distributed computing software. In recent years there has been a proliferation of NE methods, but these approaches have barely, if at all, been used in the context of calculating protein-ligand binding free energies. In a recent study by these authors, different combinations of NE methods with various test systems were compared and protocols identified which yielded results as accurate as replica exchange thermodynamic integration (RETI). The NE approaches, however, lend themselves to extensive parallelization through the use of distributed computing. Here the best performing of those NE protocols, a replica exchange method using Bennett's acceptance ratio as the free energy estimator (RENE), is applied to two sets of congeneric inhibitors bound to neuraminidase and cyclooxygenase-2. These protein-ligand systems were originally studied with RETI, giving results to which NE and RENE simulations are compared. These NE calculations were carried out on a large, highly distributed group of low-performance desktop computers which are part of a Condor pool. RENE was found to produce results of a predictive quality at least as good as RETI in less than half the wall clock time. However, non-RE NE results were found to be far less predictive. In addition, the RENE method successfully identified a localized region of rapidly changing free energy gradients without the need for prior investigation. These results suggest that the RENE protocol is appropriate for use in the context of predicting protein-ligand binding free energies and that it can offer advantages over conventional, equilibrium approaches. PMID:18973369

  11. Evaluation of ligand-binding affinity using polynomial empirical scoring functions.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Dias, Raquel

    2008-10-15

    Assessing protein-ligand interaction is of great importance for virtual screening initiatives in order to discover new drugs. The present work describes a set of empirical scoring functions to assess the binding affinity, involving terms for intermolecular hydrogen bonds and contact surface. The results show that our methodology works better to predict protein-ligand affinity when compared with XSCORE, a popular empirical scoring function.

  12. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands.

    PubMed

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand-receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket.

  13. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand–receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket. PMID:26124882

  14. Quantification of the Effects of Ionic Strength, Viscosity, and Hydrophobicity on Protein–Ligand Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In order to quantify the interactions between molecules of biological interest, the determination of the dissociation constant (Kd) is essential. Estimation of the binding affinity in this way is routinely performed in “favorable” conditions for macromolecules. Crucial data for ligand–protein binding elucidation is mainly derived from techniques (e.g., macromolecular crystallography) that require the addition of high concentration of salts and/or other additives. In this study we have evaluated the effect of temperature, ionic strength, viscosity, and hydrophobicity on the Kd of three previously characterized protein–ligand systems, based on variation in their binding sites, in order to provide insight into how these often overlooked unconventional circumstances impact binding affinity. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) increasing solvent viscosity in general is detrimental to ligand binding, (2) moderate increases in temperature have marginal effects on the dissociation constant, and (3) the degree of hydrophobicity of the ligand and the binding site determines the extent of the influence of cosolvents and salt concentration on ligand binding affinity. PMID:25147617

  15. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  16. Estimation of Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinity from Fluctuation of Their Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohta, Masami; Misu, Takashi; Hata, Masayuki; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2005-10-01

    It is necessary for the understanding of protein interactions or in silico drug designs to accurately estimate ligand-receptor affinity. The energy calculation based on the electrostatic force, van der Waals force, and solvation effect is a direct method of computing the magnitude of the interaction between ligand and receptor. By this conventional method, however, it is difficult to estimate a slight difference in binding affinity with sufficient accuracy. We propose a novel concept for the evaluation of binding affinity between a ligand and its receptor by functionalizing the fluctuation at the ligand-receptor interface. This method enables an adequate estimation with a high accuracy compared with the conventional energetic approach. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor are used to explain how binding affinity is extracted from the fluctuation in interfacial energy, and a combination of an antigen and its antibody is examined to demonstrate the compatibility between the estimation from the interfacial fluctuation and the experimentally measured binding energy.

  17. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  18. A computational study of ligand binding affinities in iron(III) porphine and protoporphyrin IX complexes.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Marcus C

    2014-07-01

    The search for novel anti-malarial drugs that can disrupt biomineralization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX to haemozoin requires an understanding of the fundamental chemistry of the porphyrin's iron(iii) centre at the water-lipid interface. Towards this end, the binding affinities for a diverse set of 31 small ligands with iron(iii) porphine have been calculated using density functional theory, in the gas phase and also with implicit solvent corrections for both water and n-octanol. In addition, the binding of hydroxide, chloride, acetate, methylamine and water to ferriprotoporphyrin IX has been studied, and very similar trends are observed for the smaller and larger models. Anionic ligands generally give stronger binding than neutral ones; the strongest binding is observed for RO(-) and OH(-) ligands, whilst acetate binds relatively weakly among the anions studied. Electron-rich nitrogen donors tend to bind more strongly than electron-deficient ones, and the weakest binding is found for neutral O and S donors such as oxazole and thiophene. In all cases, ligand binding is stronger in n-octanol than in water, and the differences in binding energies for the two solvents are greater for ionic ligands than for neutrals. Finally, dimerization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX by means of iron(iii)-carboxylate bond formation has been modelled. The results are discussed in terms of haemozoin crystal growth and its disruption by known anti-malarial drugs.

  19. Binding affinity prediction for protein-ligand complexes based on β contacts and B factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Li, Jinyan

    2013-11-25

    Accurate determination of protein-ligand binding affinity is a fundamental problem in biochemistry useful for many applications including drug design and protein-ligand docking. A number of scoring functions have been proposed for the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity. However, accurate prediction is still a challenging problem because poor performance is often seen in the evaluation under the leave-one-cluster-out cross-validation (LCOCV). We introduce a new scoring function named B2BScore to improve the prediction performance. B2BScore integrates two physicochemical properties for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction. One is the property of β contacts. A β contact between two atoms requires no other atoms to interrupt the atomic contact and assumes that the two atoms should have enough direct contact area. The other is the property of B factor to capture the atomic mobility in the dynamic protein-ligand binding process. Tested on the PDBBind2009 data set, B2BScore shows superior prediction performance to existing methods on independent test data as well as under the LCOCV evaluation framework. In particular, B2BScore achieves a significant LCOCV improvement across 26 protein clusters-a big increase of the averaged Pearson's correlation coefficients from 0.418 to 0.518 and a significant decrease of standard deviation of the coefficients from 0.352 to 0.196. We also identified several important and intuitive contact descriptors of protein-ligand binding through the random forest learning in B2BScore. Some of these descriptors are closely related to contacts between carbon atoms without covalent-bond oxygen/nitrogen, preferred contacts of metal ions, interfacial backbone atoms from proteins, or π rings. Some others are negative descriptors relating to those contacts with nitrogen atoms without covalent-bond hydrogens or nonpreferred contacts of metal ions. These descriptors can be directly used to guide protein-ligand docking.

  20. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  1. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M. PMID:23325100

  2. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-01

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. PMID:25981289

  3. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  4. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  5. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  6. Generating new ligand-binding RNAs by affinity maturation and disintegration of allosteric ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, G A; DeRose, E C; Koizumi, M; Breaker, R R

    2001-01-01

    Allosteric ribozymes are engineered RNAs that operate as molecular switches whose rates of catalytic activity are modulated by the binding of specific effector molecules. New RNA molecular switches can be created by using "allosteric selection," a molecular engineering process that combines modular rational design and in vitro evolution strategies. In this report, we describe the characterization of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP)-dependent hammerhead ribozymes that were created using allosteric selection (Koizumi et al., Nat Struct Biol, 1999, 6:1062-1071). Artificial phylogeny data generated by random mutagenesis and reselection of existing cGMP-, cCMP-, and cAMP-dependent ribozymes indicate that each is comprised of distinct effector-binding and catalytic domains. In addition, patterns of nucleotide covariation and direct mutational analysis both support distinct secondary-structure organizations for the effector-binding domains. Guided by these structural models, we were able to disintegrate each allosteric ribozyme into separate ligand-binding and catalytic modules. Examinations of the independent effector-binding domains reveal that each retains its corresponding cNMP-binding function. These results validate the use of allosteric selection and modular engineering as a means of simultaneously generating new nucleic acid structures that selectively bind ligands. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the binding affinity of an allosteric ribozyme can be improved through random mutagenesis and allosteric selection under conditions that favor tighter binding. This "affinity maturation" effect is expected to be a valuable attribute of allosteric selection as future endeavors seek to apply engineered allosteric ribozymes as biosensor components and as controllable genetic switches. PMID:11345431

  7. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  8. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  9. Cyclic peptide ligand with high binding capacity for affinity purification of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Choe, Weonu; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, B Moon; Chung, Sang J

    2016-09-30

    The rapidly increasing implementation of antibodies in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the development of antibody production and purification technologies for both academic and industrial usage. Bacterial Protein A and Protein G are known to bind antibodies with high affinity and have facilitated the isolation and purification thereof. Recently, small peptide ligands (i.e. IgG Fc domain-binding peptides, FcBP) that specifically bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies were reported. In the present study we describe the development of a reusable high affinity column for antibody purification utilizing immobilized FcBP, comprising 13 amino acids residues, on a sepharose resin. In addition to FcBP, Cys to Ser substituted FcBP (FcBP-Ser), reduced FcBP (FcBP-Red), commercial Protein A and Protein G resins, packed into columns, were evaluated for antibody purification. All these columns except the FcBP-Ser one showed good binding capacity for a humanized IgG (trastuzumab) and a chimeric IgG (cetuximab). The column packed with FcBP-Red allowed antibody purification at a less acidic pH (pH 4.8) than was required for the other ligand affinity columns used in our experiments (i.e., pH 3.2 for Protein G and FcBP columns, and pH 3.5 for Protein A column, respectively). Utilizing the FcBP column, antibodies from swine human sera were isolated with a purity of 95%. Interestingly, the FcBP column could be easily regenerated and operated without loss of efficiency for up to 60 runs, the maximum number of runs performed in the present study.

  10. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  11. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  12. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water. PMID:11128445

  13. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  14. Metal-ligand binding affinity vs reactivity: qualitative studies in Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening reactions.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Gavin Chit; Dougan, Patrick; Lautens, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring opening (ARO) of oxabenzonorbornadiene is used as a model system to qualitatively study reactions involving multiple metal-ligand interactions. The key feature of this approach is the use of product ee as an indicator to quickly gain important information such as the relative ligand binding affinity and relative reactivity of catalysts.

  15. The MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to estimate ligand-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The molecular mechanics energies combined with the Poisson–Boltzmann or generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA) methods are popular approaches to estimate the free energy of the binding of small ligands to biological macromolecules. They are typically based on molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor–ligand complex and are therefore intermediate in both accuracy and computational effort between empirical scoring and strict alchemical perturbation methods. They have been applied to a large number of systems with varying success. Areas covered: The authors review the use of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to calculate ligand-binding affinities, with an emphasis on calibration, testing and validation, as well as attempts to improve the methods, rather than on specific applications. Expert opinion: MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA are attractive approaches owing to their modular nature and that they do not require calculations on a training set. They have been used successfully to reproduce and rationalize experimental findings and to improve the results of virtual screening and docking. However, they contain several crude and questionable approximations, for example, the lack of conformational entropy and information about the number and free energy of water molecules in the binding site. Moreover, there are many variants of the method and their performance varies strongly with the tested system. Likewise, most attempts to ameliorate the methods with more accurate approaches, for example, quantum-mechanical calculations, polarizable force fields or improved solvation have deteriorated the results. PMID:25835573

  16. Ligand affinity chromatography, an indispensable method for the purification of soluble cytokine receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography separation is based on unique interaction between the target analyte and a ligand, which is coupled covalently to a resin. It is a simple, rapid, selective, and efficient purification procedure of proteins providing tens of thousands fold purification in one step. The biological activity of the isolated proteins is retained in most cases thus function is revealed concomitantly with the isolation. Prior to the completion of the genome project this method facilitated rapid and reliable cloning of the corresponding gene. Upon completion of this project, a partial protein sequence is enough for retrieving its complete mRNA and hence its complete protein sequence. This method is indispensable for the isolation of both expected (e.g. receptors) but mainly unexpected, unpredicted and very much surprising binding proteins. No other approach would yield the latter. This chapter provides examples for both the expected target proteins, isolated from rich sources of human proteins, as well as the unexpected binding proteins, found by serendipity. PMID:22131033

  17. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  18. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  19. Thermodynamic mixing of molecular states of the epidermal growth factor receptor modulates macroscopic ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, M R; Slakey, L L; Gross, D J

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr), when expressed on the cell surface, has long been known to display two distinct affinities for epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding. In addition, the treatment of cells expressing the EGFr with phorbol esters has been shown to cause a loss of the high-affinity binding capacity of the receptor. In the present study, point mutations that alter acidic or phosphorylation sites have been made in an intracellular domain near Tyr-992 (residues 988-992) of the EGFr. Equilibrium (125)I-EGF binding studies demonstrate that the conversion of Tyr-992 into glutamate induces a 4-fold decrease in the EGFr apparent low-affinity dissociation constant, whereas the mutation of two acidic residues, Asp-988 and Glu-991, or the conversion of Tyr-992 into phenylalanine does not alter EGFr affinity. Phorbol ester treatment of EGFr-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells results in a loss of high-affinity binding and an increase in the apparent low-affinity dissociation constant of the receptor, similar to the effect of a truncation mutant in which the C-terminal 190 residues are deleted. These results are examined in the context of a new model for regulation of the affinity of the EGFr for EGF in which a cytosolic particle stabilizes the high-affinity conformation of the EGFr and a rapid equilibrium exists between EGFr high-affinity and low-affinity conformations. This model demonstrates that the macroscopic affinities of the EGFr can differ from the affinities of individual EGFr molecules and provides a theoretical framework whereby the measured affinities of the EGFr are modulated by intracellular interactions. PMID:11062062

  20. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  1. A carbohydrate-binding affinity ligand for the specific enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; El Khoury, Graziella; Zhang, Peiqing; Rudd, Pauline M; Lowe, Christopher R

    2016-04-29

    One challenge facing the production of glycoprotein therapeutics is the lack of stable and selective affinity ligands for their enrichment. Synthetic affinity ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction represent a desirable option, particularly those incorporating benzoboroxole and its derivatives, which have been shown to enrich glycoproteins under physiological conditions. Thus, an Ugi ligand, A21C11I8, comprising 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenylboronic acid was synthesised on aldehyde-functionalised Sepharose™. Immobilised A21C11I8 displayed affinity for the glycosylated protein, glucose oxidase (GOx), which bound primarily through its glycan moiety. The ligand had a preference for sugar alcohols and the furanose form of the monosaccharides tested. Compared with immobilised 3-aminophenylboronic acid and Concanavalin A, the Ugi ligand was able to purify GOx from spiked Escherichia coli supernatants with retention of its maximum enzymatic activity and protein recovery. Glycan profiles of human immunoglobulin G tested on A21C11I8 columns suggested that the adsorbent possesses the potential to resolve sialylated and neutral glycoforms. The benzoboroxole-functionalised Ugi ligand may find application in selective glycoform separation.

  2. Evaluation and optimization of the metal-binding properties of a complex ligand for immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Rong; Li, Shiyu; Chen, Xiaoli; Yang, Kaidi; Chen, Guoliang; Ma, Xiaoxun

    2016-02-01

    The simultaneous determination of two binding parameters for metal ions on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography column was performed by frontal chromatography. In this study, the binding parameters of Cu(2+) to l-glutamic acid were measured, the metal ion-binding characteristics of the complex ligand were evaluated. The linear correlation coefficients were all greater than 99%, and the relative standard deviations of two binding parameters were 0.58 and 0.059%, respectively. The experiments proved that the frontal chromatography method was accurate, reproducible, and could be used to determine the metal-binding parameters of the affinity column. The effects of buffer pH, type, and concentration on binding parameters were explored by uniform design experiment. Regression, matching and residual analyses of the models were performed. Meanwhile, the optimum-binding conditions of Cu(2+) on the l-glutamic acid-silica column were obtained. Under these binding conditions, observations and regression values of two parameters were similar, and the observation values were the best. The results demonstrated that high intensity metal affinity column could be effectively prepared by measuring and evaluating binding parameters using frontal chromatography combined with a uniform design experiment. The present work provided a new mode for evaluating and preparing immobilized metal affinity column with good metal-binding behaviors. PMID:26632098

  3. Structure-Affinity Properties of a High-Affinity Ligand of FKBP12 Studied by Molecular Simulations of a Binding Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Lilian; Gardebien, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    With a view to explaining the structure-affinity properties of the ligands of the protein FKBP12, we characterized a binding intermediate state between this protein and a high-affinity ligand. Indeed, the nature and extent of the intermolecular contacts developed in such a species may play a role on its stability and, hence, on the overall association rate. To find the binding intermediate, a molecular simulation protocol was used to unbind the ligand by gradually decreasing the biasing forces introduced. The intermediate was subsequently refined with 17 independent stochastic boundary molecular dynamics simulations that provide a consistent picture of the intermediate state. In this state, the core region of the ligand remains stable, notably because of the two anchoring oxygen atoms that correspond to recurrent motifs found in all FKBP12 ligand core structures. Besides, the non-core regions participate in numerous transient intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The dynamic aspect of most of the contacts seems important both for the ligand to retain at least a part of its configurational entropy and for avoiding a trapped state along the binding pathway. Since the transient and anchoring contacts contribute to increasing the stability of the intermediate, as a corollary, the dissociation rate constant of this intermediate should be decreased, resulting in an increase of the affinity constant . The present results support our previous conclusions and provide a coherent rationale for explaining the prevalence in high-affinity ligands of (i) the two oxygen atoms found in carbonyl or sulfonyl groups of dissimilar core structures and of (ii) symmetric or pseudo-symmetric mobile groups of atoms found as non-core moieties. Another interesting aspect of the intermediate is the distortion of the flexible 80 s loop of the protein, mainly in its tip region, that promotes the accessibility to the bound state. PMID:25502559

  4. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier.

  5. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier. PMID:27100851

  6. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  7. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection. PMID:25271333

  8. Synthesis and Binding Affinity of Novel Mono- and Bivalent Morphinan Ligands for κ, μ and δ Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Tangzhi; Sromek, Anna W.; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel series of homo- and heterodimeric ligands containing κ/μ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist pharmacophores joined by a 10-carbon ester linker chain were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity at κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors and their functional activities were determined at κ and μ receptors in [35S]GTPγS functional assays. Most of these compounds had high binding affinity at μ and κ receptors (Ki values less than 1 nM). Compound 15b, which contains butorphan (1) at one end of linking chain and butorphanol (5) at the other end, was the most potent ligand in this series with binding affinity Ki values of 0.089 nM at the μ receptor and 0.073 nM at the κ receptor. All of the morphinan-derived ligands were found to be partial κ and μ agonists; ATPM-derived ligands 12 and 11 were found to be full κ agonists and partial μ agonists. PMID:21482470

  9. CORAL: prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors based on attributes of molecular structure extracted from simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES) are established using the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is used as the measure of the binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors. Molecular features which are statistically reliable promoters of increase and decrease for IC50 are suggested. The examples of modifications of molecular structure which lead to the increase or to the decrease of the endpoint are represented. PMID:26188619

  10. Does the tissue concentration in receptor binding studies change the affinity of the labelled ligand?

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; De Zeeuw, R A

    1984-12-14

    When the tissue concentration in a radioreceptor assay for anticholinergic drugs was varied in order to obtain optimum conditions, and the receptor concentration Cr and the equilibrium dissociation constant KD were determined by Scatchard analysis, the KD increased with increasing tissue concentrations. This phenomenon was considered as an artefact caused by non-specific binding of the labelled ligand to constituents of the receptor preparation which were not completely retained on the glass-fibre filters used for the separation of bound and free fraction of radio-labelled ligand. The increase in KD in these experiments could be described with a mathematical model of the binding experiments. PMID:6514542

  11. Transmembrane-truncated alphavbeta3 integrin retains high affinity for ligand binding: evidence for an 'inside-out' suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R J; Diefenbach, B; Brown, A; Cullen, E; Jonczyk, A; Güssow, D; Luckenbach, G A; Goodman, S L

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of alphavbeta3 integrin affinity regulation have important biological implications in tumour development, wound repair and angiogenesis. We expressed, purified and characterized recombinant forms of human alphavbeta3 (r-alphavbeta3) and compared the activation state of these with alphavbeta3 in its cellular environment. The ligand specificity and selectivity of recombinant full-length and double transmembrane truncations of r-alphavbeta3 cloned in BacPAK6 vectors and expressed in Sf9 and High Five insect cells were compared with those of native placental alphavbeta3 and the receptor in situ on the cell surface. r-alphavbeta3 integrins were purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of cells (full-length), and from the culture medium of cells expressing double-truncated r-alphavbeta3. r-alphavbeta3 had the same epitopes, ligand-binding specificities, bivalent cation requirements and susceptibility to RGD-containing peptides as native alphavbeta3. On M21-L4 melanoma cells, alphavbeta3 mediated binding to vitronectin, but not to fibrinogen unless activated with Mn2+. Non-activated alphaIIbbeta3 integrin as control in M21-L-IIb cells had the opposite profile, mediating binding to fibrinogen, but not to vitronectin unless activated with Mn2+. Thus these receptors had moderate to low ligand affinity. In marked contrast, purified alphavbeta3 receptors, with or without transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, were constitutively of high affinity and able to bind strongly to vitronectin, fibronectin and fibrinogen under physiological conditions. Our data suggest that, in contrast with the positive regulation of alphaIIbbeta3 in situ, intracellular controls lower the affinity of alphavbeta3, and the cytoplasmic domains may act as a target for negative regulators of alphavbeta3 activity. PMID:9480902

  12. A fullerene C60-based ligand in a stationary phase for affine chromatography of membrane porphyrin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirshakhi, N.; Alyautdin, R. N.; Orlov, A. P.; Poloznikov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    A new affine chromatography technique is suggested for the purification of porphyrin-binding proteins (PBP) from mammal cell membranes. The procedure uses new fullerene-porphyrin ligands immobilized on agarose and bound to the polysaccharide matrix via the epoxycyclohexyl residue. A selective PBP stationary phase was used in a single-column chromatography run for the complete purification of a monomeric protein (17.6 kDa) from mitochondrial membranes of rat myocardium. This protein was characterized by high affinity for porphyrin-related structures. To separate it from other nonspecifically sorbed membrane proteins, synchronous linear pH and ionic strength gradients were used.

  13. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    PubMed Central

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the environmental effect of the atom under consideration. We have developed a novel knowledge-based statistical energy function for protein-ligand complexes which takes atomic environment in to account hence functional group as a singular entity. The proposed knowledge based scoring function is fast, simple to construct, easy to use and moreover it tackle the existing problem of handling molecular orientation in active site pocket. We have designed and used Functional group based Ligand retrieval (FBLR) system which can identify and detect the orientation of functional groups in ligand. This decoy searching was used to build the above KBSF to quantify the activity and affinity of high resolution protein-ligand complexes. We have proposed the probable use of these decoys in molecular build-up as a de-novo drug designing approach. We have also discussed the possible use of the said KSBF in pharmacophore fragment detection and pseudo center based fragment alignment procedure. PMID:19255647

  14. A New Method for Navigating Optimal Direction for Pulling Ligand from Binding Pocket: Application to Ranking Binding Affinity by Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan Van; Nguyen, Tin Trung; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-12-28

    In this paper we present a new method for finding the optimal path for pulling a ligand from the binding pocket using steered molecular dynamics (SMD). Scoring function is defined as the steric hindrance caused by a receptor to ligand movement. Then the optimal path corresponds to the minimum of this scoring function. We call the new method MSH (Minimal Steric Hindrance). Contrary to existing navigation methods, our approach takes into account the geometry of the ligand while other methods including CAVER only consider the ligand as a sphere with a given radius. Using three different target + receptor sets, we have shown that the rupture force Fmax and nonequilibrium work Wpull obtained based on the MSH method show a much higher correlation with experimental data on binding free energies compared to CAVER. Furthermore, Wpull was found to be a better indicator for binding affinity than Fmax. Thus, the new MSH method is a reliable tool for obtaining the best direction for ligand exiting from the binding site. Its combination with the standard SMD technique can provide reasonable results for ranking binding affinities using Wpull as a scoring function. PMID:26595261

  15. The high affinity melationin binding site probed with conformationally restricted ligand--I. Pharmacophore and minireceptor models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J M; Copinga, S; Gruppen, G; Molinari, E J; Dubocovich, M L; Grol, C J

    1996-08-01

    The affinities of enantiomers of conformationally restricted melatonin analogues for the ML-1 and ML-2 putative melatonin receptor subtypes are reported. Most ligands exhibited reversed stereoselectivity when competing with 125I 2-iodomelatonin binding to chicken retinal (ML-1) and hamster brain (ML-2) membranes, further supporting the biochemical and pharmacological differences reported for these two sites. Based on the data for the ML-1 site and thorough conformational analyses of several ligands, two pharmacophore models were derived using the program APOLLO. The pharmacophoric elements included were putative receptor points from the amide NH, the amide CO, and the methoxy-O, together with the normal through the phenyl ring. The large drop in ML-1 affinity observed for 4-methoxy-2-acetamido-indan (6a) could not be explained from either of these models. Minireceptors were subsequently built around the two pharmacophores using Yak. Analysis of the resulting ligand-minireceptor interactions offered an explanation for the low affinity of 6a and allowed one of the pharmacophore models to be selected for use in future drug design. PMID:8879554

  16. Neutrophil recruitment limited by high-affinity bent β2 integrin binding ligand in cis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; McArdle, Sara; Marki, Alex; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Gutierrez, Edgar; Engelhardt, Britta; Deutsch, Urban; Ginsberg, Mark; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for innate immunity and inflammation and many neutrophil functions are β2 integrin-dependent. Integrins can extend (E+) and acquire a high-affinity conformation with an ‘open' headpiece (H+). The canonical switchblade model of integrin activation proposes that the E+ conformation precedes H+, and the two are believed to be structurally linked. Here we show, using high-resolution quantitative dynamic footprinting (qDF) microscopy combined with a homogenous conformation-reporter binding assay in a microfluidic device, that a substantial fraction of β2 integrins on human neutrophils acquire an unexpected E−H+ conformation. E−H+ β2 integrins bind intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) in cis, which inhibits leukocyte adhesion in vitro and in vivo. This endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism inhibits neutrophil aggregation, accumulation and inflammation. PMID:27578049

  17. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening. PMID:27454185

  18. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening.

  19. Enhancing ligand-protein binding in affinity thermoprecipitation: elucidation of spacer effects

    PubMed

    Vaidya; Lele; Kulkarni; Mashelkar

    1999-08-20

    Copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and N-acryloyl amino acid spacers of varying chain length were synthesized. p-Aminobenzamidine (PABA) was chemically linked to the pendant carboxyl groups of these polymers to obtain thermoprecipitating affinity polymers. The inhibition constant (Ki) of these polymers for trypsin decreased, i. e., the efficiency of PABA-trypsin binding increased with increase in the spacer chain length. The polymer to which PABA was linked through a spacer of five methylene groups exhibited eleven times lower Ki than that of the polymer containing PABA without a spacer. Investigations on model inhibitors N-acyl-p-aminobenzamidines showed that this enhancement in trypsin binding by the polymers was due to the spacer as well as to microenvironmental effects. Recovery and specific activity of the trypsin recovered increased with the spacer chain length. Separation of trypsin from a mixture of trypsin and chymotrypsin was also enhanced with the spacer chain length. The inhibition constants of these affinity polymers were not adversely affected by the crowding effect. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10397880

  20. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  1. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  2. C-X...H contacts in biomolecular systems: how they contribute to protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxiang; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zhijian; Yan, Xiuhua; Luo, Xiaoming; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Weiliang

    2009-09-17

    The hydrogen bond acceptor capability of halogens has long been underappreciated in the field of biology. In this work, we have surveyed structures of protein complexes with halogenated ligands to characterize geometrical preferences of C-X...H contacts and contributions of such interactions to protein-ligand binding affinity. Notably, F...H interactions in biomolecules exhibit a remarkably different behavior as compared to three other kinds of X...H (X = Cl, Br, I) interactions, which has been rationalized by means of ab initio calculations using simple model systems. The C-X...H contacts in biological systems are characterized as weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Furthermore, the electrophile "head on" and nucleophile "side on" interactions of halogens have been extensively investigated through the examination of interactions in protein structures and a two-layer ONIOM-based QM/MM method. In biomolecular systems, C-X...H contacts are recognized as secondary interaction contributions to C-X...O halogen bonds that play important roles in conferring specificity and affinity for halogenated ligands. The results presented here are within the context of their potential applications in drug design, including relevance to the development of accurate force fields for halogens.

  3. Information theory-based scoring function for the structure-based prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kulharia, Mahesh; Goody, Roger S; Jackson, Richard M

    2008-10-01

    The development and validation of a new knowledge based scoring function (SIScoreJE) to predict binding energy between proteins and ligands is presented. SIScoreJE efficiently predicts the binding energy between a small molecule and its protein receptor. Protein-ligand atomic contact information was derived from a Non-Redundant Data set (NRD) of over 3000 X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. This information was classified for individual "atom contact pairs" (ACP) which is used to calculate the atomic contact preferences. In addition to the two schemes generated in this study we have assessed a number of other common atom-type classification schemes. The preferences were calculated using an information theoretic relationship of joint entropy. Among 18 different atom-type classification schemes "ScoreJE Atom Type set2" (SATs2) was found to be the most suitable for our approach. To test the sensitivity of the method to the inclusion of solvent, Single-body Solvation Potentials (SSP) were also derived from the atomic contacts between the protein atom types and water molecules modeled using AQUARIUS2. Validation was carried out using an evaluation data set of 100 protein-ligand complexes with known binding energies to test the ability of the scoring functions to reproduce known binding affinities. In summary, it was found that a combined SSP/ScoreJE (SIScoreJE) performed significantly better than ScoreJE alone, and SIScoreJE and ScoreJE performed better than GOLD::GoldScore, GOLD::ChemScore, and XScore.

  4. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  5. Affinity chromatographic purification of tetrodotoxin by use of tetrodotoxin-binding high molecular weight substances in the body fluid of shore crab (Hemigrapsus sanguineus) as ligands.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Yamaguchi, S; Shimakura, K; Nagashima, Y; Yamamori, K; Matsui, T

    1993-12-01

    A purification method for tetrodotoxin (TTX), based on affinity chromatography using the TTX-binding high mol. wt substances in the body fluid of shore crab (Hemigrapsus sanguineus) as ligands, was developed. This method was particularly useful for analysis of TTX in biological samples with low concentrations of TTX. The affinity gel prepared was highly specific for TTX, having no ability to bind 4-epi-TTX and anhydro-TTX as well as saxitoxin.

  6. The high affinity ligand binding conformation of the nuclear 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor is functionally linked to the transactivation domain 2 (AF-2).

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, S; Kahlen, J P; Carlberg, C

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD), VDR, is a transcription factor that mediates all genomic actions of the hormone. The activation of VDR by ligand induces a conformational change within its ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the lack of a crystal structure analysis, biochemical methods have to be applied in order to investigate the details of this receptor-ligand interaction. The limited protease digestion assay can be used as a tool for the determination of a functional dissociation constant (K(df)) of VDR with any potential ligand. This method provided with the natural hormone VD two protease-resistant fragments of the VDR LBD and with the 20-epi conformation of VD, known as MC1288, even an additional fragment of intermediate size. These fragments were interpreted as different receptor conformations and their decreasing size was found to be associated with decreasing ligand binding affinity. A critical amino acid for VDR's high ligand binding conformation has been identified by C-terminal receptor truncations and point mutations as phenylalanine 422. This amino acid appears to directly contact the ligand and belongs to the ligand-inducible activation function-2 (AF-2) domain. Moreover, functional assays supported the observation that high affinity ligand binding is directly linked to transactivation function. PMID:8948643

  7. Complementary three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of binding affinity and functional potency: a study on alpha4beta2 nicotinic ligands.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Ahring, Philip K; Dyhring, Tino; Peters, Dan; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liljefors, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2009-04-23

    Complementary 3D-QSAR modeling of binding affinity and functional potency is proposed as a tool to pinpoint the molecular features of the ligands, and the corresponding amino acids in the receptor, responsible for high affinity binding vs those driving agonist behavior and receptor activation. This approach proved successful on a series of nicotinic alpha(4)beta(2) ligands, whose partial/full agonist profile could be linked to the size of the scaffold as well as to the nature of the substituents.

  8. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  9. The Dipole Potential Modifies the Clustering and Ligand Binding Affinity of ErbB Proteins and Their Signaling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Hajdu, Tímea; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Zákány, Florina; Csomós, István; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although activation of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbB1-4) is driven by oligomerization mediated by intermolecular interactions between the extracellular, the kinase and the transmembrane domains, the transmembrane domain has been largely neglected in this regard. The largest contributor to the intramembrane electric field, the dipole potential, alters the conformation of transmembrane peptides, but its effect on ErbB proteins is unknown. Here, we show by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and number and brightness (N&B) experiments that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced increase in the homoassociation of ErbB1 and ErbB2 and their heteroassociation are augmented by increasing the dipole potential. These effects were even more pronounced for ErbB2 harboring an activating Val → Glu mutation in the transmembrane domain (NeuT). The signaling capacity of ErbB1 and ErbB2 was also correlated with the dipole potential. Since the dipole potential decreased the affinity of EGF to ErbB1, the augmented growth factor-induced effects at an elevated dipole potential were actually induced at lower receptor occupancy. We conclude that the dipole potential plays a permissive role in the clustering of ErbB receptors and that the effects of lipid rafts on ligand binding and receptor signaling can be partially attributed to the dipole potential. PMID:27775011

  10. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  11. Excited protein states of human tear lipocalin for low- and high-affinity ligand binding revealed by functional AB loop motion.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Human tear lipocalin (TL), a prominent member of lipocalin family, exhibits functional and structural promiscuity. The plasticity of loop regions modulates entry to the ligand pocket at the "open" end of the eight-stranded beta-barrel. Site-directed multi-distance measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between functional loops register two excited protein states for low- and high-affinity ligand binding. At low pH, the longest loop AB adopts the conformation of the low-affinity excited protein state that matches the crystal structure of holo-TL at pH 8. A "crankshaft" like movement is detected for the loop AB in a low pH transition. At pH 7.3 the holo-protein assumes a high-affinity excited protein state, in which the loop AB is more compact (RMS=3.1A). In the apo-holo transition, the reporter Trp 28 moves about 4.5A that reflects a decrease in distance between Glu27 and Lys108. This interaction fixes the loop AB conformation for the high-affinity mode. No such movement is detected at low pH, where Glu27 is protonated. Data strongly indicate that the protonation state of Glu27 modulates the conformation of the loop AB for high- and low-affinity binding. PMID:20439130

  12. Molecular simulations of β-lactoglobulin complexed with fatty acids reveal the structural basis of ligand affinity to internal and possible external binding sites.

    PubMed

    Evoli, Stefania; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of saturated fatty acids of different length (C8:0 to C18:0) with β-lactoglobulin (βLG) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and docking approaches. The results show that the presence of such ligands in the hydrophobic central cavity of βLG, known as the protein calyx, determines an enhancement of atomic fluctuations compared with the unliganded form, especially for loops at the entrance of the binding site. Concerted motions are evidenced for protein regions that could favor the binding of ligands. The mechanism of anchoring of fatty acids of different length is similar for the carboxylate head-group, through electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Lys60/Lys69. The key protein residues to secure the hydrocarbon chain are Phe105/Met107, which adapt their conformation upon ligand binding. In particular, Phe105 provides an additional hydrophobic clamp only for the tail of the two fatty acids with the longest chains, palmitic, and stearic acid, which are known to bind βLG with a high affinity. The search of additional external binding sites for fatty acids, distinct from the calyx, was also carried out for palmitic acid. Two external sites with a lower affinity were identified as secondary sites, one consisting in a hydrophobic cavity allowing two distinct binding modes for the fatty acid, and the other corresponding to a surface crevice close to the protein α-helix. The overall results provide a comprehensive picture of the dynamical behavior of βLG in complex with fatty acids, and elucidate the structural basis of the binding of these physiological ligands.

  13. Synthesis and Opioid Receptor Binding Affinities of 2-Substituted and 3-Aminomorphinans: Ligands for mu, kappa and delta Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michael; Si, Yu-Gui; Knapp, Brian I.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Neumeyer, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The phenolic group of the potent μ and κ opioid morphinan agonist/antagonists cyclorphan and butorphan was replaced by phenylamino and benzylamino groups including compounds with p-substituents in the benzene ring. These compounds are highly potent μ and κ ligands, e. g. p-methoxyphenylaminocyclorphan showing a Ki of 0.026 nM at the mu and a Ki of 0.03 nM at the kappa receptor. Phenyl carbamates and phenylureas were synthesized and investigated. Selective o-formylation of butorphan and levorphanol was achieved. This reaction opened the way to a large set of 2-substituted 3-hydroxymorphinans, including 2-hydroxymethyl-, 2-aminomethyl-, and N-substituted 2-aminomethyl-3-hydroxymorphinans. Bivalent ligands bridged in the 2-position were also synthesized and connected with secondary and tertiary aminomethyl groups, amide bonds or hydroxymethylene groups, respectively. Although most of the 2-substituted morphinans showed considerably lower affinities compared to their parent compounds, the bivalent ligand approach led to significantly higher affinities compared to the univalent aminomethylmorphinans. PMID:19928862

  14. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  15. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  16. A combination of docking, QM/MM methods, and MD simulation for binding affinity estimation of metalloprotein ligands.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Akash; Lukacova, Viera; Comez, Dogan; Kroll, Daniel M; Raha, Soumyendu; Balaz, Stefan

    2005-08-25

    To alleviate the problems in the receptor-based design of metalloprotein ligands due to inadequacies in the force-field description of coordination bonds, a four-tier approach was devised. Representative ligand-metalloprotein interaction energies are obtained by subsequent application of (1) docking with metal-binding-guided selection of modes, (2) optimization of the ligand-metalloprotein complex geometry by combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, (3) conformational sampling of the complex with constrained metal bonds by force-field-based molecular dynamics (MD), and (4) a single point QM/MM energy calculation for the time-averaged structures. The QM/MM interaction energies are, in a linear combination with the desolvation-characterizing changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas, correlated with experimental data. The approach was applied to structural correlation of published binding free energies of a diverse set of 28 hydroxamate inhibitors to zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Inclusion of steps 3 and 4 significantly improved both correlation and prediction. The two descriptors explained 90% of variance in inhibition constants of all 28 inhibitors, ranging from 0.08 to 349 nM, with the average unassigned error of 0.318 log units. The structural and energetic information obtained from the time-averaged MD simulation results helped understand the differences in binding modes of related compounds.

  17. High throughput screening of high-affinity ligands for proteins with anion-binding sites using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  18. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  19. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  20. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  1. Characterization of SynCAM surface trafficking using a SynCAM derived ligand with high homophilic binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Breillat, Christelle; Thoumine, Olivier; Choquet, Daniel . E-mail: Daniel.Choquet@pcs.u-bordeaux2.fr

    2007-08-03

    In order to better probe SynCAM function in neurons, we produced a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of SynCAM1 and the constant fragment of human IgG (SynCAM-Fc). Whether in soluble form or immobilized on latex microspheres, the chimera bound specifically to the surface of hippocampal neurons and recruited endogenous SynCAM molecules. SynCAM-Fc was also used in combination with Quantum Dots to follow the mobility of transfected SynCAM receptors at the neuronal surface. Both immobile and highly mobile SynCAM were found. Thus, SynCAM-Fc behaves as a high affinity ligand that can be used to study the function of SynCAM at the neuronal membrane.

  2. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  3. Characterization of the sources of protein-ligand affinity: 1-sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene binding to intestinal fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, W R; Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G

    1996-01-01

    1-Sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene (1,8-ANS) was employed as a fluorescent probe of the fatty acid binding site of recombinant rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein (1-FABP). The enhancement of fluorescence upon binding allowed direct determination of binding affinity by fluorescence titration experiments, and measurement of the effects on that affinity of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Solvent isotope effects were also determined. These data were compared to results from isothermal titration calorimetry. We obtained values for the enthalpy and entropy of this interaction at a variety of temperatures, and hence determined the change in heat capacity of the system consequent upon binding. The ANS-1-FABP is enthalpically driven; above approximately 14 degrees C it is entropically opposed, but below this temperature the entropy makes a positive contribution to the binding. The changes we observe in both enthalpy and entropy of binding with temperature can be derived from the change in heat capacity upon binding by integration, which demonstrates the internal consistency of our results. Bound ANS is displaced by fatty acids and can itself displace fatty acids bound to I-FABP. The binding site for ANS appears to be inside the solvent-containing cavity observed in the x-ray crystal structure, the same cavity occupied by fatty acid. From the fluorescence spectrum and from an inversion of the Debye-Hueckel formula for the activity coefficients as a function of added salt, we inferred that this cavity is fairly polar in character, which is in keeping with inferences drawn from the x-ray structure. The binding affinity of ANS is considered to be a consequence of both electrostatic and conditional hydrophobic effects. We speculate that the observed change in heat capacity is produced mainly by the displacement of strongly hydrogen-bonded waters from the protein cavity. PMID:8770188

  4. Quantification of ventricular β2 -adrenoceptor density and ligand binding affinity in wild sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka smolts using a novel modification to the tritiated ligand technique.

    PubMed

    Goulding, A T; Farrell, A P

    2016-05-01

    A new, image-based, tritiated ligand technique for measuring cardiac β2 -adrenoceptor (β2 -AR) binding characteristics was developed and validated with adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss hearts so that the tissue limitation of traditional receptor binding techniques could be overcome and measurements could be made in hearts nearly 14-times smaller than previously used. The myocardial cell-surface (functional) β2 -AR density of O. nerka smolts sampled at the headwaters of the Chilko River was 54·2 fmol mg protein(-1) and about half of that previously found in return migrating adults of the same population, but still more than twice that of adult hatchery O. mykiss (21·1 fmol mg protein(-1) ). This technique now opens the possibility of investigating cardiac receptor density in a much wider range of fish species and life stages. PMID:27095288

  5. Molecular Determinants for Ligand Binding at Serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C GPCRs: Experimental Affinity Results Analyzed by Molecular Modeling and Ligand Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sakhuja, Rajeev; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Canal, Clinton E.; Booth, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Ligands that activate the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) may be therapeutic for psychoses, addiction, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Ligands that are antagonists at the closely related 5-HT2A GPCR also may treat neuropsychiatric disorders; in contrast, 5-HT2A activation may cause hallucinations. 5-HT2C-specific agonist drug design is challenging because 5-HT2 GPCRs share 80% transmembrane (TM) homology, same second messenger signaling, and no crystal structures are reported. To help delineate molecular determinants underlying differential binding and activation of 5-HT2 GPCRs, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C homology models were built from the β2-adrenergic GPCR crystal structure and equilibrated in a lipid phosphatidyl choline bilayer performing molecular dynamics simulations. Ligand docking studies at the 5-HT2 receptor models were conducted with the (2R, 4S)- and (2S, 4R)-enantiomers of the novel 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A/2B antagonist trans-4-phenyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-aminotetralin (PAT) and its 4′-chlorophenyl congners. Results indicate PAT–5-HT2 molecular interactions especially in TM domain V are important for the (2R, 4S) enantiomer, whereas, TM domain VI and VII interactions are more important for the (2S, 4R) enantiomer. PMID:23913978

  6. Binding Affinity Prediction for Ligands and Receptors Forming Tautomers and Ionization Species: Inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 (MK2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of ionization and tautomerism of ligands and receptors is one of the unresolved issues in structure-based prediction of binding affinities. Our solution utilizes the thermodynamic master equation, expressing the experimentally observed association constant as the sum of products, each valid for a specific ligand–receptor species pair, consisting of the association microconstant and the fractions of the involved ligand and receptor species. The microconstants are characterized by structure-based simulations, which are run for individual species pairs. Here we incorporated the multispecies approach into the QM/MM linear response method and used it for structural correlation of published inhibition data on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) by 66 benzothiophene and pyrrolopyridine analogues, forming up to five tautomers and seven ionization species under experimental conditions. Extensive cross-validation showed that the resulting models were stable and predictive. Inclusion of all tautomers and ionization ligand species was essential: the explained variance increased to 90% from 66% for the single-species model. PMID:22280316

  7. High affinity ligands from in vitro selection: Complex targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin N.; Jensen, Kirk B.; Julin, Carol M.; Weil, Michael; Gold, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Human red blood cell membranes were used as a model system to determine if the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) methodology, an in vitro protocol for isolating high-affinity oligonucleotides that bind specifically to virtually any single protein, could be used with a complex mixture of potential targets. Ligands to multiple targets were generated simultaneously during the selection process, and the binding affinities of these ligands for their targets are comparable to those found in similar experiments against pure targets. A secondary selection scheme, deconvolution-SELEX, facilitates rapid isolation of the ligands to targets of special interest within the mixture. SELEX provides high-affinity compounds for multiple targets in a mixture and might allow a means for dissecting complex biological systems. PMID:9501188

  8. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  9. Ligand-Binding Affinity at the Insulin Receptor Isoform-A and Subsequent IR-A Tyrosine Phosphorylation Kinetics are Important Determinants of Mitogenic Biological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Harinda; Forbes, Briony E.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A) arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signaling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival, and migration by activating some unique signaling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signaling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signaling (MAPK and Akt) and receptor internalization rates (related to mitogenic signaling). We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic [(His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51) IGF-I, qIGF-I] or metabolic (S597 peptide) biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signaling through the IR-A. The threefold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316, and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide, it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I. PMID:26217307

  10. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  11. Labeling by ( sup 3 H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. )

    1991-02-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. (Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)). Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that ({sup 3}H)DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels.

  12. The importance of helix P1 stability for structural pre-organization and ligand binding affinity of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain

    PubMed Central

    Nozinovic, Senada; Reining, Anke; Kim, Yong-Boum; Noeske, Jonas; Schlepckow, Kai; Wöhnert, Jens; Schwalbe, Harald

    2014-01-01

    We report here an in-depth characterization of the aptamer domain of the transcriptional adenine-sensing riboswitch (pbuE) by NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. By NMR studies, the structure of two aptamer sequences with different lengths of the helix P1, the central element involved in riboswitch conformational switching, was characterized. Hydrogen-bond interactions could be mapped at nucleotide resolution providing information about secondary and tertiary structure, structure homogeneity and dynamics. Our study reveals that the elongation of helix P1 has pronounced effects not only on the local but on the global structure of the apo aptamer domain. The structural differences induced by stabilizing helix P1 were found to be linked to changes of the ligand binding affinity as revealed from analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence studies. The results provide new insight into the sequence-dependent fine tuning of the structure and function of purine-sensing riboswitches. PMID:24921630

  13. O-tert-Butyltyrosine, an NMR tag for high-molecular-weight systems and measurements of submicromolar ligand binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Kuppan, Kekini Vahini; Lee, Michael David; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Huber, Thomas; Otting, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    O-tert-Butyltyrosine (Tby) is an unnatural amino acid that can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins using established orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA systems. Here we show that the tert-butyl group presents an outstanding NMR tag that can readily be observed in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectra without any isotope labeling. Owing to rapid bond rotations and the chemical equivalence of the protons of a solvent-exposed tert-butyl group from Tby, the singlet resonance from the tert-butyl group generates an easily detectable narrow signal in a spectral region with limited overlap with other methyl resonances. The potential of the tert-butyl (1)H NMR signal in protein research is illustrated by the observation and assignment of two resonances in the Bacillus stearothermophilus DnaB hexamer (320 kDa), demonstrating that this protein preferentially assumes a 3-fold rather than 6-fold symmetry in solution, and by the quantitative measurement of the submicromolar dissociation constant Kd (0.2 μM) of the complex between glutamate and the Escherichia coli aspartate/glutamate binding protein (DEBP, 32 kDa). The outstanding signal height of the (1)H NMR signal of the Tby tert-butyl group allows Kd measurements using less concentrated protein solutions than usual, providing access to Kd values 1 order of magnitude lower than established NMR methods that employ direct protein detection for Kd measurements. PMID:25789794

  14. Synthesis, structure information, DNA/BSA binding affinity and in vitro cytotoxic studies of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes containing a phenylalanine derivative and diimine co-ligands.

    PubMed

    Annaraj, B; Balakrishnan, C; Neelakantan, M A

    2016-07-01

    Binary [Cu(PAIC)(H2O)2]·H2O (1) and mixed ligand [Cu(PAIC)(L)]·2H2O complexes, where PAIC=phenylalanine imidazole carboxylic acid, L=diimine coligands [2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (2) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3)] have been synthesized and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. The X-ray structure of [Cu(PAIC)(phen)]·2H2O (3) shows a N4O coordination with square pyramidal geometry around the copper (II) atom. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated for the complexes account for the distorted square planar structure and rules out the possibility of a trigonal bipyramidal structure. Interaction of the complexes (1-3) with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was studied by using different techniques (absorption titration, fluorescence quenching and thermal melting) and the studies suggest that these complexes bind to CT DNA through intercalation. The DNA-binding affinity of the complexes has further been explained by DFT computational results. Binding activity of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the complexes can strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. DNA cleavage experiments using plasmid DNA pUC 19 show that the complexes exhibit efficient chemical nuclease activity even in the absence of any external additives. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human normal cell line (HBL 100) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) shows that metal complexation of the ligands results in a significant enhancement in the cell death of MCF-7. Finally, docking studies on DNA and protein binding interactions were performed. PMID:27155593

  15. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  16. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  17. Effects of midgut-protein-preparative and ligand binding procedures on the toxin binding characteristics of BT-R1, a common high-affinity receptor in Manduca sexta for Cry1A Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    PubMed

    Keeton, T P; Francis, B R; Maaty, W S; Bulla, L A

    1998-06-01

    The identity of the physiologically important Cry1A receptor protein(s) in the lepidopteran Manduca sexta has been a matter of dispute due to the multiple proteins which bind the Cry1Ac toxin. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac exhibit essentially identical toxicities toward M. sexta larvae and show a high degree of sequence and presumed structural identities. These similarities make it likely that there is a common mechanism of toxicity in these lepidopteran-specific toxins in terms of both mode of action and the receptor proteins through which these toxins exert their lepidopteran-specific toxicity. Investigators in our laboratory previously demonstrated that the cloned 210-kDa glycoprotein BT-R1 binds all three Cry1A toxins (T. P. Keeton and L. A. Bulla, Jr., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3419-3425, 1997). This protein remains a common binding protein even after being subjected to various midgut membrane preparation and processing protocols. The method used to isolate proteins from the M. sexta larval midgut in no significant way affects the results of ligand binding and vacuum blotting experiments, and we have been unable to detect specific, high-affinity binding of any Cry1A toxin to Cry1Ac binding proteins other than BT-R1. Alterations in blot substrate and blocking, hybridization, and washing buffers support these conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate that in M. sexta the cadherin-like BT-R1 protein is a common high-affinity receptor protein for the Cry1A family of toxins.

  18. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  19. Cadherin-dependent mechanotransduction depends on ligand identity but not affinity

    PubMed Central

    Tabdili, Hamid; Langer, Matthew; Shi, Quanming; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Wang, Ning; Leckband, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary This study investigates the relationship between classical cadherin binding affinities and mechanotransduction through cadherin-mediated adhesions. The mechanical properties of cadherin-dependent intercellular junctions are generally attributed to differences in the binding affinities of classical cadherin subtypes that contribute to cohesive energies between cells. However, cell mechanics and mechanotransduction may also regulate intercellular contacts. We used micropipette measurements to quantify the two-dimensional affinities of cadherins at the cell surface, and two complementary mechanical measurements to assess ligand-dependent mechanotransduction through cadherin adhesions. At the cell surface, the classical cadherins investigated in this study form both homophilic and heterophilic bonds with two-dimensional affinities that differ by less than threefold. In contrast, mechanotransduction through cadherin adhesions is strongly ligand dependent such that homophilic, but not heterophilic ligation mediates mechanotransduction, independent of the cadherin binding affinity. These findings suggest that ligand-selective mechanotransduction may supersede differences in cadherin binding affinities in regulating intercellular contacts. PMID:22718345

  20. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  1. Zinc Coordination Geometry and Ligand Binding Affinity: The Structural and Kinetic Analysis of the Second-Shell Serine 228 Residue and the Methionine 180 Residue of the Aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Ataie, Niloufar J.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Zahniser, Megan P.D.; Tu, Yupeng; Milne, Amy; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-28

    The chemical properties of zinc make it an ideal metal to study the role of coordination strain in enzymatic rate enhancement. The zinc ion and the protein residues that are bound directly to the zinc ion represent a functional charge/dipole complex, and polarization of this complex, which translates to coordination distortion, may tune electrophilicity, and hence, reactivity. Conserved protein residues outside of the charge/dipole complex, such as second-shell residues, may play a role in supporting the electronic strain produced as a consequence of functional polarization. To test the correlation between charge/dipole polarity and ligand binding affinity, structure?function studies were carried out on the dizinc aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus. Alanine substitutions of S228 and M180 resulted in catalytically diminished enzymes whose crystal structures show very little change in the positions of the metal ions and the protein residues. However, more detailed inspections of the crystal structures show small positional changes that account for differences in the zinc ion coordination geometry. Measurements of the binding affinity of leucine phosphonic acid, a transition state analogue, and leucine, a product, show a correlation between coordination geometry and ligand binding affinity. These results suggest that the coordination number and polarity may tune the electrophilicity of zinc. This may have provided the evolving enzyme with the ability to discriminate between reaction coordinate species.

  2. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  3. Stereoselective Binding of Chiral Ligands to Single Nucleotide Polymorphs (SNPs) of the Human Organic Cation Transporter-1 Determined Using Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Moaddel, R.; Bighi, F.; Yamaguchi, R.; Patel, S.; Ravichandran, S.; Wainer, I.W.

    2010-01-01

    Membranes from stably transfected cell lines that expresses two point mutations of the human organic cation 1 transporter (hOCT1), R488M and G465R, have been immobilized on the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) liquid chromatographic stationary phase to form the Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography (CMAC) (hOCT1G465R) and CMAC(hOCT1R488M). Columns were created using both stationary phases and frontal displacement chromatography experiments were conducted using [3H]-methyl phenyl pyridinium, [3H]-MPP+, as the marker ligand and various displacers, including the single enantiomers of verapamil, fenoterol and isoproterenol. The chromatographic data obtained was used to refine a previously developed pharmacophore for the hOCT1 transporter. PMID:20206116

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M = Co, Ni or Cu, m = 4, 0 and n = 2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34 × 104 and 2.5 × 104 M-1, respectively.

  5. Petasis-Ugi ligands: New affinity tools for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Íris L; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-09-15

    Affinity chromatography is a widespread technique for the enrichment and isolation of biologics, which relies on the selective and reversible interaction between affinity ligands and target molecules. Small synthetic affinity ligands are valuable alternatives due to their robustness, low cost and fast ligand development. This work reports, for the first time, the use of a sequential Petasis-Ugi multicomponent reaction to generate rationally designed solid-phase combinatorial libraries of small synthetic ligands, which can be screened for the selection of new affinity adsorbents towards biological targets. As a proof of concept, the Petasis-Ugi reaction was here employed in the discovery of affinity ligands suitable for phosphopeptide enrichment. A combinatorial library of 84 ligands was designed, synthesized on a chromatographic solid support and screened in situ for the specific binding of phosphopeptides binding human BRCA1C-terminal domains. The success of the reaction on the chromatographic matrix was confirmed by both inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Three lead ligands were identified due to their superior performance in terms of binding capacity and selectivity towards the phosphorylated moiety on peptides, which showed the feasibility of the Petasis-Ugi reaction for affinity ligand development. PMID:27469904

  6. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  7. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  8. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  9. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  10. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  11. Water mediated ligand functional group cooperativity: the contribution of a methyl group to binding affinity is enhanced by a COO(-) group through changes in the structure and thermodynamics of the hydration waters of ligand-thermolysin complexes.

    PubMed

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-10-11

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2' pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO(-) reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2' pocket and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding.

  12. Synthesis of affinity ligands and radioactive probes for isolation and study of myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Jina, A.N.; Ralph, J.; Ballou, C.E. )

    1990-05-29

    To synthesize an affinity matrix for isolation of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding proteins, racemic 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxyaldehyde was oxidized and converted to a mixture of trans-3,4-dihydroxycyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid methyl ester isomers, which was phosphorylated and separated into ({plus minus})-(1R,3R,4R)- and ({plus minus})-(1R,3S,4S)-trans-3,4-bis((diphenoxyphosphoryl)oxy)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid methyl esters. Each of these racemic compounds was hydrogenolyzed and reacted with ethylenediamine to give a monoamide, N-(2-aminoethyl)-bis(phosphonyloxy)cyclohexane-1-carboxamide, that was coupled to cyanogen bromide activated Sepharose 4B to provide the desired affinity matrices. The intermediate trans-3,4-bis((diphenoxyphosphoryl)oxy)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid methyl ester was also reduced with lithium borotritide to give the (hydroxyl({sup 3}H)methyl)cyclohexane derivative, which was phosphorylated and hydrogenolyzed to yield trans-3,4-bis(phosphonyloxy)-1-((phosphonyloxy)({sup 3}H)methyl)cyclohexane, a radiolabeled analogue of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The carboxamide was also coupled to 4-azidosalicylic acid, and the product was iodinated to provide a {sup 125}I-radiolabeled photoactivatable cross-linking derivative of cyclohexanediol bisphosphate.

  13. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  14. Affinity Chromatography Purification of Cytochrome c Binding Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Angelo; Bill, Kurt; Broger, Clemens

    1982-04-01

    An efficient affinity chromatography procedure for the isolation of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and reductase is described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c was used as a ligand, bound to a thiol-Sepharose 4B gel through cysteine-107. In this way, the site of interaction of cytochrome c with cytochrome oxidase and reductase remained unmodified and available for binding to a number of partner enzymes. The procedure is adequate for the purification of all those proteins having in common the property of binding with high affinity to cytochrome c--e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, reductase, and peroxidase, sulfite oxidase, and reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria.

  15. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  16. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  17. Time-dynamic imaging of individual cell ligand binding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David; Chung, Johnson

    1997-05-01

    Ligand-binding assays are commonly applied to large numbers of cells in culture; the binding parameters derived from such assays reflect the ensemble average behavior of many cells. Equilibrium binding assays of epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to the EGF receptor (EGFR) indicate that the EGFR exhibits two affinity states for EGF, one low affinity with Kd about 10 nM and one high affinity with Kd < 1 nM. Bulk binding studies cannot determined if such multiple ligand binding classes are due to cell population heterogeneity or are due to heterogeneity at the individual cell level. Here is described a technique based on single cell imaging of fluorescein-EGF (f-EGF) binding to individual human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells that demonstrates that both classes of EGFR are found on all A431 cells, that the time course of f-EGF binding to individual cells shows two kinetic on-rates and two off-rates, that cell-to-cell heterogeneity of EGF binding is significant and that ligand binding kinetics vary across an individual cell. Contributions of cell autofluorescence photobleaching and f- EGF photobleaching in the measurement of fluorescent ligand binding are shown to be significant.

  18. Analyzing Ligand Depletion in a Saturation Equilibrium Binding Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claro, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    I present a proposal for a laboratory practice to generate and analyze data from a saturation equilibrium binding experiment addressed to advanced undergraduate students. [[superscript 3]H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a nonselective muscarinic ligand with very high affinity and very low nonspecific binding to brain membranes, which contain a high…

  19. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  20. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  1. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  2. Two bradykinin binding sites with picomolar affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, D.C.; Vavrek, R.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and related peptides exert a wide range of effects on several organ systems. We have attempted to sort out these effects by studying the binding interaction of (/sup 3/H)BK at the membrane level with in vitro receptor binding techniques. High specific activity (/sup 3/H)BK and an enzyme inhibitor cocktail has enabled us to label two BK binding sites with different affinity and peptide specificity in several guinea-pig tissues. In the guinea-pig ileum the high-affinity site has an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (/sup 3/H)BK of 13 pM and a maximal number of binding sites of 8.3 pmol/g of tissue wet weight. The low-affinity guinea-pig ileum site displays a Kd of 910 pM, a maximum number of binding sites of 14 pmol/g of tissue wet weight and shows a greater selectivity for BK analogs over Lysyl-BK analogs. Two similar sites can also be discriminated in kidney and heart. The potencies of a series of BK analogs at the high-affinity guinea-pig ileum site correlate well with their potencies in contracting ileal smooth muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)BK in the guinea-pig ileum is inhibited by physiological concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations.

  3. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  4. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media.

  5. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media. PMID:27524303

  6. Octapeptide-based affinity chromatography of human immunoglobulin G: comparisons of three different ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Fu-Feng; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-09-12

    In an earlier work, we have developed a biomimetic design strategy based on the human IgG (hIgG)-Protein A interactions and identified an affinity ligand for hIgG, FYWHCLDE, which ranked top one in a pool of 14 potential candidates. Herein, two more octapeptides, FYCHWALE and FYCHTIDE, were identified, and the binding and purification of hIgG on the affinity columns packed with the three octapeptide-modified Sepharose gels were extensively studied and compared to find more effective octapeptide-based affinity ligands. It was found that all the three ligands bound hIgG and Fc fragment but barely bound Fab fragment, and the binding to hIgG and Fc was mainly by electrostatic interactions. The optimum binding pH values for the three ligands were different from each other, but kept in the range of 5.0-6.0. Ligand binding competition revealed that the binding sites on hIgG for the three octapeptides were similar to those for Protein A. Adsorption isotherms revealed that hIgG binding capacity was in the range of 64-104mg/mL drained gel in the order of FYWHCLDE>FYCHWALE>FYCHTIDE. Then, purifications of hIgG and human monoclonal antibody from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved with the three affinity columns at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the molecular basis for the binding affinity of the peptides for the Fc fragment of hIgG was elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25064536

  7. Persistent Binding of Ligands to the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the biological and toxic effects of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other structurally diverse ligands. While HAHs are several orders of magnitude more potent in producing AhR-dependent biochemical effects than PAHs or other AhR agonists, only the HAHs have been observed to produce AhR-dependent toxicity in vivo. Here we have characterized the dissociation of a prototypical HAH ligand ([3H] 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD]) and PAH-like ligand ([3H] β-naphthoflavone [βNF]) from the guinea pig, hamster, mouse, and rat hepatic cytosolic AhR in order to elucidate the relationship between the apparent ligand-binding affinities and the divergent potency of these chemicals. Both compounds dissociated very slowly from the AhR with the amount of specific binding remaining at 96 h ranging from 53% to 70% for [3H]TCDD and 26% to 85% for [3H] βNF, depending upon the species examined. The rate of ligand dissociation was unaffected by protein concentration or incubation temperature. Preincubation of cytosol with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, carbaryl, or primaquine, prior to the addition of [3H]TCDD, shifted the apparent IC50 of these compounds as competitive AhR ligands by ∼10- to 50-fold. Our results support the need for reassessment of previous AhR ligand-binding affinity calculations and competitive binding analysis since these measurements are not carried out at equilibrium binding conditions. Our studies suggest that AhR binding affinity/occupancy has little effect on the observed differences in the persistence of gene expression by HAHs and PAHs. PMID:17431010

  8. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  9. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Béhar, Ghislaine; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized. PMID:25647098

  10. Interpolation method for accurate affinity ranking of arrayed ligand-analyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Andree, Kiki C; van der Velde, Niels; van der Kooi, Alex; Stojanović, Ivan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-05-01

    The values of the affinity constants (kd, ka, and KD) that are determined by label-free interaction analysis methods are affected by the ligand density. This article outlines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging method that yields high-throughput globally fitted affinity ranking values using a 96-plex array. A kinetic titration experiment without a regeneration step has been applied for various coupled antibodies binding to a single antigen. Globally fitted rate (kd and ka) and dissociation equilibrium (KD) constants for various ligand densities and analyte concentrations are exponentially interpolated to the KD at Rmax = 100 RU response level (KD(R100)).

  11. Ligand binding by the tandem glycine riboswitch depends on aptamer dimerization but not double ligand occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The glycine riboswitch predominantly exists as a tandem structure, with two adjacent, homologous ligand-binding domains (aptamers), followed by a single expression platform. The recent identification of a leader helix, the inclusion of which eliminates cooperativity between the aptamers, has reopened the debate over the purpose of the tandem structure of the glycine riboswitch. An equilibrium dialysis-based assay was combined with binding-site mutations to monitor glycine binding in each ligand-binding site independently to understand the role of each aptamer in glycine binding and riboswitch tertiary interactions. A series of mutations disrupting the dimer interface was used to probe how dimerization impacts ligand binding by the tandem glycine riboswitch. While the wild-type tandem riboswitch binds two glycine equivalents, one for each aptamer, both individual aptamers are capable of binding glycine when the other aptamer is unoccupied. Intriguingly, glycine binding by aptamer-1 is more sensitive to dimerization than glycine binding by aptamer-2 in the context of the tandem riboswitch. However, monomeric aptamer-2 shows dramatically weakened glycine-binding affinity. In addition, dimerization of the two aptamers in trans is dependent on glycine binding in at least one aptamer. We propose a revised model for tandem riboswitch function that is consistent with these results, wherein ligand binding in aptamer-1 is linked to aptamer dimerization and stabilizes the P1 stem of aptamer-2, which controls the expression platform. PMID:25246650

  12. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  13. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  14. Chlorophenylpiperazine analogues as high affinity dopamine transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Motel, William C; Healy, Jason R; Viard, Eddy; Pouw, Buddy; Martin, Kelly E; Matsumoto, Rae R; Coop, Andrew

    2013-12-15

    Selective σ2 ligands continue to be an active target for medications to attenuate the effects of psychostimulants. In the course of our studies to determine the optimal substituents in the σ2-selective phenyl piperazines analogues with reduced activity at other neurotransmitter systems, we discovered that 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-phenethylpiperazine actually had preferentially increased affinity for dopamine transporters (DAT), yielding a highly selective DAT ligand. PMID:24211020

  15. Classification of 5-HT1A Receptor Ligands on the Basis of Their Binding Affinities by Using PSO-Adaboost-SVM

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Yuntao; Zhou, Changhong; Zhang, Wenjun; Gao, Shibo

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the support vector machine (SVM) and Adaboost-SVM have been used to develop a classification model as a potential screening mechanism for a novel series of 5-HT1A selective ligands. Each compound is represented by calculated structural descriptors that encode topological features. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) and the stepwise multiple linear regression (Stepwise-MLR) methods have been used to search descriptor space and select the descriptors which are responsible for the inhibitory activity of these compounds. The model containing seven descriptors found by Adaboost-SVM, has showed better predictive capability than the other models. The total accuracy in prediction for the training and test set is 100.0% and 95.0% for PSO-Adaboost-SVM, 99.1% and 92.5% for PSO-SVM, 99.1% and 82.5% for Stepwise-MLR-Adaboost-SVM, 99.1% and 77.5% for Stepwise-MLR-SVM, respectively. The results indicate that Adaboost-SVM can be used as a useful modeling tool for QSAR studies. PMID:20111683

  16. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  17. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  18. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.

  19. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  20. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  1. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  2. A 45-amino acid scaffold mined from the Protein Data Bank for high affinity ligand engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kruziki, Max A.; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Woldring, Daniel R.; Duong, Vandon T.; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small protein ligands can provide superior physiological distribution versus antibodies and improved stability, production, and specific conjugation. Systematic evaluation of the Protein Data Bank identified a scaffold to push the limits of small size and robust evolution of stable, high-affinity ligands: 45-residue T7 phage gene 2 protein (Gp2) contains an α-helix opposite a β-sheet with two adjacent loops amenable to mutation. De novo ligand discovery from 108 mutants and directed evolution towards four targets yielded target-specific binders with affinities as strong as 200 ±100 pM, Tm’s from 65 ±3 °C to 80 ±1 °C, and retained activity after thermal denaturation. For cancer targeting, a Gp2 domain for epidermal growth factor receptor was evolved with 18 ±8 nM affinity, receptor-specific binding, and high thermal stability with refolding. The efficiency of evolving new binding function and the size, affinity, specificity, and stability of evolved domains render Gp2 a uniquely effective ligand scaffold. PMID:26165154

  3. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  4. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  5. Combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and time-resolved luminescence for high affinity antibody-ligand interaction thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Meares, Claude F

    2012-02-01

    For experiments using synthetic ligands as probes for biological experiments, it is useful to determine the specificity and affinity of the ligands for their receptors. As ligands with higher affinities are developed (K(A)>10(8)M(-1); K(D)<10(-8)M), a new challenge arises: to measure these values accurately. Isothermal titration calorimetry measures heat produced or consumed during ligand binding, and also provides the equilibrium binding constant. However, as normally practiced, its range is limited. Displacement titration, where a competing weaker ligand is used to lower the apparent affinity of the stronger ligand, can be used to determine the binding affinity as well as the complete thermodynamic data for ligand-antibody complexes with very high affinity. These equilibrium data have been combined with kinetic measurements to yield the rate constants as well. We describe this methodology, using as an example antibody 2D12.5, which captures yttrium S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetate.

  6. Affinity Enhancement by Ligand Clustering Effect Inspired by Peptide Dendrimers−Shank PDZ Proteins Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity binders are desirable tools to probe the function that specific protein−protein interactions play in cell. In the process of seeking a general strategy to design high-affinity binders, we found a clue from the βPIX (p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor)−Shank PDZ interaction in synaptic assembly: three PDZ-binding sites are clustered by a parallel coiled-coil trimer but bind to Shank PDZ protein with 1:1 stoichiometry (1 trimer/1 PDZ). Inspired by this architecture, we proposed that peptide dendrimer, mimicking the ligand clustering in βPIX, will also show enhanced binding affinity, yet with 1:1 stoichiometry. This postulation has been proven here, as we synthesized a set of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric peptides and measured their binding affinity and stoichiometry with Shank PDZ domains by isothermal titration calorimetry, native mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance. This affinity enhancement, best explained by proximity effect, will be useful to guide the design of high-affinity blockers for protein−protein interactions. PMID:26918521

  7. Prediction of ligand-binding sites of proteins by molecular docking calculation for a random ligand library.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to predicting the ligand-binding sites of proteins was developed, using protein-ligand docking computation. In this method, many compounds in a random library are docked onto the whole protein surface. We assumed that the true ligand-binding site would exhibit stronger affinity to the compounds in the random library than the other sites, even if the random library did not include the ligand corresponding to the true binding site. We also assumed that the affinity of the true ligand-binding site would be correlated to the docking scores of the compounds in the random library, if the ligand-binding site was correctly predicted. We call this method the molecular-docking binding-site finding (MolSite) method. The MolSite method was applied to 89 known protein-ligand complex structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank, and it predicted the correct binding sites with about 80-99% accuracy, when only the single top-ranked site was adopted. In addition, the average docking score was weakly correlated to the experimental protein-ligand binding free energy, with a correlation coefficient of 0.44.

  8. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this aim, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to a thousand domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. Extracts of overexpressed domains are incubated with peptide-coated resins and subjected to filtration. Binding affinities are deduced from microfluidic capillary electrophoresis of flow-throughs. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from Human Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human PDZome. We obtained exquisite sequence-dependent binding profiles, describing quantitatively the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has a wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes. PMID:26053890

  9. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity. PMID:26263125

  10. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  11. Selection is more intelligent than design: improving the affinity of a bivalent ligand through directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Kareem M; Xiao, Yi; Soh, H Tom

    2012-12-01

    Multivalent molecular interactions can be exploited to dramatically enhance the performance of an affinity reagent. The enhancement in affinity and specificity achieved with a multivalent construct depends critically on the effectiveness of the scaffold that joins the ligands, as this determines their positions and orientations with respect to the target molecule. Currently, no generalizable design rules exist for construction of an optimal multivalent ligand for targets with known structures, and the design challenge remains an insurmountable obstacle for the large number of proteins whose structures are not known. As an alternative to such design-based strategies, we report here a directed evolution-based method for generating optimal bivalent aptamers. To demonstrate this approach, we fused two thrombin aptamers with a randomized DNA sequence and used a microfluidic in vitro selection strategy to isolate scaffolds with exceptionally high affinities. Within five rounds of selection, we generated a bivalent aptamer that binds thrombin with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) <10 pM, representing a ∼200-fold improvement in binding affinity over the monomeric aptamers and a ∼15-fold improvement over the best designed bivalent construct. The process described here can be used to produce high-affinity multivalent aptamers and could potentially be adapted to other classes of biomolecules.

  12. Ligand recognition by influenza virus. The binding of bivalent sialosides.

    PubMed

    Glick, G D; Toogood, P L; Wiley, D C; Skehel, J J; Knowles, J R

    1991-12-15

    Infection by influenza virus is initiated by a cellular adhesion event that is mediated by the viral protein, hemagglutinin, which is exposed on the surface of the virion. Hemagglutinin recognizes and binds to cell surface sialic acid residues. Although each individual ligand binding interaction is weak, the high affinity of influenza virus for cells that bear sialic acid residues is thought to result from a multivalent attachment process involving many similar recognition events. To evaluate such binding we have synthesized three series of compounds, each containing two sialic acid residues separated by spacers of different length, and have tested them as ligands for influenza hemagglutinin. No increased binding to the bromelain-released hemagglutinin ectodomain was seen for any of the bivalent compounds as determined by 1H NMR titration. In contrast, however, a spacer length between sialic acid residues of approximately 55 A sharply increases the binding of these bidentate species to whole virus as determined by hemagglutination inhibition assays. The most effective compound containing glycines in the linking chain displayed 100-fold increased affinity for whole virus over the paradigm monovalent ligand, Neu5Ac alpha 2Me.

  13. Rolling adhesion of alphaL I domain mutants decorrelated from binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Lauren R; Hammer, Daniel A; Boder, Eric T

    2006-06-30

    Activated lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1, alphaLbeta2 integrin) found on leukocytes facilitates firm adhesion to endothelial cell layers by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation. Recent work has shown that LFA-1 in a pre-activation, low-affinity state may also be involved in the initial tethering and rolling phase of the adhesion cascade. The inserted (I) domain of LFA-1 contains the ligand-binding epitope of the molecule, and a conformational change in this region during activation increases ligand affinity. We have displayed wild-type I domain on the surface of yeast and validated expression using I domain specific antibodies and flow cytometry. Surface display of I domain supports yeast rolling on ICAM-1-coated surfaces under shear flow. Expression of a locked open, high-affinity I domain mutant supports firm adhesion of yeast, while yeast displaying intermediate-affinity I domain mutants exhibit a range of rolling phenotypes. We find that rolling behavior for these mutants fails to correlate with ligand binding affinity. These results indicate that unstressed binding affinity is not the only molecular property that determines adhesive behavior under shear flow.

  14. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  15. General approach for characterizing in vitro selected peptides with protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Gillig, Annabelle; Shah, Pankti; Sau, Sujay P; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2014-08-01

    In vitro selection technologies are important tools for identifying high affinity peptides to proteins of broad medical and biological interest. However, the technological advances that have made it possible to generate long lists of candidate peptides have far outpaced our ability to characterize the binding properties of individual peptides. Here, we describe a low cost strategy to rapidly synthesize, purify, screen, and characterize peptides for high binding affinity. Peptides are assayed in a 96-well dot blot apparatus using membranes that enable partitioning of bound and unbound peptide-protein complexes. We have validated the binding affinity constants produced by this method using known peptide ligands and applied this process to discover five new peptides with nanomolar affinity to human α-thrombin. Given the need for new analytical tools that can accelerate peptide discovery and characterization, we feel that this approach would be useful to a wide range of technologies that utilize high affinity peptides.

  16. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not.

    PubMed

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R; Jehle, Stefan; Jehle, Sefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O; Jones, Elizabeth V; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots--regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy--the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  17. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R.; Jehle, Stefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Jones, Elizabeth V.; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N.; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots—regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy—the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  18. Uncoupling the Structure-Activity Relationships of β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands from Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Hornak, Viktor; Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Reilly, John; Sandham, David A; Shaw, Duncan; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J; Sykes, David A; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, Jose S

    2016-06-23

    Ligand binding to membrane proteins may be significantly influenced by the interaction of ligands with the membrane. In particular, the microscopic ligand concentration within the membrane surface solvation layer may exceed that in bulk solvent, resulting in overestimation of the intrinsic protein-ligand binding contribution to the apparent/measured affinity. Using published binding data for a set of small molecules with the β2 adrenergic receptor, we demonstrate that deconvolution of membrane and protein binding contributions allows for improved structure-activity relationship analysis and structure-based drug design. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand bound membrane protein complexes were used to validate binding poses, allowing analysis of key interactions and binding site solvation to develop structure-activity relationships of β2 ligand binding. The resulting relationships are consistent with intrinsic binding affinity (corrected for membrane interaction). The successful structure-based design of ligands targeting membrane proteins may require an assessment of membrane affinity to uncouple protein binding from membrane interactions. PMID:27239696

  19. Beyond helper phage: Using "helper cells" to select peptide affinity ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Phipps, Mary Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M.; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie A.; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; et al

    2016-09-14

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report onmore » the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Here, based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.« less

  20. Ligand electronic properties modulate tau filament binding site density

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Jensen, Jordan R.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that bind tau-bearing neurofibrillary lesions are being sought for premortem diagnosis, staging, and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases. The utility of these agents will depend on both their binding affinity and binding site density (Bmax). Previously we identified polarizability as a descriptor of protein aggregate binding affinity. To examine its contribution to binding site density, we investigated the ability of two closely related benzothiazole derivatives ((E)-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-6-methoxybenzothiazole) and ((E)-2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methoxybenzothiazole)) that differed in polarizability to displace probes of high (Thioflavin S) and low (radiolabeled (E,E)-1-iodo-2,5-bis(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-methoxy)styrylbenzene; IMSB) density sites. Consistent with their site densities, Thioflavin S completely displaced radiolabeled IMSB, but IMSB was incapable of displacing Thioflavin S. Although both benzothiazoles displaced the low Bmax IMSB probe, only the highly polarizable analog displaced near saturating concentrations of the Thioflavin S probe. Quantum calculations showed that high polarizability reflected extensive pi-electron delocalization fostered by the presence of electron donating and accepting groups. These data suggest that electron delocalization promotes ligand binding at a subset of sites on tau aggregates that are present at high density, and that optimizing this aspect of ligand structure can yield tau-directed agents with superior diagnostic and therapeutic performance. PMID:23072817

  1. Fluorescent ligands to investigate GPCR binding properties and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Martin; Faklaris, Orestis; Falco, Amadine; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Mouillac, Bernard; Durroux, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescent ligands for GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) have been synthesized for a long time but their use was usually restricted to receptor localization in the cell by fluorescent imaging microscopy. During the last two decades, the emergence of new fluorescence-based strategies and the concomitant development of fluorescent measurement apparatus have dramatically widened the use of fluorescent ligands. Among the various strategies, TR (time-resolved)-FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) approaches exhibit an interesting potential to study GPCR interactions with various partners. We have derived various sets of ligands that target different GPCRs with fluorophores, which are compatible with TR-FRET strategies. Fluorescent ligands labelled either with a fluorescent donor (such as europium or terbium cryptate) or with a fluorescent acceptor (such as fluorescein, dy647 or Alexa Fluor® 647), for example, kept high affinities for their cognate receptors. These ligands turn out to be interesting tools to develop FRET-based binding assays. We also used these fluorescent ligands to analyse GPCR oligomerization by measuring FRET between ligands bound to receptor dimers. In contrast with FRET strategies, on the basis of receptor labelling, the ligand-based approach we developed is fully compatible with the study of wild-type receptors and therefore with receptors expressed in native tissues. Therefore, by using fluorescent analogues of oxytocin, we demonstrated the existence of oxytocin receptor dimers in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

  2. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected. PMID:26830536

  3. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  4. Identifying high-affinity aptamer ligands with defined cross-reactivity using high-throughput guided systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Levay, Agata; Brenneman, Randall; Hoinka, Jan; Sant, David; Cardone, Marco; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Berezhnoy, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide aptamers represent a novel platform for creating ligands with desired specificity, and they offer many potentially significant advantages over monoclonal antibodies in terms of feasibility, cost, and clinical applicability. However, the isolation of high-affinity aptamer ligands from random oligonucleotide pools has been challenging. Although high-throughput sequencing (HTS) promises to significantly facilitate systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) analysis, the enormous datasets generated in the process pose new challenges for identifying those rare, high-affinity aptamers present in a given pool. We show that emulsion PCR preserves library diversity, preventing the loss of rare high-affinity aptamers that are difficult to amplify. We also demonstrate the importance of using reference targets to eliminate binding candidates with reduced specificity. Using a combination of bioinformatics and functional analyses, we show that the rate of amplification is more predictive than prevalence with respect to binding affinity and that the mutational landscape within a cluster of related aptamers can guide the identification of high-affinity aptamer ligands. Finally, we demonstrate the power of this selection process for identifying cross-species aptamers that can bind human receptors and cross-react with their murine orthologs. PMID:26007661

  5. Identifying high-affinity aptamer ligands with defined cross-reactivity using high-throughput guided systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment.

    PubMed

    Levay, Agata; Brenneman, Randall; Hoinka, Jan; Sant, David; Cardone, Marco; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Przytycka, Teresa M; Berezhnoy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Oligonucleotide aptamers represent a novel platform for creating ligands with desired specificity, and they offer many potentially significant advantages over monoclonal antibodies in terms of feasibility, cost, and clinical applicability. However, the isolation of high-affinity aptamer ligands from random oligonucleotide pools has been challenging. Although high-throughput sequencing (HTS) promises to significantly facilitate systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) analysis, the enormous datasets generated in the process pose new challenges for identifying those rare, high-affinity aptamers present in a given pool. We show that emulsion PCR preserves library diversity, preventing the loss of rare high-affinity aptamers that are difficult to amplify. We also demonstrate the importance of using reference targets to eliminate binding candidates with reduced specificity. Using a combination of bioinformatics and functional analyses, we show that the rate of amplification is more predictive than prevalence with respect to binding affinity and that the mutational landscape within a cluster of related aptamers can guide the identification of high-affinity aptamer ligands. Finally, we demonstrate the power of this selection process for identifying cross-species aptamers that can bind human receptors and cross-react with their murine orthologs.

  6. Jacalin-carbohydrate interactions: distortion of the ligand molecule as a determinant of affinity.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Kaushal; Swaminathan, C P; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2015-02-01

    Jacalin is among the most thoroughly studied lectins. Its carbohydrate-binding site has also been well characterized. It has been postulated that the lower affinity of β-galactosides for jacalin compared with α-galactosides is caused by steric interactions of the substituents in the former with the protein. This issue has been explored energetically and structurally using different appropriate carbohydrate complexes of jacalin. It turns out that the earlier postulation is not correct. The interactions of the substituent with the binding site remain essentially the same irrespective of the anomeric nature of the substitution. This is achieved through a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The difference in energy, and therefore in affinity, is caused by a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The elucidation of this unprecedented distortion of the ligand as a strategy for modulating affinity is of general interest. The crystal structures also provide a rationale for the relative affinities of the different carbohydrate ligands for jacalin. PMID:25664742

  7. Jacalin-carbohydrate interactions: distortion of the ligand molecule as a determinant of affinity.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Kaushal; Swaminathan, C P; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2015-02-01

    Jacalin is among the most thoroughly studied lectins. Its carbohydrate-binding site has also been well characterized. It has been postulated that the lower affinity of β-galactosides for jacalin compared with α-galactosides is caused by steric interactions of the substituents in the former with the protein. This issue has been explored energetically and structurally using different appropriate carbohydrate complexes of jacalin. It turns out that the earlier postulation is not correct. The interactions of the substituent with the binding site remain essentially the same irrespective of the anomeric nature of the substitution. This is achieved through a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The difference in energy, and therefore in affinity, is caused by a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The elucidation of this unprecedented distortion of the ligand as a strategy for modulating affinity is of general interest. The crystal structures also provide a rationale for the relative affinities of the different carbohydrate ligands for jacalin.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Multivalent Ligand Presentation on Gold Glyconanoparticles and Their Effects on Protein Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-03-01

    Bio-functionalized nanomaterials, which combine functions of biological ligands and unique properties of nano-sized building blocks, have exhibited increased potential applications in biosensing, therapeutics, and diagnostics. Glyconanoparitcles carrying a monolayer of carbohydrate ligands on nanoparticles provide an excellent platform for sensitive protein recognitions. Using Au nanoparticles as the scaffold, multivalent interactions between glycan ligands and proteins have been demonstrated. However, quantitative analysis especially the binding affinity of the resulting glyconanoparticles is challenging to determine. Here we present a new characterization technique, based on fluorescent competition binding assays, for measuring dissociation constants for glyconanoparticles-protein interactions. Au nanoparticles coupled with a series of un-derivatized carbohydrates were prepared by a photocoupling chemistry. Dramatic binding affinity enhancement was observed due to the high ligand density on nanoparticles, which was highly relevant to ligand display, controlled by the linker type, chain length, ligand size and density.

  9. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  10. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  11. Impact of D2 Receptor Internalization on Binding Affinity of Neuroimaging Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ningning; Guo, Wen; Kralikova, Michaela; Jiang, Man; Schieren, Ira; Narendran, Raj; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Javitch, Jonathan A; Rayport, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic dopamine (DA) levels seem to affect the in vivo binding of many D2 receptor radioligands. Thus, release of endogenous DA induced by the administration of amphetamine decreases ligand binding, whereas DA depletion increases binding. This is generally thought to be due to competition between endogenous DA and the radioligands for D2 receptors. However, the temporal discrepancy between amphetamine-induced increases in DA as measured by microdialysis, which last on the order of 2 h, and the prolonged decrease in ligand binding, which lasts up to a day, has suggested that agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization may contribute to the sustained decrease in D2 receptor-binding potential seen following a DA surge. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro system showing robust agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization following treatment with the agonist quinpirole. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were stably co-transfected with human D2 receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and arrestin 3. Agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and radioligand competition binding. The binding of seven D2 antagonists and four agonists to the surface and internalized receptors was measured in intact cells. All the imaging ligands bound with high affinity to both surface and internalized D2 receptors. Affinity of most of the ligands to internalized receptors was modestly lower, indicating that internalization would reduce the binding potential measured in imaging studies carried out with these ligands. However, between-ligand differences in the magnitude of the internalization-associated affinity shift only partly accounted for the data obtained in neuroimaging experiments, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms beyond competition and internalization. PMID:19956086

  12. A liposomal drug platform overrides peptide ligand targeting to a cancer biomarker, irrespective of ligand affinity or density.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bethany Powell; McGuire, Michael J; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2013-01-01

    One method for improving cancer treatment is the use of nanoparticle drugs functionalized with targeting ligands that recognize receptors expressed selectively by tumor cells. In theory such targeting ligands should specifically deliver the nanoparticle drug to the tumor, increasing drug concentration in the tumor and delivering the drug to its site of action within the tumor tissue. However, the leaky vasculature of tumors combined with a poor lymphatic system allows the passive accumulation, and subsequent retention, of nanosized materials in tumors. Furthermore, a large nanoparticle size may impede tumor penetration. As such, the role of active targeting in nanoparticle delivery is controversial, and it is difficult to predict how a targeted nanoparticle drug will behave in vivo. Here we report in vivo studies for αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide targeted liposomal doxorubicin, which increased liposomal delivery and toxicity to lung cancer cells in vitro. We systematically varied ligand affinity, ligand density, ligand stability, liposome dosage, and tumor models to assess the role of active targeting of liposomes to αvβ6. In direct contrast to the in vitro results, we demonstrate no difference in in vivo targeting or efficacy for H2009.1 tetrameric peptide liposomal doxorubicin, compared to control peptide and no peptide liposomes. Examining liposome accumulation and distribution within the tumor demonstrates that the liposome, and not the H2009.1 peptide, drives tumor accumulation, and that both targeted H2009.1 and untargeted liposomes remain in perivascular regions, with little tumor penetration. Thus H2009.1 targeted liposomes fail to improve drug efficacy because the liposome drug platform prevents the H2009.1 peptide from both actively targeting the tumor and binding to tumor cells throughout the tumor tissue. Therefore, using a high affinity and high specificity ligand targeting an over-expressed tumor biomarker does not guarantee enhanced efficacy of a

  13. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Lund, Line Naomi; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Michael, Roice; Lindgren, Johan; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Lund, Martin; Houen, Gunnar; Staby, Arne; St Hilaire, Phaedria M

    2012-02-17

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide ligands have an advantage over biological ligands; they are cheaper to produce, ligand leakage by enzymatic degradation is either eliminated or significantly reduced, and they can in general better withstand cleaning in place (CIP) conditions such as 0.1M NaOH. Here, we present a novel synthetic peptide ligand for purification of human IgG. Immobilized on WorkBeads, an agarose-based base matrix from Bio-Works, the ligand has a dynamic binding capacity of up to 48 mg/mL and purifies IgG from harvest cell culture fluid with purities and recovery of >93%. The binding affinity is ∼10⁵ M⁻¹ and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non-aggregated IgG, indicating that the ligand could be used both as a primary purification step of IgG as well as a subsequent polishing step.

  14. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  15. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  16. Effect of receptor-ligand affinity on the strength of endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Truskey, G A

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of receptor-ligand affinity on the strength of endothelial cell adhesion. Linear and cyclic forms of the fibronectin (Fn) cell-binding domain peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) were covalently immobilized to glass, and Fn was adsorbed onto glass slides. Bovine aortic endothelial cells attached to the surfaces for 15 min. The critical wall shear stress at which 50% of the cells detached increased nonlinearly with ligand density and was greater with immobilized cyclic RGD than with immobilized linear RGD or adsorbed Fn. To directly compare results for the different ligand densities, the receptor-ligand dissociation constant and force per bond were estimated from data for the critical shear stress and contact area. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was used to measure the contact area as a function of separation distance. Contact area increased with increasing ligand density. Contact areas were similar for the immobilized peptides but were greater on surfaces with adsorbed Fn. The dissociation constant was determined by nonlinear regression of the net force on the cells to models that assumed that bonds were either uniformly stressed or that only bonds on the periphery of the contact region were stressed (peeling model). Both models provided equally good fits for cells attached to immobilized peptides whereas the peeling model produced a better fit of data for cells attached to adsorbed Fn. Cyclic RGD and linear RGD both bind to the integrin alpha v beta 3, but immobilized cyclic RGD exhibited a greater affinity than did linear RGD. Receptor affinities of Fn adsorbed to glycophase glass and Fn adsorbed to glass were similar. The number of bonds was calculated assuming binding equilibrium. The peeling model produced good linear fits between bond force and number of bonds. Results of this study indicate that 1) bovine aortic endothelial cells are more adherent on immobilized cyclic RGD peptide than linear

  17. Analysis of affinities between specific biological ligands using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2015-12-21

    In the cell, protein-ligand recognition involves association and dissociation processes controlled by the affinity of the two binding partners and chemical harvesting of adenosine triphosphate energy. Fundamental knowledge of selected recognition events is currently translated in a synthetic environment for biosensors, immunoassays and diagnosis applications, or for pharmaceutical development. However, in order to advance such fields, one needs to determine the lifetime and binding efficiency of the two partners, as well as the complex energy landscape parameters. We employed contact mode atomic force microscopy to evaluate the association and dissociation events between streptavidin protein and its anti-streptavidin antibody ligand currently used for nucleotide array, ELISA, and flow cytometry applications, just to name a few. Using biotin as the control, our analysis helped characterize and differentiate multi- or single bonds of different strengths as well as associated energy landscapes to determine the protein-ligand structural arrangement at nanointerfaces and how these depend on the specificity of the ligand-recognition reaction. Our results suggest that understanding the importance of the rupture forces between a protein and its ligand could serve as the first step to protect on-off switches for biomedical research applications where specificity and selectivity are foremost sought. PMID:26525901

  18. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  19. Proteus and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Polydorides, Savvas; Michael, Eleni; Mignon, David; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization and use of Proteus, a multitool computational suite for the optimization of protein and ligand conformations and sequences, and the calculation of pK α shifts and relative binding affinities. The software offers the use of several molecular mechanics force fields and solvent models, including two generalized Born variants, and a large range of scoring functions, which can combine protein stability, ligand affinity, and ligand specificity terms, for positive and negative design. We present in detail the steps for structure preparation, system setup, construction of the interaction energy matrix, protein sequence and structure optimizations, pK α calculations, and ligand titration calculations. We discuss illustrative examples, including the chemical/structural optimization of a complex between the MHC class II protein HLA-DQ8 and the vinculin epitope, and the chemical optimization of the compstatin analog Ac-Val4Trp/His9Ala, which regulates the function of protein C3 of the complement system. PMID:27094287

  20. Structure-affinity relationship of the cocaine-binding aptamer with quinine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Slavkovic, Sladjana; Altunisik, Merve; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E

    2015-05-15

    In addition to binding its target molecule, cocaine, the cocaine-binding aptamer tightly binds the alkaloid quinine. In order to understand better how the cocaine-binding aptamer interacts with quinine we have used isothermal titration calorimetry-based binding experiments to study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a series of structural analogs of quinine. As a basis for comparison we also investigated the binding of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a set of cocaine metabolites. The bicyclic aromatic ring on quinine is essential for tight affinity by the cocaine-binding aptamer with 6-methoxyquinoline alone being sufficient for tight binding while the aliphatic portion of quinine, quinuclidine, does not show detectable binding. Compounds with three fused aromatic rings are not bound by the aptamer. Having a methoxy group at the 6-position of the bicyclic ring is important for binding as substituting it with a hydrogen, an alcohol or an amino group all result in lower binding affinity. For all ligands that bind, association is driven by a negative enthalpy compensated by unfavorable binding entropy.

  1. Structure-affinity relationship of the cocaine-binding aptamer with quinine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Slavkovic, Sladjana; Altunisik, Merve; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E

    2015-05-15

    In addition to binding its target molecule, cocaine, the cocaine-binding aptamer tightly binds the alkaloid quinine. In order to understand better how the cocaine-binding aptamer interacts with quinine we have used isothermal titration calorimetry-based binding experiments to study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a series of structural analogs of quinine. As a basis for comparison we also investigated the binding of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a set of cocaine metabolites. The bicyclic aromatic ring on quinine is essential for tight affinity by the cocaine-binding aptamer with 6-methoxyquinoline alone being sufficient for tight binding while the aliphatic portion of quinine, quinuclidine, does not show detectable binding. Compounds with three fused aromatic rings are not bound by the aptamer. Having a methoxy group at the 6-position of the bicyclic ring is important for binding as substituting it with a hydrogen, an alcohol or an amino group all result in lower binding affinity. For all ligands that bind, association is driven by a negative enthalpy compensated by unfavorable binding entropy. PMID:25858454

  2. Mimicking nature: Phosphopeptide enrichment using combinatorial libraries of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Iris L; Zhou, Houjiang; Lilley, Kathryn; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-07-29

    Phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification of proteins that controls a plethora of cellular processes and triggers specific physiological responses, for which there is a need to develop tools to characterize phosphorylated targets efficiently. Here, a combinatorial library of triazine-based synthetic ligands comprising 64 small molecules has been rationally designed, synthesized and screened for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides. The lead candidate (coined A8A3), composed of histidine and phenylalanine mimetic components, showed high binding capacity and selectivity for binding mono- and multi-phosphorylated peptides at pH 3. Ligand A8A3 was coupled onto both cross-linked agarose and magnetic nanoparticles, presenting higher binding capacities (100-fold higher) when immobilized on the magnetic support. The magnetic adsorbent was further screened against a tryptic digest of two phosphorylated proteins (α- and β-caseins) and one non-phosphorylated protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). The MALDI-TOF mass spectra of the eluted peptides allowed the identification of nine phosphopeptides, comprising both mono- and multi-phosphorylated peptides. PMID:27345211

  3. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions.

  4. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions. PMID:23562626

  5. Enthalpy/entropy compensation effects from cavity desolvation underpin broad ligand binding selectivity for rat odorant binding protein 3.

    PubMed

    Portman, Katherine L; Long, Jed; Carr, Stephen; Briand, Loïc; Winzor, Donald J; Searle, Mark S; Scott, David J

    2014-04-15

    Evolution has produced proteins with exquisite ligand binding specificity, and manipulating this effect has been the basis for much of modern rational drug design. However, there are general classes of proteins with broader ligand selectivity linked to function, the origin of which is poorly understood. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) sequester volatile molecules for transportation to the olfactory receptors. Rat OBP3, which we characterize by X-ray crystallography and NMR, binds a homologous series of aliphatic γ-lactones within its aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket with remarkably little variation in affinity but extensive enthalpy/entropy compensation effects. We show that the binding energetics are modulated by two desolvation processes with quite different thermodynamic signatures. Ligand desolvation follows the classical hydrophobic effect; however, cavity desolvation is consistent with the liberation of "high energy" water molecules back into bulk solvent with a strong, but compensated, enthalpic contribution, which together underpin the origins of broad ligand binding selectivity.

  6. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  7. Affinity Purification of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadonaga, James T.; Tjian, Robert

    1986-08-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed through the DNA-Sepharose resin. The desired sequence-specific DNA binding protein is purified because it preferentially binds to the recognition sites in the affinity resin rather than to the nonspecific competitor DNA in solution. For example, a protein fraction that is enriched for transcription factor Sp1 can be further purified 500- to 1000-fold by two sequential affinity chromatography steps to give Sp1 of an estimated 90% homogeneity with 30% yield. In addition, the use of tandem affinity columns containing different protein binding sites allows the simultaneous purification of multiple DNA binding proteins from the same extract. This method provides a means for the purification of rare sequence-specific DNA binding proteins, such as Sp1 and CAAT-binding transcription factor.

  8. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  9. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  10. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  11. Molecular insight in the purification of immunoglobulin by pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine and histidyl moieties in histidine ligand affinity chromatography (HLAC) by molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Savane, Tushar S; Kumar, Sanjit; Janakiraman, Vignesh Narasimhan; Kamalanathan, Agamudi S; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A

    2016-05-15

    Pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine is an inexpensive, highly stable, non-toxic ligand explored successfully over the last twenty years for the purification of immunoglobulins in immobilised histidine ligand affinity chromatography. It is of great interest to know the molecular recognition sites of IgG to immobilized l-histidine. Here, we have used an in silico approach to explore the molecular recognition of l-histidine by IgG. We have assessed the feasible binding modes of histidine and its moieties at different sites of IgG and considered only those binding conformations which are exhibited via the imidazole ring NH group or any other OH donating group apart from the ones which are terminally conjugated with the support matrix. We categorised binding site into two categories; category I: inner binding groove and category II: surface binding groove and observed that the hinge region of IgG has most favourable binding pocket for l-histidine and histidyl moieties. Ser and Tyr residues on the hinge region make several significant interactions with l-histidine and histidyl moieties. In case of Fc region of IgG, l-histidine and histidyl moieties closely resemble the binding modes of Protein A, biomimetic ligand 22/8 and B domain of SpA to IgG. In addition to these we have also observed a significant binding site for l-histidine and histidyl moieties at Fab region of IgG. PMID:26476866

  12. Sensitive NMR Approach for Determining the Binding Mode of Tightly Binding Ligand Molecules to Protein Targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Nitsche, Christoph; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Graham, Bim; Huber, Thomas; Klein, Christian D; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    Structure-guided drug design relies on detailed structural knowledge of protein-ligand complexes, but crystallization of cocomplexes is not always possible. Here we present a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to determine the binding mode of tightly binding lead compounds in complex with difficult target proteins. In contrast to established NMR methods, it does not depend on rapid exchange between bound and free ligand or on stable isotope labeling, relying instead on a tert-butyl group as a chemical label. tert-Butyl groups are found in numerous protein ligands and deliver an exceptionally narrow and tall (1)H NMR signal. We show that a tert-butyl group also produces outstandingly intense intra- and intermolecular NOESY cross-peaks. These enable measurements of pseudocontact shifts generated by lanthanide tags attached to the protein, which in turn allows positioning of the ligand on the protein. Once the ligand has been located, assignments of intermolecular NOEs become possible even without prior resonance assignments of protein side chains. The approach is demonstrated with the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease in complex with a high-affinity ligand containing a tert-butyl group. PMID:26974502

  13. Rationally manipulating aptamer binding affinities in a stem-loop molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Rachel E; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-15

    Single-stranded DNA sequences that are highly specific for a target ligand are called aptamers. While the incorporation of aptamer sequences into stem-loop molecular beacons has become an essential tool in optical biosensors, the design principles that determine the magnitude of binding affinity and its relationship to placement of the aptamer sequence in the stem-loop architecture are not well defined. By controlled placement of the aptamer along the loop region of the molecular beacon, it is observed that the binding affinity can be tuned over 4 orders of magnitude (1.3 nM - 203 μM) for the Huizenga and Szostak ATP DNA aptamer sequence. It is observed that the Kd is enhanced for the fully exposed sequence, with reduced binding affinity when the aptamer is part of the stem region of the beacon. Analysis of the ΔG values indicate a clear correlation between the aptamer hybridized length in the stem and its observed Kd. The use of a nanometal surface energy transfer probe method for monitoring ATP binding to the aptamer sequence allows the observation of negative cooperativity between the two ATP binding events. Maintenance of the high binding affinity of this ATP aptamer and the observation of two separate Kd's for ATP binding indicate NSET as an effective, nonmanipulative, optical method for tracking biomolecular changes.

  14. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  15. Ligand binding cooperativity: Bioisosteric replacement of CO with SO2 among thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmed M; Hangauer, David G

    2016-08-15

    Ligand-protein binding is a complex process that involves the formation of number of non-covalent interactions, e.g. H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions, between the ligand and the protein host. Upon binding, ligand functional groups can act synergistically (positive cooperativity) to improve the overall ligand binding affinity beyond what would be expected from their individual contributions. In this study, using thrombin as a protein model system, we evaluated the effect of the bioisosteric replacement of a carbonyl functionality with a sulphonyl functionality on positive cooperativity between their H-bonds with thrombin and hydrophobic binding in the adjacent S3 pocket. The positive cooperativity observed was greatly reduced when replacing the carbonyl group with a sulphonyl group. Evaluating how bioisosteric replacements affect cooperativity is important for making better informed ligand optimization SAR decisions. PMID:27445170

  16. 3-Chlorotyramine Acting as Ligand of the D2 Dopamine Receptor. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis and D2 Receptor Affinity.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio; Andujar, Sebastian; Moreno, Laura; Garibotto, Francisco; Párraga, Javier; Peruchena, Nelida; Cabedo, Nuria; Villecco, Margarita; Cortes, Diego; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine as a ligand of the D2 dopamine receptor. This compound displayed a similar affinity by this receptor to that previously reported for dopamine. In order to understand further the experimental results we performed a molecular modeling study of 3-chlorotyramine and structurally related compounds. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio and density functional theory calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of these ligands interacting with the D2 dopamine receptors is reported here. These results provided a clear picture of the binding interactions of these compounds from both structural and energetic view points. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allowed us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) technique. Molecular aspects of the binding interactions between ligands and the D2 dopamine receptor are discussed in detail. A good correlation between the relative binding energies obtained from theoretical calculations and experimental IC50 values was obtained. These results allowed us to predict that 3-chlorotyramine possesses a significant affinity by the D2 -DR. Our theoretical predictions were experimentally corroborated when we synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine which displayed a similar affinity by the D2 -DR to that reported for DA.

  17. Affinity chromatography of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases. Small organic ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C M; Knowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of affinity chromatography for the purification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was explored by using column ligands derived from the corresponding amino acid and aminoalkyladenylate, a non-labile analogue of the aminoacyladenylate reaction intermediate. Four modes of attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to Sepharose were studied. The interaction between amino acid derivatives and the corresponding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is too weak to allow their use as ligands for affinity chromatography. Attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate via the alpha-nitrogen atom of the amino acid or via C-8 of the nucleotide abolishes synthetase binding, and immobilization via the oxidized ribose ring is only marginally useful. However, attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to the matrix via N-6 of the nucleotide allows strong and specific synthetase binding, and the use of such columns permits the isolation of homogeneous synthetase from crude mixtures. The effect of non-specific adsorption and the utility of pre-columns and of specific substrate elution are investigated and discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:597251

  18. LNP 906, the first high-affinity photoaffinity ligand selective for I1 imidazoline receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dragan, Urosevic; Stephan, Schann; Jean-Daniel, Ehrhardt; Pascal, Bousquet; Hugues, Greney

    2004-01-01

    The hypotensive effect of imidazoline-like drugs, such as clonidine, was attributed both to α2-adrenergic receptors and nonadrenergic imidazoline receptors, which are divided into I1, I2 and I3 subtypes. We have recently synthesized a derivative of (2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), the first high-affinity and selective ligand for I1 receptors (I1R), with a photoactivable function (LNP 906). This work aims to test whether this derivative retained the binding properties of LNP 911 and bound irreversibly to I1R. Binding studies showed that LNP 906 exhibited nanomolar affinity for I1R and was selective for I1R over I2 receptors and α2-adrenergic receptors (α2Ars). Upon exposure to u.v. light, LNP 906 irreversibly blocked the binding of [125I]-paraiodoclonidine (PIC) to I1R, time- and dose-dependently, on PC12 cell membranes and interacted with I1R in a reversible and competitive manner in the absence of light. Pharmacological studies showed that this blockade was prevented by the concomitant presence of rilmenidine (a well-known I1 agonist), but not by rauwolscine (an α2 antagonist). Finally, LNP 906 clearly antagonized the decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP level induced by rilmenidine, but not by melatonin. These results indicate that LNP 906 is the first high-affinity and selective photoaffinity ligand for I1R and that it behaves as an I1R antagonist. PMID:15178642

  19. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  20. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  1. Ligand-apomyoglobin interactions. Configurational adaptability of the haem-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Lind, K E; Moller, J V

    1976-01-01

    1. The interaction of the haem-binding region of apomyoglobin with different ligands was examined by ultrafiltration, equilibrium dialysis and spectrophotometry, to study unspecific features of protein-ligand interactions such as they occur in, for example, serum albumin binding. 2. Apomyoglobin, in contrast with metmyoglobin, binds at pH 7, with a high affinity, one molecule of Bromophenol Blue, bilirubin and protoporphyrin IX, two molecules of n-dodecanoate and n-decyl sulphate and four molecules of n-dodecyl sulphate and n-tetradecyl sulphate. 3. The number of high-affinity sites and/or association constants for the alkyl sulphates are enhanced by an increase of hydrocarbon length, indicating hydrophobic interactions with the protein. 4. Measurements of the temperature-dependence of the association constants of the high-affinity sites imply that the binding processes are largely entropy-driven. 5. Binding studies in the presence of two ligands show that bilirubin plus Bromophenol Blue and dodecanoate plus Bromophenol Blue can be simultaneously bound by apomyoglobin, but with decreased affinities. By contrast, the apomyoglobin-protoporphyrin IX complex does not react with Bromophenol Blue. 6. Optical-rotatory-dispersion measurements show that the laevorotation of apomyoglobin is increased towards that of metmyglobin in the presence of haemin and protoporphyrin IX. Small changes in the optical-rotatory-dispersion spectrum of apomyoglobin are observed in the presence of the other ligands. 7. It is concluded that the binding sites on apomyoglobin probably do not pre-exist but appear to be moulded from predominantly non-polar amino acid residues by reaction with hydrophobic ligands. 8. Comparison with data in the literature indicates that apomyoglobin on a weight basis has a larger hydrophobic area avaialble for binding of ligands than has human serum albumin. On the other hand, the association constants of serum for the ligands used in this study are generally

  2. Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Kumar, Ashok; Sundström, Heléne; Ledung, Erika; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-03-23

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices.

  3. Ligand-Binding Pocket Bridges DNA-Binding and Dimerization Domains of the Urate-Responsive MarR Homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control. PMID:24955985

  4. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jae Hong; Nakane, Takashi; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Toru; Kitamoto, Dai

    2001-01-01

    Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A) and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1) for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid. PMID:11604104

  5. Sulfated Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls Are High-Affinity Ligands for the Thyroid Hormone Transport Protein Transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian A.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; He, Xianran; Robertson, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The displacement of l-thyroxine (T4) from binding sites on transthyretin (TTR) is considered a significant contributing mechanism in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced thyroid disruption. Previous research has discovered hydroxylated PCB metabolites (OH-PCBs) as high-affinity ligands for TTR, but the binding potential of conjugated PCB metabolites such as PCB sulfates has not been explored. Objectives: We evaluated the binding of five lower-chlorinated PCB sulfates to human TTR and compared their binding characteristics to those determined for their OH-PCB precursors and for T4. Methods: We used fluorescence probe displacement studies and molecular docking simulations to characterize the binding of PCB sulfates to TTR. The stability of PCB sulfates and the reversibility of these interactions were characterized by HPLC analysis of PCB sulfates after their binding to TTR. The ability of OH-PCBs to serve as substrates for human cytosolic sulfotransferase 1A1 (hSULT1A1) was assessed by OH-PCB–dependent formation of adenosine-3´,5´-diphosphate, an end product of the sulfation reaction. Results: All five PCB sulfates were able to bind to the high-affinity binding site of TTR with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd values) in the low nanomolar range (4.8–16.8 nM), similar to that observed for T4 (4.7 nM). Docking simulations provided corroborating evidence for these binding interactions and indicated multiple high-affinity modes of binding. All OH-PCB precursors for these sulfates were found to be substrates for hSULT1A1. Conclusions: Our findings show that PCB sulfates are high-affinity ligands for human TTR and therefore indicate, for the first time, a potential relevance for these metabolites in PCB-induced thyroid disruption. PMID:23584369

  6. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M.; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5‧ and 3‧ ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  7. Soybean. beta. -glucan binding sites display maximal affinity for a heptaglucoside phytoalexin-elicitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cosio, E.G.; Waldmueller, T.; Frey, T.; Ebel, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The affinity of soybean {beta}-glucan-binding sites for a synthetic heptaglucan elicitor was tested in a ligand-competition assay against a {sup 125}I-labeled 1,3-1,6-{beta}-glucan preparation (avg. DP=20). Half-maximal displacement of label (IC{sub 50}) was obtained at 9nM heptaglucan, the highest affinity of all fractions tested to date. Displacement followed a uniform sigmoidal pattern and was complete at 1{mu}M indicating access of heptaglucan to all sites available to the labeled elicitor. A mathematical model was used to predict IC{sub 50} values according to the DP of glucan fragments obtained from fungal cell walls. The lowest IC{sub 50} predicted by this model is 3nM. Binding affinity of the glucans was compared with their elicitor activity in a bioassay.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of ligand dissociation from liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Mu, Yuguang; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-06-30

    The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized "portal region" could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques.

  9. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  10. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)- d-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α- d-Gal-(1→2)-[α- d-Abe-(1→3)]-α- d-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GalNAc-(1→4)[α- d-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α- l-Fuc-(1→2)-β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  11. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-D-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α-D-Gal-(1→2)-[α-D-Abe-(1→3)]-α-D-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-D-Gal-(1→4)-β-D-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α-L-Fuc-(1→2)-β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β-D-Gal-(1→4)-β-D-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  12. Design of Cyclic Peptides That Bind Protein Surfaces with Antibody-Like Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Millward, Steven W.; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J.; Roberts, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein Gαi1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic Gαi binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity (Ki ≈ 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the βγ heterodimer, an endogenous Gαi1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces. PMID:17894440

  13. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    PubMed

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  14. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand.

  15. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand. PMID:27348073

  16. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  17. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  18. Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Breiten, Benjamin; Lockett, Matthew R; Sherman, Woody; Fujita, Shuji; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Lange, Heiko; Bowers, Carleen M; Heroux, Annie; Krilov, Goran; Whitesides, George M

    2013-10-16

    The mechanism (or mechanisms) of enthalpy-entropy (H/S) compensation in protein-ligand binding remains controversial, and there are still no predictive models (theoretical or experimental) in which hypotheses of ligand binding can be readily tested. Here we describe a particularly well-defined system of protein and ligands--human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) and a series of benzothiazole sulfonamide ligands with different patterns of fluorination--that we use to define enthalpy/entropy (H/S) compensation in this system thermodynamically and structurally. The binding affinities of these ligands (with the exception of one ligand, in which the deviation is understood) to HCA are, despite differences in fluorination pattern, indistinguishable; they nonetheless reflect significant and compensating changes in enthalpy and entropy of binding. Analysis reveals that differences in the structure and thermodynamic properties of the waters surrounding the bound ligands are an important contributor to the observed H/S compensation. These results support the hypothesis that the molecules of water filling the active site of a protein, and surrounding the ligand, are as important as the contact interactions between the protein and the ligand for biomolecular recognition, and in determining the thermodynamics of binding.

  19. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  20. Ligand-binding study of Anopheles gambiae chemosensory proteins.

    PubMed

    Iovinella, Immacolata; Bozza, Francesco; Caputo, Beniamino; Della Torre, Alessandra; Pelosi, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are a class of small proteins expressed only in arthropods and endowed with heterogeneous functions. Some of them are involved in chemical communications, others in development or other physiological roles. The numbers of CSPs in different species of insects range from 4 in Drosophila to at least 70 in locusts, whereas in other arthropods such as crustaceans and millipedes, only 2-3 very similar sequences have been reported in each species. We have expressed, in a bacterial system, 5 of the 8 CSPs predicted by the genome of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, 4 identified at the protein level (SAP1, SAP2, SAP3, and CSP3) and a fifth annotated as part of this work, obtaining the proteins with high yields and in their soluble forms. Purified CSPs have been used to study their ligand-binding properties, both using competitive binding assays and quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, in order to get insights into their physiological functions. The agreement between the 2 sets of data supports the assumptions that the ligands, including the fluorescent reporter, bind within the core of the proteins. Their different affinities toward a set of pure chemicals suggest specific roles in chemical communication.

  1. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  2. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  3. Univalent and Bivalent Ligands of Butorphan: Characteristics of the Linking Chain determine the Affinity and Potency of Such Opioid Ligands†

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michael; Fulton, Brian S.; Zhang, Bin; Knapp, Brian I.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Neumeyer, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Bivalent morphinan compounds containing ester linkers were synthesized and their binding affinities at the μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors determined. Addition of methyl groups adjacent to the hydrolytically labile ester linkage increased stability while only partially affecting binding affinity. The resulting bivalent ligands with optimized spacer-length and structure show potent binding profiles with the most potent compound (4b) having Ki values of 0.47 nM for both the μ and κ opioid receptors, and 4a having Ki values of 0.95 and 0.62 nM for the μ and κ receptors, respectively. Both 4a and 4b were partial agonists at the κ and μ receptors in the [35S]GTPγS binding assay. PMID:19634902

  4. Structural insight into PPARgamma ligands binding.

    PubMed

    Farce, A; Renault, N; Chavatte, P

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPARs) are a family of three related nuclear receptors first cloned in 1990. Their involvement in glucidic and lipidic homeostasis quickly made them an attractive target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, the most prevalent mortality factor in developed countries. They therefore attracted much synthetic efforts, more particularly PPARgamma. Supported by a large number of crystallographic studies, data derived from these compounds lead to a fairly clear view of the agonist binding mode into the Ligand Binding Domain (LBD). Nearly all the compounds conform to a three-module structure, with a binder group involved in a series of hydrogen bonds in front of the ligand-dependent Activation Function (AF2), a linker mostly arranged around a phenoxyethyl and an effector end occupying the large cavity of the binding site. Following the marketing of the glitazones and the observation of the hepatotoxicity of troglitazone, variations in the binder led to the glitazars, and then pharmacomodulations have been undertaken on the two other modules, leading to a large family of highly related chemical structures. Some compounds, while still adhering to the three-module structure, diverge from the mainstream, such as the phthalates. Curiously, these plasticizers were known to elicit biological effects that led to the discovery of PPARs but were not actively studied as PPARs agonists. As the biological effects of PPARs became clearer, new compounds were also found to exert at least a part of their actions by the activation of PPARgamma. PMID:19442144

  5. The dynamics of ligands binding to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    2001-03-01

    The static structures of many proteins have been solved, and this has revealed much about how they function. On the other hand, although the importance of atomic motion to how proteins function has been conjectured for several decades, the characterization of protein dynamics on multiple time scales is scant. This is because of severe experimental and theoretical difficulties, particularly characterizing the nanosecond to millisecond time scales. Recently, several new techniques have been introduced that make it possible to initiate chemical reactions on fast time scales. We have applied advanced laser induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with nanosecond resolution to examine the binding kinetics of ligands to several enzymes. The observed kinetics take place over multiple time scales. The results reveal the dynamical nature of the binding process and show that there are substantial populations of many structures that are in a constant dynamic equilibrium in some cases. Some of these structures lie quite far from the static structure defined in crystallographic studies, which suggest that the conventional thermodynamical picture of binding (an equilibrium between ligand free in solution and bound) is far off the mark. Moreover, the results suggest that the dynamics can certainly play a crucial role in kinetic control of protein function as in, for example, affecting the rates of enzymatic catalysis. This work is a collaborative project with Hong Deng and Nick Zhadin, also at Albert Einstein. Work supported by the NSF and NIH.

  6. Exploration of Gated Ligand Binding Recognizes an Allosteric Site for Blocking FABP4-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiang; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), reversibly binding to fatty acids and other lipids with high affinities, is a potential target for treatment of cancers. The binding site of FABP4 is buried in an interior cavity and thereby ligand binding/unbinding is coupled with opening/closing of FABP4. It is a difficult task both experimentally and computationally to illuminate the entry or exit pathway, especially with the conformational gating. In this report we combine extensive computer simulations, clustering analysis, and Markov state model to investigate the binding mechanism of FABP4 and troglitazone. Our simulations capture spontaneous binding and unbinding events as well as the conformational transition of FABP4 between the open and closed states. An allosteric binding site on the protein surface is recognized for development of novel FABP4 inhibitors. The binding affinity is calculated and compared with the experimental value. The kinetic analysis suggests that ligand residence on the protein surface may delay the binding process. Overall, our results provide a comprehensive picture of ligand diffusion on the protein surface, ligand migration into the buried cavity, and the conformational change of FABP4 at an atomic level. PMID:26580122

  7. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound.

  8. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  9. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  10. myo-inositol and D-ribose ligand discrimination in an ABC periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2013-05-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) IbpA mediates the uptake of myo-inositol by the IatP-IatA ATP-binding cassette transmembrane transporter. We report a crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus IbpA bound to myo-inositol at 1.45 Å resolution. This constitutes the first structure of a PBP bound to inositol. IbpA adopts a type I PBP fold consisting of two α-β lobes that surround a central hinge. A pocket positioned between the lobes contains the myo-inositol ligand, which binds with submicromolar affinity (0.76 ± 0.08 μM). IbpA is homologous to ribose-binding proteins and binds D-ribose with low affinity (50.8 ± 3.4 μM). On the basis of IbpA and ribose-binding protein structures, we have designed variants of IbpA with inverted binding specificity for myo-inositol and D-ribose. Five mutations in the ligand-binding pocket are sufficient to increase the affinity of IbpA for D-ribose by 10-fold while completely abolishing binding to myo-inositol. Replacement of ibpA with these mutant alleles unable to bind myo-inositol abolishes C. crescentus growth in medium containing myo-inositol as the sole carbon source. Neither deletion of ibpA nor replacement of ibpA with the high-affinity ribose binding allele affected C. crescentus growth on D-ribose as a carbon source, providing evidence that the IatP-IatA transporter is specific for myo-inositol. This study outlines the evolutionary relationship between ribose- and inositol-binding proteins and provides insight into the molecular basis upon which these two related, but functionally distinct, classes of periplasmic proteins specifically bind carbohydrate ligands.

  11. Identifying ligand binding sites and poses using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yang, Yanzhi; Chodera, John D.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to identify small molecule ligand binding sites and orientations to a given protein crystal structure using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The Hamiltonians used vary from the physical end state of protein interacting with the ligand to a unphysical end state where the ligand does not interact with the protein. As replicas explore the space of Hamiltonians interpolating between these states the ligand can rapidly escape local minima and explore potential binding sites. Geometric restraints keep the ligands within the protein volume, and a potential energy pathway designed to increase phase space overlap between intermediates ensures good mixing. Because of the rigorous statistical mechanical nature of the Hamiltonian exchange framework, we can also extract binding free energy estimates at all putative binding sites, which agree well with free energies computed from occupation probabilities. We present results of this methodology on the T4 lysozyme L99A model system with four ligands, including one non-binder as a control. We find that our methodology identifies the crystallographic binding sites consistently and accurately for the small number of ligands considered here and gives free energies consistent with experiment. We are also able to analyze the contribution of individual binding sites on the overall binding affinity. Our methodology points to near term potential applications in early-stage drug discovery. PMID:24297454

  12. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  13. Relative Binding Affinities of Monolignols to Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-08-11

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic -OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic -OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate. PMID:27447548

  14. Computational design of an endo-1,4-[beta]-xylanase ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Andrew; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Fortenberry, Carie; Harp, Joel M.; Mizoue, Laura S.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-09-05

    The field of computational protein design has experienced important recent success. However, the de novo computational design of high-affinity protein-ligand interfaces is still largely an open challenge. Using the Rosetta program, we attempted the in silico design of a high-affinity protein interface to a small peptide ligand. We chose the thermophilic endo-1,4-{beta}-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa as the protein scaffold on which to perform our designs. Over the course of the study, 12 proteins derived from this scaffold were produced and assayed for binding to the target ligand. Unfortunately, none of the designed proteins displayed evidence of high-affinity binding. Structural characterization of four designed proteins revealed that although the predicted structure of the protein model was highly accurate, this structural accuracy did not translate into accurate prediction of binding affinity. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the lack of binding affinity is possibly due to unaccounted for protein dynamics in the 'thumb' region of our design scaffold intrinsic to the family 11 {beta}-xylanase fold. Further computational analysis revealed two specific, single amino acid substitutions responsible for an observed change in backbone conformation, and decreased dynamic stability of the catalytic cleft. These findings offer new insight into the dynamic and structural determinants of the {beta}-xylanase proteins.

  15. Design and synthesis of novel hydrophilic spacers for the reduction of nonspecific binding proteins on affinity resins.

    PubMed

    Shiyama, Takaaki; Furuya, Minoru; Yamazaki, Akira; Terada, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Akito

    2004-06-01

    Tubulin and actin often bind nonspecifically to affinity chromatography resins, complicating research toward identifying the cellular targets. Reduction of nonspecific binding proteins is important for success in finding such targets. We herein disclose the design, synthesis, and effectiveness in reduction of nonspecific binding proteins, of novel hydrophilic spacers (2-5), which were introduced between matrices and a ligand. Among them, tartaric acid derivative (5) exhibited the most effective reduction of nonspecific binding proteins, whilst maintaining binding of the target protein. Introduction of 5 on TOYOPEARL reduced tubulin and actin by almost 65% and 90% compared to that without the hydrophilic spacer, respectively, with effective binding to the target protein, FKBP12.

  16. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  17. In silico design of high-affinity ligands for the immobilization of inulinase.

    PubMed

    Holyavka, M G; Kondratyev, M S; Samchenko, A A; Kabanov, A V; Komarov, V M; Artyukhov, V G

    2016-04-01

    Using computer modeling, virtual screening of high-affinity ligands for immobilization of inulinase - an enzyme that cleaves inulin and fructose-containing polymers to fructose - has been performed. The inulinase molecule from Aspergillus ficuum (pdb: 3SC7) taken from the database of protein structures was used as a protein model and the target for flexible docking. The set of ligands studied included simple sugars (activators, inhibitors, products of enzymatic catalysis), as well as high-molecular weight compounds (polycation and polyanion exchange resins, glycoproteins, phenylalanine-proline peptide, polylactate, and caffeine). Based on the comparative analysis of the values of the total energy and the localization of ligand binding sites, we made several assumptions concerning the mechanisms of interaction of the suggested matrices for the immobilization of enzyme molecules and the structural features of such complexes. It was also assumed that the candidates for immobilization agents meeting the industrial requirements may be glycoproteins, for which we propose an additional incorporation of cysteine residues into their structure, aimed to create disulfide «anchors» to the surface. PMID:26945599

  18. Protein conformational plasticity and complex ligand-binding kinetics explored by atomistic simulations and Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Nuria; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the structural mechanisms of protein–ligand binding and their dependence on protein sequence and conformation is of fundamental importance for biomedical research. Here we investigate the interplay of conformational change and ligand-binding kinetics for the serine protease Trypsin and its competitive inhibitor Benzamidine with an extensive set of 150 μs molecular dynamics simulation data, analysed using a Markov state model. Seven metastable conformations with different binding pocket structures are found that interconvert at timescales of tens of microseconds. These conformations differ in their substrate-binding affinities and binding/dissociation rates. For each metastable state, corresponding solved structures of Trypsin mutants or similar serine proteases are contained in the protein data bank. Thus, our wild-type simulations explore a space of conformations that can be individually stabilized by adding ligands or making suitable changes in protein sequence. These findings provide direct evidence of conformational plasticity in receptors. PMID:26134632

  19. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  20. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  1. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    sensors for the immobilization of peptide ligands with low nonspecific binding. The silica surface was first modified by the formation of self-assembling monolayer (SAM) of 3-amino-propyl triethoxy silane as an anchor layer. Short chains of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with Fmoc-protected amino groups at one end and carboxyl groups at the other end were then coupled through the carboxyl terminal to the amino groups on the silane. The short PEG chains served as spacer arms to reduce nonspecific binding to the substrate. The gold surface was modified by a two-component SAM using mixtures of HS(CH 2)11(CH2CH2O)6NH2 and HS(CH2)11(CH2CH2O)3OH. The advantage of using a modified silica surface is its relatively higher stability than the SAM on gold during the peptide functionalization step, however the SPR sensors do not work on silica surfaces. In addition, the modification process of the gold surface is relatively simple compared with that of the silica surface. The peptide immobilization process was optimized with silica surfaces and the best conditions were applied for the immobilization on gold surfaces. The results of surface modifications and peptide immobilizations were characterized by various surface analysis techniques including, ellipsometry, contact angle goniometer, chemical force microscopy (CFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). QCM and SPR results indicated that this peptide ligand HWRGWV immobilized on modified silica or gold surfaces has high affinity and specificity to hIgG binding even in a complex medium such as cMEM. Both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of affinity interaction were obtained by the analysis of QCM and SPR data. Compared with QCM, SPR is more suitable for quantitative analysis of the protein binding, which is essential for the investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics parameters. The maximum binding capacity (4.15 mg m-2 ) and the dissociation constant (1.83 mu

  2. Probing the Determinants of Diacylglycerol Binding Affinity in C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Morgan, Brittany; Massi, Francesca; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains are independently folded modules that are responsible for targeting their parent proteins to lipid membranes containing diacylglycerol (DAG), a ubiquitous second messenger. The DAG-binding affinities of C1 domains determine the threshold concentration of DAG required for the propagation of the signaling response and the selectivity of this response among the DAG receptors in the cell. The structural information currently available for C1 domains offers little insight into the molecular basis of their differential DAG-binding affinities. In this work, we characterized the C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα (C1Bα) and its diagnostic mutant, Y123W, using solution NMR methods and molecular dynamics simulations. The mutation did not perturb the C1Bα structure or sub-nanosecond dynamics of the protein backbone, but resulted in a >100-fold increase of DAG binding affinity and substantial change in μs-timescale conformational dynamics, as quantified by NMR rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion methods. The differences in the conformational exchange behavior between the wild-type and Y123W C1Bα were localized to the hinge regions of ligand-binding loops. Molecular dynamics simulations provided insight into the identity of the exchanging conformers and revealed the significance of a particular residue, Gln128, in modulating the geometry of the ligand-binding site. Taken together with the results of binding studies, our findings suggest that the conformational dynamics and preferential partitioning of the tryptophan sidechain into the water-lipid interface are important factors that modulate the DAG-binding properties of C1 domains. PMID:21419781

  3. Rapid screening of textile dyes employed as affinity ligands to purify enzymes from yeast.

    PubMed

    Raya-Tonetti, G; Perotti, N

    1999-04-01

    A rapid method for screening potential dye ligands for use in affinity chromatography is described. Textile dyes were non-covalently coupled to a cross-linked polysaccharide Sepharose(R) matrix. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was used as the model protein for evaluating the screening system. A homogenate from baker's yeast was used as the crude source of enzyme. Batchwise adsorption and elution were used to evaluate the individual dyes. The influence of pH and ionic strength in the binding and elution steps was evaluated. Batch isotherms were used to evaluate parameter characteristics. Experimental data obtained were fitted to Langmuir isotherms to determine the maximum binding capacity and the dissociation constant for each dye evaluated in this study. A dynamic binding capacity of 107.6 units of ADH/g of resin was determined for Procion Turquoise MXG dye by frontal analysis. Specific elution with NAD+ and non-specific elution with 50 mM Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5, were tested when Procion Turquoise MXG was used, giving purification factors of 53.5 and 4.4 respectively. This screening technique is inexpensive and can be performed in a few hours. It was possible to predict the performance of different reactive dyes in this way, and the influence of pH and salt on the binding behaviour was demonstrated. PMID:10075911

  4. Rapid screening of textile dyes employed as affinity ligands to purify enzymes from yeast.

    PubMed

    Raya-Tonetti, G; Perotti, N

    1999-04-01

    A rapid method for screening potential dye ligands for use in affinity chromatography is described. Textile dyes were non-covalently coupled to a cross-linked polysaccharide Sepharose(R) matrix. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was used as the model protein for evaluating the screening system. A homogenate from baker's yeast was used as the crude source of enzyme. Batchwise adsorption and elution were used to evaluate the individual dyes. The influence of pH and ionic strength in the binding and elution steps was evaluated. Batch isotherms were used to evaluate parameter characteristics. Experimental data obtained were fitted to Langmuir isotherms to determine the maximum binding capacity and the dissociation constant for each dye evaluated in this study. A dynamic binding capacity of 107.6 units of ADH/g of resin was determined for Procion Turquoise MXG dye by frontal analysis. Specific elution with NAD+ and non-specific elution with 50 mM Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5, were tested when Procion Turquoise MXG was used, giving purification factors of 53.5 and 4.4 respectively. This screening technique is inexpensive and can be performed in a few hours. It was possible to predict the performance of different reactive dyes in this way, and the influence of pH and salt on the binding behaviour was demonstrated.

  5. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  6. Cloud computing approaches for prediction of ligand binding poses and pathways.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Morgan; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-22

    We describe an innovative protocol for ab initio prediction of ligand crystallographic binding poses and highly effective analysis of large datasets generated for protein-ligand dynamics. We include a procedure for setup and performance of distributed molecular dynamics simulations on cloud computing architectures, a model for efficient analysis of simulation data, and a metric for evaluation of model convergence. We give accurate binding pose predictions for five ligands ranging in affinity from 7 nM to > 200 μM for the immunophilin protein FKBP12, for expedited results in cases where experimental structures are difficult to produce. Our approach goes beyond single, low energy ligand poses to give quantitative kinetic information that can inform protein engineering and ligand design.

  7. Compressed images for affinity prediction-2 (CIFAP-2): an improved machine learning methodology on protein-ligand interactions based on a study on caspase 3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Erdas, Ozlem; Andac, Cenk A; Gurkan-Alp, A Selen; Alpaslan, Ferda Nur; Buyukbingol, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to propose an improved computational methodology, which is called Compressed Images for Affinity Prediction-2 (CIFAP-2) to predict binding affinities of structurally related protein-ligand complexes. CIFAP-2 method is established based on a protein-ligand model from which computational affinity information is obtained by utilizing 2D electrostatic potential images determined for the binding site of protein-ligand complexes. The quality of the prediction of the CIFAP-2 algorithm was tested using partial least squares regression (PLSR) as well as support vector regression (SVR) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy ınference system (ANFIS), which are highly promising prediction methods in drug design. CIFAP-2 was applied on a protein-ligand complex system involving Caspase 3 (CASP3) and its 35 inhibitors possessing a common isatin sulfonamide pharmacophore. As a result, PLSR affinity prediction for the CASP3-ligand complexes gave rise to the most consistent information with reported empirical binding affinities (pIC(50)) of the CASP3 inhibitors. PMID:25578823

  8. Mechanism and thermodynamics of ligand binding to auxin amidohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Mijo; Zagrovic, Bojan; Tomić, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    BrILL2 is catalytically the most efficient auxin amidohydrolase from Brassica rapa, playing a key role in auxin metabolism by catalyzing its release from amino acid conjugates. Auxins, with the most abundant representative indole-acetic acid ([1H-indol-3-yl]-acetic acid, IAA), are a group of plant hormones that in very small concentrations regulate ubiquitin-mediated degradation of transcription regulators. Kinetic studies on BrILL2 showed that it hydrolyzes alanine conjugates of IAA and of its larger analogues, indole-propionic acid (3-[1H-indol-3-yl]-propionic acid, IPA) and indole-butyric acid (4-[1H-indol-3-yl]-butyric acid, IBA). Structurally, BrILL2 belongs to the largest known family of metallopeptidases (M20) that share a recognizable 3D structure, characterized by two perpendicular domains. Its members have been implicated in numerous biochemical processes and have been found across all species sequenced to date. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study structural and thermodynamic properties of ligand binding to BrILL2. A conformational change was captured in multiple copies of 10 ns long simulations, described by a rigid body movement of the two domains, and its associated key interactions between residues were examined. For the three substrates, complexes in two possible binding modes were recreated, along with a single binding mode for the putative substrate tryptophanyl-alanine (Trp-Ala), which were subsequently simulated in multiple copies of 10 ns long simulations. Thermodynamic calculations were used to assess their binding affinities and explain the selectivity toward the longer ligands. Based on the results, a possible route for the reaction is proposed.

  9. Use of NMR saturation transfer difference spectroscopy to study ligand binding to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Venkitakrishnan, Rani Parvathy; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Max, Marianna; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-01-01

    Detection of weak ligand binding to membrane-spanning proteins, such as receptor proteins at low physiological concentrations, poses serious experimental challenges. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) spectroscopy offers an excellent way to surmount these problems. As the name suggests, magnetization transferred from the receptor to its bound ligand is measured by directly observing NMR signals from the ligand itself. Low-power irradiation is applied to a (1)H NMR spectral region containing protein signals but no ligand signals. This irradiation spreads quickly throughout the membrane protein by the process of spin diffusion and saturates all protein (1)H NMR signals. (1)H NMR signals from a ligand bound transiently to the membrane protein become saturated and, upon dissociation, serve to decrease the intensity of the (1)H NMR signals measured from the pool of free ligand. The experiment is repeated with the irradiation pulse placed outside the spectral region of protein and ligand, a condition that does not lead to saturation transfer to the ligand. The two resulting spectra are subtracted to yield the difference spectrum. As an illustration of the methodology, we review here STD-NMR experiments designed to investigate binding of ligands to the human sweet taste receptor, a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Sweetener molecules bind to the sweet receptor with low affinity but high specificity and lead to a variety of physiological responses.

  10. Irreversible blockade of the high and low affinity ( sup 3 H) naloxone binding sites by C-6 derivatives of morphinane-6-ones

    SciTech Connect

    Krizsan, D. ); Varga, E.; Benyhe, S.; Szucs, M.; Borsodi, A. ); Hosztafi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    C-6 derivatives-hydrazones, phenylhydrazones, dinitrophenylhydrazones, oximes and semicarbazones - of morphinane-6-ones were synthesized and their binding characteristics were studied on rat brain membranes. The dihydromorphinone and oxymorphone derivatives compete for the ({sup 3}H)naloxone binding sites with high affinity, while the dihydrocodeinone and oxycodone derivatives are less potent. The affinity of the new compounds is decreased for the delta sites as compared to the parent ligands. The ligands bearing bulky substituents also bind with low affinity to the kappa sites. The modification decreased the Na{sup +}-index of compounds indicating their mixed agonist-antagonist character. The dihydromorphinone derivatives are all capable to block irreversibly the high affinity binding site of ({sup 3}H)naloxone, whereas the dihydrocodeinone derivatives block irreversibly the low affinity site. A possible mechanism for the inhibition is suggested.

  11. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  12. Elucidation of Nonadditive Effects in Protein-Ligand Binding Energies: Thrombin as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Gaetano; Woods, Christopher J; Powlesland, Francis; Mey, Antonia S J S; Mulholland, Adrian J; Michel, Julien

    2016-06-23

    Accurate predictions of free energies of binding of ligands to proteins are challenging partly because of the nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions; i.e., the free energy of binding is the sum of numerous enthalpic and entropic contributions that cannot be separated into functional group contributions. In principle, molecular simulations methodologies that compute free energies of binding do capture nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions, but efficient protocols are necessary to compute well-converged free energies of binding that clearly resolve nonadditive effects. To this end, an efficient GPU-accelerated implementation of alchemical free energy calculations has been developed and applied to two congeneric series of ligands of the enzyme thrombin. The results show that accurate binding affinities are computed across the two congeneric series and positive coupling between nonpolar R(1) substituents and a X = NH3(+) substituent is reproduced, albeit with a weaker trend than experimentally observed. By contrast, a docking methodology completely fails to capture nonadditive effects. Further analysis shows that the nonadditive effects are partly due to variations in the strength of a hydrogen-bond between the X = NH3(+) ligands family and thrombin residue Gly216. However, other partially compensating interactions occur across the entire binding site, and no single interaction dictates the magnitude of the nonadditive effects for all the analyzed protein-ligand complexes. PMID:27248478

  13. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyl estrogen receptor binding affinity: An assessment of conformer flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, S.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Mekenyan, O.G.

    1996-11-01

    A diverse group of xenobiotics has a high binding affinity to the estrogen receptor (ER), suggesting that it can accommodate large variability in ligand structure. Relationships between xenobiotic surface, binding affinity, and estrogenic response have been suggested to be dependent on the conformational structures of the ligands. To explore the influence of conformational flexibility on ER binding affinity, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study was undertaken with estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, and a set of polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyls (PCHBs) of environmental concern. Although the low-energy minima of the PCHB congeners suggested that interconversions among conformers were likely, the electronic parameters associated with the conformer geometries for a specific PCHB congener could vary significantly. The results of the QSAR analysis suggested that among the PCHBs studied, the most polarizable conformers (lower absolute volume polarizability values) were most closely associated with ER binding affinity. Across the set of polarizable conformers, which did not include the low-energy gas-phase conformers, the electron donating properties of the hydroxy moiety and the aromatic component of the estradiol A ring analogue in the PCHBs were found to be correlated with higher ER binding affinity.

  14. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  15. Tuned-Affinity Bivalent Ligands for the Characterization of Opioid Receptor Heteromers.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jessica H; Long, Darcie H; England, Pamela M; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    Opioid receptors, including the mu and delta opioid receptors (MOR and DOR) are important targets for the treatment of pain. Although there is mounting evidence that these receptors form heteromers, the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer remains unresolved. We have designed and synthesized bivalent ligands as tools to elucidate the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer. Our ligands (L2 and L4) are comprised of a compound with low affinity at the DOR tethered to a compound with high affinity at the MOR, with the goal of producing ligands with "tuned affinity" at MOR/DOR heteromers compared to DOR homomers. Here we show that both L2 and L4 demonstrate enhanced affinity at MOR/DOR heteromers compared to DOR homomers, thereby providing unique pharmacological tools to dissect the role of the MOR/DOR heteromer in pain.

  16. Fringe-mediated extension of O-linked fucose in the ligand-binding region of Notch1 increases binding to mammalian Notch ligands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Sheppard, Devon; Chillakuri, Chandramouli; Lea, Susan M; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Handford, Penny A

    2014-05-20

    The Notch signaling pathway is essential for many aspects of development, cell fate determination, and tissue homeostasis. Notch signaling can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to the Notch receptor, which are known to alter both ligand binding and receptor activation. We have modified the ligand-binding region (EGF domains 11-13) of human Notch1 (hN1) with O-fucose and O-glucose glycans and shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance that the Fringe-catalyzed addition of GlcNAc to the O-fucose at T466 in EGF12 substantially increases binding to Jagged1 and Delta-like 1 (DLL1) ligands. We have subsequently determined the crystal structures of EGF domains 11-13 of hN1 modified with either the O-fucose monosaccharide or the GlcNAc-fucose disaccharide at T466 of EGF12 and observed no change in backbone structure for each variant. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for GlcNAc in modulating the ligand-binding site in hN1 EGF12, resulting in an increased affinity of this region for ligands Jagged1 and DLL1. We propose that this finding explains the Fringe-catalyzed enhancement of Notch-Delta signaling observed in flies and humans, but suggest that the inhibitory effect of Fringe on Jagged/Serrate mediated signaling involves other regions of Notch.

  17. Reevaluation of ANS binding to human and bovine serum albumins: key role of equilibrium microdialysis in ligand - receptor binding characterization.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Sulatskaya, Anna I; Povarova, Olga I; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2012-01-01

    In this work we return to the problem of the determination of ligand-receptor binding stoichiometry and binding constants. In many cases the ligand is a fluorescent dye which has low fluorescence quantum yield in free state but forms highly fluorescent complex with target receptor. That is why many researchers use dye fluorescence for determination of its binding parameters with receptor, but they leave out of account that fluorescence intensity is proportional to the part of the light absorbed by the solution rather than to the concentration of bound dye. We showed how ligand-receptor binding parameters can be determined by spectrophotometry of the solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. We determined the binding parameters of ANS - human serum albumin (HSA) and ANS - bovine serum albumin (BSA) interaction, absorption spectra, concentration and molar extinction coefficient, as well as fluorescence quantum yield of the bound dye. It was found that HSA and BSA have two binding modes with significantly different affinity to ANS. Correct determination of the binding parameters of ligand-receptor interaction is important for fundamental investigations and practical aspects of molecule medicine and pharmaceutics. The data obtained for albumins are important in connection with their role as drugs transporters.

  18. Time, the forgotten dimension of ligand binding teaching.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-11-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K(d) for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived protein-ligand complexes may be unable to trigger further biological processes as signal transduction or internalization if such processes are relatively slow with respect to dissociation of the complex that initiated them. Protein-ligand complex life span depends on the first-order rate constant for the dissociation of the complex, K(off) , but this constant and its implications are generally not treated in textbooks. This report presents a brief discussion and some examples useful for teaching the importance of time in ligand binding by macromolecules in the context of a general biochemistry course.

  19. Search for Amyloid-Binding Proteins by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    ‘Amyloid binging proteins’ is a generic term used to designate proteins that interact with different forms of amyloidogenic peptides or proteins and that, as a result, may modulate their physiological and pathological functions by altering solubility, transport, clearance, degradation, and fibril formation. We describe a simple affinity chromatography protocol to isolate and characterize amyloid-binding proteins based on the use of sequential elution steps that may provide further information on the type of binding interaction. As an example, we depict the application of this protocol to the study of Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) peptide-binding proteins derived from human plasma. Biochemical analysis of the proteins eluted under different conditions identified serum amyloid P component (SAP) and apolipoprotein J (clusterin) as the main plasma Aβ-binding proteins while various apolipoproteins (apoA-IV, apoE, and apoA-I), as well as albumin (HSA) and fibulin were identified as minor contributors. PMID:22528093

  20. Linear Interaction Energy Based Prediction of Cytochrome P450 1A2 Binding Affinities with Reliability Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Capoferri, Luigi; Verkade-Vreeker, Marlies C. A.; Buitenhuis, Danny; Commandeur, Jan N. M.; Pastor, Manuel; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Geerke, Daan P.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) binding affinities of small ligands, i.e., substrates and inhibitors, represents an important task for predicting drug-drug interactions. A quantitative assessment of the ligand binding affinity towards different CYPs can provide an estimate of inhibitory activity or an indication of isoforms prone to interact with the substrate of inhibitors. However, the accuracy of global quantitative models for CYP substrate binding or inhibition based on traditional molecular descriptors can be limited, because of the lack of information on the structure and flexibility of the catalytic site of CYPs. Here we describe the application of a method that combines protein-ligand docking, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) theory, to allow for quantitative CYP affinity prediction. Using this combined approach, a LIE model for human CYP 1A2 was developed and evaluated, based on a structurally diverse dataset for which the estimated experimental uncertainty was 3.3 kJ mol-1. For the computed CYP 1A2 binding affinities, the model showed a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.1 kJ mol-1 and a standard error in prediction (SDEP) in cross-validation of 4.3 kJ mol-1. A novel approach that includes information on both structural ligand description and protein-ligand interaction was developed for estimating the reliability of predictions, and was able to identify compounds from an external test set with a SDEP for the predicted affinities of 4.6 kJ mol-1 (corresponding to 0.8 pKi units). PMID:26551865

  1. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  2. Enhancement of binding kinetics on affinity substrates by laser point heating induced transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the time response and detection limit of affinity-binding based biosensors is an area of active research. For diffusion limited reactions, introducing active mass transport is an effective strategy to reduce the equilibration time and improve surface binding. Here, a laser is focused on the ceiling of a microchamber to generate point heating, which introduces natural advection and thermophoresis to promote mass transport to the reactive floor. We first used the COMSOL simulation to study how the kinetics of ligand binding is influenced by the optothermal effect. Afterwards, binding of biotinylated nanoparticles to NeutrAvidin-treated substrates is quantitatively measured with and without laser heating. It is discovered that laser induced point heating reduces the reaction half-life locally, and the reduction improves with the natural advection velocity. In addition, non-uniform ligand binding on the substrate is induced by the laser with predictable binding patterns. This optothermal strategy holds promise to improve the time-response and sensitivity of biosensors and microarrays. PMID:26898559

  3. Thermodynamics of binding of di- and tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide ligands to DNA G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Prato, Gary; Silvent, Samantha; Saka, Sammy; Lamberto, Massimiliano; Kosenkov, Dmytro

    2015-02-26

    Naphthalene diimide ligands have the potential to stabilize human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA via noncovalent interactions. Stabilization of G-quadruplex high order structures has become an important strategy to develop novel anticancer therapeutics. In this study four naphthalene diimide based ligands were analyzed in order to elucidate the principal factors determining contributions to G-quadruplex-ligand binding. Three possible modes of binding and their respective Gibbs free energies for two naphthalene diimide based di-N-alkylpyridinium substituted ligands have been determined using a molecular docking technique and compared to experimental results. The structures obtained from the molecular docking calculations, were analyzed using the ab initio based fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method in order to determine the major enthalpic contributions to the binding and types of interactions between the ligand and specific residues of the G-quadruplex. A computational methodology for the efficient and inexpensive ligand optimization as compared to fully ab initio methods based on the estimation of binding affinities of the naphthalene diimide derived ligands to G-quadruplex is proposed.

  4. Thermodynamics of binding of di- and tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide ligands to DNA G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Prato, Gary; Silvent, Samantha; Saka, Sammy; Lamberto, Massimiliano; Kosenkov, Dmytro

    2015-02-26

    Naphthalene diimide ligands have the potential to stabilize human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA via noncovalent interactions. Stabilization of G-quadruplex high order structures has become an important strategy to develop novel anticancer therapeutics. In this study four naphthalene diimide based ligands were analyzed in order to elucidate the principal factors determining contributions to G-quadruplex-ligand binding. Three possible modes of binding and their respective Gibbs free energies for two naphthalene diimide based di-N-alkylpyridinium substituted ligands have been determined using a molecular docking technique and compared to experimental results. The structures obtained from the molecular docking calculations, were analyzed using the ab initio based fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method in order to determine the major enthalpic contributions to the binding and types of interactions between the ligand and specific residues of the G-quadruplex. A computational methodology for the efficient and inexpensive ligand optimization as compared to fully ab initio methods based on the estimation of binding affinities of the naphthalene diimide derived ligands to G-quadruplex is proposed. PMID:25635929

  5. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li L; Feng, Guo Q; Zhang, Qing G

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  6. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  7. Bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium): a chiral scaffold for developing high-affinity ligands for SK channels.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Jean-François; Wouters, Johan; Seutin, Vincent; Dilly, Sébastien

    2014-04-01

    N-Methyl-bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium) analogues derived from AG525 (1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)-bis-(6,7-dimethoxy-2- methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline)) stereoisomers and tetrandrine, a rigid bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline) analogue with an S,S configuration, were synthesized and tested for their affinity for small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK/KCa2) subtypes using radioligand binding assays. A significant increase in affinity was observed for the quaternized analogues over the parent 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds. Interestingly, the impact of stereochemistry was not the same in the two groups of compounds. For quaternized analogues, affinities of S,S and R,R isomers for SK2 and SK3 channels were similar and in both cases higher than that of the meso derivative. Among the bis-tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds, the S,S isomers exhibited high affinity, while the R,R and meso isomers had similarly lower affinities. Furthermore, the SK2/SK3 selectivity ratio was slightly increased for quaternized analogues. Bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium) represents a new scaffold for the development of high-affinity ligands for SK channel subtypes. PMID:24829978

  8. Ligands Binding and Molecular Simulation: the Potential Investigation of a Biosensor Based on an Insect Odorant Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  9. Ligands binding and molecular simulation: the potential investigation of a biosensor based on an insect odorant binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  10. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  11. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes. PMID:19754879

  12. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  13. Calculation of cooperativity and equilibrium constants of ligands binding to G-quadruplex DNA in solution.

    PubMed

    Kudrev, A G

    2013-11-15

    Equilibrium model of a ligand binding with DNA oligomer has been considered as a process of small molecule adsorption onto a lattice of multiple binding sites. An experimental example has been used to verify the assertion that during saturation of the macromolecule by a ligand should expect effect of cooperativity due to changes in DNA conformation or the mutual influence between bound ligands. Such phenomenon cannot be entirely described by the classical stepwise complex formation model. To evaluate a ligand binding affinity and cooperativity of ligand-oligomer complex formation the statistical approach has been proposed. This new computational approach used to re-examine previously studded ligand binding towards DNA quadruplexes targets with multiple binding sites. The intrinsic equilibrium constants K1-3 of the mesotetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TMPyP4) binding with the [d(T4G4)]4 and with the [AG3(T2AG3)3] quadruplexes and the correction for the mutual influence between bound ligands (cooperativity parameters ω) was determined from the Job plots based upon the nonlinear least-squares fitting procedure. The re-examination of experimental curves reveals that the equilibrium is affected by the positive cooperative (ω>1) binding of the TMPyP4 ligand with tetramolecular [d(T4G4)]4. However for an intramolecular antiparallel-parallel hybrid structure [AG3(T2AG3)3] the weak anti-cooperativity of TMPyP4 accommodation (ω<1) onto two from three nonidentical sites was detected. PMID:24148442

  14. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  15. Affinity labeling of GTP-binding proteins in cellular extracts.

    PubMed

    Löw, A; Faulhammer, H G; Sprinzl, M

    1992-05-25

    GTP-binding proteins in cellular extracts from Escherichia coli, Thermus thermophilus, yeast, wheat germ or calf thymus were identified using in situ periodate-oxidized [alpha-32P]GTP as affinity label. Site-specific reaction of individual GTP-binding proteins was achieved by cross-linking the protein-bound 2',3'-dialdehyde derivative of GTP with the single lysine residue of the conserved NKXD sequence through Schiff's base formation and subsequent cyanoborohydride reduction. Labeled GTP-binding proteins from prokaryotic or eukaryotic cell homogenates were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. In addition cross-linking of [alpha-32P]GTP with GTP-binding proteins was demonstrated in model systems using different purified GTPases, human c-H-ras p21, transducin from bovine retina, polypeptide elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) from T. thermophilus and initiation factor 2 (IF2) from T. thermophilus. The described affinity labeling technique can serve as an analytical method for the identification of GTPases belonging to the classes of ras-proteins, elongation and initiation factors, and heterotrimeric signal transducing G-proteins. PMID:1592117

  16. Halogen bond: its role beyond drug-target binding affinity for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Lu, Yunxiang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-27

    Halogen bond has attracted a great deal of attention in the past years for hit-to-lead-to-candidate optimization aiming at improving drug-target binding affinity. In general, heavy organohalogens (i.e., organochlorines, organobromines, and organoiodines) are capable of forming halogen bonds while organofluorines are not. In order to explore the possible roles that halogen bonds could play beyond improving binding affinity, we performed a detailed database survey and quantum chemistry calculation with close attention paid to (1) the change of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines along the drug discovery and development process and (2) the halogen bonds between organohalogens and nonbiopolymers or nontarget biopolymers. Our database survey revealed that (1) an obviously increasing trend of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines was observed along the drug discovery and development process, illustrating that more organofluorines are worn and eliminated than heavy organohalogens during the process, suggesting that heavy halogens with the capability of forming halogen bonds should have priority for lead optimization; and (2) more than 16% of the halogen bonds in PDB are formed between organohalogens and water, and nearly 20% of the halogen bonds are formed with the proteins that are involved in the ADME/T process. Our QM/MM calculations validated the contribution of the halogen bond to the binding between organohalogens and plasma transport proteins. Thus, halogen bonds could play roles not only in improving drug-target binding affinity but also in tuning ADME/T property. Therefore, we suggest that albeit halogenation is a valuable approach for improving ligand bioactivity, more attention should be paid in the future to the application of the halogen bond for ligand ADME/T property optimization.

  17. Protoglobin: structure and ligand-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Alessandra; Bolognesi, Martino; Nardini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Protoglobin is the first globin identified in Archaea; its biological role is still unknown, although it can bind O2, CO and NO reversibly in vitro. The X-ray structure of Methanosarcina acetivorans protoglobin revealed several peculiar structural features. Its tertiary structure can be considered as an expanded version of the canonical globin fold, characterised by the presence of a pre-A helix (named Z) and a 20-residue N-terminal extension. Other unusual trends are a large distortion of the haem moiety, and its complete burial in the protein matrix due to the extended CE and FG loops and the 20-residue N-terminal loop. Access of diatomic ligands to the haem has been proposed to be granted by two tunnels, which are mainly defined by helices B/G (tunnel 1) and B/E (tunnel 2), and whose spatial orientation and topology give rise to an almost orthogonal two-tunnel system unprecedented in other globins. At a quaternary level, protoglobin forms a tight dimer, mostly based on the inter-molecular four-helix bundle built by the G- and H-helices, similar to that found in globin-coupled sensor proteins, which share with protoglobin a common phylogenetic origin. Such unique structural properties, together with an unusually low O2 dissociation rate and a selectivity ratio for O2/CO binding that favours O2 ligation, make protoglobin a peculiar case for gaining insight into structure to function relationships within the globin superfamily. While recent structural and biochemical data have given answers to important questions, the functional issue is still unclear and it is expected to represent the major focus of future investigations. PMID:24054795

  18. Ultrasensitive Analysis of Binding Affinity of HIV Receptor and Neutralizing Antibody Using Solution-Phase Electrochemiluminescence Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy; Wen, Zhaoyang; Brownlow, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Binding of a few ligand molecules with its receptors on cell surface can initiate cellular signaling transduction pathways, and trigger viral infection of host cells. HIV-1 infects host T-cells by binding its viral envelope protein (gp120) with its receptor (a glycoprotein, CD4) on T cells. Primary strategies to prevent and treat HIV infection is to develop therapies (e.g., neutralizing antibodies) that can block specific binding of CD4 with gp120. The infection often leads to the lower counts of CD4 cells, which makes it an effective biomarker to monitor the AIDS progression and treatment. Despite research over decades, quantitative assays for effective measurements of binding affinities of protein-protein (ligand-receptor, antigen-antibody) interactions remains highly sought. Solid-phase electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay has been commonly used to capture analytes from the solution for analysis, which involves immobilization of antibody on solid surfaces (micron-sized beads), but it cannot quantitatively measure binding affinities of molecular interactions. In this study, we have developed solution-phase ECL assay with a wide dynamic range (0–2 nM) and high sensitivity and specificity for quantitative analysis of CD4 at femtomolar level and their binding affinity with gp120 and monoclonal antibodies (MABs). We found that binding affinities of CD4 with gp120 and MAB (Q4120) are 9.5×108 and 1.2×109 M−1, respectively. The results also show that MAB (Q4120) of CD4 can completely block the binding of gp120 with CD4, while MAB (17b) of gp120 can only partially block their interaction. This study demonstrates that the solution-phase ECL assay can be used for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of binding affinities of protein-protein interactions in solution for better understating of protein functions and identification of effective therapies to block their interactions. PMID:23565071

  19. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important

  20. FYWHCLDE-based affinity chromatography of IgG: effect of ligand density and purifications of human IgG and monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-08-15

    This work reports the development of an octapeptide-based affinity adsorbent for the purification of human IgG (hIgG) and monoclonal antibody (mAb). The octapeptide was FYWHCLDE selected earlier by the biomimetic design of affinity peptide ligands for hIgG. The ligand was coupled to Sepharose gel at four densities from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL, and the effect of peptide density on the adsorption of hIgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was first investigated. The binding capacity of hIgG increased from 104.2 to 176.4mg/mL within the ligand density range, and the binding affinity (dissociation constant) kept at 2.4-3.7μM. Batch adsorption revealed that the selectivity of FYWHCLDE-Sepharose for IgG was 30-40 times over BSA. The effective pore diffusivity of IgG decreased somewhat with increasing ligand density, but the dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough, measured by using 10-fold diluted human serum as feedstock, doubled with increasing ligand density from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL due to the remarkable increase of static binding capacity. By using the affinity column with a ligand density of 23.9μmol/mL, hIgG and humanized mAb purifications from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the robustness of the peptide gel was demonstrated by recycled use of the affinity column in 20 breakthrough cycles. PMID:24947889

  1. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results.

  2. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  3. DNA-binding affinity and nuclease activity of two cytotoxic copper terpyridine complexes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pengfei; Lin, Miaoxin; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Yangmiao; Jiang, Qin

    2009-01-01

    Two copper(II) terpyridine complexes, [Cu(atpy)(NO(3))(H(2)O)](NO(3)) 3H(2)O (1) and [Cu(ttpy)(NO(3))(2)] (2) (atpy = 4'-p-N9-adeninylmethyl-phenyl-2,2':6,2''-terpyridine; ttpy = 4'-p-tolyl-2,2':6,2''-terpyridine) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with average ten times more potency than cisplatin against the human cervix carcinoma cell line (HeLa), the human liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2), the human galactophore carcinoma cell line (MCF7), and the human prostate carcinoma cell line (PC-3). The cytotoxicity of the complex 1 was lower than that of the complex 2. Both complexes showed more efficient oxidative DNA cleavage activity under irradiation with UV light at 260 nm than in the presence of ascorbic acid. Especially, complex 1 exhibited evident photoinduced double-stranded DNA cleavage activity. The preliminary mechanism experiments revealed that hydrogen peroxide was involved in the oxidative DNA damage induced by both complexes. From the absorption titration data, the DNA-binding affinity of the complexes with surpersoiled plasmid pUC19 DNA, polydAdT, and polydGdC was calculated and complex 2 showed higher binding affinity than complex 1 with all these substrates. The DNA cleavage ability and DNA-binding affinity of both complexes depended on the substituent group on the terpyrdine ligands. PMID:19705364

  4. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  5. Myo1e binds anionic phospholipids with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Feeser, Elizabeth A; Ignacio, Cherry Mae G; Krendel, Mira; Ostap, E Michael

    2010-11-01

    Myo1e is a single-headed motor protein that has been shown to play roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis in HeLa cells and podocyte function in the kidney. The myo1e C-terminal tail domain includes a basic region that is required for localization to clathrin-coated vesicles and contains a putative pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain that has been shown to play a role in phospholipid binding in other myosin-I proteins. We used sedimentation assays, stopped-flow fluorescence, and fluorescence microscopy to determine the membrane binding affinities, kinetics, and in vivo localization of fluorescently labeled recombinant myo1e-tail constructs. We found that the myo1e tail binds tightly to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing physiological concentrations of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) or phosphatidylserine. The rate of myo1e attachment to LUVs nears the diffusion limit while the calculated rate of detachment from LUVs is slow (k(diss) ≤ 0.4 s(-1)). Mutation of conserved residues in the myo1e PH domain has little effect on lipid binding in vitro or membrane localization in vivo. Soluble inositol phosphate headgroups, such as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, can compete with PtdIns(4,5)P(2) for binding, but the apparent affinity for the soluble inositol phosphate is substantially lower than that for PtdIns(4,5)P(2). These results suggest that myo1e binds lipids through nonspecific electrostatic interactions rather than a stereospecific protein-phosphoinositide interaction. PMID:20860408

  6. The quest for affinity chromatography ligands: are the molecular libraries the right source?

    PubMed

    Perret, Gérald; Santambien, Patrick; Boschetti, Egisto

    2015-08-01

    Affinity chromatography separations of proteins call for highly specific ligands. Antibodies are the most obvious approach; however, except for specific situations, technical and economic reasons are arguments against this choice especially for preparative purposes. With this in mind, the rationale is to select the most appropriate ligands from collections of pre-established molecules. To reach the objective of having a large structural coverage, combinatorial libraries have been proposed. These are classified according to their nature and origin. This review presents and discusses the most common affinity ligand libraries along with the most appropriate screening methods for the identification of the right affinity chromatography selective structure according to the type of library; a side-by-side comparison is also presented. PMID:26033846

  7. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design.

  8. Binding of ionic species: a general approach to measuring binding constants and assessing affinities.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Stefano; Vacca, Alberto; Venturi, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Bound together: The association of receptors with ionic species cannot be assimilated to the binding of neutral guests. When dealing with salts, both ion pairing and binding to the free and the ion-paired ionic guest determine the actual association pattern (see figure). The general issue of measuring association constants and assessing affinities for ions is addressed and validated in two cases of anion binding.A general approach to the largely underestimated issue of measuring binding constants and assessing affinities in the binding of ionic species is described. The approach is based on a rigorous, nongraphical determination of binding constants in multiequilibrium systems by nonlinear regression of chemical shift data from NMR titrations and on the use of the BC(50) descriptor for assessing affinities and ranking the binding ability of receptors on a common scale. The approach has been validated with two tripodal anion-binding receptors, namely, a ureidic (1) and a pyrrolic (2) receptor, binding to tetramethylammonium chloride in CDCl(3)/CD(3)CN (80:20). A set of five and six formation constants could be measured for 1 and 2, respectively, including, in addition to the ion pair, complexes of the free and the ion-paired anion. The BC(50) values calculated from the measured constants allowed a quantitative assessment of each receptor's binding affinity towards the chloride anion, the pyrrolic receptor showing a 15-fold larger affinity over the ureidic receptor, a figure that quantifies the improvement obtained by replacing the amido-pyrrolic for ureidic binding groups on the tripodal scaffold of the receptor. The results have shown that, in contrast to common practice, neither of the two systems could be appropriately described by a 1:1 association with the anion only, but required the ion-pairing and ion-pair binding equilibria to be taken into account because these contribute substantially to the complexation process. The BC(50) descriptor has also been shown

  9. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, P A

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I{center_dot}C base pairs are functional analogs of A{center_dot}T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  10. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  11. T cell recognition of weak ligands: roles of signaling, receptor number, and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay J.

    2011-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen is a crucial aspect of the adaptive immune response. One of the most common means of pathogen immune evasion is mutation of T cell epitopes. T cell recognition of such ligands can result in a variety of outcomes including activation, apoptosis and anergy. The ability of a given T cell to respond to a specific peptide–MHC ligand is regulated by a number of factors, including the affinity, on- and off-rates and half-life of the TCR–peptide–MHC interaction. Interaction of T cells with low-potency ligands results in unique signaling patterns and requires engagement with a larger number of T cell receptors than agonist ligands. This review will address these aspects of T cell interaction with weak ligands and the ways in which these ligands have been utilized therapeutically. PMID:21365321

  12. SOD1 exhibits allosteric frustration to facilitate metal binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Das, Atanu; Plotkin, Steven S

    2013-03-01

    Superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) is a ubiquitous, Cu and Zn binding, free-radical defense enzyme whose misfolding and aggregation play a potential key role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease. Over 150 mutations in SOD1 have been identified with a familial form of the disease, but it is presently not clear what unifying features, if any, these mutants share to make them pathogenic. Here, we develop several unique computational assays for probing the thermo-mechanical properties of both ALS-associated and rationally designed SOD1 variants. Allosteric interaction-free energies between residues and metals are calculated, and a series of atomic force microscopy experiments are simulated with variable tether positions to quantify mechanical rigidity "fingerprints" for SOD1 variants. Mechanical fingerprinting studies of a series of C-terminally truncated mutants, along with an analysis of equilibrium dynamic fluctuations while varying native constraints, potential energy change upon mutation, frustratometer analysis, and analysis of the coupling between local frustration and metal binding interactions for a glycine scan of 90 residues together, reveal that the apo protein is internally frustrated, that these internal stresses are partially relieved by mutation but at the expense of metal-binding affinity, and that the frustration of a residue is directly related to its role in binding metals. This evidence points to apo SOD1 as a strained intermediate with "self-allostery" for high metal-binding affinity. Thus, the prerequisites for the function of SOD1 as an antioxidant compete with apo state thermo-mechanical stability, increasing the susceptibility of the protein to misfold in the apo state.

  13. Peptide Ligand Structure and I-Aq Binding Avidity Influence T Cell Signaling Pathway Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Park, Jeoung-Eun; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Factors that drive T cells to signal through differing pathways remain unclear. We have shown that an altered peptide ligand (A9) activates T cells to utilize an alternate signaling pathway which is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk. However, it remains unknown whether the affinity of peptide binding to MHC drives this selection. To answer this question we developed a panel of peptides designed so that amino acids interacting with the p6 and p9 predicted MHC binding pockets were altered. Analogs were tested for binding to I-Aq using a competitive binding assay and selected analogs were administered to arthritic mice. Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, arthritis severity was correlated with T cell cytokine production and molecular T cell signaling responses. We establish that reduced affinity of interaction with the MHC correlates with T cell signaling through the alternative pathway, leading ultimately to secretion of suppressive cytokine and attenuation of arthritis. PMID:25982319

  14. Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyunsook; Robison, Aaron D.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid supported lipid bilayers provide an excellent platform for studying multivalent protein-ligand interactions because the two-dimensional fluidity of the membrane allows for lateral rearrangement of ligands in order to optimize binding. Our laboratory has combined supported lipid bilayer-coated microfluidic platforms with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) to obtain equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) data for these systems. This high throughput, on-chip approach provides highly accurate thermodynamic information about multivalent binding events while requiring only very small sample volumes. Herein, we review some of the most salient findings from these studies. In particular, increasing ligand density on the membrane surface can provide a modest enhancement or attenuation of ligand-receptor binding depending upon whether the surface ligands interact strongly with each other. Such effects, however, lead to little more than one order of magnitude change in the apparent KD values. On the other hand, the lipophilicity and presentation of lipid bilayer-conjugated ligands can have a much greater impact. Indeed, changing the way a particular ligand is conjugated to the membrane can alter the apparent KD value by at least three orders of magnitude. Such a result speaks strongly to the role of ligand availability for multivalent ligand-receptor binding. PMID:19508894

  15. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  16. ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY ULTRAFAST AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY USING IMMOBILIZED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Rangan; Yoo, Michelle J.; Briscoe, Chad J.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was explored for use as a stationary phase and ligand in affinity microcolumns for the ultrafast extraction of free drug fractions and the use of this information for the analysis of drug-protein binding. Warfarin, imipramine, and ibuprofen were used as model analytes in this study. It was found that greater than 95% extraction of all these drugs could be achieved in as little as 250 ms on HSA microcolumns. The retained drug fraction was then eluted from the same column under isocratic conditions, giving elution in less than 40 s when working at 4.5 mL/min. The chromatographic behavior of this system gave a good fit with that predicted by computer simulations based on a reversible, saturable model for the binding of an injected drug with immobilized HSA. The free fractions measured by this method were found to be comparable to those determined by ultrafiltration, and equilibrium constants estimated by this approach gave good agreement with literature values. Advantages of this method include its speed and the relatively low cost of microcolumns that contain HSA. The ability of HSA to bind many types of drugs also creates the possibility of using the same affinity microcolumn to study and measure the free fractions for a variety of pharmaceutical agents. These properties make this technique appealing for use in drug binding studies and in the high-throughput screening of new drug candidates. PMID:20227701

  17. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and binding affinities of rhenium(I) thiosemicarbazone complexes for the estrogen receptor (α/β).

    PubMed

    Núñez-Montenegro, Ara; Carballo, Rosa; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2014-11-01

    The binding affinities towards estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β of a set of thiosemicarbazone ligands (HL(n)) and their rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes [ReX(HL(n))(CO)3] (X=Cl, Br) were determined by a competitive standard radiometric assay with [(3)H]-estradiol. The ability of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone ligands to undergo deprotonation and the lability of the ReX bond were used as a synthetic strategy to obtain [Re(hpy)(L(n))(CO)3] (hpy=3- or 4-hydroxypyridine). The inclusion of the additional hpy ligand endows the new thiosemicarbazonate complexes with an improved affinity towards the estrogen receptors and, consequently, the values of the inhibition constant (Ki) could be determined for some of them. In general, the values of Ki for both ER subtypes suggest an appreciable selectivity towards ERα.

  19. Allosteric modulation of ligand binding to [3H](+)pentazocine-defined sigma recognition sites by phenytoin.

    PubMed

    DeHaven-Hudkins, D L; Ford-Rice, F Y; Allen, J T; Hudkins, R L

    1993-01-01

    The allosteric modulation of sigma recognition sites by phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) has been demonstrated by the ability of phenytoin to stimulate binding of various [3H] sigma ligands, as well as to slow dissociation from sigma sites and to shift sigma sites from a low- to a high-affinity state. Phenytoin stimulated the binding of the sigma 1- selective ligand [3H](+)pentazocine in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of binding at a final concentration of 250 microM phenytoin was associated with a decrease in the KD. The affinities of the sigma reference compounds caramiphen, dextromethorphan, dextrophan, (+)3-PPP and (+)SKF-10,047 were three- to eight-fold higher, while the affinities of benzetimide, BMY-14802, carbetapentane, DTG and haloperidol were unchanged in the presence of 250 microM phenytoin. The relative sensitivity of sigma compounds to allosteric modulation by phenytoin is not a property of all sigma ligands, and may provide an in vitro basis for distinguishing actions of sigma compounds and predicting sigma effects in vivo. PMID:8515681

  20. Two Affinity Sites of the Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor Identified by a Novel Homogeneous Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Rabal, Obdulia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Zamarbide, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; de Miguel, Irene; Lanciego, José L; Oyarzabal, Julen; Franco, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Endocannabinoids act on G protein-coupled receptors that are considered potential targets for a variety of diseases. There are two different cannabinoid receptor types: ligands for cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2Rs) show more promise than those for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) because they lack psychotropic actions. However, the complex pharmacology of these receptors, coupled with the lipophilic nature of ligands, is delaying the translational success of medications targeting the endocannabinoid system. We here report the discovery and synthesis of a fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157 (3-[[4-[2-tert-butyl-1-(tetrahydropyran-4-ylmethyl)benzimidazol-5-yl]sulfonyl-2-pyridyl]oxy]propan-1-amine), which was useful for pharmacological characterization of CB2R by using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. This methodology does not require radiolabeled compounds and may be undertaken in homogeneous conditions and in living cells (i.e., without the need to isolate receptor-containing membranes). The affinity of the labeled compound was similar to that of the unlabeled molecule. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays disclosed a previously unreported second affinity site and showed conformational changes in CB2R forming receptor heteromers with G protein-coupled receptor GPR55, a receptor for l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol. The populations displaying subnanomolar and nanomolar affinities were undisclosed in competitive assays using a well known cannabinoid receptor ligand, AM630 (1-[2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethyl]-2-methyl-3-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-6-iodoindole), and TH-chrysenediol, not previously tested on binding to cannabinoid receptors. Variations in binding parameters upon formation of dimers with GPR55 may reflect decreases in binding sites or alterations of the quaternary structure of the macromolecular G protein-coupled receptor complexes. In summary, the homogeneous binding assay described here may

  1. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  2. Multiple lectin detection by cell membrane affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana; Catarino, Sofia; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that lectins evolved to recognise relatively complex and branched oligosaccharides or parts of them, rather than simple sugars, a procedure based on lectin affinity binding to isolated erythrocyte (or any other cell type) membranes is proposed. This methodology was validated using six pure commercial lectins, as well as lectins from total protein extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves. All commercial lectins, as well as five polypeptides from A. unedo leaves bound to the glycosylated membrane receptors and were eluted by the corresponding sugars. When compared to the standard affinity chromatography procedure involving an individual sugar bound to a solid matrix, the new method provides a single-step, effective detection method for lectins and allows the rapid screening of their profile present in any unknown protein solution, indicates their biological carbohydrate affinities as well as their sugar specificities (if any), enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples, does not require any pre-purification steps, permits detection of additional lectins and provides data which are more relevant from the physiological point of view. PMID:22381939

  3. A general framework improving teaching ligand binding to a macromolecule.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Gendrault, Yves; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Ranjeva, Raoul; Madec, Morgan; Lallement, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a ligand with a macromolecule has been modeled following different theories. The tenants of the induced fit model consider that upon ligand binding, the protein-ligand complex undergoes a conformational change. In contrast, the allosteric model assumes that only one among different coexisting conformers of a given protein is suitable to bind the ligand optimally. In the present paper, we propose a general framework to model the binding of ligands to a macromolecule. Such framework built on the binding polynomial allows opening new ways to teach in a unified manner ligand binding, enzymology and receptor binding in pharmacology. Moreover, we have developed simple software that allows building the binding polynomial from the schematic description of the biological system under study. Taking calmodulin as a canonical example, we show here that the proposed tool allows the easy retrieval of previously experimental and computational reports. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau.

  4. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  5. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  6. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  7. Assessment and acceleration of binding energy calculations for protein-ligand complexes by the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Takao; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto

    2015-11-15

    In the field of drug discovery, it is important to accurately predict the binding affinities between target proteins and drug applicant molecules. Many of the computational methods available for evaluating binding affinities have adopted molecular mechanics-based force fields, although they cannot fully describe protein-ligand interactions. A noteworthy computational method in development involves large-scale electronic structure calculations. Fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, which is one of such large-scale calculation techniques, is applied in this study for calculating the binding energies between proteins and ligands. By testing the effects of specific FMO calculation conditions (including fragmentation size, basis sets, electron correlation, exchange-correlation functionals, and solvation effects) on the binding energies of the FK506-binding protein and 10 ligand complex molecule, we have found that the standard FMO calculation condition, FMO2-MP2/6-31G(d), is suitable for evaluating the protein-ligand interactions. The correlation coefficient between the binding energies calculated with this FMO calculation condition and experimental values is determined to be R = 0.77. Based on these results, we also propose a practical scheme for predicting binding affinities by combining the FMO method with the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. The results of this combined method can be directly compared with experimental binding affinities. The FMO and QSAR combined scheme shows a higher correlation with experimental data (R = 0.91). Furthermore, we propose an acceleration scheme for the binding energy calculations using a multilayer FMO method focusing on the protein-ligand interaction distance. Our acceleration scheme, which uses FMO2-HF/STO-3G:MP2/6-31G(d) at R(int) = 7.0 Å, reduces computational costs, while maintaining accuracy in the evaluation of binding energy.

  8. Purification of a ligand for the EPH-like receptor HEK using a biosensor-based affinity detection approach.

    PubMed Central

    Lackmann, M; Bucci, T; Mann, R J; Kravets, L A; Viney, E; Smith, F; Moritz, R L; Carter, W; Simpson, R J; Nicola, N A; Mackwell, K; Nice, E C; Wilks, A F; Boyd, A W

    1996-01-01

    Advances in screening technologies allowing the identification of growth factor receptors solely by virtue of DNA or protein sequence comparison call for novel methods to isolate corresponding ligand growth factors. The EPH-like receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) HEK (human EPH-like kinase) was identified previously as a membrane antigen on the LK63 human pre-B-cell line and overexpression in leukemic specimens and cell lines suggested a role in oncogenesis. We developed a biosensor-based approach using the immobilized HEK receptor exodomain to detect and monitor purification of the HEK ligand. A protein purification protocol, which included HEK affinity chromatography, achieved a 1.8 X 10(6)-fold purification of an approximately 23-kDa protein from human placental conditioned medium. Analysis of specific sHEK (soluble extracellular domain of HEK) ligand interactions in the first and final purification steps suggested a ligand concentration of 40 pM in the source material and a Kd of 2-3 nM. Since the purified ligand was N-terminally blocked, we generated tryptic peptides and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of 7 tryptic fragments of the S-pyridylethylated protein unequivocally matched the sequence for AL-1, a recently reported ligand for the related EPH-like RTK REK7 (Winslow, J.W., Moran, P., Valverde, J., Shih, A., Yuan, J.Q., Wong, S.C., Tsai, S.P., Goddard, A., Henzel, W.J., Hefti, F., Beck, K.D., & Caras, I.W. (1995) Neuron 14, 973-981). Our findings demonstrate the application of biosensor technology in ligand purification and show that AL-1, as has been found for other ligands of the EPH-like RTK family, binds more than one receptor. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8637907

  9. Affinity Interaction between Hexamer Peptide Ligand HWRGWV and Immunoglobulin G Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fei

    sensors for the immobilization of peptide ligands with low nonspecific binding. The silica surface was first modified by the formation of self-assembling monolayer (SAM) of 3-amino-propyl triethoxy silane as an anchor layer. Short chains of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with Fmoc-protected amino groups at one end and carboxyl groups at the other end were then coupled through the carboxyl terminal to the amino groups on the silane. The short PEG chains served as spacer arms to reduce nonspecific binding to the substrate. The gold surface was modified by a two-component SAM using mixtures of HS(CH 2)11(CH2CH2O)6NH2 and HS(CH2)11(CH2CH2O)3OH. The advantage of using a modified silica surface is its relatively higher stability than the SAM on gold during the peptide functionalization step, however the SPR sensors do not work on silica surfaces. In addition, the modification process of the gold surface is relatively simple compared with that of the silica surface. The peptide immobilization process was optimized with silica surfaces and the best conditions were applied for the immobilization on gold surfaces. The results of surface modifications and peptide immobilizations were characterized by various surface analysis techniques including, ellipsometry, contact angle goniometer, chemical force microscopy (CFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). QCM and SPR results indicated that this peptide ligand HWRGWV immobilized on modified silica or gold surfaces has high affinity and specificity to hIgG binding even in a complex medium such as cMEM. Both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of affinity interaction were obtained by the analysis of QCM and SPR data. Compared with QCM, SPR is more suitable for quantitative analysis of the protein binding, which is essential for the investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics parameters. The maximum binding capacity (4.15 mg m-2 ) and the dissociation constant (1.83 mu

  10. Analyzing ligand and small molecule binding activity of solubilized GPCRs using biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Dioszegi, Marianna; Myszka, David G

    2006-08-01

    We used Biacore technology to measure directly the binding of natural ligands and small molecules to the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Both G protein-coupled receptors were solubilized from whole cell pellets and captured on antibody surfaces for analysis. Our solubilization conditions maintained high-affinity binding of chemokines SDF-1alpha and RANTES to CXCR4 and CCR5, respectively. Surface density- and buffer-dependent binding responses, along with binding data for a selective ligand (RCP-168), further validated the biosensor assay. In addition, we showed that it is possible to collect high-quality binding responses for the archetypal small molecule inhibitors JM-2987 and TAK-779. Finally, using our biosensor-based method, we characterized the kinetics of 19 novel small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 and showed that their affinities correlated with values determined for the membrane-associated receptor. Together, the chemokine and small molecule binding data provide evidence that the solubilized receptors maintain native binding properties. These solubilized receptor preparations could be useful reagents for biophysical studies as well as for structural analysis.

  11. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  12. The gall bladder cholecystokinin receptor exists in two guanine nucleotide-binding protein-regulated affinity states

    SciTech Connect

    Molero, X.; Miller, L.J. )

    1991-02-01

    To study proximal events in cholecystokinin (CCK) action on bovine gall bladder smooth muscle, we used the hormone analogue D-Tyr-Gly-((N1e28,31)CCK-26-32)-phenethyl ester (OPE), which has unique biological properties. This fully efficacious agonist differs from native CCK by not expressing supramaximal inhibition of cell shortening, yet it clearly interacts with the same receptor molecule. This was demonstrated in binding and affinity labeling studies, where both peptides label the same Mr 70,000-85,000 protein and both fully compete for binding of the other ligand. Further, its relatively high affinity for the low affinity CCK receptor permits the clear demonstration of two affinity states of a CCK receptor on a membrane preparation and makes possible evaluation of the molecular basis of these affinity states and their regulation. Analysis of homologous and heterologous binding curves performed with both CCK and OPE peptides and radioligands demonstrated the presence of two affinity states, with CCK being able to distinguish them (Kd1 = 0.48 +/- 0.04 nM and Kd2 = 56.5 +/- 7.4 nM) and OPE recognizing them equally (Kd1 = 0.94 +/- 0.31 nM and Kd2 = 0.96 +/- 0.23 nM). In the presence of nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues, there was a shift in distribution of receptors toward the low affinity state, with the total number of receptors and their absolute affinities for each peptide remaining constant. Thus, the gall bladder CCK receptor is a single molecule capable of assuming two interconvertible affinity states, regulated by a guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Two full agonists are capable of interacting with this molecule to yield different biological responses via different molecular events.

  13. Ligand interactions with lactose repressor protein and the repressor-operator complex: the effects of ionization and oligomerization on binding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2007-03-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and ligands that modify their functions are crucial in biology. Here, we examine sugars that bind the lactose repressor protein (LacI) and modify repressor affinity for operator DNA using isothermal titration calorimetry and equilibrium DNA binding experiments. High affinity binding of the commonly-used inducer isopropyl-beta,D-thiogalactoside is strongly driven by enthalpic forces, whereas inducer 2-phenylethyl-beta,D-galactoside has weaker affinity with low enthalpic contributions. Perturbing the dimer interface with either pH or oligomeric state shows that weak inducer binding is sensitive to changes in this distant region. Effects of the neutral compound o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-galactoside are sensitive to oligomerization, and at elevated pH this compound converts to an anti-inducer ligand with slightly enhanced enthalpic contributions to the binding energy. Anti-inducer o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-fucoside exhibits slightly enhanced affinity and increased enthalpic contributions at elevated pH. Collectively, these results both demonstrate the range of energetic consequences that occur with LacI binding to structurally-similar ligands and expand our insight into the link between effector binding and structural changes at the subunit interface. PMID:16860458

  14. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  15. The Added Value of Assessing Ligand-Receptor Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade drug research community has started to appreciate the indispensable role of ligand-receptor binding kinetics (BK) in drug discovery. Next to the classical equilibrium-based drug evaluation process with affinity and potency values as outcomes, kinetic investigation of the ligand-receptor interaction can aid compound triage in the hit-to-lead campaign and provide additional information to understand the molecular mechanism of drug action. Translational models incorporating BK are emerging as well, which represent powerful tools for the prediction of in vivo effects. In this viewpoint we will summarize some recent findings and discuss and emphasize the added value of ligand-receptor binding kinetics in drug research. PMID:27660682

  16. Measurement of Cationic and Intracellular Modulation of Integrin Binding Affinity by AFM-Based Nanorobot

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kevin C.; Yang, Ruiguo; Zeng, Bixi; Song, Bo; Wang, Shouye; Xi, Ning; Basson, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrins are dynamic transmembrane cation-dependent heterodimers that both anchor cells in position and transduce signals into and out of cells. We used an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanorobotic system to measure integrin-binding forces in intact human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The AFM-based nanorobot enables human-directed, high-accuracy probe positioning and site-specific investigations. Functionalizing the AFM probe with an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-containing sequence (consensus binding sequence for integrins) allowed us to detect a series of peptide-cell membrane interactions with a median binding force of 115.1 ± 4.9 pN that were not detected in control interactions. Chelating divalent cations from the culture medium abolished these interactions, as did inhibiting intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using Y15. Adding 1 mM Mg2+ to the medium caused a rightward shift in the force-binding curve. Adding 1 mM Ca2+ virtually abolished the RGD-membrane specific interactions and blocked the Mg2+ effects. Cell adhesion assays demonstrated parallel effects of divalent cations and the FAK inhibitor on cell adhesion. These results demonstrate direct modulation of integrin-binding affinity by both divalent cations and intracellular signal inhibition. Additionally, three binding states (nonspecific, specific inactivated, and specific activated) were delineated from affinity measurements. Although other research has assumed that this process of integrin conformational change causes altered ligand binding, in this work we directly measured these three states in individual integrins in a physiologically based study. PMID:23823222

  17. The complex regulatory function of the ligand-binding domain of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Devogelaere, Benoit; Verbert, Leen; Parys, Jan B; Missiaen, Ludwig; De Smedt, Humbert

    2008-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor (IP(3)R) can be divided in three functionally distinct regions: a ligand-binding domain, a modulatory domain and a channel domain. Numerous regulatory mechanisms including inter- and intra-molecular protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events act via these domains to regulate the function of the IP(3)R. Regulation at the level of the ligand-binding domain primarily affects the affinity for IP(3). The extent of IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release (IICR) is, however, not only determined by the affinity for IP(3) but also by the effectiveness of the coupling between ligand binding and channel opening. As a result, regulation as well as malfunction of IICR may be affected by both steps in the activation mechanism. The 3D structures of the two subdomains of the ligand-binding domain have recently been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. This allows a more detailed molecular explanation of the regulatory events situated at the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3)R. In this review, we will focus on recent structural and functional data on the ligand-binding domain that have extended and clarified the view on the molecular mechanisms of IP(3)R regulation.

  18. Low density and high affinity of platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Agneta; Sundblad-Elverfors, Charlotta; Landén, Mikael; Eriksson, Tomas; Eriksson, Elias

    2006-06-15

    Impaired serotonin transmission has been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa. As an indirect measure of brain serotonergic activity, the binding of tritiated ligands to platelet serotonin transporters has been studied in bulimia nervosa as well as in other putatively serotonin-related psychiatric disorders. In this study, the density and affinity of platelet serotonin transporters were assessed in 20 women meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa and in 14 controls without previous or ongoing eating disorder using [(3)H]paroxetine as a ligand. In comparison to controls, women with bulimia nervosa had a significantly reduced number of platelet binding sites (B(max) = 721 +/- 313 vs. 1145 +/- 293 fmol/mg protein) and an increase in the affinity for the ligand demonstrated by a lower dissociaton constant (K(d) = 33 +/- 10 vs. 44 +/- 10 pM). A significant correlation between B(max) and K(d) values was found in patients but not in controls. Our results support the notion that bulimia nervosa is associated with a reduction in platelet serotonin transporter density. In addition, our study is the first to report that this reduced transporter density in women with bulimia nervosa is accompanied by an increase in the affinity of the transporter for the ligand.

  19. Structure and ligand binding of the extended Tudor domain of D. melanogaster Tudor-SN.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Anders; Corsini, Lorenzo; Mourão, André; Sattler, Michael

    2009-04-10

    The Tudor-SN protein (p100, SND1) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription, processing of edited double-stranded RNA, and splicing regulation. Molecular details of these functions are not yet understood. Tudor domains have previously been shown to bind methylated ligands, such as methylated lysines and arginines. It has been suggested that the role of Tudor-SN in splicing may involve binding to such methylated ligands or to the methylated 5' cap of spliceosomal snRNAs. Here, we report the crystal structure of the extended Tudor domain of Tudor-SN from Drosophila melanogaster to a resolution of 2.1 A. NMR secondary chemical shifts, relaxation data, and residual dipolar couplings indicate that the solution and crystal structures are similar. Binding of various ligands was investigated by NMR. Binding sites and affinities were characterized by chemical shift perturbations. We show that the aromatic cage of the Tudor domain specifically binds a peptide containing symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) with micromolar affinity, while the same peptide comprising nonmethylated arginines does not show significant chemical shift perturbations. Tudor-SN preferentially recognizes sDMA over asymmetrically dimethylated arginine (aDMA). In contrast, two 5' cap analogues with different methylation patterns, as well as mono-, di-, and trimethyllysines, show no binding. Our data demonstrate that the Tudor domain of Tudor-SN specifically recognizes sDMA-containing ligands. The aromatic cage of Tudor-SN is very similar to the one in the Tudor domain of the survival of motor neuron protein, which also recognizes sDMA peptides, indicating a conserved binding motif for this methylation mark. Recognition of sDMA in the C-terminal tails of spliceosomal Sm proteins suggests how Tudor-SN may interact with small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles during the regulation of splicing. PMID:19232356

  20. Specific recognition of supercoiled plasmid DNA by affinity chromatography using a synthetic aromatic ligand.

    PubMed

    Caramelo-Nunes, Catarina; Tomaz, Cândida T

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography is the method of choice for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA), since it is simple, robust, versatile, and highly reproducible. The most important features of a chromatographic procedure are the use of suitable stationary phases and ligands. As conventional purification protocols are being replaced by more sophisticated and selective procedures, the focus changes toward designing and selecting ligands of high affinity and specificity. In fact, the chemical composition of the chromatographic supports determines the interactions established with the target molecules, allowing their preferential retention over the undesirable ones. Here it is described the selective recognition and purification of supercoiled pDNA by affinity chromatography, using an intercalative molecule (3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridine) as ligand. PMID:25749945

  1. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P.; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G.; Hubbard, Roderick E.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  2. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  3. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO.

  4. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO. PMID:26851523

  5. Benzodiazepine binding studies on living cells: application of small ligands for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegener, Oliver; Jordan, Randolf; Häberlein, Hanns

    2002-11-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for receptor binding studies using low molecular weight ligands on the membranes of living nerve cells. The binding of the benzodiazepine Ro 7-1986/602 (N-des-diethyl-fluorazepam), labeled with the fluorophore Alexa 532, to the benzodiazepine receptor was analyzed quantitatively at the membrane of single rat hippocampal neurons. The values obtained for the dissociation constant Kd = (9.9 +/- 1.9) nm and the rate constant for ligand-receptor dissociation kdisS = (1.28 +/- 0.08) x 10(-3) s(-1) show that there is a specific and high affinity interaction between the dye-labeled ligand (Ro-Alexa) and the receptor site. The binding was saturated at approx. 100 nM and displacement of 10 nM Ro-Alexa, with a 1,000-fold excess of midazolam, showed a non-specific binding of 7-10%. Additionally, two populations of the benzodiazepine receptor that differed in their lateral mobility were detected in the membrane of rat neurons. The diffusion coefficients for these two populations [D(bound1) = (1.32 +/- 0.26) microm2/s; D(bound2) = (2.63 +/- 0.63) x 10(-2) microm2/s] are related to binding sites, which shows a mono-exponential decay in a time-dependent dissociation of the ligand-receptor complex.

  6. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  7. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  9. Essential role of conformational selection in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Two competing and mutually exclusive mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules for almost six decades. Conformational selection posits the pre-existence of multiple conformations of the macromolecule from which the ligand selects the optimal one. Induced fit, on the other hand, postulates the existence of conformational rearrangements of the original conformation into an optimal one that is induced by binding of the ligand. In the former case, conformational transitions precede the binding event; in the latter, conformational changes follow the binding step. Kineticists have used a facile criterion to distinguish between the two mechanisms based on the dependence of the rate of relaxation to equilibrium, kobs, on the ligand concentration, [L]. A value of kobs decreasing hyperbolically with [L] is seen as diagnostic of conformational selection, while a value of kobs increasing hyperbolically with [L] is considered diagnostic of induced fit. However, this simple conclusion is only valid in the rather unrealistic assumption of conformational transitions being much slower than binding and dissociation events. In general, induced fit only produces values of kobs that increase with [L] but conformational selection is more versatile and is associated with values of kobs that increase, decrease with or are independent of [L]. The richer repertoire of kinetic properties of conformational selection applies to kinetic mechanisms with single or multiple saturable relaxations and explains the behavior of nearly all experimental systems reported in the literature thus far. Conformational selection is always sufficient and often necessary to account for the relaxation kinetics of ligand binding to a biological macromolecule and is therefore an essential component of any binding mechanism. On the other hand, induced fit is never necessary and only sufficient in a

  10. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  11. Comparative analysis the binding affinity of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone with human serum albumin: Insight by NMR relaxation data and docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoli; He, Jiawei; Yan, Jin; Wang, Qing; Li, Hui

    2016-03-25

    Mycophenolic sodium is an immunosuppressive agent that is always combined administration with corticosteroid in clinical practice. Considering the distribution and side-effect of the drug may change when co-administrated drug exist, this paper comparatively analyzed the binding ability of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone toward human serum albumin by nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data and docking simulation. The nuclear magnetic resonance approach was based on the analysis of proton selective and non-selective relaxation rate enhancement of the ligand in the absence and presence of macromolecules. The contribution of the bound ligand fraction to the observed relaxation rate in relation to protein concentration allowed the calculation of the affinity index. This approach allowed the comparison of the binding affinity of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone. Molecular modeling was operated to simulate the binding model of ligand and albumin through Autodock 4.2.5. Competitive binding of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone was further conducted through fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26892221

  12. Crystal structure and ligand affinity of avidin in the complex with 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Avidin is a protein found in egg white that binds numerous organic compounds with high affinity, especially biotin and its derivatives. Due to its extraordinary affinity for its ligands, avidin is extensively used in biotechnology. X-ray crystallography and fluorescence-based biophysical techniques were used to show that avidin binds the dye 4‧-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA) with a lower affinity than biotin. The apparent dissociation constant determined for the avidin complex with HABA by microscale thermophoresis (MST) is 4.12 μM. The crystal structure of avidin-HABA complex was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å (PDB entry 5chk). The crystals belong to a hexagonal system, in the space group P6422. In that structure, the hydrazone tautomer of HABA is bound at the bottom part of the central calyx near the polar residues. We show interactions of the dye with avidin and compare them with the previously reported avidin-biotin complex.

  13. Designing a mutant CCL2-HSA chimera with high glycosaminoglycan-binding affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gerlza, Tanja; Winkler, Sophie; Atlic, Aid; Zankl, Christina; Konya, Viktoria; Kitic, Nikola; Strutzmann, Elisabeth; Knebl, Kerstin; Adage, Tiziana; Heinemann, Akos; Weis, Roland; Kungl, Andreas J

    2015-08-01

    Chemokines like CCL2 mediate leukocyte migration to inflammatory sites by binding to G-protein coupled receptors on the target cell as well as to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the endothelium of the inflamed tissue. We have recently shown that the dominant-negative Met-CCL2 mutant Y13A/S21K/Q23R with improved GAG binding affinity is highly bio-active in several animal models of inflammatory diseases. For chronic indications, we have performed here a fusion to human serum albumin (HSA) in order to extend the serum half-life of the chemokine mutant. To compensate a potential drop in GAG-binding affinity due to steric hindrance by HSA, a series of novel CCL2 mutants was generated with additional basic amino acids which were genetically introduced at sites oriented towards the GAG ligand. From this set of mutants, the Met-CCL2 variant Y13A/N17K/S21K/Q23K/S34K exhibited high GAG-binding affinity and a similar selectivity as wild type (wt) CCL2. From a set of different HSA-chemokine chimeric constructs, the linked HSA(C34A)(Gly)4Ser-Met-CCL2(Y13A/N17K/S21K/Q23K/S34K) fusion protein was found to show the best overall GAG-binding characteristics. Molecular modeling demonstrated an energetically beneficial fold of this novel protein chimera. This was experimentally supported by GdmCl-induced unfolding studies, in which the fusion construct exhibited a well-defined secondary structure and a transition point significantly higher than both the wt and the unfused CCL2 mutant protein. Unlike the wt chemokine, the quaternary structure of the HSA-fusion protein is monomeric according to size-exclusion chromatography experiments. In competition experiments, the HSA-fusion construct displaced only two of seven unrelated chemokines from heparan sulfate, whereas the unfused CCL2 mutant protein displaced five other chemokines. The most effective concentration of the HSA-fusion protein in inhibiting CCL2-mediated monocyte attachment to endothelial cells, as detected in the flow chamber

  14. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  15. Cucurbiturils: from synthesis to high-affinity binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Khaleel I; Nau, Werner M

    2015-01-21

    In the wide area of supramolecular chemistry, cucurbit[n]urils (CBn) present themselves as a young family of molecular containers, able to form stable complexes with various guests, including drug molecules, amino acids and peptides, saccharides, dyes, hydrocarbons, perfluorinated hydrocarbons, and even high molecular weight guests such as proteins (e.g., human insulin). Since the discovery of the first CBn, CB6, the field has seen tremendous growth with respect to the synthesis of new homologues and derivatives, the discovery of record binding affinities of guest molecules in their hydrophobic cavity, and associated applications ranging from sensing to drug delivery. In this review, we discuss in detail the fundamental properties of CBn homologues and their cyclic derivatives with a focus on their synthesis and their applications in catalysis.

  16. Calculation of Mg(+)-ligand relative binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The calculated relative binding energies of 16 organic molecules to Mg(+) are compared with experimental results where available. The geometries of the ligands and the Mg(+)-ligand complexes arc optimized at the self-consistent field level using a 6-31G* basis set. The Mg(+) binding energies are evaluated using second-order perturbation theory and basis sets of triple-sigma quality augmented with two sets of polarization functions. This level of theory is calibrated against higher levels of theory for selected systems. The computed binding energies are accurate to about 2 kcal/mol.

  17. Motifs for molecular recognition exploiting hydrophobic enclosure in protein–ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Young, Tom; Abel, Robert; Kim, Byungchan; Berne, Bruce J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties and phase behavior of water in confined regions can vary significantly from that observed in the bulk. This is particularly true for systems in which the confinement is on the molecular-length scale. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and a powerful solvent analysis technique based on inhomogenous solvation theory to investigate the properties of water molecules that solvate the confined regions of protein active sites. Our simulations and analysis indicate that the solvation of protein active sites that are characterized by hydrophobic enclosure and correlated hydrogen bonds induce atypical entropic and enthalpic penalties of hydration. These penalties apparently stabilize the protein–ligand complex with respect to the independently solvated ligand and protein, which leads to enhanced binding affinities. Our analysis elucidates several challenging cases, including the super affinity of the streptavidin–biotin system. PMID:17204562

  18. Topological Analyses of Protein-Ligand Binding: a Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be conveniently represented as networks of interacting residues, thus allowing the study of several network parameters that can shed light onto several of their structural and functional aspects. With respect to the binding of ligands, which are central for the function of many proteins, network analysis may constitute a possible route to assist the identification of binding sites. As the bulk of this review illustrates, this has generally been easier for enzymes than for non-enzyme proteins, perhaps due to the different topological nature of the binding sites of the former over those of the latter. The article also illustrates how network representations of binding sites can be used to search PDB structures in order to identify proteins that bind similar molecules and, lastly, how codifying proteins as networks can assist the analysis of the conformational changes consequent to ligand binding.

  19. Ligand binding pocket of the human somatostatin receptor 5: mutational analysis of the extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M T; Hukovic, N; Kumar, U; Panetta, R; Hjorth, S A; Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1997-11-01

    The ligand binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands consists of a pocket formed by extracellular and transmembrane domain (TM) residues. In the case of somatostatin (SRIF), however, previous studies have suggested that the binding cavity of the octapeptide analog SMS201-995 (SMS) is lined by residues in TMs III-VII. The additional involvement of the extracellular domains for binding SMS or the natural SRIF ligands (SRIF-14, SRIF-28) has not been clarified. Using a cassette construct cDNA for the human somatostatin 5 receptor (sst5R), we systematically examined the role of exofacial structures in ligand binding by creating a series of mutants in which the extracellular portions have been altered by conservative segment exchange (CSE) mutagenesis for the extracellular loops (ECLs) and by deletion (for the NH2-terminal segment) or truncation analysis (ECL3). CHO-K1 cells were stably transfected with wild type or mutant human sst5R constructs, and agonist binding was assessed using membrane binding assays with 125I-LTT SRIF-28 ligand. Deletion of the NH2 terminus or CSE mutagenesis of ECL1 and ECL3 produced minor 2-8-fold decreases in affinity for SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and SMS ligands. Truncation of ECL3 to mimic the size of this loop in sst1R and sst4R (the two subtypes that do not bind SMS) did not interfere with the binding of SMS, SRIF-14, or SRIF-28. In contrast, both ECL2 mutants failed to bind 125I-LTT SRIF-28. Immunocytochemical analysis of nonpermeabilized cells with a human sst5R antibody revealed that the mutant receptors were targeted to the plasma membrane. Labeled SMS (125I-Tyr3 SMS) also failed to bind to the mutant ECL2 receptors. These results suggest a potential contribution of ECL2 (in addition to the previously identified residues in TMs III-VII) to the SRIF ligand binding pocket.

  20. Probing the interaction of distamycin A with S100β: the "unexpected" ability of S100β to bind to DNA-binding ligands.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amato, Jussara; Borsi, Valentina; Pagano, Bruno; Randazzo, Antonio; Fragai, Marco

    2015-06-01

    DNA-minor-groove-binding ligands are potent antineoplastic molecules. The antibiotic distamycin A is the prototype of one class of these DNA-interfering molecules that have been largely used in vitro. The affinity of distamycin A for DNA is well known, and the structural details of the complexes with some B-DNA and G-quadruplex-forming DNA sequences have been already elucidated. Here, we show that distamycin A binds S100β, a protein involved in the regulation of several cellular processes. The reported affinity of distamycin A for the calcium(II)-loaded S100β reinforces the idea that some biological activities of the DNA-minor-groove-binding ligands arise from the binding to cellular proteins.

  1. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H.; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline; Cherkasov, Artem Hammond, Geoffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  2. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors effectively recognizing monosaccharides. Affinity assessment through a generalized binding descriptor.

    PubMed

    Nativi, Cristina; Cacciarini, Martina; Francesconi, Oscar; Vacca, Alberto; Moneti, Gloriano; Ienco, Andrea; Roelens, Stefano

    2007-04-11

    Pyrrolic and imino (3) or amino (4) H-bonding ligands were incorporated into a benzene-based tripodal scaffold to develop a new generation of receptors for molecular recognition of carbohydrates. Receptors 3 and 4 effectively bound a set of octylglycosides of biologically relevant monosaccharides, including glucose (Glc), galactose (Gal), mannose (Man), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc), showing micromolar affinities in CDCl3 and millimolar affinities in CD3CN by NMR titrations. Both receptors selectively recognized Glc among the investigated monosaccharides, with 3 generally less effective than 4 but showing selectivities for the all-equatorial beta-glycosides of Glc and GlcNAc among the largest reported for H-bonding synthetic receptors. Selectivities in CDCl3 spanned a range of nearly 250-fold for 3 and over 30-fold for 4. Affinities and selectivities were univocally assessed through the BC50 descriptor, for which a generalized treatment is described that extends the scope of the descriptor to include any two-reagent host-guest system featuring any number of binding constants. ITC titrations of betaGlc in acetonitrile evidenced, for both receptors, a strong enthalpic contribution to the binding interaction, suggesting multiple H bonding. Selectivity trends toward alphaGlc and betaGlc analogous to those obtained in solution were also observed in the gas phase for 3 and 4 by collision-induced dissociation experiments. From comparison with appropriate reference compounds, a substantial contribution to carbohydrate binding emerged for both the imino/amino and the pyrrolic H-bonding groups but not for the amidic group. This previously undocumented behavior, supported by crystallographic evidence, has been discussed in terms of geometric, functional, and coordinative complementarity between H-bonding groups and glycosidic hydroxyls and opens the way to a new designer strategy of H-bonding receptors for carbohydrates.

  3. Positive modulation of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors by an antagonist of the high affinity benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Simon J; Maldifassi, Maria C; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin

    2015-08-01

    GABAA receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the target for many clinically important drugs such as the benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines act at the high-affinity binding site at the α+/γ- subunit interface. Previously, an additional low affinity binding site for diazepam located in the transmembrane (TM) domain has been described. The compound SJM-3 was recently identified in a prospective screening of ligands for the benzodiazepine binding site and investigated for its site of action. We determined the binding properties of SJM-3 at GABAA receptors recombinantly expressed in HEK-cells using radioactive ligand binding assays. Impact on function was assessed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with electrophysiological experiments using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. SJM-3 was shown to act as an antagonist at the α+/γ- site. At the same time it strongly potentiated GABA currents via the binding site for diazepam in the transmembrane domain. Mutation of a residue in M2 of the α subunit strongly reduced receptor modulation by SJM-3 and a homologous mutation in the β subunit abolished potentiation. SJM-3 acts as a more efficient modulator than diazepam at the site in the trans-membrane domain. In contrast to low concentrations of benzodiazepines, SJM-3 modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. A detailed exploration of the membrane site may provide the basis for the design and identification of subtype-selective modulatory drugs.

  4. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  5. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  6. Nucleic acid binding affinity of fd gene 5 protein in the cooperative binding mode.

    PubMed

    Bobst, A M; Ireland, J C; Bobst, E V

    1984-02-25

    A sensitive ESR method which allows a direct quantitative determination of nucleic acid binding affinities of proteins under physiologically relevant conditions has been applied to the gene 5 protein of bacteriophage fd. This was achieved with two spin-labeled nucleic acids, (ldT, dT)n and (lA,A)n, which served as macro-molecular spin probes in ESR competition experiments. With the two different macromolecular spin probes, it was possible to determine the relative apparent affinity constants, Kapp, over a large affinity domain. In 20 mM Tris X HCl (pH 8.1), 1 mM sodium EDTA, 0.1 mM dithiothreitol, 10% (w/v) glycerol, 0.05% Triton, and 125 mM NaCl, the following affinity relationship was observed: K(dT)napp = 10(3) KfdDNAapp = 2 X 10(4) K(A)napp = 6.6 X 10(4) KrRNAapp = 1.5 X 10(5) KR17RNAapp. Increasing the [NaCl] from 125 to 200 mM caused considerably less tight binding of gene 5 protein to (lA,A)n, and a typical cooperative binding isotherm was observed, whereas at the lower [NaCl] used for the competition experiments, the binding was essentially stoichiometric. A computer fit of the experimental titration data at 200 mM NaCl gave an intrinsic binding constant, Kint, of 1300 M-1 and a cooperativity factor, omega, of 60 (Kint omega = Kapp) for (lA,A)n.

  7. In vitro selection of novel RNA ligands that bind human cytomegalovirus and block viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Jiang, H; Liu, F

    2000-01-01

    Ribonuclease-resistant RNA molecules that bind to infectious human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were isolated in vitro from a pool of randomized sequences after 16 cycles of selection and amplification. The two ligands (L13 and L19) characterized exhibited high HCMV-binding affinity in vitro and effectively inhibited viral infection in tissue culture. Their antiviral activity was also specific as they only reacted with two different strains of HCMV but not with the related herpes simplex virus 1 and human cells. These two ligands appeared to function as antivirals by blocking viral entry. Ultraviolet (UV) crosslinking studies suggested that L13 and L19 bind to HCMV essential glycoproteins B and H, respectively. Thus, RNA ligands that bind to different surface antigens of HCMV can be simultaneously isolated by the selection procedure. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using these RNA ligands as a research tool to identify viral proteins required for infectivity and as an antiviral agent to block viral infection. PMID:10786848

  8. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction. PMID:26473627

  9. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  10. Binding modes of noncompetitive GABA-channel blockers revisited using engineered affinity-labeling reactions combined with new docking studies.

    PubMed

    Charon, Sébastien; Taly, Antoine; Rodrigo, Jordi; Perret, Philippe; Goeldner, Maurice

    2011-04-13

    The binding modes of noncompetitive GABA(A)-channel blockers were re-examined taking into account the recent description of the 3D structure of prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which provided access to new mammalian or insect GABA receptor models, emphasizing their transmembrane portion. Two putative binding modes were deciphered for this class of compounds, including the insecticide fipronil, located nearby either the intra- or the extracellular part of the membrane, respectively. These results are in full agreement with previously described affinity-labeling reactions performed with GABA(A) noncompetitive blockers (Perret et al. J. Biol. Chem.1999, 274, 25350-25354).

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of [76Br]-Labeled High Affinity A3 Adenosine Receptor Ligands for Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Melman, Artem; de Castro, Sonia; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Bromine-76 radiolabeled analogues of previously reported high affinity A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) nucleoside ligands have been prepared as potential radiotracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods The radiosyntheses were accomplished by oxidative radiobromination on the N6-benzyl moiety of trimethyltin precursors. Biodistribution studies of the kinetics of uptake were conducted in awake rats. Results We prepared an agonist ligand {[76Br](1′R,2′R,3′S,4′R,5′S)-4-{2-chloro-6-[(3-bromophenylmethyl)amino]purin-9-yl}-1-(methylaminocarbonyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol (MRS3581)} in 59% radiochemical yield (RCY) with a specific activity of 19.5 GBq/μmol and an antagonist ligand {[76Br](1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(6-(3-bromobenzylamino)-2-chloro-9H-purin-9-yl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol. (MRS5147)} in 65% RCY with a specific activity of 22 GBq/μmol). The resultant products exhibited the expected high affinity (Ki ~ 0.6 nM) and specific binding at the human A3AR in vitro. Biodistribution studies in the rat showed uptake in the organs of excretion and metabolism. The antagonist MRS5147 exhibited increasing uptake in testes, an organ that contains significant quantities of A3AR, over a 2 h time course, which suggests the presence of a specific A3AR retention mechanism. Conclusion We were able to compare uptake of the [76Br]labeled antagonist MRS5147 to [76Br]agonist MRS3581. The antagonist MRS5147 shows increasing uptake in the testes, an A3AR rich tissue, suggesting that this ligand may have promise as a molecular imaging agent. PMID:19181263

  12. Cooperative and noncooperative binding of protein ligands to nucleic acid lattices: experimental approaches to the determination of thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Paul, L S; Lonberg, N; Newport, J W; McSwiggen, J A; von Hippel, P H

    1986-03-25

    Many biologically important proteins bind nonspecifically, and often cooperatively, to single-or double-stranded nucleic acid lattices in discharging their physiological functions. This binding can generally be described in thermodynamic terms by three parameters: n, the binding site size; K, the intrinsic binding constant; omega, the binding cooperativity parameter. The experimental determination of these parameters often appears to be straightforward but can be fraught with conceptual and methodological difficulties that may not be readily apparent. In this paper we describe and analyze a number of approaches that can be used to measure these protein-nucleic acid interaction parameters and illustrate these methods with experiments on the binding of T4-coded gene 32 (single-stranded DNA binding) protein to various nucleic acid lattices. We consider the following procedures: (i) the titration of a fixed amount of lattice (nucleic acid) with added ligand (protein); (ii) the titration of a fixed amount of ligand with added lattice; (iii) the determination of ligand binding affinities at very low levels of lattice saturation; (iv) the analysis of ligand cluster size distribution on the lattice; (v) the analysis of ligand binding to lattices of finite length. The applicability and limitations of each approach are considered and discussed, and potential pitfalls are explicitly pointed out.

  13. Pharmacologically distinct phenotypes of α1B-adrenoceptors: variation in binding and functional affinities for antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Uwada, Junsuke; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Umada, Hidenori; Hayashi, Ryoji; Kainoh, Mie; Masuoka, Takayoshi; Nishio, Matomo; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The pharmacological properties of particular receptors have recently been suggested to vary under different conditions. We compared the pharmacological properties of the α1B-adrenoceptor subtype in various tissue preparations and under various conditions. Experimental Approach [3H]-prazosin binding to α1B-adrenoceptors in rat liver (segments, dispersed hepatocytes and homogenates) was assessed and the pharmacological profiles were compared with the functional and binding profiles in rat carotid artery and recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors. Key Results In association and saturation-binding experiments with rat liver, binding affinity for [3H]-prazosin varied significantly between preparations (KD value approximately ten times higher in segments than in homogenates). The binding profile for various drugs in liver segments also deviated from the representative α1B-adrenoceptor profile observed in liver homogenates and recombinant receptors. L-765,314 and ALS-77, selective antagonists of α1B-adrenoceptors, showed high binding and antagonist affinities in liver homogenates and recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors. However, binding affinities for both ligands in the segments of rat liver and carotid artery were 10 times lower, and the antagonist potencies in α1B-adrenoceptor-mediated contractions of carotid artery were more than 100 times lower than the representative α1B-adrenoceptor profile. Conclusions and Implications In contrast to the consistent profile of recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors, the pharmacological profile of native α1B-adrenoceptors of rat liver and carotid artery varied markedly under various receptor environments, showing significantly different binding properties between intact tissues and homogenates, and dissociation between functional and binding affinities. In addition to conventional ‘subtype’ characterization, ‘phenotype’ pharmacology must be considered in native receptor evaluations in vivo and in future

  14. Characterisation of iron binding ligands in seawater by reverse titration.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Gledhill, Martha; Connelly, Douglas P; Achterberg, Eric P

    2013-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the use of reverse titration - competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (RT-CLE-ACSV) for the analysis of iron (Fe) binding ligands in seawater. In contrast to the forward titration, which examines excess ligands in solution, RT-CLE-ACSV examines the existing Fe-ligand complexes by increasing the concentration of added (electroactive) ligand (1-nitroso-2-naphthol) and analysis of the proportion of Fe bound to the added ligand. The data manipulation allows the accurate characterisation of ligands at equal or lower concentrations than Fe in seawater, and disregards electrochemically inert dissolved Fe such as some colloidal phases. The method is thus superior to the forward titration in environments with high Fe and low ligand concentrations or high concentrations of inert Fe. We validated the technique using the siderophore ligand ferrioxamine B, and observed a stability constant [Formula: see text] of 0.74-4.37×10(21) mol(-1), in agreement with previous results. We also successfully analysed samples from coastal waters and a deep ocean hydrothermal plume. Samples from these environments could not be analysed with confidence using the forward titration, highlighting the effectiveness of the RT-CLE-ACSV technique in waters with high concentrations of inert Fe.

  15. Mu/sub 1/: A very high affinity subtype of enkephalin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Cruciani, R.A.; Munson, P.J.; Rodbard, D.

    1985-06-10

    Displacement studies of (/sup 3/H)-(D-Ala/sup 2/-MePhe/sup 4/-Gly-ol/sup 5/)-enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)-DAGO) and (/sup 3/H)-(D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/)-enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)-DADL) by the corresponding unlabeled ligands show that there are at least three classes of sites which bind these enkephalin analogs with high affinity. Using computer modeling, the introduction of the third site significantly improved the goodness of fit in ten consecutive experiments. These sites appear to correspond to the ..mu.., delta, and ..mu../sub 1/ sites, with mean dissociation constants of 11, 1.3 and 0.9 nM for DADL and 2.5, 300 and 0.3 nM for DAGO, respectively. 15 reference, 3 figures, 1 table.

  16. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  17. Highly selective ligand binding by Methylophilus methylotrophus cytochrome c''.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Pedro O; Catarino, Teresa; Todorovic, Smilja; Turner, David L

    2011-06-28

    Cytochrome c'' (cyt c'') from Methylophilus methylotrophus is unusual insofar as the heme has two axial histidine ligands in the oxidized form but one is detached when the protein is reduced. Despite cyt c'' having an axial site available for binding small ligands, we show here that only NO binds readily to the ferrous cyt c''. Binding of CO, as well as CN(-), on the other hand requires considerable structural reorganization, or reduction of the disulfide bridge close to the heme. Standard free energies for the binding of NO and CO reveal high selectivity of the ferrous cyt c'' for NO, indicating its putative physiological role. In this work, we characterize in detail the kinetics of NO binding and the structural features of the Fe(2+)-NO adduct by stopped-flow and resonance Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  18. Protein-specific force field derived from the fragment molecular orbital method can improve protein-ligand binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-30

    Accurate computational estimate of the protein-ligand binding affinity is of central importance in rational drug design. To improve accuracy of the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) for protein-ligand simulations, we use a protein-specific FF derived by the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method and by the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. Applying this FMO-RESP method to two proteins, dodecin, and lysozyme, we found that protein-specific partial charges tend to differ more significantly from the standard AMBER charges for isolated charged atoms. We did not see the dependence of partial charges on the secondary structure. Computing the binding affinities of dodecin with five ligands by MM PBSA protocol with the FMO-RESP charge set as well as with the standard AMBER charges, we found that the former gives better correlation with experimental affinities than the latter. While, for lysozyme with five ligands, both charge sets gave similar and relatively accurate estimates of binding affinities.

  19. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  20. VEGFR-2 conformational switch in response to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    VEGFR-2 is the primary regulator of angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. VEGFR-2 has been hypothesized to be monomeric in the absence of bound ligand, and to undergo dimerization and activation only upon ligand binding. Using quantitative FRET and biochemical analysis, we show that VEGFR-2 forms dimers also in the absence of ligand when expressed at physiological levels, and that these dimers are phosphorylated. Ligand binding leads to a change in the TM domain conformation, resulting in increased kinase domain phosphorylation. Inter-receptor contacts within the extracellular and TM domains are critical for the establishment of the unliganded dimer structure, and for the transition to the ligand-bound active conformation. We further show that the pathogenic C482R VEGFR-2 mutant, linked to infantile hemangioma, promotes ligand-independent signaling by mimicking the structure of the ligand-bound wild-type VEGFR-2 dimer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13876.001 PMID:27052508

  1. Relation between the change in DNA elasticity on ligand binding and the binding energetics.

    PubMed

    Kostjukov, Viktor V; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2012-09-01

    The widespread use of tweezers for measurement of ligand-DNA binding parameters is based on the McGhee-von Hippel treatment of the DNA contour and persistence length as a function of concentration. The McGhee-von Hippel approach contains the basic assumption that the binding constant K is independent of the number of already bound ligands. However, the change in elasticity of DNA on binding affects the entropic part of the Gibbs free energy and, hence, the K value in a concentration-dependent manner, making the whole approach inconsistent. In the present work we show that the energetic effect of DNA stiffening on noncovalent binding of small ligands is negligible with respect to the net energy of reaction, whereas the DNA stiffening on binding of large ligands must always be considered in each particular case.

  2. Relation between the change in DNA elasticity on ligand binding and the binding energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2012-09-01

    The widespread use of tweezers for measurement of ligand-DNA binding parameters is based on the McGhee-von Hippel treatment of the DNA contour and persistence length as a function of concentration. The McGhee-von Hippel approach contains the basic assumption that the binding constant K is independent of the number of already bound ligands. However, the change in elasticity of DNA on binding affects the entropic part of the Gibbs free energy and, hence, the K value in a concentration-dependent manner, making the whole approach inconsistent. In the present work we show that the energetic effect of DNA stiffening on noncovalent binding of small ligands is negligible with respect to the net energy of reaction, whereas the DNA stiffening on binding of large ligands must always be considered in each particular case.

  3. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  4. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests. PMID:24832237

  5. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  6. Regions outside of conserved PxxPxR motifs drive the high affinity interaction of GRB2 with SH3 domain ligands.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Rebekah R; Light, Jonathan; Vacaflores, Aldo; Butcher, Alayna; Pandian, Madhana; Nash, Piers; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-10-01

    SH3 domains are evolutionarily conserved protein interaction domains that control nearly all cellular processes in eukaryotes. The current model is that most SH3 domains bind discreet PxxPxR motifs with weak affinity and relatively low selectivity. However, the interactions of full-length SH3 domain-containing proteins with ligands are highly specific and have much stronger affinity. This suggests that regions outside of PxxPxR motifs drive these interactions. In this study, we observed that PxxPxR motifs were required for the binding of the adaptor protein GRB2 to short peptides from its ligand SOS1. Surprisingly, PxxPxR motifs from the proline rich region of SOS1 or CBL were neither necessary nor sufficient for the in vitro or in vivo interaction with full-length GRB2. Together, our findings show that regions outside of the consensus PxxPxR sites drive the high affinity association of GRB2 with SH3 domain ligands, suggesting that the binding mechanism for this and other SH3 domain interactions may be more complex than originally thought.

  7. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  8. Regulation of neurexin 1beta tertiary structure and ligand binding through alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kaiser C; Kuczynska, Dorota A; Wu, Irene J; Murray, Beverly H; Sheckler, Lauren R; Rudenko, Gabby

    2008-03-01

    Neurexins and neuroligins play an essential role in synapse function, and their alterations are linked to autistic spectrum disorder. Interactions between neurexins and neuroligins regulate inhibitory and excitatory synaptogenesis in vitro through a "splice-insert signaling code." In particular, neurexin 1beta carrying an alternative splice insert at site SS#4 interacts with neuroligin 2 (found predominantly at inhibitory synapses) but much less so with other neuroligins (those carrying an insert at site B and prevalent at excitatory synapses). The structure of neurexin 1beta+SS#4 reveals dramatic rearrangements to the "hypervariable surface," the binding site for neuroligins. The splice insert protrudes as a long helix into space, triggers conversion of loop beta10-beta11 into a helix rearranging the binding site for neuroligins, and rearranges the Ca(2+)-binding site required for ligand binding, increasing its affinity. Our structures reveal the mechanism by which neurexin 1beta isoforms acquire neuroligin splice isoform selectivity.

  9. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  10. Structure-Based Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Mechanism for DhelOBP21, a C-minus Odorant Binding Protein, from Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Bothrideridae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong-Zhen; Yu, Guang-Qiang; Yi, Shan-Cheng; Zhang, Yinan; Kong, De-Xin; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) transport hydrophobic odor molecules across the sensillar lymph to trigger a neuronal response. Herein, the Minus-C OBP (DhelOBP21) was characterized from Dastarcus helophoroides, the most important natural parasitic enemy insect that targets Monochamus alternatus. Homology modeling and molecular docking were conducted on the interaction between DhelOBP21 and 17 volatile molecules (including volatiles from pine bark, the larva of M. alternatus, and the faeces of the larva). The predicted three-dimensional structure showed only two disulfide bridges and a hydrophobic binding cavity with a short C-terminus. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe showed that DhelOBP21 exhibited better binding affinities against those ligands with a molecular volume between 100 and 125 ų compared with ligands with a molecular volume between 160 and 185 ų. Molecules that are too big or too small are not conducive for binding. We mutated the amino acid residues of the binding cavity to increase either hydrophobicity or hydrophilia. Ligand-binding experiments and cyber molecular docking assays indicated that hydrophobic interactions are more significant than hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although hydrogen-bond interactions could be predicted for some binding complexes, the hydrophobic interactions had more influence on binding following hydrophobic changes that affected the cavity. The orientation of ligands affects binding by influencing hydrophobic interactions. The binding process is controlled by multiple factors. This study provides a basis to explore the ligand-binding mechanisms of Minus-C OBP. PMID:26435694

  11. Structure-Based Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Mechanism for DhelOBP21, a C-minus Odorant Binding Protein, from Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Bothrideridae).

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhen; Yu, Guang-Qiang; Yi, Shan-Cheng; Zhang, Yinan; Kong, De-Xin; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) transport hydrophobic odor molecules across the sensillar lymph to trigger a neuronal response. Herein, the Minus-C OBP (DhelOBP21) was characterized from Dastarcus helophoroides, the most important natural parasitic enemy insect that targets Monochamus alternatus. Homology modeling and molecular docking were conducted on the interaction between DhelOBP21 and 17 volatile molecules (including volatiles from pine bark, the larva of M. alternatus, and the faeces of the larva). The predicted three-dimensional structure showed only two disulfide bridges and a hydrophobic binding cavity with a short C-terminus. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe showed that DhelOBP21 exhibited better binding affinities against those ligands with a molecular volume between 100 and 125 Å(³) compared with ligands with a molecular volume between 160 and 185 Å(³). Molecules that are too big or too small are not conducive for binding. We mutated the amino acid residues of the binding cavity to increase either hydrophobicity or hydrophilia. Ligand-binding experiments and cyber molecular docking assays indicated that hydrophobic interactions are more significant than hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although hydrogen-bond interactions could be predicted for some binding complexes, the hydrophobic interactions had more influence on binding following hydrophobic changes that affected the cavity. The orientation of ligands affects binding by influencing hydrophobic interactions. The binding process is controlled by multiple factors. This study provides a basis to explore the ligand-binding mechanisms of Minus-C OBP. PMID:26435694

  12. High affinity binding of /sup 125/I-labeled mouse interferon to a specific cell surface receptor. II. Analysis of binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Aguet, M.; Blanchard, B.

    1981-12-01

    Direct ligand-binding studies with highly purified /sup 125/I-labeled virus-induced mouse interferon on mouse lymphoma L 1210 cells revealed a direct correlation of specific high-affinity binding with the biologic response to interferon. Neutralization of the antiviral effect by anti-interferon gamma globulin occurred at the same antibody concentration as the inhibition of specific binding. These results suggest that specific high-affinity binding of /sup 125/I-interferon occurred at a biologically functional interferon receptor. Competitive inhibition experiments using /sup 125/I- and /sup 127/I-labeled interferon provided strong evidence that the fraction of /sup 125/I-interferon inactivated upon labeling did not bind specifically. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yielded linear plots and thus suggested that interferon binds to homogeneous noncooperative receptor sites. In contrast to a characteristic property of several peptide hormone systems, binding of /sup 125/I-interferon to its specific receptor did not induce subsequent ligand degradation. At 37/sup o/ bound interferon was rapidly released in a biologically active form without evidence for molecular degradation. The expression of interferon receptors was not modified by treatment with interferon. Trypsin treatment of target cells and inhibition of protein synthesis abolished the specific binding of /sup 125/I-interferon. Three major molecular weight species of Newcastle disease virus-induced mouse C 243 cell interferon were isolated, separated, and identified as mouse ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. interferons. These interferons were shown to inhibit competitively the specific binding of the highly purified labeled starting material thus providing evidence for a common receptor site for mouse interferon.

  13. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L.; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1–ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  14. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  15. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity.

  16. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von . E-mail: m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand ({alpha}/{beta}-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available.

  17. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  18. First Principles-Based Calculations of Free Energy of Binding: Application to Ligand Binding in a Self-Assembling Superstructure.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Fox, Thomas; Tautermann, Christofer S; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-04-12

    The accurate prediction of ligand binding affinities to a protein remains a desirable goal of computational biochemistry. Many available methods use molecular mechanics (MM) to describe the system, however, MM force fields cannot fully describe the complex interactions involved in binding, specifically electron transfer and polarization. First principles approaches can fully account for these interactions, and with the development of linear-scaling first principles programs, it is now viable to apply first principles calculations to systems containing tens of thousands of atoms. In this paper, a quantum mechanical Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach is applied to a model of a protein-ligand binding cavity, the "tennis ball" dimer. Results obtained from this approach demonstrate considerable improvement over conventional molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area due to the more accurate description of the interactions in the system. For the first principles calculations in this study, the linear-scaling density functional theory program ONETEP is used, allowing the approach to be applied to receptor-ligand complexes of pharmaceutical interest that typically include thousands of atoms.

  19. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  20. Specific affinity-labeling of the nociceptin ORL1 receptor using a thiol-activated Cys(Npys)-containing peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ayami; Nishimura, Hirokazu; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Liu, Xiaohui; Costa, Tommaso; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that an antagonist-based peptide ligand, H-Cys(Npys)-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg- Ile-Lys-NH2 , captures the free thiol groups in the ligand-binding site of the nociceptin receptor ORL1. However, the exact receptor sites of this thiol-disulfide exchange reaction have not been uncovered, although such identification would help to clarify the ligand recognition site. Since the Cys→Ala substitution prevents the reaction, we performed the so-called Ala scanning for all the Cys residues in the transmembrane (TM) domains of the ORL1 receptor. Seven different mutant receptors were soundly expressed in the COS-7 cells and examined for their specific affinity labeling by a competitive binding assay using nociceptin and [(3) H]nociceptin. The results of in vitro Ala scanning analyses revealed that the labeled residues were Cys59 in TM1, Cys215 and Cys231 in TM5, and Cys310 in TM7. The present study has provided a novel method of Cys(Npys)-affinity labeling for identification of the ligand-binding sites in the ORL1 receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 460-469, 2016.

  1. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: MODEL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The training set used to derive a common reactivity pattern (COREPA) model for estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinity in Model I (see Abstract I in this series) was extended to include 47 rat estrogen receptor (rER) relative binding affinity (RBA) measurements in addition to the...

  2. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  3. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  4. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  5. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  6. Interactions between alkaline earth cations and oxo ligands. DFT study of the affinity of the Mg²+ cation for phosphoryl ligands.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Leonardo Moreira; de Mesquita Carneiro, José Walkimar; Paes, Lilian Weitzel Coelho

    2011-08-01

    DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) calculations of Mg(2+) affinities for a set of phosphoryl ligands were performed. Two types of ligands were studied: a set of trivalent [O = P(R)] and a set of pentavalent phosphoryl ligands [O = P(R)(3)] (R = H, F, Cl, Br, OH, OCH(3), CH(3), CN, NH(2) and NO(2)), with R either bound directly to the phosphorus atom or to the para position of a phenyl ring. The affinity of the Mg(2+) cation for the ligands was quantified by means of the enthalpy for the substitution of one water molecule in the [Mg(H(2)O)(6)](2+) complex for a ligand. The enthalpy of substitution was correlated with electronic and geometric parameters. Electron-donor groups increase the interaction between the cation and the ligand, while electron-acceptor groups decrease the interaction enthalpy. PMID:21161556

  7. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  8. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-11-04

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound (/sup 125/I)EDP I, (/sup 125/I)Glu-plasminogen, and (/sup 125/I)Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 ..mu..M, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of (/sup 125/I)EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor.

  9. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  10. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  11. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues.

  12. A Prediction Method of Binding Free Energy of Protein and Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Wang, Xicheng

    2010-05-01

    Predicting the binding free energy is an important problem in bimolecular simulation. Such prediction would be great benefit in understanding protein functions, and may be useful for computational prediction of ligand binding strengths, e.g., in discovering pharmaceutical drugs. Free energy perturbation (FEP)/thermodynamics integration (TI) is a classical method to explicitly predict free energy. However, this method need plenty of time to collect datum, and that attempts to deal with some simple systems and small changes of molecular structures. Another one for estimating ligand binding affinities is linear interaction energy (LIE) method. This method employs averages of interaction potential energy terms from molecular dynamics simulations or other thermal conformational sampling techniques. Incorporation of systematic deviations from electrostatic linear response, derived from free energy perturbation studies, into the absolute binding free energy expression significantly enhances the accuracy of the approach. However, it also is time-consuming work. In this paper, a new prediction method based on steered molecular dynamics (SMD) with direction optimization is developed to compute binding free energy. Jarzynski's equality is used to derive the PMF or free-energy. The results for two numerical examples are presented, showing that the method has good accuracy and efficiency. The novel method can also simulate whole binding proceeding and give some important structural information about development of new drugs.

  13. Studies with an immobilized metal affinity chromatography cassette system involving binuclear triazacyclononane-derived ligands: automation of batch adsorption measurements with tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Martin; Coghlan, Campbell J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-07-18

    This study describes the determination of the adsorption isotherms and binding kinetics of tagged recombinant proteins using a recently developed IMAC cassette system and employing automated robotic liquid handling procedures for IMAC resin screening. These results confirm that these new IMAC resins, generated from a variety of different metal-charged binuclear 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) ligands, interact with recombinant proteins containing a novel N-terminal metal binding tag, NT1A, with static binding capacities similar to those obtained with conventional hexa-His tagged proteins, but with significantly increased association constants. In addition, higher kinetic binding rates were observed with these new IMAC systems, an attribute that can be positively exploited to increase process productivity. The results from this investigation demonstrate that enhancements in binding capacities and affinities were achieved with these new IMAC resins and chosen NT1A tagged protein. Further, differences in the binding performances of the bis(tacn) xylenyl-bridged ligands were consistent with the distance between the metal binding centres of the two tacn moieties, the flexibility of the ligand and the potential contribution from the aromatic ring of the xylenyl group to undergo π/π stacking interactions with the tagged proteins.

  14. Development of a sensitive method for selection of affinity ligand for trypsin using quartz crystal microbalance sensor.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Yakup Arica, M

    2012-03-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed for selection of affinity ligands towards the enzyme "trypsin" using quartz crystals microbalance (QCM) technique. To achieve this goal, the surface amination of gold plated QCM crystals was achieved in 13.56 MHz plasma polymerization system by using ethylenediamine. Three different ligands (i.e., 4-aminobenzamidine, 4-aminobenzoic acid, and phenylalanine) were immobilized on the aminated QCM crystals surface via glutaraldehyde coupling. All three ligand immobilized QCM crystals were characterized and compared under different experimental conditions. It was observed that the benzamidine ligand showed higher affinity to trypsin with a dissociation constant on the order of 1.76 × 10(-9) M, which is within the range of 10(-4)-10(-8) M for affinity ligands. Thus, its selectivity was suitable for purification of trypsin from biological fluids. PMID:21853329

  15. Inversion of axial coordination in myoglobin to create a "proximal" ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Sakamoto, Rikiharu; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2003-09-01

    A ligand binding pocket has been created on the proximal side of the heme in porcine myoglobin by site-directed mutagenesis. Our starting point was the H64V/V68H double mutant which has been shown to have bis-histidine (His68 and His93) heme coordination [Dou, Y., Admiraal, S. J., Ikeda-Saito, M., Krzywda, S., Wilkinson, A. J., Li, T., Olson, J. S., Prince, R. C., Pickering, I. J., George, G. N. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15993-16001]. The replacement of the proximal His93 ligand by noncoordinating Ala (H64V/V68H/H93A) or Gly (H64V/V68H/H93G) residues resulted unexpectedly in a six-coordinate low-spin species in both ferric and ferrous states. To test the hypothesis that the sixth coordinating ligand in the triple mutants was the imidazole of His97, this residue was mutated to Phe, in the quadruple mutants, H64V/V68H/H93A/H97F and H64V/V68H/H93G/H97F. The ferric quadruple mutants show a clear water/hydroxide alkaline transition and high cyanide and CO affinities, characteristics similar to those of wild-type myoglobin. The nu(Fe-CO) and nu(C-O) stretching frequencies in the ferrous-CO state of the quadruple mutants indicate that the "proximal" ligand binding heme pocket is less polar than the distal pocket in the wild-type protein. Thus, we conclude that the proximal heme pocket in the quadruple mutants has a similar affinity for exogenous ligands to the distal pocket of wild-type myoglobin but that the two pockets have different polarities. The quadruple mutants open up new approaches for developing heme chemistry on the myoglobin scaffold.

  16. Biochemical characterization and ligand binding properties of neuroglobin, a novel member of the globin family.

    PubMed

    Dewilde, S; Kiger, L; Burmester, T; Hankeln, T; Baudin-Creuza, V; Aerts, T; Marden, M C; Caubergs, R; Moens, L

    2001-10-19

    Neuroglobin is a recently discovered member of the globin superfamily that is suggested to enhance the O(2) supply of the vertebrate brain. Spectral measurements with human and mouse recombinant neuroglobin provide evidence for a hexacoordinated deoxy ferrous (Fe(2+)) form, indicating a His-Fe(2+)-His binding scheme. O(2) or CO can displace the endogenous protein ligand, which is identified as the distal histidine by mutagenesis. The ferric (Fe(3+)) form of neuroglobin is also hexacoordinated with the protein ligand E7-His and does not exhibit pH dependence. Flash photolysis studies show a high recombination rate (k(on)) and a slow dissociation rate (k(off)) for both O(2) and CO, indicating a high intrinsic affinity for these ligands. However, because the rate-limiting step in ligand combination with the deoxy hexacoordinated form involves the dissociation of the protein ligand, O(2) and CO binding is suggested to be slow in vivo. Because of this competition, the observed O(2) affinity of recombinant human neuroglobin is average (1 torr at 37 degrees C). Neuroglobin has a high autoxidation rate, resulting in an oxidation at 37 degrees C by air within a few minutes. The oxidation/reduction potential of mouse neuroglobin (E'(o) = -129 mV) lies within the physiological range. Under natural conditions, recombinant mouse neuroglobin occurs as a monomer with disulfide-dependent formation of dimers. The biochemical and kinetic characteristics are discussed in view of the possible functions of neuroglobin in the vertebrate brain. PMID:11473128

  17. Rational design and asymmetric synthesis of potent and neurotrophic ligands for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs).

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Sebastian; Wang, Yansong; Kirschner, Alexander; Kozany, Christian; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To create highly efficient inhibitors for FK506-binding proteins, a new asymmetric synthesis for pro-(S)-C(5) -branched [4.3.1] aza-amide bicycles was developed. The key step of the synthesis is an HF-driven N-acyliminium cyclization. Functionalization of the C(5)  moiety resulted in novel protein contacts with the psychiatric risk factor FKBP51, which led to a more than 280-fold enhancement in affinity. The most potent ligands facilitated the differentiation of N2a neuroblastoma cells with low nanomolar potency.

  18. Identification and affinity of very high affinity binding sites for the phenylalkylamine series of Ca/sup +/ channel blockers in the Drosophila nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Pauron, D.; Qar, J.; Barhanin, J.; Fournier, D.; Cuany, A.; Pralavorio, M.; Berge, J.B.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-10-06

    The interaction of putative Ca/sup 2 +/ channels of Drosophila head membranes with molecules of the phenylalkylamine series was studied from binding experiments using (-)-(/sup 3/H)D888 and (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)verapamil. These ligands recognize a single class of very high affinity binding sites. The most potent molecule in the phenylalkylamine series was (-)-verapamil with a K/sub d/ value as exceptional low as 4.7 pM. Molecules in the benzothiazepine and diphenylbutylpiperidine series of Ca/sup 2 +/ channel blockers as well as bepridil inhibited (-)-(/sup 3/H)D888 binding in a competitive way with K/sub d/ values between 12 and 190 nM, suggesting a close correlation, as in the mammalian system, between these receptor sites and those recognizing phenylalkylamines. A tritiated (arylazido)phenylalkylamine with high affinity for the Drosophila head membranes, phenylalkylamine receptor was used in photoaffinity experiments. A protein of M/sub r/ 135,000 +/- 5000 was specifically labeled after ultraviolet irradiation.

  19. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  20. AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors for protein-peptide binding affinity study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Geng-Yen; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Hsu, You-Ren; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen; Sun, Yuh-Chang; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Yeh, J Andrew; Yao, Da-Jeng; Ren, Fan; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2013-03-15

    Antibody-immobilized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect a short peptide consisting of 20 amino acids. One-binding-site model and two-binding-site model were used for the analysis of the electrical signals, revealing the number of binding sites on an antibody and the dissociation constants between the antibody and the short peptide. In the binding-site models, the surface coverage ratio of the short peptide on the sensor surface is relevant to the electrical signals resulted from the peptide-antibody binding on the HEMTs. Two binding sites on an antibody were observed and two dissociation constants, 4.404×10(-11) M and 1.596×10(-9) M, were extracted from the binding-site model through the analysis of the surface coverage ratio of the short peptide on the sensor surface. We have also shown that the conventional method to extract the dissociation constant from the linear regression of curve-fitting with Langmuir isotherm equation may lead to an incorrect information if the receptor has more than one binding site for the ligand. The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor observed in the experimental result (~10 pM of the short peptide) is very close to the LOD (around 2.7-3.4 pM) predicted from the value of the smallest dissociation constants. The sensitivity of the sensor is not only dependent on the transistors, but also highly relies on the affinity of the ligand-receptor pair. The results demonstrate that the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs cannot only be used for biosensors, but also for the biological affinity study.

  1. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of pseudo-affinity ligand for penicillin acylase purification.

    PubMed

    Keçili, Rüstem; Say, Ridvan; Yavuz, Handan

    2006-11-15

    The aim of this work was to test a chromatographic affinity support containing methacryloyl antipyrine (MAAP) for penicillin acylase (PA) purification by using pure penicillin acylase and crude extract. First, MAAP as a pseudo-specific ligand was synthesized by using methacryloyl chloride and 4-aminoantipyrine. Polymer beads (average size diameter: 40-120 micro m) were prepared by suspension polymerization of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and MAAP. This approach for the preparation of adsorbent has several advantages over conventional preparation protocols. An expensive and time consuming step in the preparation of adsorbent is immobilization of a ligand to the adsorption matrix. In this procedure, affinity ligand MAAP acts as comonomer without further modification steps. Poly(EGDMA-MAAP) beads were characterized by FTIR, NMR and screen analysis. Elemental analysis of MAAP for nitrogen was estimated as 89.3 micro mol/g. The prepared adsorbent was then used for the capture of penicillin acylase in batch system. The maximum penicillin acylase adsorption capacity of the poly(EGDMA-MAAP) beads was found to be 82.2 mg/g at pH 5.0. Chromatography with crude feedstock resulted in 23.2-fold purification and 93% recovery with 1.0 M NaOH.

  3. A Mollusk Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Ortholog Sheds Light on the Evolution of Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M.; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Bourguet, William

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  4. Protein ligand design: from phage display to synthetic protein epitope mimetics in human antibody Fc-binding peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ricardo L A; Fasan, Rudi; Moehle, Kerstin; Renard, Annabelle; Obrecht, Daniel; Robinson, John A

    2006-03-01

    Phage display is a powerful method for selecting peptides with novel binding functions. Synthetic peptidomimetic chemistry is a powerful tool for creating structural diversity in ligands as a means to establish structure-activity relationships. Here we illustrate a method of bridging these two methodologies, by starting with a disulfide bridged phage display peptide which binds a human antibody Fc fragment (Delano et al. Science 2000, 287, 1279) and creating a backbone cyclic beta-hairpin peptidomimetic with 80-fold higher affinity for the Fc domain. The peptidomimetic is shown to adopt a well-defined beta-hairpin conformation in aqueous solution, with a bulge in one beta-strand, as seen in the crystal structure of the phage peptide bound to the Fc domain. The higher binding affinity of the peptidomimetic presumably reflects the effect of constraining the free ligand into the conformation required for binding, thus highlighting in this example the influence that ligand flexibility has on the binding energy. Since phage display peptides against a wide variety of different proteins are now accessible, this approach to synthetic ligand design might be applied to many other medicinally and biotechnologically interesting target proteins.

  5. Syntheses of 2-amino and 2-halothiazole derivatives as high-affinity metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 ligands and potential radioligands for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T; Pike, Victor W

    2011-02-10

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu(5) ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu(5) ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed subnanomolar mGlu(5) affinity. 10b also displayed >10000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [(18)F]fluoride ion (t(1/2) = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu(5) with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu(5) and may also serve as a lead to a potential (123)I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu(5) with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  6. Syntheses of 2-Amino and 2-Halothiazole Derivatives as High-Affinity Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Ligands and Potential Radioligands for In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T.; Pike, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu5 ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu5 ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed sub-nanomolar mGlu5 affinity. 10b also displayed >10,000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [18F]fluoride ion (t1/2 = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu5 with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu5 and may also serve as a lead to a potential 123I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu5 with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  7. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  8. Selection of ceramic fluorapatite-binding peptides from a phage display combinatorial peptide library: optimum affinity tags for fluorapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tuhidul; Bibi, Noor Shad; Vennapusa, Rami Reddy; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-08-01

    Peptide affinity tags have become efficient tools for the purification of recombinant proteins from biological mixtures. The most commonly used ligands in this type of affinity chromatography are immobilized metal ions, proteins, antibodies, and complementary peptides. However, the major bottlenecks of this technique are still related to the ligands, including their low stability, difficulties in immobilization, and leakage into the final products. A model approach is presented here to overcome these bottlenecks by utilizing macroporous ceramic fluorapatite (CFA) as the stationary phase in chromatography and the CFA-specific short peptides as tags. The CFA chromatographic materials act as both the support matrix and the ligand. Peptides that bind with affinity to CFA were identified from a randomized phage display heptapeptide library. A total of five rounds of phage selection were performed. A common N-terminal sequence was found in two selected peptides: F4-2 (KPRSMLH) and F5-4 (KPRSVSG). The peptide F5-4, displayed by more than 40% of the phages analyzed in the fifth round of selection, was subjected to further studies. Selectivity of the peptide for the chemical composition and morphology of CFA was assured by the adsorption studies. The dissociation constant, obtained from the F5-4/CFA adsorption isotherm, was in the micromolar range, and the maximum capacity was 39.4 nmol/mg. The chromatographic behavior of the peptides was characterized on a CFA stationary phase with different buffers. Preferential affinity and specific retention properties suggest the possible application of the phage-derived peptides as a tag in CFA affinity chromatography for enhancing the selective recovery of proteins.

  9. Anion-induced increases in the affinity of colcemid binding to tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ray, K; Bhattacharyya, B; Biswas, B B

    1984-08-01

    Colcemid binds tubulin rapidly and reversibly in contrast to colchicine which binds tubulin relatively slowly and essentially irreversibly. At 37 degrees C the association rate constant for colcemid binding is 1.88 X 10(6) M-1 h-1, about 10 times higher than that for colchicine; this is reflected in the activation energies for binding which are 51.4 kJ/mol for colcemid and 84.8 kJ/mol for colchicine. Scatchard analysis indicates two binding sites on tubulin having different affinities for colcemid. The high-affinity site (Ka = 0.7 X 10(5) M-1 at 37 degrees C) is sensitive to temperature and binds both colchicine and colcemid and hence they are mutually competitive inhibitors. The low-affinity site (Kb = 1.2 X 10(4) M-1) is rather insensitive to temperature and binds only colcemid. Like colchicine, 0.6 mol of colcemid are bound/mol of tubulin dimer (at the high-affinity site) and the reaction is entropy driven (163 J K-1 mol-1). Similar to colchicine, colcemid binding to tubulin is stimulated by certain anions (viz. sulfate and tartrate) but by a different mechanism. Colcemid binding affinity at the lower-affinity site of tubulin is increased in the presence of ammonium sulfate. Interestingly, the lower-affinity site on tubulin for colcemid, even when converted to higher affinity in presence of ammonium sulfate, is not recognized by colchicine. We conclude that tubulin possesses two binding sites, one of which specifically recognized the groups present on the B-ring of colchicine molecule and is effected by the ammonium sulfate, whereas the higher-affinity site, which could accommodate both colchicine and colcemid, possibly recognized the A and C ring of colchicine.

  10. Low affinity binding site clusters confer hox specificity and regulatory robustness.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Abe, Namiko; Rinaldi, Lucrezia; McGregor, Alistair P; Frankel, Nicolás; Wang, Shu; Alsawadi, Ahmad; Valenti, Philippe; Plaza, Serge; Payre, François; Mann, Richard S; Stern, David L

    2015-01-15

    In animals, Hox transcription factors define regional identity in distinct anatomical domains. How Hox genes encode this specificity is a paradox, because different Hox proteins bind with high affinity in vitro to similar DNA sequences. Here, we demonstrate that the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in complex with its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) bound specifically to clusters of very low affinity sites in enhancers of the shavenbaby gene of Drosophila. These low affinity sites conferred specificity for Ubx binding in vivo, but multiple clustered sites were required for robust expression when embryos developed in variable environments. Although most individual Ubx binding sites are not evolutionarily conserved, the overall enhancer architecture-clusters of low affinity binding sites-is maintained and required for enhancer function. Natural selection therefore works at the level of the enhancer, requiring a particular density of low affinity Ubx sites to confer both specific and robust expression. PMID:25557079

  11. Solvent fluctuations in hydrophobic cavity–ligand binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Setny, Piotr; Baron, Riccardo; Michael Kekenes-Huskey, Peter; McCammon, J. Andrew; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Water plays a crucial part in virtually all protein–ligand binding processes in and out of equilibrium. Here, we investigate the role of water in the binding kinetics of a ligand to a prototypical hydrophobic pocket by explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and implicit diffusional approaches. The concave pocket in the unbound state exhibits wet/dry hydration oscillations whose magnitude and time scale are significantly amplified by the approaching ligand. In turn, the ligand’s stochastic motion intimately couples to the slow hydration fluctuations, leading to a sixfold-enhanced friction in the vicinity of the pocket entrance. The increased friction considerably decelerates association in the otherwise barrierless system, indicating the importance of molecular-scale hydrodynamic effects in cavity–ligand binding arising due to capillary fluctuations. We derive and analyze the diffusivity profile and show that the mean first passage time distribution from the MD simulation can be accurately reproduced by a standard Brownian dynamics simulation if the appropriate position-dependent friction profile is included. However, long-time decays in the water–ligand (random) force autocorrelation demonstrate violation of the Markovian assumption, challenging standard diffusive approaches for rate prediction. Remarkably, the static friction profile derived from the force correlations strongly resembles the profile derived on the Markovian assumption apart from a simple shift in space, which can be rationalized by a time–space retardation in the ligand’s downhill dynamics toward the pocket. The observed spatiotemporal hydrodynamic coupling may be of biological importance providing the time needed for conformational receptor–ligand adjustments, typical of the induced-fit paradigm. PMID:23297241

  12. Selectivity of odorant-binding proteins from the southern house mosquito tested against physiologically relevant ligands.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiao; Choo, Young-Moo; Duan, Hongxia; Leal, Walter S

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to humans, insects rely heavily on an acute olfactory system for survival and reproduction. Two major types of olfactory proteins, namely, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs), may contribute to the selectivity and sensitivity of the insects' olfactory system. Here, we aimed at addressing the question whether OBPs highly enriched in the antennae of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, contribute at least in part to the selective reception of physiologically relevant compounds. Using a fluorescence reporter and a panel of 34 compounds, including oviposition attractants, human-derived attractants, and repellents, we measured binding affinities of CquiOBP1, CquiOBP2, and CquiOBP5. Based on dissociation constants, we surmised that CquiOBP2 is a carrier for the oviposition attractant skatole, whereas CquiOBP1 and CquiOBP5 might transport the oviposition pheromone MOP, a human-derived attractant nonanal, and the insect repellent picardin. Binding of these three ligands to CquiOBP1 was further analyzed by examining the influence of pH on apparent affinity as well as by docking these three ligands into CquiOBP1. Our findings suggest that CquiOBP1 might discriminate MOP from nonanal/picaridin on the basis of the midpoint transition of a pH-dependence conformational change, and that MOP is better accommodated in the binding cavity than the other two ligands. These findings, along with previous experimental evidence suggesting that CquiOBP1 does not detect nonanal in vivo, suggest that OBP selectivity may not be clearly manifested in their dissociation constants. PMID:25774136

  13. Selectivity of odorant-binding proteins from the southern house mosquito tested against physiologically relevant ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jiao; Choo, Young-Moo; Duan, Hongxia; Leal, Walter S.

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to humans, insects rely heavily on an acute olfactory system for survival and reproduction. Two major types of olfactory proteins, namely, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs), may contribute to the selectivity and sensitivity of the insects' olfactory system. Here, we aimed at addressing the question whether OBPs highly enriched in the antennae of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, contribute at least in part to the selective reception of physiologically relevant compounds. Using a fluorescence reporter and a panel of 34 compounds, including oviposition attractants, human-derived attractants, and repellents, we measured binding affinities of CquiOBP1, CquiOBP2, and CquiOBP5. Based on dissociation constants, we surmised that CquiOBP2 is a carrier for the oviposition attractant skatole, whereas CquiOBP1 and CquiOBP5 might transport the oviposition pheromone MOP, a human-derived attractant nonanal, and the insect repellent picardin. Binding of these three ligands to CquiOBP1 was further analyzed by examining the influence of pH on apparent affinity as well as by docking these three ligands into CquiOBP1. Our findings suggest that CquiOBP1 might discriminate MOP from nonanal/picaridin on the basis of the midpoint transition of a pH-dependence conformational change, and that MOP is better accommodated in the binding cavity than the other two ligands. These findings, along with previous experimental evidence suggesting that CquiOBP1 does not detect nonanal in vivo, suggest that OBP selectivity may not be clearly manifested in their dissociation constants. PMID:25774136

  14. Bodilisant—A Novel Fluorescent, Highly Affine Histamine H3 Receptor Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (Ki hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R. PMID:24900647

  15. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography.

  16. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography. PMID:17618635

  17. Biophysical basis of the promiscuous binding of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 apoptotic repressor to BH3 ligands.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-10-01

    B-cell lymphoma protein 2 (Bcl2) apoptotic repressor carries out its function by virtue of its ability to bind to BH3 domains of various pro-apoptotic regulators in a highly promiscuous manner. Herein, we investigate the biophysical basis of such promiscuity of Bcl2 toward its cognate BH3 ligands. Our data show that although the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif bind to Bcl2 with submicromolar affinity, those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif afford weak interactions. This implies that the replacement of alanine at the fourth position (A + 4)-relative to the N-terminal leucine (L0) within the LXXXAD motif-to glycine/serine results in the loss of free energy of binding. Consistent with this notion, the A + 4 residue within the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif engages in key intermolecular van der Waals contacts with A149 lining the ligand binding groove within Bcl2, whereas A + 4G/S substitution results in the disruption of such favorable binding interactions. Of particular interest is the observation that although increasing ionic strength has little or negligible effect on the binding of high-affinity BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif, the binding of those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif in general experiences a varying degree of enhancement. This salient observation is indicative of the fact that hydrophobic forces not only play a dominant but also a universal role in driving the Bcl2-BH3 interactions. Taken together, our study sheds light on the molecular basis of the factors governing the promiscuous binding of Bcl2 to pro-apoptotic regulators and thus bears important consequences on the development of rational therapeutic approaches. PMID:23996493

  18. Competitive interactions of ligands and macromolecular crowders with maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Miklos, Andrew C; Sumpter, Matthew; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Cellular signaling involves a cascade of recognition events occurring in a complex environment with high concentrations of proteins, polysaccharides, and other macromolecules. The influence of macromolecular crowders on protein binding affinity through hard-core repulsion is well studied, and possible contributions of protein-crowder soft attraction have been implicated recently. Here we present direct evidence for weak association of maltose binding protein (MBP) with a polysaccharide crowder Ficoll, and that this association effectively competes with the binding of the natural ligand, maltose. Titration data over wide ranges of maltose and Ficoll concentrations fit well with a three-state competitive binding model. Broadening of MBP (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra by the addition of Ficoll indicates weak protein-crowder association, and subsequent recovery of sharp NMR peaks upon addition of maltose indicates that the interactions of the crowder and the ligand with MBP are competitive. We hypothesize that, in the Escherichia coli periplasm, the competitive interactions of polysaccharides and maltose with MBP could allow MBP to shuttle between the peptidoglycan attached to the outer membrane and the ATP-binding cassette transporter in the inner membrane.

  19. Structural mechanisms underlying sequence-dependent variations in GAG affinities of decorin binding protein A, a Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli M; Wang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Decorin-binding protein A (DBPA) is an important surface adhesin of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates the bacteria's colonization of human tissue by adhering to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), a sulfated polysaccharide. Interestingly, DBPA sequence variation among different strains of Borrelia spirochetes is high, resulting in significant differences in their GAG affinities. However, the structural mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. We determined the solution structures of DBPAs from strain N40 of B. burgdorferi and strain PBr of Borrelia garinii, two DBPA variants whose GAG affinities deviate significantly from strain B31, the best characterized version of DBPA. Our structures revealed that significant differences exist between PBr DBPA and B31/N40 DBPAs. In particular, the C-terminus of PBr DBPA, unlike C-termini from B31 and N40 DBPAs, is positioned away from the GAG-binding pocket and the linker between helices one and two of PBr DBPA is highly structured and retracted from the GAG-binding pocket. The repositioning of the C-terminus allowed the formation of an extra GAG-binding epitope in PBr DBPA and the retracted linker gave GAG ligands more access to the GAG-binding epitopes than other DBPAs. Characterization of GAG ligands' interactions with wild-type (WT) PBr and mutants confirmed the importance of the second major GAG-binding epitope and established the fact that the two epitopes are independent of one another and the new epitope is as important to GAG binding as the traditional epitope.

  20. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on ligand binding to hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Carey, F G; Knowles, F; Gibson, Q H

    1977-06-25

    Increase in hydrostatic pressure to 1000 atm increased the affinity of human and menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) hemoglobins for oxygen. With necessary assumptions about the form of the equilibrium curve, and after correction for changes in pH and volume due to pressure, the increase in affinity is about 2-fold for both hemoglobins. At pH 6.5, Hill's n for menhaden hemoglobin is near 1, and it is believed to remain in the T state, whereas human hemoglobin undergoes a T to R transition. This suggests that the R-T equilibrium is not disturbed by pressure. In direct experiments the binding of a fluorescent effector (8 hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene (trisulfonic acid) to deoxyhemoglobin was not changed by pressure. The binding of n-butylisocyanide to hemoglobin and to myoglobin is also greater at high pressures, similarly suggesting that the R-T transition is not involved in the pressure effect. PMID:16924

  1. Quantification of helix–helix binding affinities in micelles and lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, I.D.; Mosberg, H.I.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical approach for estimating association free energies of α-helices in nonpolar media has been developed. The parameters of energy functions have been derived from ΔΔG values of mutants in water-soluble proteins and partitioning of organic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents. The proposed approach was verified successfully against three sets of published data: (1) dissociation constants of α-helical oligomers formed by 27 hydrophobic peptides; (2) stabilities of 22 bacteriorhodopsin mutants, and (3) protein-ligand binding affinities in aqueous solution. It has been found that coalescence of helices is driven exclusively by van der Waals interactions and H-bonds, whereas the principal destabilizing contributions are represented by side-chain conformational entropy and transfer energy of atoms from a detergent or lipid to the protein interior. Electrostatic interactions of α-helices were relatively weak but important for reproducing the experimental data. Immobilization free energy, which originates from restricting rotational and translational rigid-body movements of molecules during their association, was found to be less than 1 kcal/mole. The energetics of amino acid substitutions in bacteriorhodopsin was complicated by specific binding of lipid and water molecules to cavities created in certain mutants. PMID:15340167

  2. Nexus Between Protein–Ligand Affinity Rank-Ordering, Biophysical Approaches, and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The confluence of computational and biophysical methods to accurately rank-order the binding affinities of small molecules and determine structures of macromolecular complexes is a potentially transformative advance in the work flow of drug discovery. This viewpoint explores the impact that advanced computational methods may have on the efficacy of small molecule drug discovery and optimization, particularly with respect to emerging fragment-based methods. PMID:24900579

  3. ProBiS-ligands: a web server for prediction of ligands by examination of protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Konc, Janez; Janežič, Dušanka

    2014-01-01

    The ProBiS-ligands web server predicts binding of ligands to a protein structure. Starting with a protein structure or binding site, ProBiS-ligands first identifies template proteins in the Protein Data Bank that share similar binding sites. Based on the superimpositions of the query protein and the similar binding sites found, the server then transposes the ligand structures from those sites to the query protein. Such ligand prediction supports many activities, e.g. drug repurposing. The ProBiS-ligands web server, an extension of the ProBiS web server, is open and free to all users at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/ligands. PMID:24861616

  4. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  5. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  6. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  7. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  8. Ligand-Protein Affinity Studies Using Long-Lived States of Fluorine-19 Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-03-10

    The lifetimes TLLS of long-lived states or TLLC of long-lived coherences can be used for the accurate determination of dissociation constants of weak protein-ligand complexes. The remarkable contrast between signals derived from LLS or LLC in free and bound ligands can be exploited to search for weak binders with large dissociation constants KD > 1 mM that are important for fragment-based drug discovery but may escape detection by other screening techniques. Alternatively, the high sensitivity of the proposed method can be exploited to work with large ligand-to-protein ratios, with an evident advantage of reduced consumption of precious proteins. The detection of (19)F-(19)F long-lived states in suitably designed fluorinated spy molecules allows one to perform competition binding experiments with high sensitivity while avoiding signal overlap that tends to hamper the interpretation of proton spectra of mixtures. PMID:26800391

  9. Ligand-Protein Affinity Studies Using Long-Lived States of Fluorine-19 Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Canet, Estel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-03-10

    The lifetimes TLLS of long-lived states or TLLC of long-lived coherences can be used for the accurate determination of dissociation constants of weak protein-ligand complexes. The remarkable contrast between signals derived from LLS or LLC in free and bound ligands can be exploited to search for weak binders with large dissociation constants KD > 1 mM that are important for fragment-based drug discovery but may escape detection by other screening techniques. Alternatively, the high sensitivity of the proposed method can be exploited to work with large ligand-to-protein ratios, with an evident advantage of reduced consumption of precious proteins. The detection of (19)F-(19)F long-lived states in suitably designed fluorinated spy molecules allows one to perform competition binding experiments with high sensitivity while avoiding signal overlap that tends to hamper the interpretation of proton spectra of mixtures.

  10. Engineered protein A ligands, derived from a histidine-scanning library, facilitate the affinity purification of IgG under mild acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In antibody purification processes, the acidic buffer commonly used to elute the bound antibodies during conventional affinity chromatograph, can damage the antibody. Herein we describe the development of several types of affinity ligands which enable the purification of antibodies under much milder conditions. Results Staphylococcal protein A variants were engineered by using both structure-based design and combinatorial screening methods. The frequency of amino acid residue substitutions was statistically analyzed using the sequences isolated from a histidine-scanning library screening. The positions where the frequency of occurrence of a histidine residue was more than 70% were thought to be effective histidine-mutation sites. Consequently, we identified PAB variants with a D36H mutation whose binding of IgG was highly sensitive to pH change. Conclusion The affinity column elution chromatograms demonstrated that antibodies could be eluted at a higher pH (∆pH**≧2.0) than ever reported (∆pH = 1.4) when the Staphylococcal protein A variants developed in this study were used as affinity ligands. The interactions between Staphylococcal protein A and IgG-Fab were shown to be important for the behavior of IgG bound on a SpA affinity column, and alterations in the affinity of the ligands for IgG-Fab clearly affected the conditions for eluting the bound IgG. Thus, a histidine-scanning library combined with a structure-based design was shown to be effective in engineering novel pH-sensitive proteins. PMID:25057290

  11. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  12. Does the ligand-biopolymer equilibrium binding constant depend on the number of bound ligands?

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2010-11-01

    Conventional methods, such as Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel analyses, used to treat ligand-biopolymer interactions, indirectly make the assumption that the microscopic binding constant is independent of the number of ligands, i, already bound to the biopolymer. Recent results on the aggregation of aromatic molecules (Beshnova et al., J Chem Phys 2009, 130, 165105) indicated that the equilibrium constant of self-association depends intrinsically on the number of molecules in an aggregate due to loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on formation of the complex. The influence of these factors on the equilibrium binding constant for ligand-biopolymer complexation was analyzed in this work. It was shown that under the conditions of binding of "small" molecules, these factors can effectively be ignored and, hence, do not provide any hidden systematic error in such widely-used approaches, such as the Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel methods for analyzing ligand-biopolymer complexation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 932-935, 2010.

  13. Probing the mechanism of ligand recognition in family 29 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Nurizzo, Didier; Taylor, Edward J; Williamson, Michael P; Walters, Christopher; Davies, Gideon J; Gilbert, Harry J

    2005-06-24

    The recycling of photosynthetically fixed carbon, by the action of microbial plant cell wall hydrolases, is integral to one of the major geochemical cycles and is of considerable industrial importance. Non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play a key role in this degradative process by targeting hydrolytic enzymes to their cognate substrate within the complex milieu of polysaccharides that comprise the plant cell wall. Family 29 CBMs have, thus far, only been found in an extracellular multienzyme plant cell wall-degrading complex from the anaerobic fungus Piromyces equi, where they exist as a CBM29-1:CBM29-2 tandem. Here we present both the structure of the CBM29-1 partner, at 1.5 A resolution, and examine the importance of hydrophobic stacking interactions as well as direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds in the binding of CBM29-2 to different polysaccharides. CBM29 domains display unusual binding properties, exhibiting specificity for both beta-manno- and beta-gluco-configured ligands such as mannan, cellulose, and glucomannan. Mutagenesis reveals that "stacking" of tryptophan residues in the n and n+2 subsites plays a critical role in ligand binding, whereas the loss of tyrosine-mediated stacking in the n+4 subsite reduces, but does not abrogate, polysaccharide recognition. Direct hydrogen bonds to ligand, such as those provided by Arg-112 and Glu-78, play a pivotal role in the interaction with both mannan and cellulose, whereas removal of water-mediated interactions has comparatively little effect on carbohydrate binding. The interactions of CBM29-2 with the O2 of glucose or mannose contribute little to binding affinity, explaining why this CBM displays dual gluco/manno specificity. PMID:15784618

  14. Affinity binding-guided fluorescent nanobiosensor for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors via distance modulation between the fluorophore and metallic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaodong; Hei, Tingting; Cai, Yanan; Gao, Qunqun; Zhang, Qi

    2012-03-20

    The magnitude of fluorescence enhancement was found to depend strongly on the distance between fluorophores and metal nanostructures in metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). However, the precise placement of the particle in front of the molecule with nanometer accuracy and distance control is a great challenge. We describe a method using acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to modulate the distance between a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) and the fluorophore 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one) (DDAO). We found that DDAO is a reversible mixed type-I AChE inhibitor. DDAO binds to the peripheral anionic site and penetrates into the active gorge site of AChE via inhibition kinetics test and molecular docking study. The affinity ligand DDAO bound to AChE which was immobilized onto AuNPs, and its fluorescence was sharply enhanced due to MEF. The fluorescence was reduced by distance variations between the AuNP and DDAO, which resulted from other inhibitors competitively binding with AChE and partly or completely displacing DDAO. Experimental results show that changes in fluorescence intensity are related to the concentration of inhibitors present in the solution. In addition, the nanobiosensor has high sensitivity, with detection limits as low as 0.4 μM for paraoxon and 10 nM for tacrine, and also exhibits different reduction efficiencies for the two types of inhibitor. Thus, instead of an inhibition test, a new type of affinity binding-guided fluorescent nanobiosensor was fabricated to detect AChE inhibitors, determine AChE inhibitor binding mode, and screen more potent AChE inhibitors. The proposed strategy may be applied to other proteins or protein domains via changes in the affinity ligand.

  15. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  16. Multiple mode of binding of phencyclidines: high affinity association between phencyclidine receptors in rat brain and a monovalent ion-sensitive polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Haring, R.; Kloog, Y.; Harshak-Felixbrodt, N.A.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-30

    Two populations of phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites are shown to exist in the rat brain: a high-affinity monovalent ion-sensitive site (Kd of 10-14 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP, (/sup 3/H)N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine), which exists in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, and a lower affinity site (Kd of 80-130 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP) which is found in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The nature of the interactions between the ion-binding sites and the high affinity PCP receptors depend on both ligand structure (PCP or TCP) and the ion involved (K or Na). The high-affinity sites are associated with an Mr 90,000 polypeptide whose labeling by (/sup 3/H)azido phencyclidine is selectively inhibited by monovalent ions.

  17. Competition effects in cation binding to humic acid: Conditional affinity spectra for fixed total metal concentration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Calin; Mongin, Sandrine; Rey-Castro, Carlos; Galceran, Josep; Companys, Encarnació; Garcés, José Luis; Salvador, José; Puy, Jaume; Cecilia, Joan; Lodeiro, Pablo; Mas, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    Information on the Pb and Cd binding to a purified Aldrich humic acid (HA) is obtained from the influence of different fixed total metal concentrations on the acid-base titrations of this ligand. NICA (Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption) isotherm has been used for a global quantitative description of the binding, which has then been interpreted by plotting the Conditional Affinity Spectra of the H + binding at fixed total metal concentrations (CAScTM). This new physicochemical tool, here introduced, allows the interpretation of binding results in terms of distributions of proton binding energies. A large increase in the acidity of the phenolic sites as the total metal concentration increases, especially in presence of Pb, is revealed from the shift of the CAScTM towards lower affinities. The variance of the CAScTM distribution, which can be used as a direct measure of the heterogeneity, also shows a significant dependence on the total metal concentration. A discussion of the factors that influence the heterogeneity of the HA under the conditions of each experiment is provided, so that the smoothed pattern exhibited by the titration curves can be justified.

  18. Organic solvents identify specific ligand binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G

    1997-03-01

    Enzymes frequently recognize substrates and pharmaceutical drugs through specific binding interactions in deep pockets on the protein surface. We show how the specificity-determining substrate binding site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) can be readily identified in aqueous solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using small organic solvent molecules as detection probes. Exchange of magnetization between the 1H nuclei of the protein and the ligands through dipole-dipole interactions is observed which allows the modeling of their position and orientation at the binding site. Combined with site-specific binding constants measured by titration experiments with different organic solvents, the method can provide important information for rational drug design. In addition, the lifetime of nonspecific interactions of HEWL with organic solvents is shown to be in the sub-nanosecond time range. PMID:9062927

  19. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes.

  20. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  1. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; et al

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  2. An energetically beneficial leader-linker interaction abolishes ligand-binding cooperativity in glycine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eileen M; Esquiaqui, Jackie; Elsayed, Galal; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2012-03-01

    Comprised of two aptamers connected by a short nucleotide linker, the glycine riboswitch was the first example of naturally occurring RNA elements reported to bind small organic molecules cooperatively. Earlier works have shown binding of glycine to the second aptamer allows tertiary interactions to be made between the two aptamers, which facilitates binding of a separate glycine molecule to the first aptamer, leading to glycine-binding cooperativity. Prompted by a distinctive protection pattern in the linker region of a minimal glycine riboswitch construct, we have identified a highly conserved (>90%) leader-linker duplex involving leader nucleotides upstream of the previously reported consensus glycine riboswitch sequences. In >50% of the glycine riboswitches, the leader-linker interaction forms a kink-turn motif. Characterization of three glycine ribsowitches showed that the leader-linker interaction improved the glycine-binding affinities by 4.5- to 86-fold. In-line probing and native gel assays with two aptamers in trans suggested synergistic action between glycine-binding and interaptamer interaction during global folding of the glycine riboswitch. Mutational analysis showed that there appeared to be no ligand-binding cooperativity in the glycine riboswitch when the leader-linker interaction is present, and the previously measured cooperativity is simply an artifact of a truncated construct missing the leader sequence.

  3. PSCDB: a database for protein structural change upon ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Takayuki; Koike, Ryotaro; Kidera, Akinori; Ota, Motonori

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are flexible molecules that undergo structural changes to function. The Protein Data Bank contains multiple entries for identical proteins determined under different conditions, e.g. with and without a ligand molecule, which provides important information for understanding the structural changes related to protein functions. We gathered 839 protein structural pairs of ligand-free and ligand-bound states from monomeric or homo-dimeric proteins, and constructed the Protein Structural Change DataBase (PSCDB). In the database, we focused on whether the motions were coupled with ligand binding. As a result, the protein structural changes were classified into seven classes, i.e. coupled domain motion (59 structural changes), independent domain motion (70), coupled local motion (125), independent local motion (135), burying ligand motion (104), no significant motion (311) and other type motion (35). PSCDB provides lists of each class. On each entry page, users can view detailed information about the motion, accompanied by a morphing animation of the structural changes. PSCDB is available at http://idp1.force.cs.is.nagoya-u.ac.jp/pscdb/. PMID:22080505

  4. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  5. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations for protein–ligand binding and inhibitor design☆

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Daniel J.; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase are an important component of treatment against HIV infection. Novel inhibitors are sought that increase potency against variants that contain the Tyr181Cys mutation. Methods Molecular dynamics based free energy perturbation simulations have been run to study factors that contribute to protein–ligand binding, and the results are compared with those from previous Monte Carlo based simulations and activity data. Results Predictions of protein–ligand binding modes are very consistent for the two simulation methods, which are attributed to the use of an enhanced sampling protocol. The Tyr181Cys binding pocket supports large, hydrophobic substituents, which is in good agreement with experiment. Conclusions Although some discrepancies exist between the results of the two simulation methods and experiment, free energy perturbation simulations can be used to rapidly test small molecules for gains in binding affinity. General significance Free energy perturbation methods show promise in providing fast, reliable and accurate data that can be used to complement experiment in lead optimization projects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Recent developments of molecular dynamics”. PMID:25196360

  6. Interaction with membrane lipids and heme ligand binding properties of Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Farina, Anna; Gattoni, Maurizio; Schininà, M Eugenia; Bellelli, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto

    2003-05-20

    Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin has been shown to be able to bind specifically unsaturated and/or cyclopropanated fatty acids with very high affinity. Unsaturated or cyclopropanated fatty acid binding results in a modification of the visible absorption spectrum of the ferric heme, corresponding to a transition from a pentacoordinated (typical of the ligand free protein) to a hexacoordinated, high spin, heme iron. In contrast, no detectable interaction has been observed with saturated fatty acid, saturated phospholipids, linear, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons pointing out that the protein recognizes specifically double bonds in cis conformation within the hydrocarbon chain of the fatty acid molecule. Accordingly, as demonstrated in gel filtration experiments, flavohemoglobin is able to bind liposomes obtained from lipid extracts of E. coli membranes and eventually abstract phospholipids containing cis double bonds and/or cyclopropane rings along the acyl chains. The presence of a protein bound lipid strongly affects the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of imidazole binding to the ferric protein and brings about significant modifications in the reactivity of the ferrous protein with oxygen and carbon monoxide. The effect of the bound lipid has been accounted for by a reaction scheme that involves the presence of two sites for the lipid/ligand recognition, namely, the heme iron and a non-heme site located in a loop region above the heme pocket. PMID:12741837

  7. [Cell-ELA-based determination of binding affinity of DNA aptamer against U87-EGFRvIII cell].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Liang, Huiyu; Wu, Xidong; Gao, Yubo; Zhang, Xingmei

    2013-05-01

    A15, a DNA aptamer with binding specificity for U87 glioma cells stably overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (U87-EGFRvIII), was generated by cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) using a random nucleotide library. Subsequently, we established a cell enzyme-linked assay (cell-ELA) to detect the affinity of A15 compared to an EGFR antibody. We used A15 as a detection probe and cultured U87-EGFRvIII cells as targets. Our data indicate that the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) for A15 were below 100 nmol/L and had similar affinity compared to an EGFR antibody for U87-EGFRvIII. We demonstrated that the cell-ELA was a useful method to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) of aptamers generated by cell-SELEX.

  8. Synthesis and dopamine D2-like receptor binding affinity of substituted 5-phenyl-pyrrole-3-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Pinna, G A; Curzu, M M; Sechi, M; Chelucci, G; Maciocco, E

    1999-08-30

    A series of 5-p-substituted phenyl-pyrrole-3-carboxamide derivatives was designed as hybrid analogs of the dopamine D2-like 5-phenyl-pyrrole and heterocyclic carboxamide antipsychotics. The title compounds were synthesized and evaluated for dopamine D2-like receptor by means of [3H]YM-09151-2 receptor binding assay. The compound bearing a 1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyrrolidine moiety as the basic part of 5-phenyl-pyrrole-3-carboxamide derivative 1a together with its 2-chloro analog 1f were found to possess affinity in the low micromolar range. Substituted phenyl-pyrrolecarboxamides containing groups such as F, Cl, NO2, CH3, at the 4-position of the phenyl ring, gave ligands with lower D2-like affinity.

  9. Recent advances in affinity capillary electrophoresis for binding studies.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; El Deeb, Sami; AlGarabli, Noura; AlAstal, Raghda; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The present review covers recent advances and important applications of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). It provides an overview about various ACE types, including ACE-MS, the multiple injection mode, the use of microchips and field-amplified sample injection-ACE. The most common scenarios of the studied affinity interactions are protein-drug, protein-metal ion, protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-carbohydrate, carbohydrate-drug, peptide-peptide, DNA-drug and antigen-antibody. Approaches for the improvements of ACE in term of precision, rinsing protocols and sensitivity are discussed. The combined use of computer simulation programs to support data evaluation is presented. In conclusion, the performance of ACE is compared with other techniques such as equilibrium dialysis, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, high-performance affinity chromatography as well as surface plasmon resonance, ultraviolet, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, MS and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:25534793

  10. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  11. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.