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Sample records for affinity maturation process

  1. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  2. Co-administration of CpG oligonucleotides enhances the late affinity maturation process of human anti-hepatitis B vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pihlgren, Maria; Tougne, Chantal; Efler, Sue M; Morris, Mary Lou; AlAdhami, Mohammed J; Cameron, D William; Cooper, Curtis L; Heathcote, Jenny; Davis, Heather L; Lambert, Paul-Henri

    2004-12-16

    We assessed the avidity maturation process elicited by human immunization with alum-adsorbed HBsAg alone or with a novel adjuvant containing CpG motifs (CpG 7909). Mean avidity indexes and distribution of low- and high-avidity anti-HBs indicated that avidity maturation essentially takes place late after priming. CpG 7909 markedly enhanced this affinity maturation process, increasing the pool of high-avidity antibodies. The influence of CpG 7909 was antigen-specific, isotype-specific and distinct from the influence on anti-HBs production, as avidity did not correlate with anti-HBs IgG titers. This is the first demonstration that a novel human adjuvant may induce antibodies with higher antigen-binding affinity. PMID:15542181

  3. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  4. Molecular fine-tuning of affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-affinity antibodies in response to infection is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation/somatic hypermutation and antigen-driven selection. These processes occur within specific regions of the secondary lymphoid structures known as germinal centers (GCs) and the environmental and signaling cues provided by these regions guide the GC reactions that drive B cell maturation and antibody production, ultimately determining B cell fate. In this issue of the JCI, Nakagawa and colleagues examine the role of miR-155, a microRNA that is required for GC development and the production of high-affinity antibodies. They show that miR-155 is highly expressed in positively selected B cells and promotes survival of these cells by orienting the Myc transcription program toward survival rather than apoptosis through the inhibition of the transcriptional regulator JARID2. These findings illustrate the fine balance between apoptosis and proliferation that is required for the development of high-affinity antibodies.

  5. Maturation of functional antibody affinity in animals immunised with synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, G; Reid, E; Dimarchi, R D; Gale, C; Doel, T R

    1992-03-01

    A good correlation exists between specific neutralising antibody titre and protection against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in infected or virus-vaccinated cattle, but not in the case of animals immunised with synthetic FMDV peptides. Therefore, mechanisms other than simple neutralisation are likely to be important in vivo. Antibody affinity may influence the protective capacity of sera from immunised animals and experiments were carried out to measure the functional affinity for synthetic FMDV peptide of sera from guinea pigs and cattle given various synthetic vaccines. In guinea pigs given a single dose of synthetic vaccine, antibody affinity increased with time after immunisation. In cattle, however, administration of a second dose of peptide 21 days after the first markedly retarded the process of affinity maturation. For guinea pig sera of equivalent neutralising activity, those of higher functional affinity had higher protective indices than those of lower functional affinity. Knowledge of the importance of antibody affinity in protection against FMD is important for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of protection and for the design of novel vaccines. PMID:1316628

  6. In Vitro Evolution and Affinity-Maturation with Coliphage Qβ Display

    PubMed Central

    Skamel, Claudia; Aller, Stephen G.; Bopda Waffo, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriophage, Qβ (Coliphage Qβ), offers a favorable alternative to M13 for in vitro evolution of displayed peptides and proteins due to high mutagenesis rates in Qβ RNA replication that better simulate the affinity maturation processes of the immune response. We describe a benchtop in vitro evolution system using Qβ display of the VP1 G-H loop peptide of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). DNA encoding the G-H loop was fused to the A1 minor coat protein of Qβ resulting in a replication-competent hybrid phage that efficiently displayed the FMDV peptide. The surface-localized FMDV VP1 G-H loop cross-reacted with the anti-FMDV monoclonal antibody (mAb) SD6 and was found to decorate the corners of the Qβ icosahedral shell by electron microscopy. Evolution of Qβ-displayed peptides, starting from fully degenerate coding sequences corresponding to the immunodominant region of VP1, allowed rapid in vitro affinity maturation to SD6 mAb. Qβ selected under evolutionary pressure revealed a non-canonical, but essential epitope for mAb SD6 recognition consisting of an Arg-Gly tandem pair. Finally, the selected hybrid phages induced polyclonal antibodies in guinea pigs with good affinity to both FMDV and hybrid Qβ-G-H loop, validating the requirement of the tandem pair epitope. Qβ-display emerges as a novel framework for rapid in vitro evolution with affinity-maturation to molecular targets. PMID:25393763

  7. Autoimmunity and antibody affinity maturation are modulated by genetic variants on mouse chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Collin, Roxanne; Dugas, Véronique; Chabot-Roy, Geneviève; Salem, David; Zahn, Astrid; Di Noia, Javier M; Rauch, Joyce; Lesage, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases result from a break in immune tolerance leading to an attack on self-antigens. Autoantibody levels serve as a predictive tool for the early diagnosis of many autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. We find that a genetic locus on mouse chromosome 12 influences the affinity maturation of antibodies as well as autoantibody production. Thus, we generated a NOD.H2(k) congenic strain bearing B10 alleles at the locus comprised within the D12Mit184 and D12Mit12 markers, which we named NOD.H2(k)-Chr12. We determined the biological relevance of the Chr12 locus on the autoimmune process using an antigen-specific TCR transgenic autoimmune mouse model. Specifically, the 3A9 TCR transgene, which recognizes a peptide from hen egg lysozyme (HEL) in the context of I-A(k), and the HEL transgene, which is expressed under the rat-insulin promoter (iHEL), were bred into the NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 congenic strain. In the resulting 3A9 TCR:iHEL NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 mice, we observed a significant decrease in diabetes incidence as well as a decrease in both the quantity and affinity of HEL-specific IgG autoantibodies relative to 3A9 TCR:iHEL NOD.H2(k) mice. Notably, the decrease in autoantibodies due to the Chr12 locus was not restricted to the TCR transgenic model, as it was also observed in the non-transgenic NOD.H2(k) setting. Of importance, antibody affinity maturation upon immunization and re-challenge was also impeded in NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 congenic mice relative to NOD.H2(k) mice. Together, these results demonstrate that a genetic variant(s) present within the Chr12 locus plays a global role in modulating antibody affinity maturation.

  8. Tailored Immunogens Direct Affinity Maturation toward HIV Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Skog, Patrick; Menis, Sergey; Jacak, Ronald; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; de Val, Natalia; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Le, Khoa M; Ramos, Alejandra; Jones, Meaghan; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Blane, Tanya R; Spencer, Skye; Georgeson, Erik; Hu, Xiaozhen; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Sarkar, Anita; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Nemazee, David; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R

    2016-09-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a primary goal of HIV vaccine development. VRC01-class bnAbs are important vaccine leads because their precursor B cells targeted by an engineered priming immunogen are relatively common among humans. This priming immunogen has demonstrated the ability to initiate a bnAb response in animal models, but recall and maturation toward bnAb development has not been shown. Here, we report the development of boosting immunogens designed to guide the genetic and functional maturation of previously primed VRC01-class precursors. Boosting a transgenic mouse model expressing germline VRC01 heavy chains produced broad neutralization of near-native isolates (N276A) and weak neutralization of fully native HIV. Functional and genetic characteristics indicate that the boosted mAbs are consistent with partially mature VRC01-class antibodies and place them on a maturation trajectory that leads toward mature VRC01-class bnAbs. The results show how reductionist sequential immunization can guide maturation of HIV bnAb responses.

  9. Tailored Immunogens Direct Affinity Maturation toward HIV Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Skog, Patrick; Menis, Sergey; Jacak, Ronald; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; de Val, Natalia; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Le, Khoa M; Ramos, Alejandra; Jones, Meaghan; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Blane, Tanya R; Spencer, Skye; Georgeson, Erik; Hu, Xiaozhen; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Sarkar, Anita; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Nemazee, David; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R

    2016-09-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a primary goal of HIV vaccine development. VRC01-class bnAbs are important vaccine leads because their precursor B cells targeted by an engineered priming immunogen are relatively common among humans. This priming immunogen has demonstrated the ability to initiate a bnAb response in animal models, but recall and maturation toward bnAb development has not been shown. Here, we report the development of boosting immunogens designed to guide the genetic and functional maturation of previously primed VRC01-class precursors. Boosting a transgenic mouse model expressing germline VRC01 heavy chains produced broad neutralization of near-native isolates (N276A) and weak neutralization of fully native HIV. Functional and genetic characteristics indicate that the boosted mAbs are consistent with partially mature VRC01-class antibodies and place them on a maturation trajectory that leads toward mature VRC01-class bnAbs. The results show how reductionist sequential immunization can guide maturation of HIV bnAb responses. PMID:27610570

  10. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  11. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  12. An affinity matured minibody for PET imaging of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Zhou, Yu; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; McCabe, Katelyn E.; Hahm, Scott; Marks, James D.; Reiter, Robert E.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a cell surface glycoprotein expressed in normal human prostate and bladder, is over-expressed in the majority of localized prostate cancer and most bone metastases. We have previously shown that the hu1G8 minibody, a humanized anti-PSCA antibody fragment (single-chain Fv-CH3 dimer, 80 kDa), can localize specifically and image PSCA-expressing xenografts at 21 h post-injection. However, the humanization and antibody fragment reformatting decreased its apparent affinity. Here, we sought to evaluate PET imaging contrast with affinity matured minibodies. Methods Yeast scFv display, involving four rounds of selection, was used to generate the three affinity matured antibody fragments (A2, A11, and C5) that were reformatted into minibodies. These three affinity matured anti-PSCA minibodies were characterized in vitro, and following radiolabeling with 124I were evaluated in vivo for microPET imaging of PSCA-expressing tumors. Results The A2, A11, and C5 minibody variants all demonstrated improved affinity compared to the parental (P) minibody and were ranked as follows: A2 > A11 > C5 > P. The 124I-labeled A11 minibody demonstrated higher immunoreactivity than the parental minibody and also achieved the best microPET imaging contrast in two xenograft models, LAPC-9 (prostate cancer) and Capan-1 (pancreatic cancer), when evaluated in vivo. Conclusion Of the affinity variant minibodies tested, the A11 minibody that ranked second in affinity was selected as the best immunoPET tracer to image PSCA-expressing xenografts. This candidate is currently under development for evaluation in a pilot clinical imaging study. PMID:20354850

  13. Generating new ligand-binding RNAs by affinity maturation and disintegration of allosteric ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, G A; DeRose, E C; Koizumi, M; Breaker, R R

    2001-01-01

    Allosteric ribozymes are engineered RNAs that operate as molecular switches whose rates of catalytic activity are modulated by the binding of specific effector molecules. New RNA molecular switches can be created by using "allosteric selection," a molecular engineering process that combines modular rational design and in vitro evolution strategies. In this report, we describe the characterization of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP)-dependent hammerhead ribozymes that were created using allosteric selection (Koizumi et al., Nat Struct Biol, 1999, 6:1062-1071). Artificial phylogeny data generated by random mutagenesis and reselection of existing cGMP-, cCMP-, and cAMP-dependent ribozymes indicate that each is comprised of distinct effector-binding and catalytic domains. In addition, patterns of nucleotide covariation and direct mutational analysis both support distinct secondary-structure organizations for the effector-binding domains. Guided by these structural models, we were able to disintegrate each allosteric ribozyme into separate ligand-binding and catalytic modules. Examinations of the independent effector-binding domains reveal that each retains its corresponding cNMP-binding function. These results validate the use of allosteric selection and modular engineering as a means of simultaneously generating new nucleic acid structures that selectively bind ligands. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the binding affinity of an allosteric ribozyme can be improved through random mutagenesis and allosteric selection under conditions that favor tighter binding. This "affinity maturation" effect is expected to be a valuable attribute of allosteric selection as future endeavors seek to apply engineered allosteric ribozymes as biosensor components and as controllable genetic switches. PMID:11345431

  14. CD4+ T Cells Promote Antibody Production but Not Sustained Affinity Maturation during Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Rebecca A.; Hastey, Christine J.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial for enhancing B cell-mediated immunity, supporting the induction of high-affinity, class-switched antibody responses, long-lived plasma cells, and memory B cells. Previous studies showed that the immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi appears to lack robust T-dependent B cell responses, as neither long-lived plasma cells nor memory B cells form for months after infection, and nonswitched IgM antibodies are produced continuously during this chronic disease. These data prompted us to evaluate the induction and functionality of B. burgdorferi infection-induced CD4 TFH cells. We report that CD4 T cells were effectively primed and TFH cells induced after B. burgdorferi infection. These CD4 T cells contributed to the control of B. burgdorferi burden and supported the induction of B. burgdorferi-specific IgG responses. However, while affinity maturation of antibodies against a prototypic T-dependent B. burgdorferi protein, Arthritis-related protein (Arp), were initiated, these increases were reversed later, coinciding with the previously observed involution of germinal centers. The cessation of affinity maturation was not due to the appearance of inhibitory or exhausted CD4 T cells or a strong induction of regulatory T cells. In vitro T-B cocultures demonstrated that T cells isolated from B. burgdorferi-infected but not B. burgdorferi-immunized mice supported the rapid differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells rather than continued proliferation, mirroring the induction of rapid short-lived instead of long-lived T-dependent antibody responses in vivo. The data further suggest that B. burgdorferi infection drives the humoral response away from protective, high-affinity, and long-lived antibody responses and toward the rapid induction of strongly induced, short-lived antibodies of limited efficacy. PMID:25312948

  15. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  16. Guiding the evolution to catch the virus: An in silico study of affinity maturation against rapidly mutating antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Burton, Dennis; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    2014-03-01

    The immune system comprises an intricate and evolving collection of cells and molecules that enables a defense against pathogenic agents. Its workings present a rich source of physical problems that impact human health. One intriguing example is the process of affinity maturation (AM) through which an antibody (Ab)--a component of the host immune system--evolves to more efficiently bind an antigen (Ag)--a unique part of a foreign pathogen such as a virus. Sufficiently strong binding to the Ag enables recognition and neutralization. A major challenge is to contain a diversifying mixture of Ag variants, that arise in natural infection, from evading Ab neutralization. This entails a thorough understanding of AM against multiple Ag species and mutating Ag. During AM, Ab-encoding cells undergo cycles of mutation and selection, a process reminiscent of Darwinian evolution yet occurring in real time. We first cast affinity-dependent selection into an extreme value problem and show how the binding characteristics scale with Ag diversity. We then develop an agent-based residue-resolved computational model of AM which allows us to track the evolutionary trajectories of individual cells. This dynamic model not only reveals significant stochastic effects associated with the relatively small and highly dynamic population size, it also uncovers the markedly distinct maturation outcomes if designed Ag variants are presented in different temporal procedures. Insights thus obtained would guide rational design of vaccination protocols.

  17. Germline variable region gene segment derivation of human monoclonal anti-Rh(D) antibodies. Evidence for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation and repertoire shift.

    PubMed Central

    Bye, J M; Carter, C; Cui, Y; Gorick, B D; Songsivilai, S; Winter, G; Hughes-Jones, N C; Marks, J D

    1992-01-01

    To date, there has been no systematic study of the process of affinity maturation of human antibodies. We therefore sequenced the variable region genes (V genes) of 14 human monoclonal antibodies specific for the erythrocyte Rh(D) alloantigen and determined the germline gene segments of origin and extent of somatic hypermutation. These data were correlated with determinations of antibody affinity. The four IgM antibodies (low affinity) appear to be derived from two germline heavy chain variable region gene segments and one or two germline light chain variable region gene segments and were not extensively mutated. The 10 IgG antibodies (higher affinity) appear to be derived from somatic hypermutation of these V gene segments and by use of new V gene segments or V gene segment combinations (repertoire shift). Affinity generally increased with increasing somatic hypermutation; on average, there were 8.9 point mutations in the V gene segments of the four IgM antibodies (Ka = 1-4 x 10(7)/M-1) compared with 19 point mutations in the V gene segments of the 10 IgG antibodies. The four highest affinity antibodies (Ka = 0.9-3 x 10(9)/M-1) averaged 25.5 point mutations. The use of repertoire shift and somatic hypermutation in affinity maturation of human alloantibodies is similar to data obtained in inbred mice immunized with haptens. PMID:1469099

  18. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  19. Immune complex relay by subcapsular sinus macrophages and non-cognate B cells drives antibody affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tri Giang; Green, Jesse A.; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Xu, Ying; Cyster, Jason G.

    2009-01-01

    Subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophages capture antigens from lymph and present them intact for B cell encounter and follicular delivery. However, the properties of SCS macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show SCS macrophage development depended on lymphotoxin-α1β2 and the cells had low lysosomal enzyme expression and retained opsonized antigens on their surface. Intravital imaging revealed immune complexes moving along macrophage processes into the follicle. Moreover, non-cognate B cells relayed antigen opsonized by newly produced antibodies from the subcapsular sinus to the germinal center and affinity maturation was impaired when this transport process was disrupted. Thus, we characterize SCS macrophages as specialized antigen-presenting cells functioning at the apex of an antigen transport chain that promotes humoral immunity. PMID:19503106

  20. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans.

    PubMed

    Garces, Fernando; Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; de la Pena, Alba Torrents; Kong, Leopold; Puchades, Cristina; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Burton, Dennis R; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-12-15

    The high-mannose patch on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein is the epicenter for binding of the potent broadly neutralizing PGT121 family of antibodies, but strategies for generating such antibodies by vaccination have not been defined. We generated structures of inferred antibody intermediates by X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to elucidate the molecular events that occurred during evolution of this family. Binding analyses revealed that affinity maturation was primarily focused on avoiding, accommodating, or binding the N137 glycan. The overall antibody approach angle to Env was defined very early in the maturation process, yet some variation evolved in the PGT121 family branches that led to differences in glycan specificities in their respective epitopes. Furthermore, we determined a crystal structure of the recombinant BG505 SOSIP.664 HIV-1 trimer with a PGT121 family member at 3.0 Å that, in concert with these antibody intermediate structures, provides insights to advance design of HIV vaccine candidates. PMID:26682982

  1. Development of an affinity-matured humanized anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takeshi; Maru, Takamitsu; Tahara, Kazuhiro; Sanada, Hideaki; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi

    2013-02-01

    We showed previously that humanization of 528, a murine anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, causes reduced affinity for its target. Here, to improve the affinity of the humanized antibody for use in cancer immunotherapy, we constructed phage display libraries focused on the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of the antibody and carried out affinity selection. Two-step selections using libraries constructed in a stepwise manner enabled a 32-fold affinity enhancement of humanized 528 (h528). Thermodynamic analysis of the interactions between the variable domain fragment of h528 (h528Fv) mutants and the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR indicated that the h528Fv mutants obtained from the first selection showed a large increase in negative enthalpy change due to binding, resulting in affinity enhancement. Furthermore, mutants from the second selection showed a decrease in entropy loss, which led to further affinity maturation. These results suggest that a single mutation in the heavy chain variable domain (i.e. Tyr(52) to Trp) enthalpically contributed for overcoming the energetic barrier to the antigen-antibody interaction, which was a major hurdle for the in vitro affinity maturation of h528. We reported previously that the humanized bispecific diabody hEx3 Db, which targets EGFR and CD3, shows strong anti-tumor activity. hEx3 Db mutants, in which the variable domains of h528 were replaced with those of the affinity-enhanced mutants, were prepared and characterized. In a growth inhibition assay of tumor cells, the hEx3 Db mutants showed stronger anti-tumor activity than that of hEx3 Db, suggesting that affinity enhancement of h528Fv enhances the anti-tumor activity of the bispecific diabody. PMID:23118340

  2. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M.; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5‧ and 3‧ ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling by follicular dendritic cells is pivotal for germinal center onset and affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Garin, Alexandre; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Contie, Mathias; Figge, Marc Thilo; Buatois, Vanessa; Gunzer, Matthias; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H

    2010-07-23

    Germinal centers (GCs) are specialized microenvironments where antigen-activated B cells undergo proliferation, immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination, somatic hypermutation (SHM), and affinity maturation. Within GCs, follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are key players in driving these events via direct interaction with GC B cells. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FDCs express and upregulate Toll-like-receptor (TLR) 4 in situ during germinal center reactions, confirm that their maturation is driven by TLR4, and associate the role of FDC-expressed TLR4 with quantitative and qualitative affects of GC biology. In iterative cycles of predictions by in silico modeling subsequently verified by in vivo experiments, we demonstrated that TLR4 signaling modulates FDC activation, strongly impacting SHM and generation of Ig class-switched high-affinity plasma and memory B cells. Thus, our data place TLR4 in the heart of adaptive humoral immunity, providing further insight into mechanisms driving GCs arising in both health and disease.

  4. Multivalent scaffolds for affinity maturation of small molecule cell surface-binders and their application to prostate tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Valerie; Misra, Preeti; Bhushan, Kumar R.; Nasr, Khaled; Ko, Yao-Sen; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Pannier, Nadine; Frangioni, John V.; Maison, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Adamantane scaffolds for affinity maturation of prostate cancer specific ligands of low molecular mass are described. These scaffolds are modular and can be used for conjugation of up to three ligands and an additional effector molecule by standard peptide coupling techniques. The potential of the scaffolds is demonstrated with the multimerization of GPI 1, a prostate cancer specific small molecule. A detailed study of multimerized GPI conjugates with NIR-fluorophores and their binding properties to different prostate cancer cell lines shows the specific binding of these conjugates to cell types positive for prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA). We demonstrate that these conjugates allow the sensitive imaging of prostate cancer cells with NIR methodology and suggest that our adamantane scaffolds might be generally useful for affinity maturation of small molecules targeting cell surface epitopes. PMID:19108655

  5. Combining somatic mutations present in different in vivo affinity-matured antibodies isolated from immunized Lama glama yields ultra-potent antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Alex; Blanchetot, Christophe; Schragel, Georg; Sadi, Ava S; Ongenae, Nico; Hemrika, Wieger; Wijdenes, John; Spinelli, Silvia; Desmyter, Aline; Cambillau, Christian; Hultberg, Anna; Kretz-Rommel, Anke; Dreier, Torsten; De Haard, Hans J W; Roovers, Rob C

    2016-04-01

    Highly potent human antibodies are required to therapeutically neutralize cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) that is involved in many inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Although a number of mutagenesis approaches exist to perform antibody affinity maturation, these may cause antibody instability and production issues. Thus, a robust and easy antibody affinity maturation strategy to increase antibody potency remains highly desirable. By immunizing llama, cloning the 'immune' antibody repertoire and using phage display, we selected a diverse set of IL-6 antagonistic Fabs. Heavy chain shuffling was performed on the Fab with lowest off-rate, resulting in a panel of variants with even lower off-rate. Structural analysis of the Fab:IL-6 complex suggests that the increased affinity was partly due to a serine to tyrosine switch in HCDR2. This translated into neutralizing capacity in an in vivo model of IL-6 induced SAA production. Finally, a novel Fab library was designed, encoding all variations found in the natural repertoire of VH genes identified after heavy chain shuffling. High stringency selections resulted in identification of a Fab with 250-fold increased potency when re-formatted into IgG1. Compared with a heavily engineered anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently in clinical development, this IgG was at least equally potent, showing the engineering process to have had led to a highly potent anti-IL-6 antibody.

  6. Assessment of banana fruit maturity by image processing technique.

    PubMed

    Surya Prabha, D; Satheesh Kumar, J

    2015-03-01

    Maturity stage of fresh banana fruit is an important factor that affects the fruit quality during ripening and marketability after ripening. The ability to identify maturity of fresh banana fruit will be a great support for farmers to optimize harvesting phase which helps to avoid harvesting either under-matured or over-matured banana. This study attempted to use image processing technique to detect the maturity stage of fresh banana fruit by its color and size value of their images precisely. A total of 120 images comprising 40 images from each stage such as under-mature, mature and over-mature were used for developing algorithm and accuracy prediction. The mean color intensity from histogram; area, perimeter, major axis length and minor axis length from the size values, were extracted from the calibration images. Analysis of variance between each maturity stage on these features indicated that the mean color intensity and area features were more significant in predicting the maturity of banana fruit. Hence, two classifier algorithms namely, mean color intensity algorithm and area algorithm were developed and their accuracy on maturity detection was assessed. The mean color intensity algorithm showed 99.1 % accuracy in classifying the banana fruit maturity. The area algorithm classified the under-mature fruit at 85 % accuracy. Hence the maturity assessment technique proposed in this paper could be used commercially to develop a field based complete automatic detection system to take decision on the right time of harvest by the banana growers. PMID:25745200

  7. Yeast Display-Based Antibody Affinity Maturation Using Detergent-Solubilized Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Benjamin J; Lajoie, Jason M; Shusta, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    It is often desired to identify or engineer antibodies that target membrane proteins (MPs). However, due to their inherent insolubility in aqueous solutions, MPs are often incompatible with in vitro antibody discovery and optimization platforms. Recently, we adapted yeast display technology to accommodate detergent-solubilized cell lysates as sources of MP antigens. The following protocol details the incorporation of cell lysates into a kinetic screen designed to obtain antibodies with improved affinity via slowed dissociation from an MP antigen. PMID:26060070

  8. Yeast display-based antibody affinity maturation using detergent-solubilized cell lysates

    PubMed Central

    Tillotson, Benjamin J.; Lajoie, Jason M.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary It is often desired to identify or engineer antibodies that target membrane proteins (MPs). However, due to their inherent insolubility in aqueous solutions, MPs are often incompatible with in vitro antibody discovery and optimization platforms. Recently, we adapted yeast display technology to accommodate detergent-solubilized cell lysates as sources of MP antigens. The following protocol details the incorporation of cell lysates into a kinetic screen designed to obtain antibodies with improved affinity via slowed dissociation from an MP antigen. PMID:26060070

  9. Affinity maturation of immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies during development of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, A; Ankelo, M; Simell, S; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Simell, O; Hinkkanen, A E

    2007-05-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of wheat gluten and related cereals in genetically predisposed individuals. Circulating immunoglobulin A (IgA) class autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGA) are highly specific and sensitive serological markers for CD, which is ultimately confirmed by duodenal biopsy. Although CD is considered a life-long disorder, transient or fluctuating IgA-TGA seropositivity has been observed in asymptomatic individuals on a gluten-containing diet. We set out to explore possible differences in the maturation of IgA-TGA avidity between individuals progressing to CD and subjects remaining healthy despite occasional expression of autoantibodies. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric IgA-TGA assay based on human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and further modified the method to also measure urea-dependent avidity of the autoantibodies. We measured the autoantibody titres and avidities of sequential serum samples from 10 children developing CD and 10 children presenting transient or fluctuating autoantibodies. Both the initial titres at seroconversion and peak values of transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA were significantly lower than corresponding autoantibody titres in samples drawn from individuals with progressing CD (P = 0.004 and P = 0.0002, respectively). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the initial or peak avidity index values between the two groups of children. The avidity index values increased during the follow-up period (P = 0.013 for both groups) with no significant difference in the rate of avidity maturation between children with transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA and children developing CD. According to our results, high autoantibody titres have a higher predictive value than avidity maturation of TGA-IgA in screening for CD.

  10. Affinity maturation of T-cell receptor-like antibodies for Wilms tumor 1 peptide greatly enhances therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Hasan, Aisha; Kuo, Tzu-Yun; Guo, Hong-fen; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    WT1126 (RMFPNAPYL) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) restricted peptide derived from Wilms tumor protein (WT1), which is widely expressed in a broad spectrum of leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. A novel T-cell-receptor (TCR)-like single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody specific for the T cell epitope consisting of the WT1/HLA-A2 complex was isolated from a human scFv phage library. This scFv was affinity-matured by mutagenesis combined with yeast display, and structurally analyzed using a homology model. This monovalent scFv showed a 100-fold affinity improvement (dissociation constant [KD]= 3nM) and exquisite specificity towards its targeted epitope or HLA-A2+/WT1+ tumor cells. Bivalent scFv-huIgG1-Fc fusion protein demonstrated an even higher avidity (KD = 2pM) binding to the T cell epitope and to tumor targets, and was capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or tumor lysis by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing human T or NK-92-MI transfected cells. This antibody demonstrated specific and potent cytotoxicity in vivo towards WT1-positive leukemia xenograft that was HLA-A2 restricted. In summary, T cell epitopes can provide novel targets for antibody-based therapeutics. By combining phage and yeast displays and scFv-Fc fusion platforms, a strategy for developing high affinity TCR-like antibodies could be rapidly explored for potential clinical development. PMID:25987253

  11. Determination of animal skeletal maturity by image processing.

    PubMed

    Hatem, I; Tan, J; Gerrard, D E

    2003-11-01

    Color image features were computed to characterize the skeletal maturity of beef carcasses based on cartilage ossification in the thoracic vertebrae. A trained neural network was tested for predicting USDA beef maturity grades from image features of ossification. A feature curve was defined to characterize the color variations of an isolated cartilage-bone object. Both RGB and HSL color systems were used to derive image features. The maturity grades were assigned by an official USDA grader. Two sets of samples were obtained from two different meat-processing plants. The first set contained samples of only A and B maturity grades whereas the second set had all five maturity classifications (A through E). The hue value was the most useful color feature. The mean hue values of cartilage differed (P<0.05) among the maturity grades and the feature curve based on the hue value was used as neural network input for maturity prediction. The accuracy of prediction was 75% for the first set of samples and 65.9% for the second set of samples. The results data show the potential of computer vision techniques for beef maturity assessment.

  12. Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for Software Process Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Robert Y.

    2000-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Avionic Systems Division's implementation of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for improvements in the software development process. The presentation reviews the process involved in implementing the model and the benefits of using CMM to improve the software development process.

  13. Affinity maturation of lymphocyte receptors and positive selection of T cells in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Steele, E J; Rothenfluh, H S; Ada, G L; Blanden, R V

    1993-10-01

    In this review we have re-evaluated the dominant paradigm that TcR V genes do not somatically mutate. We highlight the many structural and functional similarities between Ig and TcR antigen-specific receptors on B and T cells. We have reviewed the factors influencing the somatic and germline evolution of IgV regions in B cells, have evaluated in detail various models which could be invoked to explain the pattern of variation in both transcribed and non-transcribed segments of germline IgV-gene DNA sequences, and applied this perspective to the TcR V beta and V alpha genes. Whilst specific TcRs recognize a complex of a short antigenic peptide bound to MHC Class I or II glycoprotein, and Ig receptors can recognize both oligopeptides and conformational determinants on undegraded polypeptides, they both employ heterodimer variable regions (Fabs) utilizing all three CDRs in epitope binding. We conclude that a plausible case can be made for the possibility that rearranged TcR V genes may undergo some type of somatic hypermutation process during T-cell development in the thymus (concurrent with or after the positive selection phase) thus allowing a repertoire of TvR alpha beta heterodimers to be both positively and negatively selected by the same set of ligands (self MHC + self peptide) in the thymus.

  14. Affinity Maturation of Monoclonal Antibody 1E11 by Targeted Randomization in CDR3 Regions Optimizes Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of HER2-Positive Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Choi, Soyoung; Cui, Lei Guang; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HER2 murine monoclonal antibody 1E11 has strong and synergistic anti-tumor activity in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells when used in combination with trastuzumab. We presently optimized this antibody for human therapeutics. First, the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the murine antibody were grafted onto human germline immunoglobulin variable genes. No difference in affinity and biological activity was observed between chimeric 1E11 (ch1E11) and humanized 1E11 (hz1E11). Next, affinity maturation of hz1E11 was performed by the randomization of CDR-L3 and H3 residues followed by stringent biopanning selection. Milder selection pressure favored the selection of more diverse clones, whereas higher selection stringency resulted in the convergence of the panning output to a smaller number of clones with improved affinity. Clone 1A12 had four amino acid substitutions in CDR-L3, and showed a 10-fold increase in affinity compared to the parental clone and increased potency in an in vitro anti-proliferative activity assay with HER2-overepxressing gastric cancer cells. Clone 1A12 inhibited tumor growth of NCI-N87 xenograft model with similar efficacy to trastuzumab alone, and the combination treatment of 1A12 and trastuzumab completely removed the established tumors. These results suggest that humanized and affinity matured monoclonal antibody 1A12 is a highly optimized molecule for future therapeutic development against HER2-positive tumors.

  15. Maturation of Cognitive Processes From Late Childhood to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna,Beatriz; Garver,Krista E.; Urban,Trinity A.; Lazar,Nicole A.; Sweeney,John A.

    2004-01-01

    To characterize cognitive maturation through adolescence, processing speed, voluntary response suppression, and spatial working memory were measured in 8- to 30-year-old (N=245) healthy participants using oculomotor tasks. Development progressed with a steep initial improvement in performance followed by stabilization in adolescence. Adult-level…

  16. Affinity and its derivatives in the glass transition process.

    PubMed

    Garden, J-L; Guillou, H; Richard, J; Wondraczek, L

    2012-07-14

    The thermodynamic treatment of the glass transition remains an issue of intense debate. When associated with the formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the lattice-hole theory of liquids can provide new insight in this direction, as has been shown by Schmelzer and Gutzow [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 184511 (2006)], by Möller et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094505 (2006)], and more recently by Tropin et al. [J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 1291 (2011); ibid. 357, 1303 (2011)]. Here, we employ a similar approach. We include pressure as an additional variable, in order to account for the freezing-in of structural degrees of freedom upon pressure increase. Second, we demonstrate that important terms concerning first order derivatives of the affinity-driving-force with respect to temperature and pressure have been previously neglected. We show that these are of crucial importance in the approach. Macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics is used to enlighten these contributions in the derivation of C(p),κ(T), and α(p). The coefficients are calculated as a function of pressure and temperature following different theoretical protocols, revealing classical aspects of vitrification and structural recovery processes. Finally, we demonstrate that a simple minimalist model such as the lattice-hole theory of liquids, when being associated with rigorous use of macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics, is able to account for the primary features of the glass transition phenomenology. Notwithstanding its simplicity and its limits, this approach can be used as a very pedagogical tool to provide a physical understanding on the underlying thermodynamics which governs the glass transition process. PMID:22803545

  17. [Degradation of cyanide and maturity in cassava processing wastes composting].

    PubMed

    Lü, Yu-Cai; Wang, Xiao-Fen; Zhu, Wan-Bin; Cheng, Xu; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2009-05-15

    An investigation was carried out to approach the degradation of cyanide and maturity during the cassava processing wastes composting process. Mixtures of cassava hull, cassava residues and pig manure were used in the experiment. Parameters like temperature, pH, cyanide, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and C/N ratio were assessed during the composting process, the effect of composting process on the degradation of cyanide and maturity were evaluated. The results reveal that the content of cyanide decreases sharply and declines to 2.08 mg/kg (30 days of composting), the degradation rate of cyanide is 94.16% and is in accord with food safety standard. After 15 days of the composting process, degradation of composting materials containing carbon (starch, cellulose, hemicellulose) and cyanide are quick and the degradation rates of them are more than 80%, properties tend towards stability basically. During 30 days of the composting process, the composting temperature drops to normal temperature and tends to stability, pH remains stable at 7.2. Parameters like C/N ratio, nitrate-nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) as maturity evaluation index were measured, and the results indicate that physical and chemical properties keep stability after 15 days of cassava processing wastes composting process. At the end of fermentation, C/N ratio is 17.55, the content of nitrate-nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen reach 2.5g/kg and 10 mg/kg respectively, NO3(-)-N/NH4(+)-N ratio is 250. The changes of these above mentioned parameters meet with maturity evaluation standard. Proving that cassava processing wastes during 30 days of composting treatment can achieve stability and security state.

  18. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  19. The maturation of incentive processing and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Charles; Luna, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how immaturities in the reward system affect decision-making can inform us on adolescent vulnerabilities to risk-taking, which is a primary contributor to mortality and substance abuse in this age group. In this paper, we review the literature characterizing the neurodevelopment of reward and cognitive control and propose a model for adolescent reward processing. While the functional neuroanatomy of the mature reward system has been well-delineated, adolescent reward processing is just beginning to be understood. Results indicate that adolescents relative to adults demonstrate decreased anticipatory processing and assessment of risk, but an increased consummatory response. Such differences could result in suboptimal representations of reward valence and value and bias adolescent decision-making. These functional differences in reward processing occur in parallel with on-going structural and pharmacological maturation in the adolescent brain. In addition to limitations in incentive processing, basic cognitive control abilities, including working memory and inhibitory control, continue to mature during adolescence. Consequently, adolescents may be limited, relative to adults, in their abilities to inhibit impulsive behaviors and reliably hold ‘on-line’ comparisons of potential rewards/punishments during decision-making. PMID:19593842

  20. Process maturity progress at Motorola Cellular Systems Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgstahl, Ron; Criscione, Mark; Dobson, Kim; Willey, Allan

    1994-01-01

    We believe that the key success elements are related to our recognition that Software Process Improvement (SPI) can and should be organized, planned, managed, and measured as if it were a project to develop a new process, analogous to a software product. We believe that our process improvements have come as the result of these key elements: use of a rigorous, detailed requirements set (Capability Maturity Model, CMM); use of a robust, yet flexible architecture (IEEE 1074); use of a SPI project, resourced and managed like other work, to produce the specifications and implement them; and development of both internal and external goals, with metrics to support them.

  1. Humanized Affinity-matured Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Has Potent Antitumor Activity and Binds to FG Loop of Tumor Antigen B7-H3.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Goldgur, Yehuda; Cheal, Sarah M; Guo, Hong-fen; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-kong V

    2015-12-11

    B7-H3 (CD276) is both an inhibitory ligand for natural killer cells and T cells and a tumor antigen that is widely expressed among human solid tumors. Anti-B7-H3 mouse monoclonal antibody 8H9 has been successfully used for radioimmunotherapy for patients with B7-H3(+) tumors. We present the humanization, affinity maturation, and epitope mapping of 8H9 based on structure determination, modeling, and yeast display methods. The crystal structure of ch8H9 Fab fragment was solved to 2.5-Å resolution and used as a template for humanization. By displaying the humanized 8H9 single chain Fv (scFv) on the surface of yeast, the affinity was matured by sequential random mutagenesis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Six mutations (three in the complementarity-determining region and three in the framework regions) were identified and incorporated into an affinity-matured humanized 8H9 construct (hu8H9-6m) and an affinity-matured chimeric 8H9 construct (ch8H9-6m). The hu8H9-6m scFv had a 160-fold improvement in affinity (0.9 nm KD) compared with parental hu8H9 scFv (144 nm KD). The IgG formats of ch8H9-6m and hu8H9-6m (nanomolar to subnanomolar KD) had 2-9-fold enhancements in affinity compared with their parental forms, potent in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (0.1-0.3 μg/ml EC50), and high tumor uptake in mouse xenografts. Based on in silico docking studies and experimental validation, the molecular epitope of 8H9 was determined to be dependent on the FG loop of B7-H3, a region critical to its function in immunologic blockade and unique among anti-B7-H3 antibodies published to date. PMID:26487718

  2. High-Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-Elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-05-01

    Because of the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing Abs to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited Ab responses, we used single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques after five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third CDR of Ig H chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in Ab sequences isolated at the late immunization time point compared with the early time point. Abs with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of Ag affinity selection in Ab maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high-resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response after Env immunization in primates. PMID:27001953

  3. Technology maturation process: the NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Mario R.; Pham, Bruce T.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2014-08-01

    In 2009 the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters established the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) solicitation as a new technology maturation program to fill the needed gap for mid-Technology Readiness Level (TRL) levels (3≤ TRL <6). In three full proposal selection cycles since the inception of this program, more than 40 investigations have been selected, many meritorious milestones have been met and advances have been achieved. In this paper, we review the process of establishing technology priorities, the management of technology advancements and milestones, and the incipient success of some of these investigations in light of the need of future space missions.

  4. Generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a human anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody with dual antagonistic and agonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ka Yin; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Zhang, Hua; Mackall, Crystal L.; Rader, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Summary In humans, NKG2D is an activating receptor on NK cells and a costimulatory receptor on certain T cells and plays a central role in mediating immune responses in autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and cancer. Monoclonal antibodies that antagonize or agonize immune responses mediated by human NKG2D are considered to be of broad and potent therapeutic utility. Nonetheless, monoclonal antibodies to NKG2D that are suitable for clinical investigations have not been published yet. Here we describe the generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a fully human monoclonal antibody to human NKG2D. Using phage display technology based on a newly generated naïve human Fab library in phage display vector pC3C followed by a tandem chain shuffling process designed for minimal deviation from natural human antibody sequences, we selected a human Fab, designated KYK-2.0, with high specificity and affinity to human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 Fab blocked the binding of the natural human NKG2D ligands MICA, MICB, and ULBP2 as potently as a commercially available mouse anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody in IgG format. Conversion of KYK-2.0 Fab to IgG1 resulted in subnanomolar avidity for human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to selectively recognize defined subpopulations of human lymphocytes known to express NKG2D, i.e. the majority of human CD8+, CD16+, and CD56+ cells as well as a small fraction of human CD4+ cells. In solution, KYK-2.0 IgG1 interfered with the cytolytic activity of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. By contrast, immobilized KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to strongly induce human NK cell activation. The dual antagonistic and agonistic activity promises a wide range of therapeutic applications for KYK-2.0 IgG1 and its derivatives. PMID:18809410

  5. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv. PMID:26041237

  6. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Schanzer, Juergen M; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the "knobs-into-holes" technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2-3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  7. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Juergen M.; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J.; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H.; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the “knobs-into-holes” technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2–3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  8. Process for recovering metals from solution utilizing metalloprotein affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, D.R.; Vincent, J.B.

    1993-11-29

    The invention relates generally to a process for recovering metals from an aqueous metal-bearing solution and, more particularly, to a process which utilizes metalloproteins immobilized on an insoluble support to remove metal ions such as the main group, transition, lanthanide, and actinide ions from the aqueous metal-ion bearing solution.

  9. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  10. F-actin flow drives affinity maturation and spatial organization of LFA-1 at the immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Comrie, William A.; Babich, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Integrin-dependent interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells are vital for proper T cell activation, effector function, and memory. Regulation of integrin function occurs via conformational change, which modulates ligand affinity, and receptor clustering, which modulates valency. Here, we show that conformational intermediates of leukocyte functional antigen 1 (LFA-1) form a concentric array at the immunological synapse. Using an inhibitor cocktail to arrest F-actin dynamics, we show that organization of this array depends on F-actin flow and ligand mobility. Furthermore, F-actin flow is critical for maintaining the high affinity conformation of LFA-1, for increasing valency by recruiting LFA-1 to the immunological synapse, and ultimately for promoting intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) binding. Finally, we show that F-actin forces are opposed by immobilized ICAM-1, which triggers LFA-1 activation through a combination of induced fit and tension-based mechanisms. Our data provide direct support for a model in which the T cell actin network generates mechanical forces that regulate LFA-1 activity at the immunological synapse. PMID:25666810

  11. Process Paradigms in Design and Composition: Affinities and Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostelnick, Charles

    1989-01-01

    Argues that comparing developments in the process approach to writing and the design methods movement sheds light on the evolution and future direction of the writing paradigm. Argues that sensitivity to the variety of writing tasks and social contexts is more effective than a single amorphous model. (RS)

  12. Manganese-induced integrin affinity maturation promotes recruitment of alpha V beta 3 integrin to focal adhesions in endothelial cells: evidence for a role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Src.

    PubMed

    Dormond, Olivier; Ponsonnet, Lionel; Hasmim, Meriem; Foletti, Alessandro; Rüegg, Curzio

    2004-07-01

    Integrin activity is controlled by changes in affinity (i.e. ligand binding) and avidity (i.e. receptor clustering). Little is known, however, about the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity and on the associated signaling pathways. To study the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity, we stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with MnCl(2) to increase integrin affinity and monitored clustering of beta 1 and beta 3 integrins. In unstimulated HUVEC, beta 1 integrins were present in fibrillar adhesions, while alpha V beta 3 was detected in peripheral focal adhesions. Clustered beta 1 and beta 3 integrins expressed high affinity/ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) epitopes. MnCl(2)-stimulation promoted focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation at the basal surface of the cells, and strongly enhanced mAb LM609 staining and expression of beta 3 high affinity/LIBS epitopes at focal adhesions. MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering was blocked by a soluble RGD peptide, by wortmannin and LY294002, two pharmacological inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and by over-expressing a dominant negative PI 3-K mutant protein. Conversely, over-expression of active PI 3-K and pharmacological inhibiton of Src with PP2 and CGP77675, enhanced basal and manganese-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering. Transient increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt, a direct target of PI 3K, occurred upon manganese stimulation. MnCl(2) did not alter beta 1 integrin distribution or beta1 high-affinity/LIBS epitope expression. Based on these results, we conclude that MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 integrin affinity maturation stimulates focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation, and promotes recruitment of high affinity alpha V beta 3 to focal adhesions. Affinity-modulated alpha V beta 3 clustering requires PI3-K signaling and is negatively regulate by Src.

  13. Affinity maturation of an anti-V antigen IgG expressed in situ through adenovirus gene delivery confers enhanced protection against Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Van Blarcom, T J; Sofer-Podesta, C; Ang, J; Boyer, J L; Crystal, R G; Georgiou, G

    2010-07-01

    Genetic transfer of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has been shown to confer strong and persistent protection against bacterial and viral infectious agents. Although it is well established that for many exogenous neutralizing Abs increased antigen affinity correlates with protection, the effect of antigen affinity on Abs produced in situ after adenoviral gene transfer has not been examined. The mouse IgG2b monoclonal Ab, 2C12.4, recognizes the Yersinia pestis type III secretion apparatus protein, LcrV (V antigen), and confers protection in mice when administered as an IgG intraperitoneally or after genetic immunization with engineered, replication-defective serotype 5 human adenovirus (Ad). The 2C12.4 Ab was expressed as a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) in Escherichia coli and was shown to display an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D))=3.5 nM by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The 2C12.4 scFv was subjected to random mutagenesis, and variants with increased affinity were isolated by flow cytometry using the anchored periplasmic expression bacterial display system. After a single round of mutagenesis, variants displaying up to 35-fold lower K(D) values (H8, K(D)=100 pM) were isolated. The variable domains of the H8 scFv were used to replace those of the parental 2C12.4 IgG encoded in the Ad vector, AdalphaV, giving rise to AdalphaV.H8. The two adenoviral vectors resulted in similar titers of anti-V antigen Abs 3 days after immunization, with 10(9), 10(10) or 10(11) particle units (pu). After intranasal challenge with 363 LD(50) (lethal dose, 50%) of Y. pestis CO92, 54% of the mice immunized with 10(10) pu of AdalphaV.H8 survived through the 14 day end point compared with only 15% survivors for the group immunized with AdalphaV expressing the lower-affinity 2C12.4 (P<0.04; AdalphaV versus AdalphaV.H8). These results indicate that affinity maturation of a neutralizing Ab delivered by genetic transfer may confer increased protection not only for Y. pestis

  14. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  15. Development of a specific affinity-matured exosite inhibitor to MT1-MMP that efficiently inhibits tumor cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A.; Kwok, Hang Fai; Terp, Mikkel G.; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; Santamaria, Salvatore; McCafferty, John; Andreasen, Peter A.; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Ditzel, Henrik J.; Murphy, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase-14, MT1-MMP, has been implicated in pericellular proteolysis with an important role in cellular invasion of collagenous tissues. It is substantially upregulated in various cancers and rheumatoid arthritis, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we report the identification of antibody fragments to MT1-MMP that potently and specifically inhibit its cell surface functions. Lead antibody clones displayed inhibitory activity towards pro-MMP-2 activation, collagen-film degradation and gelatin-film degradation, and were shown to bind to the MT1-MMP catalytic domain outside the active site cleft, inhibiting binding to triple helical collagen. Affinity maturation using CDR3 randomization created a second generation of antibody fragments with dissociation constants down to 0.11 nM, corresponding to an improved affinity of 332-fold with the ability to interfere with cell-surface MT1-MMP functions, displaying IC50 values down to 5 nM. Importantly, the new inhibitors were able to inhibit collagen invasion by tumor-cells in vitro and in vivo primary tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells in a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. Herein is the first demonstration that an inhibitory antibody targeting sites outside the catalytic cleft of MT1-MMP can effectively abrogate its in vivo activity during tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:26934448

  16. Twin-column CaptureSMB: a novel cyclic process for protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Baur, Daniel; Lievrouw, Roel; Lissens, Geert; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-04-10

    A twin-column counter-current chromatography processes, CaptureSMB, was used for the protein A affinity capture of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). By means of sequential loading, the process improves the utilization of the stationary phase by achieving loadings much closer to the static binding capacity of the resin in comparison to batch chromatography. Using a mAb capture case study with protein A affinity chromatography, the performance and product quality obtained from CaptureSMB and batch processes were compared. The effect of the flow rate, column length and titer concentration on the process performance and product quality were evaluated. CaptureSMB showed superior performance compared to batch chromatography with respect to productivity, capacity utilization, product concentration and buffer consumption. A simplified economic evaluation showed that CaptureSMB could decrease resin costs of 10-30% depending on the manufacturing scenario.

  17. Twin-column CaptureSMB: a novel cyclic process for protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Baur, Daniel; Lievrouw, Roel; Lissens, Geert; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-04-10

    A twin-column counter-current chromatography processes, CaptureSMB, was used for the protein A affinity capture of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). By means of sequential loading, the process improves the utilization of the stationary phase by achieving loadings much closer to the static binding capacity of the resin in comparison to batch chromatography. Using a mAb capture case study with protein A affinity chromatography, the performance and product quality obtained from CaptureSMB and batch processes were compared. The effect of the flow rate, column length and titer concentration on the process performance and product quality were evaluated. CaptureSMB showed superior performance compared to batch chromatography with respect to productivity, capacity utilization, product concentration and buffer consumption. A simplified economic evaluation showed that CaptureSMB could decrease resin costs of 10-30% depending on the manufacturing scenario. PMID:25748537

  18. Somatic mutations and affinity maturation are impaired by excessive numbers of T follicular helper cells and restored by Treg cells or memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Preite, Silvia; Baumjohann, Dirk; Foglierini, Mathilde; Basso, Camilla; Ronchi, Francesca; Rodriguez, Blanca M. Fernandez; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that Cd3e‐deficient mice adoptively transferred with CD4+ T cells generate high numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which go on to induce a strong B‐cell and germinal center (GC) reaction. Here, we show that in this system, GC B cells display an altered distribution between the dark and light zones, and express low levels of activation‐induced cytidine deaminase. Furthermore, GC B cells from Cd3e –/– mice accumulate fewer somatic mutations as compared with GC B cells from wild‐type mice, and exhibit impaired affinity maturation and reduced differentiation into long‐lived plasma cells. Reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with regulatory T (Treg) cells restored Tfh‐cell numbers, GC B‐cell numbers and B‐cell distribution within dark and light zones, and the rate of antibody somatic mutations. Tfh‐cell numbers and GC B‐cell numbers and dynamics were also restored by pre‐reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with Cxcr5 –/– Treg cells or non‐regulatory, memory CD4+ T cells. Taken together, these findings underline the importance of a quantitatively regulated Tfh‐cell response for an efficient and long‐lasting serological response. PMID:26332258

  19. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  20. Electrophysiological Evidence for Late Maturation of Strategic Episodic Retrieval Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprondel, Volker; Kipp, Kerstin H.; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Improvement in source memory performance throughout development is thought to be mediated by strategic processes that facilitate the retrieval of task-relevant information. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we examined developmental changes in these processes during adolescence. Adolescents (13-14 years) and adults (19-29 years) completed a…

  1. Aspergillus carbonarius polygalacturonases purified by integrated membrane process and affinity precipitation for apple juice production.

    PubMed

    Nakkeeran, Ekambaram; Umesh-Kumar, Sukumaran; Subramanian, Rangaswamy

    2011-02-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius, when grown by submerged and solid-state fermentation, produces different molecular forms of polygalacturonase (PG; EC 3.2.1.15), among them a 42 kDa PG with a high specific activity of 7000 U/mg protein. When the enzymes were purified by integrated membrane process (IMP) and alginate affinity precipitation (AAP), the two processes concentrated different forms of the enzyme. The AAP process selectively purified and concentrated the high active PG whereas the IMP yielded different PGs and also amylase and protease. Evaluation of the AAP enzyme preparations for apple juice preparation under conditions usually employed commercially demonstrated that the high activity PG did not result in good juice clarity. With IMP processed enzymes, juice yields and clarity were similar to that obtained with commercial PG from A. niger.

  2. Maturity determination and information visualization of new forming processes considering uncertain indicator values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckenmann, A.; Akkasoglu, G.

    2012-04-01

    Operative or strategic decision-making during the development of novel objects is complicated and mostly based on fuzzy assumptions or uncertain information. Consideration of information uncertainty would enhance the reliability of any evaluation of the current development status of new objects. Decisions could be made with a higher safety. The development status equates to the maturity and is to be assessed by previously elicited indicators in relation to phase-dependent requirements. Within this paper, a reference-model based maturity method considering uncertain indicators is introduced for enabling the determination and assurance of the development status in a quantitative and systematic way. The method is applied within the development of a novel metal forming process namely the Sheet-Bulk Metal Forming, which aims to unite the advantages of sheet metal and bulk metal forming. Additionally techniques for visualizing the determined maturity value are proposed to support subsequent decision processes in the context of maturity assurance or improvement.

  3. Using Dual Process Models to Examine Impulsivity Throughout Neural Maturation.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    The multivariate construct of impulsivity is examined through neural systems and connections that comprise the executive functioning system. It is proposed that cognitive and behavioral components of impulsivity can be divided into two distinct groups, mediated by (1) the cognitive control system: deficits in top-down cognitive control processes referred to as action/cognitive impulsivity and (2) the socioemotional system: related to bottom-up affective/motivational processes referred to as affective impulsivity. Examination of impulsivity from a developmental viewpoint can guide future research, potentially enabling the selection of more effective interventions for impulsive individuals, based on the cognitive components requiring improvement. PMID:27186976

  4. A conceptual framework and classification of capability areas for business process maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Looy, Amy; De Backer, Manu; Poels, Geert

    2014-03-01

    The article elaborates on business process maturity, which indicates how well an organisation can perform based on its business processes, i.e. on its way of working. This topic is of paramount importance for managers who try to excel in today's competitive world. Hence, business process maturity is an emerging research field. However, no consensus exists on the capability areas (or skills) needed to excel. Moreover, their theoretical foundation and synergies with other fields are frequently neglected. To overcome this gap, our study presents a conceptual framework with six main capability areas and 17 sub areas. It draws on theories regarding the traditional business process lifecycle, which are supplemented by recognised organisation management theories. The comprehensiveness of this framework is validated by mapping 69 business process maturity models (BPMMs) to the identified capability areas, based on content analysis. Nonetheless, as a consensus neither exists among the collected BPMMs, a classification of different maturity types is proposed, based on cluster analysis and discriminant analysis. Consequently, the findings contribute to the grounding of business process literature. Possible future avenues are evaluating existing BPMMs, directing new BPMMs or investigating which combinations of capability areas (i.e. maturity types) contribute more to performance than others.

  5. Single-step affinity purification of enzyme biotherapeutics: a platform methodology for accelerated process development.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kevin P; Ryakala, Venkat K; Bird, Ryan; Godawat, Rahul; Riske, Frank J; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Warikoo, Veena; Gamble, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Downstream sample purification for quality attribute analysis is a significant bottleneck in process development for non-antibody biologics. Multi-step chromatography process train purifications are typically required prior to many critical analytical tests. This prerequisite leads to limited throughput, long lead times to obtain purified product, and significant resource requirements. In this work, immunoaffinity purification technology has been leveraged to achieve single-step affinity purification of two different enzyme biotherapeutics (Fabrazyme® [agalsidase beta] and Enzyme 2) with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, respectively, as ligands. Target molecules were rapidly isolated from cell culture harvest in sufficient purity to enable analysis of critical quality attributes (CQAs). Most importantly, this is the first study that demonstrates the application of predictive analytics techniques to predict critical quality attributes of a commercial biologic. The data obtained using the affinity columns were used to generate appropriate models to predict quality attributes that would be obtained after traditional multi-step purification trains. These models empower process development decision-making with drug substance-equivalent product quality information without generation of actual drug substance. Optimization was performed to ensure maximum target recovery and minimal target protein degradation. The methodologies developed for Fabrazyme were successfully reapplied for Enzyme 2, indicating platform opportunities. The impact of the technology is significant, including reductions in time and personnel requirements, rapid product purification, and substantially increased throughput. Applications are discussed, including upstream and downstream process development support to achieve the principles of Quality by Design (QbD) as well as integration with bioprocesses as a process analytical technology (PAT).

  6. Maturation of Fibrinolytic Bacillopeptidase F Involves both Hetero- and Autocatalytic Processes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dongheng; Dai, Meihong; Xu, Bi-Lin; Zhao, Zhong-Shu; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Mingqiu; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillopeptidase F (Bpr) is a fibrinolytic serine protease produced by Bacillus subtilis. Its precursor is composed of a signal peptide, an N-terminal propeptide, a catalytic domain, and a long C-terminal extension (CTE). Several active forms of Bpr have been previously reported, but little is known about the maturation of this enzyme. Here, a gene encoding a Bpr (BprL) was cloned from B. subtilis LZW and expressed in B. subtilis WB700, and three fibrinolytic mature forms with apparent molecular masses of 45, 75, and 85 kDa were identified in the culture supernatant. After treatment with urea, the 75-kDa mature form had the same molecular mass as the 85-kDa mature form, from which we infer that they adopt different conformations. Mutational analysis revealed that while the 85-kDa mature form is generated via heterocatalytic processing of a BprL proform by an unidentified protease of B. subtilis, the production of the 75- and 45-kDa mature forms involves both hetero- and autocatalytic events. From in vitro analysis of BprL and its sequential C-terminal truncation variants, it appears that partial removal of the CTE is required for the initiation of autoprocessing of the N-terminal propeptide, which is composed of a core domain (N*) and a 15-residue linker peptide, thereby yielding the 45-kDa mature form. These data suggest that the differential processing of BprL, either heterocatalytically or autocatalytically, leads to the formation of multiple mature forms with different molecular masses or conformations. PMID:26497454

  7. Neural classifier in the estimation process of maturity of selected varieties of apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniecki, P.; Piekarska-Boniecka, H.; Koszela, K.; Zaborowicz, M.; Przybył, K.; Wojcieszak, D.; Zbytek, Z.; Ludwiczak, A.; Przybylak, A.; Lewicki, A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper seeks to present methods of neural image analysis aimed at estimating the maturity state of selected varieties of apples which are popular in Poland. An identification of the degree of maturity of selected varieties of apples has been conducted on the basis of information encoded in graphical form, presented in the digital photos. The above process involves the application of the BBCH scale, used to determine the maturity of apples. The aforementioned scale is widely used in the EU and has been developed for many species of monocotyledonous plants and dicotyledonous plants. It is also worth noticing that the given scale enables detailed determinations of development stage of a given plant. The purpose of this work is to identify maturity level of selected varieties of apples, which is supported by the use of image analysis methods and classification techniques represented by artificial neural networks. The analysis of graphical representative features based on image analysis method enabled the assessment of the maturity of apples. For the utilitarian purpose the "JabVis 1.1" neural IT system was created, in accordance with requirements of the software engineering dedicated to support the decision-making processes occurring in broadly understood production process and processing of apples.

  8. Maturational Constraints on the Recruitment of Early Processes for Syntactic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J.

    2011-01-01

    An enduring question in the study of second language acquisition concerns the relative contributions of age of acquisition (AOA) and ultimate linguistic proficiency to neural organization for second language processing. Several event-related potential (ERP) and neuroimaging studies of second language learners have found that neural organization for syntactic processing is sensitive to delays in second language acquisition. However, such delays in second language acquisition are typically associated with lower language proficiency, rendering it difficult to assess whether differences in AOA or proficiency lead to these effects. Here we examined the effects of delayed second language acquisition while controlling for proficiency differences by examining participants who differ in AOA but who were matched for proficiency in the same language. We compared the ERP response to auditory English phrase structure violations in a group of late learners of English matched for grammatical proficiency with a group of English native speakers. In the native speaker group violations elicited a bilateral and prolonged anterior negativity, with onset at 100 ms, followed by a posterior positivity (P600). In contrast, in the non-native speaker group violations did not elicit the early anterior negativity, but did elicit a P600 which was more widespread spatially and temporally than that of the native speaker group. These results suggest that neural organization for syntactic processing is sensitive to delays in language acquisition independently of proficiency level. More specifically they suggest that both early and later syntactic processes are sensitive to maturational constraints. These results also suggest that late learners who reach a high level of second language proficiency rely on different neural mechanisms than native speakers of that language. PMID:20964590

  9. Maturational constraints on the recruitment of early processes for syntactic processing.

    PubMed

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J

    2011-10-01

    An enduring question in the study of second-language acquisition concerns the relative contributions of age of acquisition (AOA) and ultimate linguistic proficiency to neural organization for second-language processing. Several ERP and neuroimaging studies of second-language learners have found that neural organization for syntactic processing is sensitive to delays in second-language acquisition. However, such delays in second-language acquisition are typically associated with lower language proficiency, rendering it difficult to assess whether differences in AOA or proficiency lead to these effects. Here we examined the effects of delayed second-language acquisition while controlling for proficiency differences by examining participants who differ in AOA but who were matched for proficiency in the same language. We compared the ERP response to auditory English phrase structure violations in a group of late learners of English matched for grammatical proficiency with a group of English native speakers. In the native speaker group, violations elicited a bilateral and prolonged anterior negativity, with onset at 100 msec, followed by a posterior positivity (P600). In contrast, in the nonnative speaker group, violations did not elicit the early anterior negativity, but did elicit a P600 which was more widespread spatially and temporally than that of the native speaker group. These results suggest that neural organization for syntactic processing is sensitive to delays in language acquisition independently of proficiency level. More specifically, they suggest that both early and later syntactic processes are sensitive to maturational constraints. These results also suggest that late learners who reach a high level of second-language proficiency rely on different neural mechanisms than native speakers of that language.

  10. CEval: All-in-one software for data processing and statistical evaluations in affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Ördögová, Magda; Malý, Michal; Riesová, Martina

    2016-05-01

    We introduce CEval software (downloadable for free at echmet.natur.cuni.cz) that was developed for quicker and easier electrophoregram evaluation and further data processing in (affinity) capillary electrophoresis. This software allows for automatic peak detection and evaluation of common peak parameters, such as its migration time, area, width etc. Additionally, the software includes a nonlinear regression engine that performs peak fitting with the Haarhoff-van der Linde (HVL) function, including automated initial guess of the HVL function parameters. HVL is a fundamental peak-shape function in electrophoresis, based on which the correct effective mobility of the analyte represented by the peak is evaluated. Effective mobilities of an analyte at various concentrations of a selector can be further stored and plotted in an affinity CE mode. Consequently, the mobility of the free analyte, μA, mobility of the analyte-selector complex, μAS, and the apparent complexation constant, K('), are first guessed automatically from the linearized data plots and subsequently estimated by the means of nonlinear regression. An option that allows two complexation dependencies to be fitted at once is especially convenient for enantioseparations. Statistical processing of these data is also included, which allowed us to: i) express the 95% confidence intervals for the μA, μAS and K(') least-squares estimates, ii) do hypothesis testing on the estimated parameters for the first time. We demonstrate the benefits of the CEval software by inspecting complexation of tryptophan methyl ester with two cyclodextrins, neutral heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and charged heptakis(6-O-sulfo)-β-CD.

  11. General classification of maturation reaction-norm shape from size-based processes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Asbjorn; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2011-05-01

    Phenotypic plasticity of size at maturation is commonly described using size-age maturation reaction norms (MRNs). MRNs for age and size at maturation are analyzed and classified into three general categories related to different size scalings of growth and mortality. The underlying model for growth and mortality is based on processes at the level of the individual, and is motivated by the energy budget of fish. MRN shape is a balance between opposing factors and depends on subtle details of size dependence of growth and mortality. MRNs with both positive and negative slopes are predicted, and for certain mortality conditions also a lower critical spawning mass. The model is applied to predict a generic fishery-induced evolutionary response and allows assessment of climate change impact on MRNs. Our work stresses the importance of using realistic size dependence of mortality and growth, since this strongly influences the predicted MRNs and sensitivity to harvest pressure.

  12. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lei; Du Yujie; Chang Benkang; Yunsheng Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode.First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-Ophotocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses.The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  13. Formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen residues during maturation processes within the Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, S.; Wirth, R.; Schreiber, A.; Schulz, H.-M.; Horsfield, B.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrocarbon generation processes occur within organic-rich shales as a response to increases in thermal maturation. Shale gas reservoir quality is thought to be largely dependent on the extent to which solid organic material has been converted to pore space during catagenesis. Although pores may drastically vary in variety and abundance within differing shales, the occurrence of nanopores within organic particles has recently been documented for an important number of gas shale systems (i.e., Barnett, Haynesville, Utica, Eagle Ford, Woodford, Horn River, Marcellus, Posidonia …). However, despite their ubiquitous nature, the formation and the geochemical nature of these nanoporous organic compounds remain unclear. Here, we present the characterization of samples from the organic-rich Mississippian Barnett shale gas system (Fort Worth Basin, Texas, USA) at varying stages of thermal maturation. Using a combination of compositional organic geochemistry and spectromicroscopy techniques, including synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM - data collected using the CLS 10ID-1 STXM beamline) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we document a net increase in sample geochemical heterogeneity with increasing maturity. In addition to the presence of bitumen in samples of oil window maturity, very likely genetically derived from thermally degraded kerogen, the formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen has been inferred for samples of gas window maturity, likely resulting from the formation of gaseous hydrocarbons by secondary cracking of bitumen compounds. By providing in-situ insights into the fate of bitumen and pyrobitumen as a response to the thermal evolution of the macromolecular structure of kerogen, the present contribution constitutes an important step towards better constraining hydrocarbon generation processes occurring within unconventional gas shale systems.

  14. Coconut water of different maturity stages ameliorates inflammatory processes in model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Coconut water is a natural beverage that is a part of daily diet of many people. This study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of coconut water of different maturation stages (young and mature) with rat paw edema model of inflammation using plethysmometer. Methodology: For this study, albino rats were selected and divided into four equal groups (10 rats in each group). Group 1 was set as control and administered distilled water 1 ml orally; Groups 2 and 3 were treated with young and mature coconut water, respectively, at 4 ml/100 g dose orally. Group 4 was treated with the standard drug (ibuprofen) at 400 mg/70 kg. 0.1 ml of 1% w/v acetic acid was administered in the subplantar tissue of rat paw 30 min after oral treatments of groups. Plethysmometer was used to measure rat paw edema. Results: Results revealed that both coconut water possess significant anti-inflammatory activity (P < 0.001). In comparison to control, percent inhibition by young coconut water was 20.22%, 35.13%, 42.52%, and 36% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (42.52%) was observed in the second phase of the inflammatory process. On the other hand, percent inhibition by mature coconut water was 18.80%, 25.94%, 24.13%, and 18.66% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (25.94%) was observed in the first phase of the inflammatory process. Conclusions: This study strongly suggests the use of young coconut water for potent anti-inflammatory effect and mature coconut water for moderate anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:27366350

  15. Corn silage management I: effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing on chemical and physical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Robutti, J L; Swift, M; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2002-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing of whole plant corn on chemical and physical characteristics, particle size, pack density, and dry matter recovery. In the first experiment, hybrid 3845 whole plant corn was harvested at hard dough, one-third milkline, and two-thirds milkline with a theoretical length-of-cut of 6.4 mm. In the second experiment, hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline stages of maturity with a theoretical length-of-cut of 12.7 mm. At each stage of maturity, corn was harvested with and without mechanical processing by using a John Deere 5830 harvester with an onboard kernel processor. The percentage of intact corn kernels present in unprocessed corn silage explained 62% of variation in total tract starch digestibility. As the amount of intact kernels increased, total tract starch digestibility decreased. Post-ensiled vitreousness of corn kernels within the corn silage explained 31 and 48% of the variation of total tract starch digestibility for processed and unprocessed treatments, respectively. For a given amount of vitreous starch in corn kernels, total tract starch digestibility was lower for cows fed unprocessed corn silage compared with processed corn silage. This suggests that processing corn silage disrupts the dense protein matrix within the corn kernel where starch is embedded, therefore making the starch more available for digestion. Particle size of corn silage and orts that contained corn silage was reduced when it was processed. Wet pack density was greater for processed compared with unprocessed corn silage.

  16. Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Veesler, David; Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined virus maturation of selected non-enveloped and enveloped ssRNA viruses; retroviruses; bacteriophages and herpes virus. Processes associated with maturation in the RNA viruses range from subtle (noda and picornaviruses) to dramatic (tetraviruses and togaviruses). The elaborate assembly and maturation pathway of HIV is discussed in contrast to the less sophisticated but highly efficient processes associated with togaviruses. Bacteriophage assembly and maturation are discussed in general terms with specific examples chosen for emphasis. Finally the herpes viruses are compared with bacteriophages. The data support divergent evolution of noda, picorna and tetraviruses from a common ancestor and divergent evolution of alpha and flaviviruses from a common ancestor. Likewise, bacteriophages and herpes viruses almost certainly share a common ancestor in their evolution. Comparing all the viruses, we conclude that maturation is a convergent process that is required to solve conflicting requirements in biological dynamics and function. PMID:22404678

  17. Different visuomotor processes maturation rates in children support dual visuomotor learning systems.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moya, Rosinna; Díaz, Rosalinda; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Different processes are involved during visuomotor learning, including an error-based procedural and a strategy based cognitive mechanism. Our objective was to analyze if the changes in the adaptation or the aftereffect components of visuomotor learning measured across development, reflected different maturation rates of the aforementioned mechanisms. Ninety-five healthy children aged 4-12years and a group of young adults participated in a wedge prism and a dove prism throwing task, which laterally displace or horizontally reverse the visual field respectively. The results show that despite the age-related differences in motor control, all children groups adapted in the error-based wedge prisms condition. However, when removing the prism, small children showed a slower aftereffects extinction rate. On the strategy-based visual reversing task only the older children group reached adult-like levels. These results are consistent with the idea of different mechanisms with asynchronous maturation rates participating during visuomotor learning. PMID:26802974

  18. Different visuomotor processes maturation rates in children support dual visuomotor learning systems.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moya, Rosinna; Díaz, Rosalinda; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Different processes are involved during visuomotor learning, including an error-based procedural and a strategy based cognitive mechanism. Our objective was to analyze if the changes in the adaptation or the aftereffect components of visuomotor learning measured across development, reflected different maturation rates of the aforementioned mechanisms. Ninety-five healthy children aged 4-12years and a group of young adults participated in a wedge prism and a dove prism throwing task, which laterally displace or horizontally reverse the visual field respectively. The results show that despite the age-related differences in motor control, all children groups adapted in the error-based wedge prisms condition. However, when removing the prism, small children showed a slower aftereffects extinction rate. On the strategy-based visual reversing task only the older children group reached adult-like levels. These results are consistent with the idea of different mechanisms with asynchronous maturation rates participating during visuomotor learning.

  19. Sustaining a Mature Risk Management Process: Ensuring the International Space Station for a Vibrant Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raftery, Michael; Carter-Journet, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) risk management methodology is an example of a mature and sustainable process. Risk management is a systematic approach used to proactively identify, analyze, plan, track, control, communicate, and document risks to help management make risk-informed decisions that increase the likelihood of achieving program objectives. The ISS has been operating in space for over 14 years and permanently crewed for over 12 years. It is the longest surviving habitable vehicle in low Earth orbit history. Without a mature and proven risk management plan, it would be increasingly difficult to achieve mission success throughout the life of the ISS Program. A successful risk management process must be able to adapt to a dynamic program. As ISS program-level decision processes have evolved, so too has the ISS risk management process continued to innovate, improve, and adapt. Constant adaptation of risk management tools and an ever-improving process is essential to the continued success of the ISS Program. Above all, sustained support from program management is vital to risk management continued effectiveness. Risk management is valued and stressed as an important process by the ISS Program.

  20. Effects of drying process on the physicochemical properties of nopal cladodes at different maturity stages.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Padilla, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Valderrama-Bravo, María Del Carmen; Rojas-Molina, Isela; Espinosa-Arbeláez, Diego Germán; Suárez-Vargas, Raúl; Rodríguez-García, Mario Enrique

    2012-03-01

    Chemical proximate analysis was done in order to determine the changes of nutritional characteristics of nopal powders from three different maturity stages 50, 100, and 150 days and obtained by three different drying processes: freeze dried, forced air oven, and tunnel. Results indicate that nopal powder obtained by the process of freeze dried retains higher contents of protein, soluble fiber, and fat than the other two processes. Also, freeze dried process had less effect on color hue variable. No changes were observed in insoluble fiber content, chroma and lightness with the three different drying processes. Furthermore, the soluble fibers decreased with the age of nopal while insoluble fibers and ash content shows an opposite trend. In addition, the luminosity and hue values did not show differences among the maturity stages studied. The high content of dietary fibers of nopal pad powder could to be an interesting source of these important components for human diets and also could be used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:22183868

  1. Evolution of volatile aldehydes in Iberian ham matured under different processing conditions.

    PubMed

    Martín, L; Timón, M L; Petrón, M J; Ventanas, J; Antequera, T

    2000-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of the Iberian ham processing conditions in the evolution of volatile aldehydes, 35 hams were processed in two plants following different conditions of relative humidity and temperature. For this, free fatty acids, peroxide values and volatile aldehydes were quantified in the hams. The highest increases in free fatty acids were noted during the drying stage in both processing plants. The drying period also revealed the greatest increase in peroxide values, where the highest values were in those hams processed at higher temperatures. The temperature during post-salting and drying had a marked influence on the formation of volatile aldehydes, being responsible for the differences in volatile compounds of matured hams.

  2. The Impact of Maturity Stage on Cell Membrane Integrity and Enzymatic Browning Reactions in High Pressure Processed Peaches (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Techakanon, Chukwan; Gradziel, Thomas M; Zhang, Lu; Barrett, Diane M

    2016-09-28

    Fruit maturity is an important factor associated with final product quality, and it may have an effect on the level of browning in peaches that are high pressure processed (HPP). Peaches from three different maturities, as determined by firmness (M1 = 50-55 N, M2 = 35-40 N, and M3 = 15-20 N), were subjected to pressure levels at 0.1, 200, and 400 MPa for 10 min. The damage from HPP treatment results in loss of fruit integrity and the development of browning during storage. Increasing pressure levels of HPP treatment resulted in greater damage, particularly in the more mature peaches, as determined by shifts in transverse relaxation time (T2) of the vacuolar component and by light microscopy. The discoloration of peach slices of different maturities processed at the same pressure was comparable, indicating that the effect of pressure level is greater than that of maturity in the development of browning. PMID:27556337

  3. The Impact of Maturity Stage on Cell Membrane Integrity and Enzymatic Browning Reactions in High Pressure Processed Peaches (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Techakanon, Chukwan; Gradziel, Thomas M; Zhang, Lu; Barrett, Diane M

    2016-09-28

    Fruit maturity is an important factor associated with final product quality, and it may have an effect on the level of browning in peaches that are high pressure processed (HPP). Peaches from three different maturities, as determined by firmness (M1 = 50-55 N, M2 = 35-40 N, and M3 = 15-20 N), were subjected to pressure levels at 0.1, 200, and 400 MPa for 10 min. The damage from HPP treatment results in loss of fruit integrity and the development of browning during storage. Increasing pressure levels of HPP treatment resulted in greater damage, particularly in the more mature peaches, as determined by shifts in transverse relaxation time (T2) of the vacuolar component and by light microscopy. The discoloration of peach slices of different maturities processed at the same pressure was comparable, indicating that the effect of pressure level is greater than that of maturity in the development of browning.

  4. Implementing NASA's Capability-Driven Approach: Insight into NASA's Processes for Maturing Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale; Rodgers, Erica; Antol, Jeff; Simon, Matthew; Hay, Jason; Larman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    NASA is engaged in transforming human spaceflight. The Agency is shifting from an exploration-based program with human activities focused on low Earth orbit (LEO) and targeted robotic missions in deep space to a more sustainable and integrated pioneering approach. Through pioneering, NASA seeks to address national goals to develop the capacity for people to work, learn, operate, live, and thrive safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time. However, pioneering space involves more than the daunting technical challenges of transportation, maintaining health, and enabling crew productivity for long durations in remote, hostile, and alien environments. This shift also requires a change in operating processes for NASA. The Agency can no longer afford to engineer systems for specific missions and destinations and instead must focus on common capabilities that enable a range of destinations and missions. NASA has codified a capability driven approach, which provides flexible guidance for the development and maturation of common capabilities necessary for human pioneers beyond LEO. This approach has been included in NASA policy and is captured in the Agency's strategic goals. It is currently being implemented across NASA's centers and programs. Throughout 2014, NASA engaged in an Agency-wide process to define and refine exploration-related capabilities and associated gaps, focusing only on those that are critical for human exploration beyond LEO. NASA identified 12 common capabilities ranging from Environmental Control and Life Support Systems to Robotics, and established Agency-wide teams or working groups comprised of subject matter experts that are responsible for the maturation of these exploration capabilities. These teams, called the System Maturation Teams (SMTs) help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the identified exploration capabilities. The SMTs are defining performance parameters and goals for each of the 12 capabilities

  5. Differentiating maturational and training influences on fMRI activation during music processing

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Norton, Andrea C.; Overy, Katie; Winner, Ellen; Alsop, David C.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Two major influences on how the brain processes music are maturational development and active musical training. Previous functional neuroimaging studies investigating music processing have typically focused on either categorical differences between “musicians versus nonmusicians” or “children versus adults.” In the present study, we explored a cross-sectional data set (n=84) using multiple linear regression to isolate the performance-independent effects of age (5 to 33 years) and cumulative duration of musical training (0 to 21,000 practice hours) on fMRI activation similarities and differences between melodic discrimination (MD) and rhythmic discrimination (RD). Age-related effects common to MD and RD were present in three left hemisphere regions: temporofrontal junction, ventral premotor cortex, and the inferior part of the intraparietal sulcus, regions involved in active attending to auditory rhythms, sensorimotor integration, and working memory transformations of pitch and rhythmic patterns. By contrast, training-related effects common to MD and RD were localized to the posterior portion of the left superior temporal gyrus/planum temporale, an area implicated in spectrotemporal pattern matching and auditory–motor coordinate transformations. A single cluster in right superior temporal gyrus showed significantly greater activation during MD than RD. This is the first fMRI which has distinguished maturational from training effects during music processing. PMID:22348885

  6. Differentiating maturational and training influences on fMRI activation during music processing.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Norton, Andrea C; Overy, Katie; Winner, Ellen; Alsop, David C; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2012-04-15

    Two major influences on how the brain processes music are maturational development and active musical training. Previous functional neuroimaging studies investigating music processing have typically focused on either categorical differences between "musicians versus nonmusicians" or "children versus adults." In the present study, we explored a cross-sectional data set (n=84) using multiple linear regression to isolate the performance-independent effects of age (5 to 33 years) and cumulative duration of musical training (0 to 21,000 practice hours) on fMRI activation similarities and differences between melodic discrimination (MD) and rhythmic discrimination (RD). Age-related effects common to MD and RD were present in three left hemisphere regions: temporofrontal junction, ventral premotor cortex, and the inferior part of the intraparietal sulcus, regions involved in active attending to auditory rhythms, sensorimotor integration, and working memory transformations of pitch and rhythmic patterns. By contrast, training-related effects common to MD and RD were localized to the posterior portion of the left superior temporal gyrus/planum temporale, an area implicated in spectrotemporal pattern matching and auditory-motor coordinate transformations. A single cluster in right superior temporal gyrus showed significantly greater activation during MD than RD. This is the first fMRI which has distinguished maturational from training effects during music processing.

  7. Physical, chemical and nutritional characteristics of premature-processed and matured green legumes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sila; Malleshi, N G

    2012-08-01

    Premature green legumes are good sources of nutraceuticals and antioxidants and are consumed as snacks as well as vegetables. They are seasonal and have limited shelf-life. Efforts are provided to prepare shelf-stable green legumes to extend their availability throughout the year. Green legumes from chick pea or Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) and field bean (Dolichos lablab) have been processed to enhance their shelf-life, and determined their nutritional, physico-chemical and nutraceutical qualities. The shelf stable green legumes (SSGL) show higher water absorption capacity compared to matured dry legumes (MDL). The total colour change in the processed/dried SSGL and MDL samples increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the freshly harvested green samples. The carotenoid content of Bengal gram and field bean SSGLs are 8.0 and 3.2 mg/100 g, and chlorophyll contents are 12.5 and 0.5 mg/100 g, respectively, which are in negligible quantities in matured legumes; the corresponding polyphenol contents are 197.8 and 153.1 mg/100 g. These results indicate that SSGLs possess potential antioxidant activity. PMID:23904654

  8. Effect of maturation on suprasegmental speech processing in full- and preterm infants: a mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Ragó, Anett; Honbolygó, Ferenc; Róna, Zsófia; Beke, Anna; Csépe, Valéria

    2014-01-01

    Infants born prematurely are at higher risk for later linguistic deficits present in delayed or atypical processing of phonetic and prosodic information. In order to be able to specify the nature of this atypical development, it is important to investigate the role of early experience in language perception. According to the concept of Gonzalez-Gomez and Nazzi (2012) there is a special intrauterine sensitivity to the prosodic features of languages that should have a special role in language acquisition. Therefore, we may also assume that pre- and full-term infants having months difference in intrauterine experience show different maturation patterns of processing prosodic and phonetic information present at word level. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of these differences on word stress pattern vs. phoneme information processing. Two age groups of infants (6 and 10 month-olds) were included in our study. 21 of 46 of the total of infants investigated were prematurely born with low birth weight. We used the mismatch negativity (MMN) event related brain potential (ERP) component, a widely used electrophysiological correlate of acoustic change detection, for testing the assumed developmental changes of phoneme and word stress discrimination. In a passive oddball paradigm we used a word as standard, a pseudo-word as phoneme deviant, and an illegally uttered word as stress deviant. Our results showed no differences in MMN responses in the phoneme deviant condition between the groups, meaning a relatively intact maturation of phoneme processing of preterm infants as compared to their contemporaries. However, the mismatch responses measured in the stress condition revealed significant between-group differences. These results strengthen the view that the total length of intrauterine experience influences the time of emergence of prosodic processing.

  9. Measuring Group Maturity: The Development of a Process-Oriented Variable for Small Group Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krayer, Karl J.; Fiechtner, Susan Brown

    1984-01-01

    Describes the concept of group maturity and recent attempts to measure the concept. Reports on a study that administered maturity scales to students in communication and management courses and found the scales to be powerful discriminators between mature and immature groups. Discusses implications for small group and organizational communication…

  10. Maturational Constraints on the Recruitment of Early Processes for Syntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J.

    2011-01-01

    An enduring question in the study of second-language acquisition concerns the relative contributions of age of acquisition (AOA) and ultimate linguistic proficiency to neural organization for second-language processing. Several ERP and neuroimaging studies of second-language learners have found that neural organization for syntactic processing is…

  11. Analyzing a Mature Software Inspection Process Using Statistical Process Control (SPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Julie; Carleton, Anita; Stamper, Darrell E. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a cooperative effort where the Software Engineering Institute and the Space Shuttle Onboard Software Project could experiment applying Statistical Process Control (SPC) analysis to inspection activities. The topics include: 1) SPC Collaboration Overview; 2) SPC Collaboration Approach and Results; and 3) Lessons Learned.

  12. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  13. Scale-up of native beta-lactoglobulin affinity separation process.

    PubMed

    Vyas, H K; Izco, J M; Jiménez-Flores, R

    2002-07-01

    Affinity separation of beta-lactoglobulin in its native form with all-trans-retinal immobilized on calcium bio-silicate was scaled up and applied to separate it from industrial sweet whey. Three different methods of mixing the modified calcium bio-silicate and whey for the interaction between all-trans-retinal and beta-lactoglobulin were tried at pilot scale. The three methods used were 1) a column packed with calcium bio-silicate, 2) a stirred tank, and 3) a fluidized bed column of calcium bio-silicate particles. Adsorption and desorption of beta-lactoglobulin were carried out at pH 5.1 and 7.0, using 0.01 and 0.1 M phosphate buffers, respectively. The phosphate buffer containing desorbed beta-lactoglobulin was concentrated 20 times using ultrafiltration and then freeze-dried. The packed column, stirred tank, and fluidized bed column produced beta-lactoglobulin with purity of 80, >95, and >95%, and recovery of 0.65, 2.88, and 2.88 g per kilogram of calcium bio-silicate, respectively. The comparative poor purity and recovery of beta-lactoglobulin in the case of the packed column was attributed to insufficient contact between the passing fluids and the calcium bio-silicate during adsorption, desorption, and intermittent washing. The fluidized bed column method, with a gentle mixing action, was considered the best suited for further scale up to the industrial level. PMID:12201513

  14. Maturation of the Central Auditory Nervous System in Children with Auditory Processing Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tomlin, Dani; Rance, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Neurodevelopmental delay has been proposed as the underlying cause of the majority of cases of auditory processing disorder (APD). The current study employs the cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) to assess if maturational differences of the central auditory nervous system (CANS) can be identified between children who do and do not meet the diagnostic criterion for APD. The P1-N1 complex of the CAEP has previously been used for tracking development of the CANS in children with hearing impairment. Twenty-seven children (7 to 12 years old) who failed an APD behavioral test battery were age-matched (within 3 months) to children who had passed the same battery. CAEP responses to 500-Hz tone burst stimuli were recorded and analyzed for latency and amplitude measures. The P1-N1 complex of the CAEP, which has previously been used for tracking development of the CANS in children with hearing impairment, showed significant group differences. The children diagnosed with APD showed significantly increased latency (∼10 milliseconds) and significantly reduced amplitude (∼10 μV) of the early components of the CAEP compared with children with normal auditory processing. No significant differences were seen in the later P2 wave. The normal developmental course is for a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude as a function of age. The results of this study are, therefore, consistent with an immaturity of the CANS as an underlying cause of APD in children. PMID:27587924

  15. The differential maturation of two processing rates related to digit span.

    PubMed

    Cowan, N

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies have proposed that rapid-speaking durations predict short-term memory spans. However, N. Cowan et al. (1998, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 127, 141-160) found two separate types of processing durations related to digit span for children in Grade 1 (7-8 years), Grade 3 (9-10 years), and Grade 5 (11-12 years): rapid-speaking durations (thought to index the rate of covert articulation) and the durations of interword pauses in the memory span task responses (thought to index the rate of short-term memory retrieval). The present analysis additionally establishes the differential maturation of those two durations. Within-age correlations between span and rapid-speaking durations were significant only in first graders; correlations between span and interword pauses, only in fifth graders. When subsamples were selected to match spans across age groups, both types of duration also were matched between Grades 1 and 3. However, fifth graders had considerably shorter interword pauses than their third-grade counterparts. Thus, a particular memory span is accompanied by different profiles of processing rates in children of different ages. PMID:10047439

  16. Natural antisense RNA promotes 3′ end processing and maturation of MALAT1 lncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xinying; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Freier, Susan M.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNase P-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage plays a crucial role in the 3′ end processing and cellular accumulation of MALAT1, a nuclear-retained long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. The regulation of this cleavage event is largely undetermined. Here we characterize a broadly expressed natural antisense transcript at the MALAT1 locus, designated as TALAM1, that positively regulates MALAT1 levels by promoting the 3′ end cleavage and maturation of MALAT1 RNA. TALAM1 RNA preferentially localizes at the site of transcription, and also interacts with MALAT1 RNA. Depletion of TALAM1 leads to defects in the 3′ end cleavage reaction and compromises cellular accumulation of MALAT1. Conversely, overexpression of TALAM1 facilitates the cleavage reaction in trans. Interestingly, TALAM1 is also positively regulated by MALAT1 at the level of both transcription and RNA stability. Together, our data demonstrate a novel feed-forward positive regulatory loop that is established to maintain the high cellular levels of MALAT1, and also unravel the existence of sense-antisense mediated regulatory mechanism for cellular lncRNAs that display RNase P-mediated 3′ end processing. PMID:26826711

  17. Bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic composting process enhancing compost maturity of dewatered sludge with synchronous electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Jiang, Junqiu; Zhao, Qingliang; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Yunshu; Zheng, Zhen; Hao, Xiaodi

    2015-10-01

    Bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic composting process (AnCBE) with dewatered sludge as the anode fuel was constructed to accelerate composting of dewatered sludge, which could increase the quality of the compost and harvest electric energy in comparison with the traditional anaerobic composting (AnC). Results revealed that the AnCBE yielded a voltage of 0.60 ± 0.02 V, and total COD (TCOD) removal reached 19.8 ± 0.2% at the end of 35 d. The maximum power density was 5.6 W/m(3). At the end of composting, organic matter content (OM) reduction rate increased to 19.5 ± 0.2% in AnCBE and to 12.9 ± 0.1% in AnC. The fuzzy comprehensive assessment (FCA) result indicated that the membership degree of class I of AnCBE compost (0.64) was higher than that of AnC compost (0.44). It was demonstrated that electrogenesis in the AnCBE could improve the sludge stabilization degree, accelerate anaerobic composting process and enhance composting maturity with bioelectricity generation.

  18. Whey protein processing influences formula-induced gut maturation in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Østergaard, Mette V; Jiang, Pingping; Chatterton, Dereck E W; Thymann, Thomas; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Sangild, Per T

    2013-12-01

    Immaturity of the gut predisposes preterm infants to nutritional challenges potentially leading to clinical complications such as necrotizing enterocolitis. Feeding milk formulas is associated with greater risk than fresh colostrum or milk, probably due to loss of bioactive proteins (e.g., immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-β) during industrial processing (e.g., pasteurization, filtration, spray-drying). We hypothesized that the processing method for whey protein concentrate (WPC) would affect gut maturation in formula-fed preterm pigs used as a model for preterm infants. Fifty-five caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were distributed into 4 groups given 1 of 4 isoenergetic diets: formula containing conventional WPC (filtration, multi-pasteurization, standard spray-drying) (CF); formula containing gently treated WPC (reduced filtration and pasteurization, gentle spray-drying) (GF); formula containing minimally treated WPC (rennet precipitation, reduced filtration, heat treatment <40°C, freeze-drying) (MF); and bovine colostrum (used as a positive reference group) (BC). Relative to CF, GF, and MF pigs, BC pigs had greater villus heights, lactose digestion, and absorption and lower gut permeability (P < 0.05). MF and BC pigs had greater plasma citrulline concentrations than CF and GF pigs and intestinal interleukin-8 was lower in BC pigs than in the other groups (P < 0.05). MF pigs had lower concentrations of intestinal claudin-4, cleaved caspase-3, and phosphorylated c-Jun than CF pigs (P < 0.05). The conventional and gently treated WPCs had similar efficacy in stimulating proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that processing of WPC affects intestinal structure, function, and integrity when included in formulas for preterm pigs. Optimization of WPC processing technology may be important to preserve the bioactivity and nutritional value of formulas for sensitive newborns. PMID:24047702

  19. Processivity and Subcellular Localization of Glycogen Synthase Depend on a Non-catalytic High Affinity Glycogen-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Adelaida; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Fita, Ignacio; Ferrer, Juan C.; Guinovart, Joan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase, a central enzyme in glucose metabolism, catalyzes the successive addition of α-1,4-linked glucose residues to the non-reducing end of a growing glycogen molecule. A non-catalytic glycogen-binding site, identified by x-ray crystallography on the surface of the glycogen synthase from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has been found to be functionally conserved in the eukaryotic enzymes. The disruption of this binding site in both the archaeal and the human muscle glycogen synthases has a large impact when glycogen is the acceptor substrate. Instead, the catalytic efficiency remains essentially unchanged when small oligosaccharides are used as substrates. Mutants of the human muscle enzyme with reduced affinity for glycogen also show an altered intracellular distribution and a marked decrease in their capacity to drive glycogen accumulation in vivo. The presence of a high affinity glycogen-binding site away from the active center explains not only the long-recognized strong binding of glycogen synthase to glycogen but also the processivity and the intracellular localization of the enzyme. These observations demonstrate that the glycogen-binding site is a critical regulatory element responsible for the in vivo catalytic efficiency of GS. PMID:21464127

  20. Dynamic laser speckle applied to the analysis of maturation process of irradiated fresh fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincitorio, F. M.; Budini, N.; Freyre, C.; Mulone, C.; Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.

    2012-10-01

    The treatment of fresh fruits with different doses of ionizing radiation has been found effective for delaying ripening and, in this way, to extend shelf life. This preservation method is likely to produce some functional or constitutive changes in the cellular structure of the fruit. In this work, a test of the effectiveness of fruit irradiation with relatively low doses was performed by using dynamic speckle imaging. Bananas from a same lot were chosen, being a first series of them irradiated with different doses of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 kGy (Gy = J/kg) and a second series with doses of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 1 kGy. Non irradiated bananas (0 kGy) were considered as the lot reference for contrast. Irradiation was carried out at the Semi-Industrial Cobalt 60 facility of the Ezeiza Atomic Center, with an activity of 6 × 105 Curie and a dose rate of 28.5 Gy/min. The objective of this work is to analyze differences in the maturation process between irradiated and nonirradiated fruits by means of dynamic speckle pattern evaluation.

  1. Individual heterogeneity in growth and age at sexual maturity: a gamma process analysis of capture–mark–recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William; Hesed, Kyle Miller

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of organisms’ growth rates and ages at sexual maturity is important for conservation efforts and a wide variety of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology. However, these life history parameters may be difficult to obtain from natural populations: individuals encountered may be of unknown age, information on age at sexual maturity may be uncertain and interval-censored, and growth data may include both individual heterogeneity and measurement errors. We analyzed mark–recapture data for Red-backed Salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) to compare sex-specific growth rates and ages at sexual maturity. Aging of individuals was made possible by the use of a von Bertalanffy model of growth, complemented with models for interval-censored and imperfect observations at sexual maturation. Individual heterogeneity in growth was modeled through the use of Gamma processes. Our analysis indicates that female P. cinereus mature earlier and grow more quickly than males, growing to nearly identical asymptotic size distributions as males.

  2. Affinity maturation by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop of a monoclonal Fab derived from a synthetic naïve human antibody library and directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of gp41 yields a set of Fabs with improved HIV-1 neutralization potency and breadth

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Lechner, Annette; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported a broadly HIV-1 neutralizing mini-antibody (Fab 3674) of modest potency that was derived from a human non-immune phage library by panning against the chimeric gp41-derived construct NCCG-gp41. This construct presents the N-heptad repeat of the gp41 ectodomain as a stable, helical, disulfide-linked trimer that extends in helical phase from the six-helix bundle of gp41. In this paper, Fab 3674 was subjected to affinity maturation against the NCCG-gp41 antigen by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop to generate a panel of Fabs with diverse neutralization activity. Three affinity-matured Fabs selected for further study, Fabs 8060, 8066 and 8068, showed significant increases in both potency and breadth of neutralization against HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelopes of primary isolates from the standard subtypes B and C HIV-1 reference panels. The parental Fab 3674 is 10-20 fold less potent in monovalent than bivalent format over the entire B and C panels of HIV-1 pseudotypes. Of note is that the improved neutralization activity of the affinity-matured Fabs relative to the parental Fab 3674 was, on average, significantly greater for the Fabs in monovalent than bivalent format. This suggests that the increased avidity of the Fabs for the target antigen in bivalent format can be partially offset by kinetic and/or steric advantages afforded by the smaller monovalent Fabs. Indeed, the best affinity-matured Fab (8066) in monovalent format (∼50 kDa) was comparable in HIV-1 neutralization potency to the parental Fab 3674 in bivalent format (∼120 kDa) across the subtypes B and C reference panels. PMID:19695655

  3. Exploring the Decision Process of "School Leavers" and "Mature Students" in University Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harker, Debra; Slade, Peter; Harker, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Examined potential differences in how Australian mature entrants and those who have just left school undertake the decision to attend a new university. Found differences between the two groups in terms of their need for public transportation and scheduling convenience, emphasis on program quality, and college search strategies. (EV)

  4. Picomolar affinity antibodies from a fully synthetic naive library selected and evolved by ribosome display.

    PubMed

    Hanes, J; Schaffitzel, C; Knappik, A; Plückthun, A

    2000-12-01

    Here we applied ribosome display to in vitro selection and evolution of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) from a large synthetic library (Human Combinatorial Antibody Library; HuCAL) against bovine insulin. In three independent ribosome display experiments different clusters of closely related scFvs were selected, all of which bound the antigen with high affinity and specificity. All selected scFvs had affinity-matured up to 40-fold compared to their HuCAL progenitors, by accumulating point mutations during the ribosome display cycles. The dissociation constants of the isolated scFvs were as low as 82 pM, which validates the design of the naïve library and the power of this evolutionary method. We have thus mimicked the process of antibody generation and affinity maturation with a synthetic library in a cell-free system in just a few days, obtaining molecules with higher affinities than most natural antibodies.

  5. A mature and fusogenic form of the Nipah virus fusion protein requires proteolytic processing by cathepsin L

    SciTech Connect

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Craft, Willie Warren; Patch, Jared; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-03-15

    The Nipah virus fusion (F) protein is proteolytically processed to F{sub 1} + F{sub 2} subunits. We demonstrate here that cathepsin L is involved in this important maturation event. Cathepsin inhibitors ablated cleavage of Nipah F. Proteolytic processing of Nipah F and fusion activity was dramatically reduced in cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells. Additionally, Nipah virus F-mediated fusion was inhibited in cathepsin L-deficient cells, but coexpression of cathepsin L restored fusion activity. Both purified cathepsin L and B could cleave immunopurified Nipah F protein, but only cathepsin L produced products of the correct size. Our results suggest that endosomal cathepsins can cleave Nipah F, but that cathepsin L specifically converts Nipah F to a mature and fusogenic form.

  6. Dual N- and C-terminal processing of citrus chlorophyllase precursor within the plastid membranes leads to the mature enzyme.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar; Cohen-Peer, Reut; Mett, Anahit; Spicer, Victor; Lovat, Nicole; Krokhin, Oleg; Brand, Arnon; Gidoni, David; Standing, Kenneth G; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E; Eyal, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Chl, the central player in harvesting light energy for photosynthesis, is enzymatically degraded during natural turnover, leaf senescence, fruit ripening or following biotic/abiotic stress induction. The photodynamic properties of Chl and its metabolites call for tight regulation of the catabolic pathway enzymes to avoid accumulation of intermediate breakdown products. Chlorophyllase, the Chl dephytilation enzyme, was previously demonstrated to be an initiator of Chl breakdown when transcriptionally induced to be expressed during ethylene-induced citrus fruit color break or when heterologously expressed in different plant systems. Citrus chlorophyllase was previously shown to be translated as a precursor protein, which is subsequently post-translationally processed to a mature form. We demonstrate that maturation of citrus chlorophyllase involves dual N- and C-terminal processing which appear to be rate-limiting post-translational events when chlorophyllase expression levels are high. The chlorophyllase precursor and intermediate forms were shown to be of transient nature, while the mature form accumulates over time, suggesting that processing may be involved in post-translational regulation of enzyme in vivo function. This notion is further supported by the finding that neither N- nor C-terminal processed domains are essential for chloroplast targeting of the enzyme, and that both processing events occur within the chloroplast membranes. Studies on the processing of chlorophyllase versions truncated at the N- or C-termini or mutated to abolish C-terminal processing suggest that each of the processing events is independent. Dual N- and C-terminal processing, not involving an organellar targeting signal, has rarely been documented in plants and is unique for a plastid protein.

  7. Maturation of auditory neural processes in autism spectrum disorder — A longitudinal MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Port, Russell G.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Ku, Matthew; Bloy, Luke; Murray, Rebecca; Blaskey, Lisa; Levy, Susan E.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show atypical brain activity, perhaps due to delayed maturation. Previous studies examining the maturation of auditory electrophysiological activity have been limited due to their use of cross-sectional designs. The present study took a first step in examining magnetoencephalography (MEG) evidence of abnormal auditory response maturation in ASD via the use of a longitudinal design. Methods Initially recruited for a previous study, 27 children with ASD and nine typically developing (TD) children, aged 6- to 11-years-old, were re-recruited two to five years later. At both timepoints, MEG data were obtained while participants passively listened to sinusoidal pure-tones. Bilateral primary/secondary auditory cortex time domain (100 ms evoked response latency (M100)) and spectrotemporal measures (gamma-band power and inter-trial coherence (ITC)) were examined. MEG measures were also qualitatively examined for five children who exhibited “optimal outcome”, participants who were initially on spectrum, but no longer met diagnostic criteria at follow-up. Results M100 latencies were delayed in ASD versus TD at the initial exam (~ 19 ms) and at follow-up (~ 18 ms). At both exams, M100 latencies were associated with clinical ASD severity. In addition, gamma-band evoked power and ITC were reduced in ASD versus TD. M100 latency and gamma-band maturation rates did not differ between ASD and TD. Of note, the cohort of five children that demonstrated “optimal outcome” additionally exhibited M100 latency and gamma-band activity mean values in-between TD and ASD at both timepoints. Though justifying only qualitative interpretation, these “optimal outcome” related data are presented here to motivate future studies. Conclusions Children with ASD showed perturbed auditory cortex neural activity, as evidenced by M100 latency delays as well as reduced transient gamma-band activity. Despite evidence for maturation

  8. Mitochondrial Polyadenylation Is a One-Step Process Required for mRNA Integrity and tRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Maffezzini, Camilla; Felser, Andrea; Wibom, Rolf; Wedell, Anna; Wredenberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation has well characterised roles in RNA turnover and translation in a variety of biological systems. While polyadenylation on mitochondrial transcripts has been suggested to be a two-step process required to complete translational stop codons, its involvement in mitochondrial RNA turnover is less well understood. We studied knockdown and knockout models of the mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase (MTPAP) in Drosophila melanogaster and demonstrate that polyadenylation of mitochondrial mRNAs is exclusively performed by MTPAP. Further, our results show that mitochondrial polyadenylation does not regulate mRNA stability but protects the 3' terminal integrity, and that despite a lack of functioning 3' ends, these trimmed transcripts are translated, suggesting that polyadenylation is not required for mitochondrial translation. Additionally, loss of MTPAP leads to reduced steady-state levels and disturbed maturation of tRNACys, indicating that polyadenylation in mitochondria might be important for the stability and maturation of specific tRNAs. PMID:27176048

  9. Atrazine and malathion shorten the maturation process of Xenopus laevis oocytes and have an adverse effect on early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qichao; Lee, Jessica; Lin, Yu-Huey; Jing, Guihua; Tsai, L Jillianne; Chen, Andrew; Hetrick, Lindsay; Jocoy, Dylan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-04-01

    The use of pesticides has a negative impact on the environment. Amphibians have long been regarded as indicator species to pollutants due to their permeable skin and sensitivity to the environment. Studies have shown that population declines of some amphibians are directly linked with exposure to agricultural contaminants. In the past, much of the studies have focused on the toxic effect of contaminants on larvae (tadpoles), juvenile and adult frogs. However, due to the nature of their life cycle, amphibian eggs and early embryos are especially susceptible to the contaminants, and any alteration during the early reproductive stages may have a profound effect on the health and population of amphibians. In this study, we analyzed the effect of atrazine and malathion, two commonly used pesticides, on Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis. We found that both atrazine and malathion shortened the frog oocyte maturation process and resulted in reduced Emi2 levels at cytostatic factor-mediated metaphase arrest, and a high level of Emi2 is critically important for oocyte maturation. Furthermore, frog embryos fertilized under the influence of atrazine and/or malathion displayed a higher rate of abnormal division that eventually led to embryo death during early embryogenesis. PMID:26686575

  10. Atrazine and malathion shorten the maturation process of Xenopus laevis oocytes and have an adverse effect on early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qichao; Lee, Jessica; Lin, Yu-Huey; Jing, Guihua; Tsai, L Jillianne; Chen, Andrew; Hetrick, Lindsay; Jocoy, Dylan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-04-01

    The use of pesticides has a negative impact on the environment. Amphibians have long been regarded as indicator species to pollutants due to their permeable skin and sensitivity to the environment. Studies have shown that population declines of some amphibians are directly linked with exposure to agricultural contaminants. In the past, much of the studies have focused on the toxic effect of contaminants on larvae (tadpoles), juvenile and adult frogs. However, due to the nature of their life cycle, amphibian eggs and early embryos are especially susceptible to the contaminants, and any alteration during the early reproductive stages may have a profound effect on the health and population of amphibians. In this study, we analyzed the effect of atrazine and malathion, two commonly used pesticides, on Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis. We found that both atrazine and malathion shortened the frog oocyte maturation process and resulted in reduced Emi2 levels at cytostatic factor-mediated metaphase arrest, and a high level of Emi2 is critically important for oocyte maturation. Furthermore, frog embryos fertilized under the influence of atrazine and/or malathion displayed a higher rate of abnormal division that eventually led to embryo death during early embryogenesis.

  11. Mature clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats RNA (crRNA) length is measured by a ruler mechanism anchored at the precursor processing site.

    PubMed

    Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Maniv, Inbal; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2011-12-27

    Precise RNA processing is fundamental to all small RNA-mediated interference pathways. In prokaryotes, clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci encode small CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that protect against invasive genetic elements by antisense targeting. CRISPR loci are transcribed as a long precursor that is cleaved within repeat sequences by CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. In many organisms, this primary processing generates crRNA intermediates that are subject to additional nucleolytic trimming to render mature crRNAs of specific lengths. The molecular mechanisms underlying this maturation event remain poorly understood. Here, we defined the genetic requirements for crRNA primary processing and maturation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. We show that changes in the position of the primary processing site result in extended or diminished maturation to generate mature crRNAs of constant length. These results indicate that crRNA maturation occurs by a ruler mechanism anchored at the primary processing site. We also show that maturation is mediated by specific cas genes distinct from those genes involved in primary processing, showing that this event is directed by CRISPR/Cas loci.

  12. Changes in esculeoside A content in different regions of the tomato fruit during maturation and heat processing.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Akiko; Kimura, Mizuki; Saigo, Hiromi; Aburaya, Kei; Nakano, Masako; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Nagai, Ryoji

    2011-04-27

    We previously demonstrated that esculeogenin A, a new aglycone of the tomato sapogenol esculeoside A, inhibits both acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT)-1 and -2 and ameliorates the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in apoE deficient mice. Although we believe that daily intake of esculeoside A from tomato products can play a beneficial role in preventing the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the compound is not being used for preventive medicine due to the lack of information on methods for quantitative analysis and the content and stability of the compound in tomato products. In the present study, we report the development of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an instrument equipped with a refractive index (RI) detector for esculeoside A quantification. We used this method to measure the changes in esculeoside A content during maturation, its distribution in the fruit body, and its stability during the heating process. The contents of esculeoside A in cherry tomatoes and Momotaro tomatoes were 21- and 9-fold, respectively, higher than that of lycopene, which is the most well-known compound in tomatoes. Furthermore, the esculeoside A content in pericarp wall was higher than in the whole tomato fruit and increased in a time-dependent manner during maturation. Although the melting point of purified esculeoside A was 225 °C, the esculeoside A in crude tomato extract decreased in a temperature-dependent manner. Degradation due to the heating process was inhibited under a pH of 9. These results demonstrated that the esculeoside A content differs in the various types of tomatoes, during maturation, and during the heating process used for preservation. PMID:21395308

  13. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  14. Maturation of Rapid Auditory Temporal Processing and Subsequent Nonword Repetition Performance in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Allison M.; Reid, Corinne L.; Anderson, Mike; Richardson, Cassandra; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2012-01-01

    According to the rapid auditory processing theory, the ability to parse incoming auditory information underpins learning of oral and written language. There is wide variation in this low-level perceptual ability, which appears to follow a protracted developmental course. We studied the development of rapid auditory processing using event-related…

  15. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry Ih. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  16. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses.

    PubMed

    Konevtsova, O V; Lorman, V L; Rochal, S B

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry I_{h}. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  17. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  18. Acute stress alters transcript expression pattern and reduces processing of proBDNF to mature BDNF in Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stress involves alterations of brain functioning that may precipitate to mood disorders. The neurotrophin Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) has recently been involved in stress-induced adaptation. BDNF is a key regulator of neuronal plasticity and adaptive processes. Regulation of BDNF is complex and may reflect not only stress-specific mechanisms but also hormonal and emotional responses. For this reason we used, as an animal model of stress, a fish whose brain organization is very similar to that of higher vertebrates, but is generally considered free of emotional reactions. Results We provide a comprehensive characterization of BDNF gene in the Dicentrarchus labrax and its transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation following acute stress. While total BDNF mRNA levels are unchanged, BDNF transcripts 1c and 1d resulted down regulated after acute stress. Acute stress induces also a significant increase in proBDNF levels and reduction in mature BDNF suggesting altered regulation of proBDNF proteolytic processing. Notably, we provide here the first evidence that fishes possess a simplified proteolytic regulation of BDNF since the pro28Kda form, generated by the SKI-1 protease in mammals, is absent in fishes because the cleavage site has first emerged in reptilians. Finally, we show that the proBDNF/totBDNF ratio is a highly predictive novel quantitative biomarker to detect stress in fishes with sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 87%, and Negative Predictive Value = 100%. Conclusion The high predictivity of proBDNF/totBDNF ratio for stress in lower vertebrates indicates that processing of BDNF is a central mechanism in adaptation to stress and predicts that a similar regulation of pro/mature BDNF has likely been conserved throughout evolution of vertebrates from fish to man. PMID:20074340

  19. In situ Observation of Formation Process of Negative Electron Affinity Surface of GaAs by Surface Photo-Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Kazuya; Nishitani, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Katsunari; Imai, Hironobu; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Namba, Daiki; Meguro, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    We have used surface photo-absorption (SPA) to investigate the formation of negative electron affinity (NEA) surfaces on p-GaAs during the Yo-Yo method, under an alternating supply of Cs and O2. The SPA spectra showed that the surface during the first Cs step was different from those in the following Cs and O2 steps. This suggests that the surface structure did not change after the initial surface was formed, indicating that there could be two Cs adsorption sites on the GaAs surface, which is different from previously proposed models.

  20. Vocationally Mature Coping Strategies and Progress in the Decision-Making Process: A Canonical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susan D.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between factors influencing career development and the decision-making process in 174 students. Results suggested that planning orientation will hinder or facilitate movement beyond the exploratory phase of decision making, and decision-making skills reduce the effort of the prechoice portion of decision making. (WAS)

  1. Long-term performance and microbial ecology of a two-stage PN-ANAMMOX process treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Li, Huosheng; Zhou, Shaoqi; Ma, Weihao; Huang, Pengfei; Huang, Guotao; Qin, Yujie; Xu, Bin; Ouyang, Hai

    2014-05-01

    Long-term performance of a two-stage partial nitritation (PN)-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process treating mature landfill leachate was investigated. Stable partial nitritation performance was achieved in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using endpoint pH control, providing an effluent with a ratio of NO2(-)-N/NH4(+)-N at 1.23 ± 0.23. High rate nitrogen removal over 4 kg N/m(3)/d was observed in the ANAMMOX reactor in the first three months. However, during long-term operation, the ANAMMOX reactor can only stably operate under nitrogen load of 1 kg N/m(3)/d, with 85 ± 1% of nitrogen removal. The ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the PN-SBR were mainly affiliated to Nitrosomonas sp. IWT514, Nitrosomonas eutropha and Nitrosomonas eutropha, the anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) in the ANAMMOX reactor were mainly affiliated to Kuenenia stuttgartiensis.

  2. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  3. Mature landfill leachate treatment by coagulation/flocculation combined with Fenton and solar photo-Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Amor, Carlos; De Torres-Socías, Estefanía; Peres, José A; Maldonado, Manuel I; Oller, Isabel; Malato, Sixto; Lucas, Marco S

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the treatment of a mature landfill leachate through the application of chemical-based treatment processes in order to achieve the discharge legal limits into natural water courses. Firstly, the effect of coagulation/flocculation with different chemicals was studied, evaluating the role of different initial pH and chemicals concentration. Afterwards, the efficiency of two different advanced oxidation processes for leachate remediation was assessed. Fenton and solar photo-Fenton processes were applied alone and in combination with a coagulation/flocculation pre-treatment. This physicochemical conditioning step, with 2 g L(-1) of FeCl3 · 6H2O at pH 5, allowed removing 63% of COD, 80% of turbidity and 74% of total polyphenols. Combining the coagulation/flocculation pre-treatment with Fenton reagent, it was possible to reach 89% of COD removal in 96 h. Moreover, coagulation/flocculation combined with solar photo-Fenton revealed higher DOC (75%) reductions than single solar photo-Fenton (54%). In the combined treatment (coagulation/flocculation and solar photo-Fenton), it was reached a DOC reduction of 50% after the chemical oxidation, with 110 kJ L(-1) of accumulated UV energy and a H2O2 consumption of 116 mM. Toxicity and biodegradability assays were performed to evaluate possible variations along the oxidation processes. After the combined treatment, the leachate under study presented non-toxicity but biodegradability increased.

  4. MicroRNA-155 controls affinity-based selection by protecting c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Rinako; Leyland, Rebecca; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Lu, Dong; Turner, Martin; Arbore, Giuseppina; Phan, Tri Giang; Brink, Robert; Vigorito, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The production of high-affinity antibodies by B cells is essential for pathogen clearance. Antibody affinity for antigen is increased through the affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). This is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation coupled with the acquisition of mutations and antigen-based positive selection, resulting in retention of the highest-affinity B cell clones. The posttranscriptional regulator microRNA-155 (miR-155) is critical for efficient affinity maturation and the maintenance of the GCs; however, the cellular and molecular mechanism by which miR-155 regulates GC responses is not well understood. Here, we utilized a miR-155 reporter mouse strain and showed that miR-155 is coexpressed with the proto-oncogene encoding c-MYC in positively selected B cells. Functionally, miR-155 protected positively selected c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis, allowing clonal expansion of this population, providing an explanation as to why Mir155 deletion impairs affinity maturation and promotes the premature collapse of GCs. We determined that miR-155 directly inhibits the Jumonji family member JARID2, which enhances B cell apoptosis when overexpressed, and thereby promotes GC B cell survival. Our findings also suggest that there is cooperation between c-MYC and miR-155 during the normal GC response, a cooperation that may explain how c-MYC and miR-155 can collaboratively function as oncogenes.

  5. MicroRNA-155 controls affinity-based selection by protecting c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Rinako; Leyland, Rebecca; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Lu, Dong; Turner, Martin; Arbore, Giuseppina; Phan, Tri Giang; Brink, Robert; Vigorito, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The production of high-affinity antibodies by B cells is essential for pathogen clearance. Antibody affinity for antigen is increased through the affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). This is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation coupled with the acquisition of mutations and antigen-based positive selection, resulting in retention of the highest-affinity B cell clones. The posttranscriptional regulator microRNA-155 (miR-155) is critical for efficient affinity maturation and the maintenance of the GCs; however, the cellular and molecular mechanism by which miR-155 regulates GC responses is not well understood. Here, we utilized a miR-155 reporter mouse strain and showed that miR-155 is coexpressed with the proto-oncogene encoding c-MYC in positively selected B cells. Functionally, miR-155 protected positively selected c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis, allowing clonal expansion of this population, providing an explanation as to why Mir155 deletion impairs affinity maturation and promotes the premature collapse of GCs. We determined that miR-155 directly inhibits the Jumonji family member JARID2, which enhances B cell apoptosis when overexpressed, and thereby promotes GC B cell survival. Our findings also suggest that there is cooperation between c-MYC and miR-155 during the normal GC response, a cooperation that may explain how c-MYC and miR-155 can collaboratively function as oncogenes. PMID:26657861

  6. Process Maturity and Organizational Structure as a Framework for Performance Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škrinjar, Rok; Dimovski, Vlado; Škerlavaj, Miha; Indihar Šternberger, Mojca

    Business and technological change threatens organizational sustainability, which depends on a balance between change and order. Few organizations can control the forces that affect them, but they can control the way in which they deal with those forces. Organizations today face increasing pressures to integrate their processes across disparate divisions and functional units, in order to remove inefficiencies as well as to enhance manageability. Although many enterprises acknowledge the need to be quick and responsive in a global economy and market that is constantly changing, many are not adequately structured to do so. The functional/divisional organizational structure, the legacy form industrial age and one of the major agility inhibitors, is still predominant.

  7. 3[prime] end maturation of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast atpB mRNA is a two-step process

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.; Kindle, K.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The research studied the 3[prime] end maturation of green algae chloroplast atpB mRNA. Most data on transcription termination and 3[prime] end maturation in chloroplasts have been based on in vitro experiments. Newly developed chloroplast transformation techniques have allowed the use of a green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to examine chloroplast mRNA 3[prime] end stability determinants and mRNA processing both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this research showed that Chlamydomonas chloroplast protein extracts contain an endonuclease activity that cleaves a synthetic precursor of atpB mRNA 10 nucleotides downstream on the mature 3[prime] end in vitro. Rapid cleavage by this endonuclease is followed by exonucleolytic removal of 10 nucleotides to yield the mature 3[prime] end.

  8. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  9. Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, John O.

    1973-01-01

    Research in the field of Career Maturity is reviewed and summarized, with particular attention to Super's Career Pattern Study, Gribbons and Lohnes' Career Development Study, and Crites' Vocational Development Project. Crites' organization and revision into a hierarchical structure of the five dimensions of vocational maturity proposed in Supers'…

  10. Residual effects of low oxygen storage of mature green fruit on ripening processes and ester biosynthesis during ripening in bananas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature green banana (Musa sapientum L. cv. Cavendish) fruit were stored in 0.5%, 2 %, or 21% O2 for 7 days at 20 °C before ripening was initiated by ethylene. Residual effects of low O2 storage in mature green fruit on ripening and ester biosynthesis in fruit were investigated during ripening period...

  11. Processing of N-linked oligosaccharides from precursor- to mature-form herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gC.

    PubMed Central

    Serafini-Cessi, F; Dall'Olio, F; Pereira, L; Campadelli-Fiume, G

    1984-01-01

    Immature and mature forms of glycoprotein gC were purified by immunoadsorbent from herpes simplex virus type 1-infected BHK cells labeled with [3H]mannose for a 20-min pulse or for 11 h followed by a 3-h chase. The nature of N-asparagine-linked oligosaccharides carried by the immature form, pgC (molecular weight = 92,000), and the mature gC (molecular weight = 120,000) has been investigated. All pronase-digested glycopeptides of pgC were susceptible to endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H treatment; thus they have a high-mannose structure. Using thin-layer chromatography to separate endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-cleaved oligosaccharides, polymannosyl chains of different sizes, ranging from Man9GlcNAc to Man5GlcNAc, were separated. The major components were Man8GlcNAc and Man7GlcNAc, suggesting that pgC labeled in a 20-min pulse represents the form of glycoprotein already routed to the Golgi apparatus. Analysis of glycopeptides of mature gC showed that the majority (95%) of N-linked glycans were converted to complex-type glycans. Ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and leucoagglutinin-agarose revealed that diantennary and triantennary glycans predominated, whereas tetrantennary chains were not present. Parts of the di- and triantennary chains were not fully sialylated. The high heterogeneity of complex-type chains found in mature gC may be related to the high number of N-glycosylation sites of the glycoprotein as predicted by DNA sequencing studies (Frink et al., J. Virol. 45:634-647, 1983). Images PMID:6088806

  12. Folate content in faba beans (Vicia faba L.)—effects of cultivar, maturity stage, industrial processing, and bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Hefni, Mohammed E; Shalaby, Mohamed T; Witthöft, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Faba beans are an important source of folate and commonly consumed in Egypt. This study examined the effects of Egyptian industrial food processing (e.g., canning and freezing), germination, cultivar, and maturity stages on folate content, with the aim to develop a candidate functional canned faba bean food with increased folate content. The folate content in four cultivars of green faba beans ranged from 110 to 130 μg 100 g−1 fresh weight (535–620 μg 100 g−1 dry matter [DM]), which was four- to sixfold higher than in dried seeds. Industrial canning of dried seeds resulted in significant folate losses of ∼20% (P = 0.004), while industrial freezing had no effect. Germination of faba beans increased the folate content by >40% (P < 0.0001). A novel industrial canning process involving pregermination of dried faba beans resulted in a net folate content of 194 μg 100 g−1 DM, which is 52% more than in conventional canned beans. The consumption of green faba beans should be recommended, providing ∼120 μg dietary folate equivalents per 100 g/portion. PMID:25650294

  13. Tissue-engineered vascular grafts transform into mature blood vessels via an inflammation-mediated process of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jason D; Sawh-Martinez, Rajendra; Brennan, Matthew P; Jay, Steven M; Devine, Lesley; Rao, Deepak A; Yi, Tai; Mirensky, Tamar L; Nalbandian, Ani; Udelsman, Brooks; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Saltzman, W Mark; Snyder, Edward; Kyriakides, Themis R; Pober, Jordan S; Breuer, Christopher K

    2010-03-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are the earliest tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) to be used clinically. These TEVGs transform into living blood vessels in vivo, with an endothelial cell (EC) lining invested by smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, the process by which this occurs is unclear. To test if the seeded BMCs differentiate into the mature vascular cells of the neovessel, we implanted an immunodeficient mouse recipient with human BMC (hBMC)-seeded scaffolds. As in humans, TEVGs implanted in a mouse host as venous interposition grafts gradually transformed into living blood vessels over a 6-month time course. Seeded hBMCs, however, were no longer detectable within a few days of implantation. Instead, scaffolds were initially repopulated by mouse monocytes and subsequently repopulated by mouse SMCs and ECs. Seeded BMCs secreted significant amounts of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and increased early monocyte recruitment. These findings suggest TEVGs transform into functional neovessels via an inflammatory process of vascular remodeling.

  14. Folate content in faba beans (Vicia faba L.)-effects of cultivar, maturity stage, industrial processing, and bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hefni, Mohammed E; Shalaby, Mohamed T; Witthöft, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Faba beans are an important source of folate and commonly consumed in Egypt. This study examined the effects of Egyptian industrial food processing (e.g., canning and freezing), germination, cultivar, and maturity stages on folate content, with the aim to develop a candidate functional canned faba bean food with increased folate content. The folate content in four cultivars of green faba beans ranged from 110 to 130 μg 100 g(-1) fresh weight (535-620 μg 100 g(-1) dry matter [DM]), which was four- to sixfold higher than in dried seeds. Industrial canning of dried seeds resulted in significant folate losses of ∼20% (P = 0.004), while industrial freezing had no effect. Germination of faba beans increased the folate content by >40% (P < 0.0001). A novel industrial canning process involving pregermination of dried faba beans resulted in a net folate content of 194 μg 100 g(-1) DM, which is 52% more than in conventional canned beans. The consumption of green faba beans should be recommended, providing ∼120 μg dietary folate equivalents per 100 g/portion.

  15. Gene expression programs during Brassica oleracea seed maturation, osmopriming, and germination are indicators of progression of the germination process and the stress tolerance level.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Yasutaka; Konings, Maurice C J M; Vorst, Oscar; van Houwelingen, Adele M M L; Stoopen, Geert M; Maliepaard, Chris A; Kodde, Jan; Bino, Raoul J; Groot, Steven P C; van der Geest, Apolonia H M

    2005-01-01

    During seed maturation and germination, major changes in physiological status, gene expression, and metabolic events take place. Using chlorophyll sorting, osmopriming, and different drying regimes, Brassica oleracea seed lots of different maturity, stress tolerance, and germination behavior were created. Through careful physiological analysis of these seed lots combined with gene expression analysis using a dedicated cDNA microarray, gene expression could be correlated to physiological processes that occurred within the seeds. In addition, gene expression was studied during early stages of seed germination, prior to radicle emergence, since very little detailed information of gene expression during this process is available. During seed maturation expression of many known seed maturation genes, such as late-embryogenesis abundant or storage-compound genes, was high. Notably, a small but distinct subgroup of the maturation genes was found to correlate to seed stress tolerance in osmoprimed and dried seeds. Expression of these genes rapidly declined during priming and/or germination in water. The majority of the genes on the microarray were up-regulated during osmopriming and during germination on water, confirming the hypothesis that during osmopriming, germination-related processes are initiated. Finally, a large group of genes was up-regulated during germination on water, but not during osmopriming. These represent genes that are specific to germination in water. Germination-related gene expression was found to be partially reversible by physiological treatments such as slow drying of osmoprimed seeds. This correlated to the ability of seeds to withstand stress.

  16. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with MF59-adjuvanted H5 vaccines promotes antibody affinity maturation towards the hemagglutinin HA1 domain and broad H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Dimitrova, Milena; Castellino, Flora; Nicholson, Karl; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Golding, Hana

    2014-01-01

    In an open label clinical study (2007), MF59-adjuvanted hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine from H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) was administered to subjects previously vaccinated (primed) with clade 0 H5N3 (A/duck/Singapore/97) vaccine at least 6 years earlier (in 1999 or 2001). The primed individuals responded rapidly and generated high neutralizing antibody titers against the H5N1-Vietnam strain within 7 days of a single booster vaccination. Furthermore, significant cross-neutralization titers were measured against H5N1 clade 0, 1, and 2 viruses. In the current study, the impact of MF59 adjuvant during heterologous priming on the quality of humoral polyclonal immune response in different vaccine arms were further evaluated using real time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total anti-H5N1 HA1 polyclonal sera antibody binding from the heterologous prime-boost groups after a single MF59-H5N1 boost was significantly higher compared with sera from unprimed individuals that received two MF59-H5N1 vaccinations. The antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (surrogate for antibody affinity) of the polyclonal sera against HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 from the MF59-H5N3 primed groups were significantly higher compared to sera from unadjuvanted primed groups or unprimed individuals that received two MF59-H5N1 vaccines. Furthermore, strong inverse correlations were observed between the antibody dissociation off-rates of the immune sera against HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against H5 vaccine strains and heterologous H5N1 strains. These findings supports the use of oil-in-water-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines to elicit long term memory B cells with high affinity BCR capable of responding to potential variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  17. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  18. Nutrient limitation on ecosystem productivity and processes of mature and old-growth subtropical forests in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; McGroddy, Megan E; Wen, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P) limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr) at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based) in foliage, litter (L) layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H) layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16-20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors). The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China.

  19. Nutrient Limitation on Ecosystem Productivity and Processes of Mature and Old-Growth Subtropical Forests in China

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; McGroddy, Megan E.; Wen, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P) limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr) at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based) in foliage, litter (L) layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H) layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16–20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors). The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China. PMID:23284873

  20. The Origin of Voluminous Dacite (vs. Andesite) at Mature, Thick Continental Arcs: A Reflection of Processes in the Deep Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    arc crust, but at melt fractions too low (≤15%) to permit efficient transport to the upper crust (Vigneresse and Tikoff, 1999). It is further proposed that the reason why dacite is so abundant at mature thick continental arcs (e.g., Altiplano-Puno complex) may be because mantle-derived basalts are primarily emplaced at similar depths (~30-40 km) in continental arc crustal columns. If so, in the central Andean arc, a depth of 30-40 km is within the middle dioritic crust (Graeber and Asch, 1999). Partial melts of hornblende diorite (vs. hornblende gabbro) are predicted to be dacitic (vs. andesitic) at melt fractions of 20-25%, which permits transport to the upper crust. It is therefore proposed that it is deep crustal processes that determine whether andesite or dacite is the most voluminous magma type emplaced into the upper crust and erupted at arcs.

  1. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE IMPACT OF TELEVISION UPON THE MATURING PROCESS OF THE ADULT (PH.D. THESIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TADROS, SAMY S.

    A SURVEY MADE OF EMPIRICAL RESEARCH RELATED TO TELEVISION CONTENT AND EFFECTS ON ADULTS TURNED UP 39 PERTINENT STUDIES WHICH WERE ANALYZED USING FIVE CRITERIA OF ADULT MATURITY, GLEANED FROM THE LITERATURE. OPINIONS OF 44 AMERICAN UNIVERSITY ADULT EDUCATORS REGARDING PROBLEM AREAS NEEDING RESEARCH WERE SOLICITED. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT TELEVISION…

  2. Exploring Enantiospecific Ligand-Protein Interactions Using Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography: Chiral Recognition as a Dynamic Process

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Plazinska, Anita; Kozak, Joanna; Patel, Sharvil; Yamaguchi, Rika; Wainer, Irving

    2008-01-01

    The chiral recognition mechanisms responsible for the enantioselective binding on the α3β4 nicotinic acetyl choline receptor (α3β4 nAChR) and human organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1) have been reviewed. The results indicate that chiral recognition on the α3β4 nAChR is a process involving initial tethering of dextromethorphan and levomethorphan at hydrophobic pockets within the central lumen followed by hydrogen bonding interactions favoring dextromethorphan. The second step is the defining enantioselective step. Studies with the hOCT1 indentified four binding sites within the transporter that participated in chiral recognition. Each of the enantiomers of the compounds used in the study interacted with three of these sites, while (R)-verapamil interacted with all four. Chiral recognition arose from the conformational adjustments required to produce optimum interactions. With respect to the prevailing interaction-based models, the data suggest that chiral recognition is a dynamic process and that the static point-based models should be amended to reflect this. PMID:18723411

  3. A tandem laboratory scale protein purification process using Protein A affinity and anion exchange chromatography operated in a weak partitioning mode.

    PubMed

    Shamashkin, Michael; Godavarti, Ranga; Iskra, Timothy; Coffman, Jon

    2013-10-01

    A significant consequence of scaling up production of high titer monoclonal antibody (mAb) processes in existing facilities is the generation of in-process pools that exceed the capacity of storage vessels. A semi-continuous downstream process where columns and filters are linked and operated in tandem would eliminate the need for intermediate holding tanks. This study is a bench-scale demonstration of the feasibility of a tandem process for the purification of mAbs employing an affinity Protein A capture step, followed by a flow-through anion-exchange (AEX) step with the possibility of adding an in-line virus filtration step (VF). All three steps were linked sequentially and operated as one continuous process using an ÄKTA FPLC equipped with two pumps and a system of valves and bypasses that allowed the components to be engaged at different stages of the process. The AEX column was operated in a weak partitioning (WP) mode enabled by a precise in-line titration of Protein A effluent. In order to avoid complex control schemes and facilitate validation, quality and robustness were built into the system through selection of buffers based on thermodynamic and empirical models. The tandem system utilized the simplest possible combination of valves, pumps, controls, and automation, so that it could easily be implemented in a clinical or commercial production facility. Linking the purification steps in a tandem process is expected to generate savings in time and production costs and also reduce the size of quality systems due to reduced documentation requirements, microbial sampling, and elimination of hold time validation. PMID:23633385

  4. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in striped bass, Morone saxatilis: molecular characterization and processing during oocyte growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Williams, V N; Reading, B J; Hiramatsu, N; Amano, H; Glassbrook, N; Hara, A; Sullivan, C V

    2014-04-01

    The multiple vitellogenin (Vtg) system of striped bass, a perciform species spawning nearly neutrally buoyant eggs in freshwater, was investigated. Vitellogenin cDNA cloning, Western blotting of yolk proteins (YPs) using Vtg and YP type-specific antisera, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of the YPs revealed the complex mechanisms of yolk formation and maturation in this species. It was discovered that striped bass possesses a tripartite Vtg system (VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC) in which all three forms of Vtg make a substantial contribution to the yolk. The production of Vtg-derived YPs is generally similar to that described for other perciforms. However, novel amino-terminal labeling of oocyte YPs prior to MS/MS identified multiple alternative sites for cleavage of these proteins from their parent Vtg, revealing a YP mixture far more complex than reported previously. This approach also revealed that the major YP product of each form of striped bass Vtg, lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH), undergoes limited degradation to smaller polypeptides during oocyte maturation, unlike the case in marine fishes spawning buoyant eggs in which LvHAa undergoes extensive proteolysis to osmotically active free amino acids. These differences likely reflect the lesser need for hydration of pelagic eggs spawned in freshwater. The detailed characterization of Vtgs and their proteolytic fate(s) during oocyte growth and maturation establishes striped bass as a freshwater model for investigating teleost multiple Vtg systems. PMID:24005815

  5. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in striped bass, Morone saxatilis: molecular characterization and processing during oocyte growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Williams, V N; Reading, B J; Hiramatsu, N; Amano, H; Glassbrook, N; Hara, A; Sullivan, C V

    2014-04-01

    The multiple vitellogenin (Vtg) system of striped bass, a perciform species spawning nearly neutrally buoyant eggs in freshwater, was investigated. Vitellogenin cDNA cloning, Western blotting of yolk proteins (YPs) using Vtg and YP type-specific antisera, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of the YPs revealed the complex mechanisms of yolk formation and maturation in this species. It was discovered that striped bass possesses a tripartite Vtg system (VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC) in which all three forms of Vtg make a substantial contribution to the yolk. The production of Vtg-derived YPs is generally similar to that described for other perciforms. However, novel amino-terminal labeling of oocyte YPs prior to MS/MS identified multiple alternative sites for cleavage of these proteins from their parent Vtg, revealing a YP mixture far more complex than reported previously. This approach also revealed that the major YP product of each form of striped bass Vtg, lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH), undergoes limited degradation to smaller polypeptides during oocyte maturation, unlike the case in marine fishes spawning buoyant eggs in which LvHAa undergoes extensive proteolysis to osmotically active free amino acids. These differences likely reflect the lesser need for hydration of pelagic eggs spawned in freshwater. The detailed characterization of Vtgs and their proteolytic fate(s) during oocyte growth and maturation establishes striped bass as a freshwater model for investigating teleost multiple Vtg systems.

  6. A Regulatory Network-Based Approach Dissects Late Maturation Processes Related to the Acquisition of Desiccation Tolerance and Longevity of Medicago truncatula Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Jerome; Lalanne, David; Pelletier, Sandra; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Righetti, Karima; Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Leprince, Olivier; Chatelain, Emilie; Vu, Benoit Ly; Gouzy, Jerome; Gamas, Pascal; Udvardi, Michael K.; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In seeds, desiccation tolerance (DT) and the ability to survive the dry state for prolonged periods of time (longevity) are two essential traits for seed quality that are consecutively acquired during maturation. Using transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling together with a conditional-dependent network of global transcription interactions, we dissected the maturation events from the end of seed filling to final maturation drying during the last 3 weeks of seed development in Medicago truncatula. The network revealed distinct coexpression modules related to the acquisition of DT, longevity, and pod abscission. The acquisition of DT and dormancy module was associated with abiotic stress response genes, including late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) genes. The longevity module was enriched in genes involved in RNA processing and translation. Concomitantly, LEA polypeptides accumulated, displaying an 18-d delayed accumulation compared with transcripts. During maturation, gulose and stachyose levels increased and correlated with longevity. A seed-specific network identified known and putative transcriptional regulators of DT, including ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE3 (MtABI3), MtABI4, MtABI5, and APETALA2/ ETHYLENE RESPONSE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN (AtAP2/EREBP) transcription factor as major hubs. These transcriptional activators were highly connected to LEA genes. Longevity genes were highly connected to two MtAP2/EREBP and two basic leucine zipper transcription factors. A heat shock factor was found at the transition of DT and longevity modules, connecting to both gene sets. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches of MtABI3 confirmed 80% of its predicted targets, thereby experimentally validating the network. This study captures the coordinated regulation of seed maturation and identifies distinct regulatory networks underlying the preparation for the dry and quiescent states. PMID:23929721

  7. Impact of postharvest processing on the fungal population contaminating African walnut shells (Tetracarpidium conophorum Mull. Arg) at different maturity stages and potential mycotoxigenic implications.

    PubMed

    Nkwonta, Chikere G; Medina, Angel; Del Carmen Alamar, Maria; Terry, Leon A

    2015-02-01

    African walnut (Tetracarpidium conophorum Mull. Arg) is commonly processed by boiling or toasting and consumed as a snack or used as a thickener in many West African soup preparations. The nuts are usually exposed to both high temperatures and high relative humidity in open markets which predisposes them to fungal growth. Hence, the dangers of spore inhalation and resultant mycosis cannot be over-emphasized as retailers and consumers are always in direct contact with these nuts during harvest, processing and consumption. So far, there is no reported research on potential mycotoxin contamination of African walnut and whether this risk might be accentuated by processing. African walnut, at early and late maturity stages, were processed by toasting, boiling or left unprocessed before being stored at 25°C and 37°C, respectively under controlled relative humidity for 7days. Nuts were cracked and shell pieces cultured in malt extract agar (MEA) and Dichloran Glycerol 18 (DG18) media and incubated at 25°C for 7days. Results revealed that potential mycotoxigenic species - Aspergillus section Nigri, Aspergillus flavus/parasiticus, Fusarium spp. and Penicillium spp. - were frequently isolated. When compared with unprocessed nuts, toasting completely prevented fungal contamination in shell pieces from nuts in the non-stored (NSN) group at the early maturity stage, while boiling significantly reduced the level of contamination to about 58% (p<0.05). In general, simulating open market conditions caused 100% fungal contamination in all boiled samples and toasted samples at early maturity. However, contamination in toasted samples at late maturity was increased to 90 and 70% at 25°C in DG18 and MEA, respectively, while at 37°C contamination was 40 and 60% in DG18 and MEA, respectively. Mycotoxin analysis using Yeast Extract Sucrose (YES) agar and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-Fluorescence detection (FLD) showed that Aflatoxins - G1 (AFG1), B1 (AFB1), G2 (AFG2

  8. Current challenges for pre-earthquake electromagnetic emissions: shedding light from micro-scale plastic flow, granular packings, phase transitions and self-affinity notion of fracture process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftaxias, K.; Potirakis, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    Are there credible electromagnetic (EM) potential earthquake (EQ) precursors? This a question debated in the scientific community and there may be legitimate reasons for the critical views. The negative view concerning the existence of EM potential precursors is enhanced by features that accompany their observation which are considered as paradox ones, namely, these signals: (i) are not observed at the time of EQs occurrence and during the aftershock period, (ii) are not accompanied by large precursory strain changes, (iii) are not accompanied by simultaneous geodetic or seismological precursors and (iv) their traceability is considered problematic. In this work, the detected candidate EM potential precursors are studied through a shift in thinking towards the basic science findings relative to granular packings, micron-scale plastic flow, interface depinning, fracture size effects, concepts drawn from phase transitions, self-affine notion of fracture and faulting process, universal features of fracture surfaces, recent high quality laboratory studies, theoretical models and numerical simulations. We try to contribute to the establishment of strict criteria for the definition of an emerged EM anomaly as a possibly EQ-related one, and to the explanation of potential precursory EM features which have been considered as paradoxes. A three-stage model for EQ generation by means of pre-EQ fracture-induced EM emissions is proposed. The claim that the observed EM potential precursors may permit a real-time and step-by-step monitoring of the EQ generation is tested.

  9. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  10. Phagosome maturation: aging gracefully.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia V; Botelho, Roberto J; Grinstein, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Foreign particles and apoptotic bodies are eliminated from the body by phagocytic leucocytes. The initial stage of the elimination process is the internalization of the particles into a plasma membrane-derived vacuole known as the phagosome. Such nascent phagosomes, however, lack the ability to kill pathogens or to degrade the ingested targets. These properties are acquired during the course of phagosomal maturation, a complex sequence of reactions that result in drastic remodelling of the phagosomal membrane and contents. The determinants and consequences of the fusion and fission reactions that underlie phagosomal maturation are the topic of this review. PMID:12061891

  11. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  12. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  13. Mechanics of bacteriophage maturation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wouter H; Gertsman, Ilya; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Johnson, John E; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2012-02-14

    Capsid maturation with large-scale subunit reorganization occurs in virtually all viruses that use a motor to package nucleic acid into preformed particles. A variety of ensemble studies indicate that the particles gain greater stability during this process, however, it is unknown which material properties of the fragile procapsids change. Using Atomic Force Microscopy-based nano-indentation, we study the development of the mechanical properties during maturation of bacteriophage HK97, a λ-like phage of which the maturation-induced morphological changes are well described. We show that mechanical stabilization and strengthening occurs in three independent ways: (i) an increase of the Young's modulus, (ii) a strong rise of the capsid's ultimate strength, and (iii) a growth of the resistance against material fatigue. The Young's modulus of immature and mature capsids, as determined from thin shell theory, fit with the values calculated using a new multiscale simulation approach. This multiscale calculation shows that the increase in Young's modulus isn't dependent on the crosslinking between capsomers. In contrast, the ultimate strength of the capsids does increase even when a limited number of cross-links are formed while full crosslinking appears to protect the shell against material fatigue. Compared to phage λ, the covalent crosslinking at the icosahedral and quasi threefold axes of HK97 yields a mechanically more robust particle than the addition of the gpD protein during maturation of phage λ. These results corroborate the expected increase in capsid stability and strength during maturation, however in an unexpected intricate way, underlining the complex structure of these self-assembling nanocontainers.

  14. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  15. Synaptic vesicles in electromotoneurones. I. Axonal transport, site of transmitter uptake and processing of a core proteoglycan during maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, M L; Stadler, H

    1987-01-01

    We were able by using an in vivo pulse-label technique to trace part of the life cycle of a secretory organelle, the acetylcholine-storing synaptic vesicle from electromotoneurones of Torpedo marmorata. This technique uses [35S]sulphate incorporation into the cell bodies of the electromotoneurones which results in radioactive labelling of a synaptic vesicle heparansulphate proteoglycan--a major core component. Vesicles are anterogradely transported in the axons at a fast rate as 'empty' organelles (VP0 population). In the nerve terminal, maturation of the granule to a population (VP1) fully charged with acetylcholine and ATP occurs. Finally after a longer time interval a change to a third population (VP2) is observed. This population is reduced in diameter as compared to VP0 and VP1 suggesting, in agreement with earlier reports, that it has undergone exo-endocytosis. The changes from VP0 to VP1 and VP2 are accompanied by a degradation of the core proteoglycan as measured by gel filtration of the 35S-labelled compound. The results show that vesicles are axonally transported as preformed organelles, exist in the neurone at least in three different populations and that the nerve terminal is the major site of transmitter uptake. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:2444433

  16. Synthesis of boronate-silica hybrid affinity monolith via a one-pot process for specific capture of glycoproteins at neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Mao, J; He, X W; Chen, L X; Zhang, Y K

    2013-08-01

    In this study, a boronate-silica hybrid affinity monolith was prepared for specific capture of glycoproteins at neutral pH condition. The monolith was synthesized via a facile one-pot procedure in a stainless steel column by concurrently mixing hydrolyzed alkoxysilanes tetramethoxysilane and vinyltrimethoxysilane, organic monomer 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid and initiator 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile together. The polycondensation of alkoxysilanes and copolymerization of organic monomer and vinyl-silica monolith were carried out successively by reacting at different temperatures. After optimizing the preparation conditions, the resulting hybrid affinity monolith was systematically characterized and exhibited excellent affinity to both cis-diol-containing small molecules and glycoproteins at neutral and physiological pH, including adenosine, horseradish peroxidase, transferrin and ovalbumin. The binding capacity of ovalbumin on monolith was measured to be 2.5 mg g(-1) at pH 7.0. Furthermore, the hybrid affinity monolith was applied to the separation of transferrin from bovine serum sample at a physiological condition. Good repeatability was obtained and the relative standard deviations of retention time were 1.15 and 4.77 % (n = 5) for run-to-run and column-to-column, respectively. PMID:23807307

  17. Partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate using a pilot-scale continuous activated sludge process at low dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, YongYuan; Mirino, Markus W; Yuan, Yanlei

    2016-10-01

    Controlling of low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.1-0.5mg/L), a cost-effective strategy, was applied to a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic-oxic-anoxic process for partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate. High ammonium removal efficiency, stable nitrite accumulation rate and total nitrogen removal efficiency was higher than 95.0%, 90.0% and 66.4%, respectively, implying potential application of this process for nitrogen removal of mature landfill leachate. Efficient nitrite accumulation in the first oxic reactor depended on low DO conditions and sufficient alkalinity. However, operational limit was mainly decided by actual hydraulic retention time (AHRT) of the first oxic reactor and appeared with AHRT less than 13.9h under DO of 0.3-0.5mg/L. High-throughput sequencing analysis demonstrated significant change of bacterial diversity in the first oxic reactor after a long-term operation and dominant bacteria genus Nitrosomonas was shown to be responsible for NH4(+)-N removal and nitrite accumulation under low DO levels. PMID:27403860

  18. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Maturation Process of β-Cell-Like Cells Obtained from an Optimized Differentiation Protocol of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolla, Daniela; López-Beas, Javier; Lachaud, Christian C.; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Smani, Tarik; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) retain the extraordinary capacity to differentiate into different cell types of an adult organism, including pancreatic β-cells. For this particular lineage, although a lot of effort has been made in the last ten years to achieve an efficient and reproducible differentiation protocol, it was not until recently that this aim was roughly accomplished. Besides, several studies evidenced the impact of resveratrol (RSV) on insulin secretion, even though the mechanism by which this polyphenol potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) is still not clear. The aim of this study was to optimize an efficient differentiation protocol that mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis and to investigate whether RSV may improve the final maturation step to obtain functional insulin-secreting cells. Our results indicate that treatment of hESCs (HS-181) with activin-A induced definitive endoderm differentiation as detected by the expression of SOX17 and FOXA2. Addition of retinoic acid (RA), Noggin and Cyclopamine promoted pancreatic differentiation as indicated by the expression of the early pancreatic progenitor markers ISL1, NGN3 and PDX1. Moreover, during maturation in suspension culture, differentiating cells assembled in islet-like clusters, which expressed specific endocrine markers such as PDX1, SST, GCG and INS. Similar results were confirmed with the human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) line MSUH-001. Finally, differentiation protocols incorporating RSV treatment yielded numerous insulin-positive cells, induced significantly higher PDX1 expression and were able to transiently normalize glycaemia when transplanted in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice thus promoting its survival. In conclusion, our strategy allows the efficient differentiation of hESCs into pancreatic endoderm capable of generating β-cell-like cells and demonstrates that RSV improves the maturation process. PMID:25774684

  19. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same time,…

  20. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35−/− mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development of oligodendrocytes and myelination is essential for normal CNS function and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is critical for oligodendrocyte maturation, but how Cdk5 activity is controlled is unclear. Here we show that the coactivators of Cdk5, p35 and p39, regulate distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and myelination. Loss of p35 perturbs oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation, whereas loss of p39 delays oligodendrocyte maturation. Loss of both completely inhibits oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Disruption of oligodendrocyte development was more pronounced in p35−/−;p39

  1. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn; Miller, Robert H; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35(-/-) mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation.

  2. Examining the process of de novo gene birth: an educational primer on "integration of new genes into cellular networks, and their structural maturation".

    PubMed

    Frietze, Seth; Leatherman, Judith

    2014-03-01

    New genes that arise from modification of the noncoding portion of a genome rather than being duplicated from parent genes are called de novo genes. These genes, identified by their brief evolution and lack of parent genes, provide an opportunity to study the timeframe in which emerging genes integrate into cellular networks, and how the characteristics of these genes change as they mature into bona fide genes. An article by G. Abrusán provides an opportunity to introduce students to fundamental concepts in evolutionary and comparative genetics and to provide a technical background by which to discuss systems biology approaches when studying the evolutionary process of gene birth. Basic background needed to understand the Abrusán study and details on comparative genomic concepts tailored for a classroom discussion are provided, including discussion questions and a supplemental exercise on navigating a genome database.

  3. Processing and maturation of the pilin of the type IV secretion system encoded within the gonococcal genetic island.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samta; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris

    2011-12-23

    The type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded within the gonococcal genetic island (GGI) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has homology to the T4SS encoded on the F plasmid. The GGI encodes the putative pilin protein TraA and a serine protease TrbI, which is homologous to the TraF protein of the RP4 plasmid involved in circularization of pilin subunits of P-type pili. TraA was processed to a 68-amino acid long circular peptide by leader peptidase and TrbI. Processing occurred after co-translational membrane insertion and was independent of other proteins. Circularization occurred after removal of three C-terminal amino acids. Mutational analysis of TraA revealed limited flexibility at the cleavage and joining sites. Mutagenesis of TrbI showed that the conserved Lys-93 and Asp-155 are essential, whereas mutagenesis of Ser-52, the putative catalytic serine did not influence circularization. Further mutagenesis of other serine residues did not identify a catalytic serine, indicating that TrbI either contains redundant catalytic serine residues or does not function via a serine-lysine dyad mechanism. In vitro studies revealed that circularization occurs via a covalent intermediate between the C terminus of TraA and TrbI. The intermediate is processed to the circular form after cleavage of the N-terminal signal sequence. This is the first demonstration of a covalent intermediate in the circularization mechanism of conjugative pili. PMID:22006923

  4. Affinity driven social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  5. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before a mature... process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The following terms should be...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before a mature... process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The following terms should be...

  7. Physiological and molecular analysis of the maturation process in fruits of Clementine Mandarin and one of its late-ripening mutants.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Gaetano; Las Casas, Giuseppina; Caruso, Marco; Todaro, Aldo; Rapisarda, Paolo; La Malfa, Stefano; Gentile, Alessandra; Tribulato, Eugenio

    2009-09-01

    Peel color is one of the main features affecting citrus quality. Clementine is a widespread citrus species with several mutants showing a delay in pigmentation and harvesting. This work characterizes the fruit development and ripening of two clementine clones, 'Comune', a widespread variety, and one of its natural mutations, 'Tardivo', which differ by a delayed color-break and extended harvest period. Morphological, chemical, and molecular analyses were carried out on fruits of both genotypes during the whole maturation process. Analysis showed that mutation did not affect ripening characteristics such as juice acidity and TSS. However, biochemical and molecular analysis revealed marked differences in the flavedo regarding carotenogenesis and chlorophyllase gene expression. Carotenoid showed quantitative differences at biochemical and molecular levels. Results demonstrated that the mutation in 'Tardivo' influenced the transcriptional activation of PSY, a key step in carotenoid biosynthesis. The differential PSY expression led to a significant quantitative difference in phytoene accumulation between the two genotypes. Also, 'Tardivo' showed delayed accumulation of carotenes, lutein, and beta,beta-xanthophylls. The differential expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and perception suggested differing responses to ethylene signaling between the two genotypes. Moreover, exogenous application of ethylene revealed a different sensitivity of the two varieties to this hormone. The analysis added new information to better understand the complex process of ripening in citrus.

  8. Physiological and molecular analysis of the maturation process in fruits of Clementine Mandarin and one of its late-ripening mutants.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Gaetano; Las Casas, Giuseppina; Caruso, Marco; Todaro, Aldo; Rapisarda, Paolo; La Malfa, Stefano; Gentile, Alessandra; Tribulato, Eugenio

    2009-09-01

    Peel color is one of the main features affecting citrus quality. Clementine is a widespread citrus species with several mutants showing a delay in pigmentation and harvesting. This work characterizes the fruit development and ripening of two clementine clones, 'Comune', a widespread variety, and one of its natural mutations, 'Tardivo', which differ by a delayed color-break and extended harvest period. Morphological, chemical, and molecular analyses were carried out on fruits of both genotypes during the whole maturation process. Analysis showed that mutation did not affect ripening characteristics such as juice acidity and TSS. However, biochemical and molecular analysis revealed marked differences in the flavedo regarding carotenogenesis and chlorophyllase gene expression. Carotenoid showed quantitative differences at biochemical and molecular levels. Results demonstrated that the mutation in 'Tardivo' influenced the transcriptional activation of PSY, a key step in carotenoid biosynthesis. The differential PSY expression led to a significant quantitative difference in phytoene accumulation between the two genotypes. Also, 'Tardivo' showed delayed accumulation of carotenes, lutein, and beta,beta-xanthophylls. The differential expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and perception suggested differing responses to ethylene signaling between the two genotypes. Moreover, exogenous application of ethylene revealed a different sensitivity of the two varieties to this hormone. The analysis added new information to better understand the complex process of ripening in citrus. PMID:19655798

  9. Detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in Camembert irradiated before and after the maturing process-comparison of florisil column chromatography and on-line coupled liquid chromatography-gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Schreiber, G.A.

    1995-02-01

    The influence of the maturing process on the detection of radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons in the fat of Camembert has been investigated. Two analytical methods for separation of the hydrocarbon fraction from the lipid were applied: Florisil column chromatography with subsequent gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination as well as on-line coupled liquid chromatography-GC-MS. The maturing process had no influence on the detection of radiation-induced volatiles. Comparable results were achieved with both analytical methods. However, preference is given to the more effective on-line coupled LC-GC method. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Affine Invariant Character Recognition by Progressive Removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamura, Masakazu; Horimatsu, Akira; Niwa, Ryo; Kise, Koichi; Uchida, Seiichi; Omachi, Shinichiro

    Recognizing characters in scene images suffering from perspective distortion is a challenge. Although there are some methods to overcome this difficulty, they are time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a set of affine invariant features and a new recognition scheme called “progressive removing” that can help reduce the processing time. Progressive removing gradually removes less feasible categories and skew angles by using multiple classifiers. We observed that progressive removing and the use of the affine invariant features reduced the processing time by about 60% in comparison to a trivial one without decreasing the recognition rate.

  11. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis.

  12. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J. Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis. PMID:27010650

  13. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis. PMID:27010650

  14. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  15. Intra-clonal competition inhibits the formation of high affinity antibody secreting cells1

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuc-vy L.; Kim, Tea Hyun; Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Protective immunity requires a diverse, polyclonal B cell repertoire. We demonstrate that affinity maturation of the humoral response to a hapten is impaired when pre-existing clonally restricted cells recognizing the hapten are dominant in the B cell repertoire. B1- 8i+/− mice, which feature a high frequency of B cells with nitrophenyl (NP) binding specificity, respond to NP-haptenated proteins with the production of NP-specific antibodies, but affinity maturation is impaired due to insufficient generation of high affinity antibody producing cells. We manipulated the frequency of NP-specific B cells by adoptive transfer of B1-8 B cells into naïve, wild-type recipients. Remarkably, when 104 B1-8 B cells were transferred, these cells supported efficient affinity maturation and plasma cell differentiation. In contrast, when 106 B1-8 cells were transferred, affinity maturation did not occur. These data indicate that restricting the frequency of clonally related B cells is required to support affinity maturation. PMID:18941192

  16. Sexual maturation of female Saguinus oedipus oedipus

    SciTech Connect

    Tardif, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    This study is an examination of the process of female sexual maturation in the cotton-top tamarin, Saguinus oedipus oedipus, a South-American primate of the family, Callitrichidae. Two types of questions are addressed. The first question is whether the type of social grouping in which a young female lives affects the rate of her sexual maturation. Specifically, is there a difference between the maturation rate of a female housed with a strange adult male and a female housed with her natal group (i.e., her parents and various siblings). Second, the effect of sexual maturation on various social interactions is examined. Specifically are male-female interactions in mated pairs and mother-daughter interactions in natal groups changed by the sexual maturation of the young females. The mother's presence was not related to the daughter's maturation age. However, whether the natal group, as a whole, inhibited maturation, or unrelated males accelerated maturation, or both, remains unknown. Most of the behavioral interactions involving maturing females were unchanged by maturation. There was some indication that certain behaviors were affected by maturation, but only if a strange unrelated male was present.

  17. Retrovirus maturation-an extraordinary structural transformation.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Simone; Schur, Florian Km; Briggs, John Ag

    2016-06-01

    Retroviruses such as HIV-1 assemble and bud from infected cells in an immature, non-infectious form. Subsequently, a series of proteolytic cleavages catalysed by the viral protease leads to a spectacular structural rearrangement of the viral particle into a mature form that is competent to fuse with and infect a new cell. Maturation involves changes in the structures of protein domains, in the interactions between protein domains, and in the architecture of the viral components that are assembled by the proteins. Tight control of proteolytic cleavages at different sites is required for successful maturation, and the process is a major target of antiretroviral drugs. Here we will describe what is known about the structures of immature and mature retrovirus particles, and about the maturation process by which one transitions into the other. Despite a wealth of available data, fundamental questions about retroviral maturation remain unanswered. PMID:27010119

  18. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  19. From Crescent to Mature Virion: Vaccinia Virus Assembly and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Cooper, Tamara; Howley, Paul M.; Hayball, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has achieved unprecedented success as a live viral vaccine for smallpox which mitigated eradication of the disease. Vaccinia virus has a complex virion morphology and recent advances have been made to answer some of the key outstanding questions, in particular, the origin and biogenesis of the virion membrane, the transformation from immature virion (IV) to mature virus (MV), and the role of several novel genes, which were previously uncharacterized, but have now been shown to be essential for VACV virion formation. This new knowledge will undoubtedly contribute to the rational design of safe, immunogenic vaccine candidates, or effective antivirals in the future. This review endeavors to provide an update on our current knowledge of the VACV maturation processes with a specific focus on the initiation of VACV replication through to the formation of mature virions. PMID:25296112

  20. Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number Anomalies in Autism Suggest Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  1. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  2. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marcatili, Paolo; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10−6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models. PMID:27074145

  3. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  4. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  5. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1865 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1865 Mature. Mature means that the tomato has reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process, and that...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1907 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1907 Mature. Mature means that the tomato has reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process....

  8. An asparagines residue at the N-terminus affects the maturation process of low molecular weight glutenin subunits of wheat endosperm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) glutenin polymers are of two main types, high- (HMW-GS) and low- (LMW-GS) molecular weight subunits. The most common are the latter, based on the first amino acid of the mature sequence, are known as LMW-m and LMW-s types. They differ as a result of three extra amino acids (MET...

  9. One-pot preparation of silica-supported hybrid immobilized metal affinity adsorbent with macroporous surface based on surface imprinting coating technique combined with polysaccharide incorporated sol--gel process.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Li, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Shu-Sheng

    2006-10-01

    A simple and reliable one-pot approach using surface imprinting coating technique combined with polysaccharide incorporated sol-gel process was established to synthesize a new organic-inorganic hybrid matrix possessing macroporous surface and functional ligand. Using mesoporous silica gel being a support, immobilized metal affinity adsorbent with a macroporous shell/mesoporous core structure was obtained after metal ion loading. In the prepared matrix, covalently bonded coating and morphology manipulation on silica gel was achieved by using one-pot sol-gel process starting from an inorganic precursor, -glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysiloxane (GPTMS), and a functional biopolymer, chitosan (CS) at the atmosphere of imprinting polyethylene glycol (PEG). Self-hydrolysis of GPTMS, self-condensation, and co-condensation of silanol groups (Si-OH) from siloxane and silica gel surface, and in situ covalent cross-linking of CS created an orderly coating on silica gel surface. PEG extraction using hot ammonium hydroxide solution gave a chemically and mechanically stabilized pore structure and deactivated residual epoxy groups. The prepared matrix was characterized by using X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The matrix possessed a high capacity for copper ion loading. Protein adsorption performance of the new immobilized metal affinity adsorbent was evaluated by batch adsorption and column chromatographic experiment using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a simple model protein. Under the optimized coating conditions, the obtained macroporous surface resulted in a fast kinetics and high capability for protein adsorption, while the matrix non-charged with metal ions offered a low non-specific adsorption. PMID:16860332

  10. Sequential class switching is required for the generation of high affinity IgE antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huizhong; Dolpady, Jayashree; Wabl, Matthias; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    IgE antibodies with high affinity for their antigens can be stably cross-linked at low concentrations by trace amounts of antigen, whereas IgE antibodies with low affinity bind their antigens weakly. In this study, we find that there are two distinct pathways to generate high and low affinity IgE. High affinity IgE is generated through sequential class switching (μ→γ→ε) in which an intermediary IgG phase is necessary for the affinity maturation of the IgE response, where the IgE inherits somatic hypermutations and high affinity from the IgG1 phase. In contrast, low affinity IgE is generated through direct class switching (μ→ε) and is much less mutated. Mice deficient in IgG1 production cannot produce high affinity IgE, even after repeated immunizations. We demonstrate that a small amount of high affinity IgE can cause anaphylaxis and is pathogenic. Low affinity IgE competes with high affinity IgE for binding to Fcε receptors and prevents anaphylaxis and is thus beneficial. PMID:22249450

  11. Affinity enhancement of antibodies: how low-affinity antibodies produced early in immune responses are followed by high-affinity antibodies later and in memory B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Herman N

    2014-05-01

    The antibodies produced initially in response to most antigens are high molecular weight (MW) immunoglobulins (IgM) with low affinity for the antigen, while the antibodies produced later are lower MW classes (e.g., IgG and IgA) with, on average, orders of magnitude higher affinity for that antigen. These changes, often termed affinity maturation, take place largely in small B-cell clusters (germinal center; GC) in lymphoid tissues in which proliferating antigen-stimulated B cells express the highly mutagenic cytidine deaminase that mediates immunoglobulin class-switching and sequence diversification of the immunoglobulin variable domains of antigen-binding receptors on B cells (BCR). Of the large library of BCR-mutated B cells thus rapidly generated, a small minority with affinity-enhancing mutations are selected to survive and differentiate into long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. BCRs are also endocytic receptors; they internalize and cleave BCR-bound antigen, yielding peptide-MHC complexes that are recognized by follicular helper T cells. Imperfect correlation between BCR affinity for antigen and cognate T-cell engagement may account for the increasing affinity heterogeneity that accompanies the increasing average affinity of antibodies. Conservation of mechanisms underlying mutation and selection of high-affinity antibodies over the ≈200 million years of evolution separating bird and mammal lineages points to the crucial role of antibody affinity enhancement in adaptive immunity.

  12. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  13. Development of a novel affinity chromatography resin for platform purification of lambda fabs.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Nora; Medaglia, Giovanni; Anderka, Oliver; Laurin, Linus; Hermans, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) are novel formats in the growing pipeline of biotherapeutics. Sharing similar features to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with regard to expression, Fabs are considered as unchallenging for upstream development. Yet for downstream processing, the mature mAb downstream purification platform is not directly applicable. New approaches need to be found to achieve a lean purification process that maintains quality, productivity, and timelines while being generically applicable independent of the expression system. In a successful collaboration, BAC BV, GE Healthcare, and Novartis Pharma AG have developed a new affinity chromatography medium (resin) suitable to support cGMP manufacturing of lambda Fabs. We show that using this novel chromatography medium for the capture step, a purification platform for lambda Fabs can be established. PMID:25082738

  14. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  15. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  16. A general method for greatly improving the affinity of antibodies by using combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rajpal, Arvind; Beyaz, Nurten; Haber, Lauric; Cappuccilli, Guido; Yee, Helena; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Lerner, Richard A.; Crea, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Look-through mutagenesis (LTM) is a multidimensional mutagenesis method that simultaneously assesses and optimizes combinatorial mutations of selected amino acids. The process focuses on a precise distribution within one or more complementarity determining region (CDR) domains and explores the synergistic contribution of amino acid side-chain chemistry. LTM was applied to an anti-TNF-α antibody, D2E7, which is a challenging test case, because D2E7 was highly optimized (Kd = 1 nM) by others. We selected and incorporated nine amino acids, representative of the major chemical functionalities, individually at every position in each CDR and across all six CDRs (57 aa). Synthetic oligonucleotides, each introducing one amino acid mutation throughout the six CDRs, were pooled to generate segregated libraries containing single mutations in one, two, and/or three CDRs for each VH and VL domain. Corresponding antibody libraries were displayed on the cell surface of yeast. After positive binding selection, 38 substitutions in 21 CDR positions were identified that resulted in higher affinity binding to TNF-α. These beneficial mutations in both VH and VL were represented in two combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis libraries and selected by FACS to produce a convergence of variants that exhibit between 500- and 870-fold higher affinities. Importantly, these enhanced affinities translate to a 15- to 30-fold improvement in in vitro TNF-α neutralization in an L929 bioassay. Thus, this LTM/combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis strategy generates a comprehensive energetic map of the antibody-binding site in a facile and rapid manner and should be broadly applicable to the affinity maturation of antibodies and other proteins. PMID:15939870

  17. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  18. Data Product Maturity

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-25

    ... document, maturity levels are provided separately for each scientific data set (SDS) included with the data files. The data product ... indiscriminate use of these data products as the basis for research findings, journal publications, and/or presentations.   ...

  19. The bioactivity of human bone morphogenetic protein-15 is sensitive to C-terminal modification: characterization of the purified untagged processed mature region.

    PubMed

    Pulkki, Minna M; Myllymaa, Samu; Pasternack, Arja; Lun, Stanley; Ludlow, Helen; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Korchynskyi, Olexandr; Groome, Nigel; Juengel, Jennifer L; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Laitinen, Mika; Ritvos, Olli; Mottershead, David G

    2011-01-30

    Oocyte-derived bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP15) is critical for the regulation of mammalian fertility. Previously we have found that a C-terminal His(6)-tag destroys the bioactivity of growth differentiation-9 (GDF9, a homolog of BMP15). In this study we found that recombinant human BMP15 is produced by HEK-293T cells in an active form, but the bioactivity is lost by C-terminal modification, specifically, fusion to a Flag tag. After purification the mature BMP15 wt is active in transcriptional reporter assays specific for Smad1/5/8 in human granulosa-luteal (hGL) and COV434 granulosa tumor cells, whereas BMP15 with a carboxy-terminal Flag tag remains inactive. Using these same cell models we found that treatment with purified mature BMP15 wt causes a rapid phosphorylation of Smad1. The purified BMP15 wt is a potent stimulator of rat granulosa cell DNA synthesis, which could be antagonized by the BMPRII ectodomain-Fc fusion molecule, whereas the BMP15C-Flag was completely inactive. Further, the BMP15 wt form is a potent stimulator of inhibin B production in hGL cells. We found that the purified BMP15 wt consists of P16 and -17, both of which are post-translationally modified forms. This is the first characterization of a purified untagged human BMP15 mature region, which is stable and highly bioactive in human and rodent granulosa cells and as such is of importance for studies on human fertility.

  20. Maturation of the cellular and humoral immune responses to persistent infection in horses by equine infectious anemia virus is a complex and lengthy process.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S A; Cook, S J; Lichtenstein, D L; Issel, C J; Montelaro, R C

    1997-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) provides a natural model system by which immunological control of lentivirus infections may be studied. To date, no detailed study addressing in parallel both the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in horses upon infection by EIAV has been conducted. Therefore, we initiated the first comprehensive characterization of the cellular and humoral immune responses during clinical progression from chronic disease to inapparent stages of EIAV infection. Using new analyses of antibody avidity and antibody epitope conformation dependence that had not been previously employed in this system, we observed that the humoral immune response to EIAV required a 6- to 8-month period in which to fully mature. During this time frame, EIAV-specific antibody evolved gradually from a population characterized by low-avidity, nonneutralizing, and predominantly linear epitope specificity to an antibody population with an avidity of moderate to high levels, neutralizing activity, and predominantly conformational epitope specificity. Analyses of the cell-mediated immune response to EIAV revealed CD4+ and CD8+ major histocompatibility complex-restricted, EIAV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity apparent within 3 to 4 weeks postinfection, temporally correlating with the resolution of the primary viremia. After resolution of the initial viremia, EIAV-specific CTL activity differed greatly among the experimentally infected ponies, with some animals having readily detectable CTL activity while others had little measurable CTL activity. Thus, in contrast to the initial viremia, it appeared that no single immune parameter correlated with the resolution of further viremic episodes. Instead, immune control of EIAV infection during the clinically inapparent stage of infection appears to rely on a complex combination of immune system mechanisms to suppress viral replication that effectively functions only after the immune system has evolved to a

  1. Sex Differences in a Causal Model of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Studied sex differences among high school students (N=318) in career development process to determine whether sex differences exist in way six independent variables interact in career maturity causal model of career maturity and to compare each variable's effect on career maturity. Results suggest significant sex differences consistent with…

  2. Maturation of Oocytes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2016-01-01

    Only a fraction of oocytes present in the ovaries at birth are ever ovulated during the lifetime of a female mammal. In vitro maturation (IVM) offers the possibility to exploit what is a largely untapped biological resource. Although IVM is used routinely for the in vitro production of embryos in domestic species, especially cattle, its clinical use in human-assisted reproduction is still evolving. The successful recapitulation in vitro of the events associated with successful oocyte maturation is not always achieved, with the majority of immature oocytes typically failing to develop to the blastocyst stage. Evidence suggests that although culture conditions throughout in vitro embryo production may have a modest influence on the developmental potential of the early embryo, the quality of the oocyte at the start of the process is the key factor determining the proportion of oocytes developing to the blastocyst stage.

  3. Intracellular Na+ regulates epithelial Na+ channel maturation.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Elisa; Carattino, Marcelo D; Hughey, Rebecca P; Pilewski, Joseph M; Kleyman, Thomas R; Myerburg, Mike M

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function is regulated by the intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]i) through a process known as Na(+) feedback inhibition. Although this process is known to decrease the expression of proteolytically processed active channels on the cell surface, it is unknown how [Na(+)]i alters ENaC cleavage. We show here that [Na(+)]i regulates the posttranslational processing of ENaC subunits during channel biogenesis. At times when [Na(+)]i is low, ENaC subunits develop mature N-glycans and are processed by proteases. Conversely, glycan maturation and sensitivity to proteolysis are reduced when [Na(+)]i is relatively high. Surface channels with immature N-glycans were not processed by endogenous channel activating proteases, nor were they sensitive to cleavage by exogenous trypsin. Biotin chase experiments revealed that the immature surface channels were not converted into mature cleaved channels following a reduction in [Na(+)]i. The hypothesis that [Na(+)]i regulates ENaC maturation within the biosynthetic pathways is further supported by the finding that Brefeldin A prevented the accumulation of processed surface channels following a reduction in [Na(+)]i. Therefore, increased [Na(+)]i interferes with ENaC N-glycan maturation and prevents the channel from entering a state that allows proteolytic processing. PMID:25767115

  4. Affinity- and topology-dependent bound on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-08-01

    We provide a proof of a recently conjectured universal bound on current fluctuations in Markovian processes. This bound establishes a link between the fluctuations of an individual observable current, the cycle affinities driving the system into a non-equilibrium steady state, and the topology of the network. The proof is based on a decomposition of the network into independent cycles with both positive affinity and positive stationary cycle current. This formalism allows for a refinement of the bound for systems in equilibrium or with locally vanishing affinities.

  5. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  6. Cesium cation affinities and basicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Jean-François; Maria, Pierre-Charles; Massi, Lionel; Mayeux, Charly; Burk, Peeter; Tammiku-Taul, Jaana

    2007-11-01

    This review focuses on the quantitative data related to cesium cation interaction with neutral or negatively charged ligands. The techniques used for measuring the cesium cation affinity (enthalpies, CCA), and cesium cation basicities (Gibbs free energies, CCB) are briefly described. The quantum chemical calculations methods that were specifically designed for the determination of cesium cation adduct structures and the energetic aspects of the interaction are discussed. The experimental results, obtained essentially from mass spectrometry techniques, and complemented by thermochemical data, are tabulated and commented. In particular, the correlations between cesium cation affinities and lithium cation affinities for the various kinds of ligands (rare gases, polyatomic neutral molecules, among them aromatic compounds and negative ions) serve as a basis for the interpretation of the diverse electrostatic modes of interaction. A brief account of some recent analytical applications of ion/molecule reactions with Cs+, as well as other cationization approaches by Cs+, is given.

  7. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before... the ripening process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before... the ripening process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The...

  9. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  10. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  11. Need for speed: Sexual maturation precedes social maturation in gray mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Sarah; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2015-10-01

    The life history of mammals underlies a fast-slow continuum, ranging from "slow" species with large body size, delayed sexual maturation, low fertility, and long lifespan, to "fast" species showing the opposite traits. Primates fall into the "slow" category, considering their relatively low offspring numbers and delayed juvenile development. However, social and sexual maturation processes do not necessarily have to be completed simultaneously. The comparison of the timeframes for sexual and social maturation is largely lacking for primates, with the prominent exception of humans. Here, we compare both maturation processes in a basal primate, the gray mouse lemur, which ranges in many aspects at the fast end of the slow-fast life history continuum among primates. We compared the patterns and frequencies of various social and solitary behaviors in young adults (YA, 12-13 months old) and older individuals (A, ≥2 years) of both sexes outside estrus. Observations were conducted during mix-sexed dyadic encounter experiments under controlled captive conditions (eight dyads per age class). Results indicate that although all young adults were sexually mature, social maturation was not yet completed in all behavioral domains: Age-dependent differences were found in the number of playing dyads, female marking behavior, female aggression, and social tolerance. Thus, this study provides a first indication that social maturation lags behind sexual maturation in an ancestral nocturnal primate model, indicating that these two developmental schemes may have been decoupled early and throughout the primate lineage. PMID:26119105

  12. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  13. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  14. The impact of the core transformation process on spirituality, symptom experience, and psychological maturity in a mixed age sample in India: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Dinesh; Piedmont, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that spiritual and religious constructs have the potential to influence a broad range of outcomes such as health, well-being, and meaning, both positively and negatively. This study looked at the effect of an under studied psycho-spiritual approach, Core Transformation (CT), in reducing symptoms and promoting well-being. This study also examined whether the impact of CT would be moderated by age, with older participants evidencing better outcomes. Participants from an Indian convenience sample (N = 189) ranging in age from 18 to 65 (M = 34) received group training in CT and completed a battery of measures pretest and 4 weeks post-training, which included personality, spirituality, and psychosocial outcomes scales. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicated significant improvements over time for both spirituality and symptom experience. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for the predictive effects of personality, reaffirmed the incremental validity of Spiritual Transcendence and religious variables in predicting symptom change and outcome ratings. CT did not appear to effect participants levels of psychological maturity. Age was not found to mediate any of these relationships, indicating the age universality of CT's therapeutic effects.

  15. Influence of different mixing ratios on in-vessel co-composting of sewage sludge with horse stable straw bedding waste: maturity and process evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan W C; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Zhao, Zhenyong; Yu, S M; Law, Alex C W; Chung, Patricia C P

    2011-11-01

    Composting sewage sludge alone would reduce the decomposition efficiency due to free limited porosity in sludge. To alleviate this, the use of horse stable straw bedding waste (HSB) was evaluated as a co-composting material with sewage sludge in a 10 tonnes day(-1) in-vessel composter for a period of 7 days before curing in a static aeration pile. Sludge was mixed with HSB at 1 : 1.5 (HSL) and 1 : 2.9 (LSL) on a fresh weight basis. After a composting period of 56 days, both mixing ratios demonstrated to be feasible with LSL having a better organic decomposition and a shorter time to reach maturity. The overall decomposition rates were 52.0 and 58.9% (dry weight basis) for HSL and LSL, respectively. In both treatments, temperature in the in-vessel composters could reach 65°C, which was sufficient to remove the pathogens. Although both products were free of pathogens, HSL exhibited a higher ammoniacal nitrogen contents but a lower seed germination index than that of LSL indicating a higher phytotoxicity and a longer curing period would be required. It can be concluded that HSB provided a better composting conditions at a mixing ratio of 1 : 2.9. PMID:21987410

  16. The impact of the core transformation process on spirituality, symptom experience, and psychological maturity in a mixed age sample in India: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Dinesh; Piedmont, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that spiritual and religious constructs have the potential to influence a broad range of outcomes such as health, well-being, and meaning, both positively and negatively. This study looked at the effect of an under studied psycho-spiritual approach, Core Transformation (CT), in reducing symptoms and promoting well-being. This study also examined whether the impact of CT would be moderated by age, with older participants evidencing better outcomes. Participants from an Indian convenience sample (N = 189) ranging in age from 18 to 65 (M = 34) received group training in CT and completed a battery of measures pretest and 4 weeks post-training, which included personality, spirituality, and psychosocial outcomes scales. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicated significant improvements over time for both spirituality and symptom experience. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for the predictive effects of personality, reaffirmed the incremental validity of Spiritual Transcendence and religious variables in predicting symptom change and outcome ratings. CT did not appear to effect participants levels of psychological maturity. Age was not found to mediate any of these relationships, indicating the age universality of CT's therapeutic effects. PMID:25862342

  17. DExD-box RNA-helicases in Listeria monocytogenes are important for growth, ribosomal maturation, rRNA processing and virulence factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Bäreclev, Caroline; Vaitkevicius, Karolis; Netterling, Sakura; Johansson, Jörgen

    2014-01-01

    RNA-helicases are proteins required for the unwinding of occluding secondary RNA structures, especially at low temperatures. In this work, we have deleted all 4 DExD-box RNA helicases in various combinations in the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Our results show that 3 out of 4 RNA-helicases were important for growth at low temperatures, whereas the effect was less prominent at 37°C. Over-expression of one RNA-helicase, Lmo1450, was able to overcome the reduced growth of the quadruple mutant strain at temperatures above 26°C, but not at lower temperatures. The maturation of ribosomes was affected in different degrees in the various strains at 20°C, whereas the effect was marginal at 37°C. This was accompanied by an increased level of immature 23S rRNA precursors in some of the RNA-helicase mutants at low temperatures. Although the expression of the PrfA regulated virulence factors ActA and LLO decreased in the quadruple mutant strain, this strain showed a slightly increased infection ability. Interestingly, even though the level of the virulence factor LLO was decreased in the quadruple mutant strain as compared with the wild-type strain, the hly-transcript (encoding LLO) was increased. Hence, our results could suggest a role for the RNA-helicases during translation. In this work, we show that DExD-box RNA-helicases are involved in bacterial virulence gene-expression and infection of eukaryotic cells. PMID:25590644

  18. Serial studies on the affinity and heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to thyroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; McLachlan, S M; Bradbury, J; Clark, F; Young, E T

    1989-01-01

    The functional affinity and heterogeneity of autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg) were measured by an IgG subclass-specific solid-phase competition ELISA in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. High-affinity IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies formed the major anti-Tg response. Both titre and affinity of IgG3 and IgG2 anti-Tg were generally low but in some Hashimoto's disease patients high-affinity IgG2 anti-Tg were found and IgG2 anti-Tg, unlike those of other subclasses, showed very restricted heterogeneity. The affinity of IgG4 anti-Tg was similar in patients with thyroid disease and their clinically euthyroid (normal) relatives. In contrast, a progressive increase in IgG1 anti-Tg affinity was seen in clinically euthyroid individuals compared with their relatives with thyroid disease and high titred Hashimoto's disease patients, suggesting that either rising titres of high affinity IgG1 anti-Tg or affinity maturation of IgG1 anti-Tg may be indicative of impending hypothyroidism. PMID:2776357

  19. Leveraging People-Related Maturity Issues for Achieving Higher Maturity and Capability Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buglione, Luigi

    During the past 20 years Maturity Models (MM) become a buzzword in the ICT world. Since the initial Crosby's idea in 1979, plenty of models have been created in the Software & Systems Engineering domains, addressing various perspectives. By analyzing the content of the Process Reference Models (PRM) in many of them, it can be noticed that people-related issues have little weight in the appraisals of the capabilities of organizations while in practice they are considered as significant contributors in traditional process and organizational performance appraisals, as stressed instead in well-known Performance Management models such as MBQA, EFQM and BSC. This paper proposes some ways for leveraging people-related maturity issues merging HR practices from several types of maturity models into the organizational Business Process Model (BPM) in order to achieve higher organizational maturity and capability levels.

  20. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  1. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  2. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  3. MATURE: A Model Driven bAsed Tool to Automatically Generate a langUage That suppoRts CMMI Process Areas spEcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, David; Castaño, Víctor; Calvo-Manzano, Jose A.; Garbajosa, Juan

    Many companies have achieved a higher quality in their processes by using CMMI. Process definition may be efficiently supported by software tools. A higher automation level will make process improvement and assessment activities easier to be adapted to customer needs. At present, automation of CMMI is based on tools that support practice definition in a textual way. These tools are often enhanced spreadsheets. In this paper, following the Model Driven Development paradigm (MDD), a tool that supports automatic generation of a language that can be used to specify process areas practices is presented. The generation is performed from a metamodel that represents CMMI. This tool, differently from others available, can be customized according to user needs. Guidelines to specify the CMMI metamodel are also provided. The paper also shows how this approach can support other assessment methods.

  4. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  5. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  6. VARIABLES ASSOCIATED WITH VOCATIONAL MATURITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REICHMAN, WALTER

    EVIDENCE ABOUT THE CONSTRUCT VALIDITY OF PRESUMED VOCATIONAL MATURITY FACTOR SCORES WAS OBTAINED BY STUDYING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FACTORS OF VOCATIONAL MATURITY AND A GROUP OF CONCURRENT VARIABLES DEEMED RELEVANT TO VOCATIONAL MATURITY. THESE VARIABLES WERE CLASSIFIED INTO FIVE GROUPS--FAMILY SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS, ABILITY AND ACHIEVEMENT,…

  7. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  8. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  9. Membrane remodeling during reticulocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Xinhua; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    The transition of reticulocytes into erythrocytes is accompanied by extensive changes in the structure and properties of the plasma membrane. These changes include an increase in shear resistance, loss of surface area, and acquisition of a biconcave shape. The processes by which these changes are effected have remained largely undefined. Here we examine how the expression of 30 distinct membrane proteins and their interactions change during murine reticulocyte maturation. We show that tubulin and cytosolic actin are lost, whereas the membrane content of myosin, tropomyosin, intercellular adhesion molecule-4, glucose transporter-4, Na-K-ATPase, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, glycophorin A, CD47, Duffy, and Kell is reduced. The degradation of tubulin and actin is, at least in part, through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In regard to the protein-protein interactions, the formation of membrane-associated spectrin tetramers from dimers is unperturbed, whereas the interactions responsible for the formation of the membrane-skeletal junctions are weaker in reticulocytes, as is the attachment of transmembrane proteins to these structures. This weakness, in part, results from the elevated phosphorylation of 4.1R in reticulocytes, which leads to a decrease in shear resistance by reducing its interaction with spectrin and actin. These observations begin to unravel the mechanistic basis of crucial changes accompanying reticulocyte maturation. PMID:20038785

  10. Identification of proteins associated with the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase by tandem affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Del Campo, Mark; Ecker, Karen; Lambowitz, Alan M; De Gnore, Jon P; McAllister, William T

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of mitochondrial (mt) transcripts varies under different conditions, and is thought to depend upon rates of transcription initiation, transcription termination/attenuation and RNA processing/degradation. The requirement to maintain the balance between RNA synthesis and processing may involve coordination between these processes; however, little is known about factors that regulate the activity of mtRNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Recent attempts to identify mtRNAP–protein interactions in yeast by means of a generalized tandem affinity purification (TAP) protocol were not successful, most likely because they involved a C-terminal mtRNAP–TAP fusion (which is incompatible with mtRNAP function) and because of the use of whole-cell solubilization protocols that did not preserve the integrity of mt protein complexes. Based upon the structure of T7 RNAP (to which mtRNAPs show high sequence similarity), we identified positions in yeast mtRNAP that allow insertion of a small affinity tag, confirmed the mature N-terminus, constructed a functional N-terminal TAP–mtRNAP fusion, pulled down associated proteins, and identified them by LC–MS–MS. Among the proteins found in the pull-down were a DEAD-box protein (Mss116p) and an RNA-binding protein (Pet127p). Previous genetic experiments suggested a role for these proteins in linking transcription and RNA degradation, in that a defect in the mt degradadosome could be suppressed by overexpression of either of these proteins or, independently, by mutations in either mtRNAP or its initiation factor Mtf1p. Further, we found that Mss116p inhibits transcription by mtRNAP in vitro in a steady-state reaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Mss116p and Pet127p are involved in modulation of mtRNAP activity. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19536766

  11. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  12. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  13. The importance of social dimension and maturation stage for the probabilistic maturation reaction norm in Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Diaz Pauli, B; Pauli, B D; Heino, M

    2013-10-01

    Maturation is an important event in an organism's life history, with important implications on dynamics of both wild and captive populations. The probabilistic maturation reaction norm (PMRN) has emerged as an important method to describe variation in maturation in wild fish. Because most PMRNs are based on age and size only, it is important to understand limitations of these variables in explaining maturation. We experimentally assessed (i) the sensitivity of age- and size-based PMRNs to unaccounted sources of plasticity, (ii) the role of social environment on maturation and (iii) the significance of estimating PMRNs early and late in the maturation process (initiation and completion of maturation, respectively). We reared male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) under laboratory conditions, subjected to two food levels and three different social cues. We found that growth and social environment affected the maturation in a way that could not be accounted for by their effect on age and size. PMRNs estimated for the initiation stage were less plastic (growth differences and social cues influenced the PMRN shape only little) than those for completion. The initiation of maturation is probably closer to the maturation 'decision' and allows determining factors influencing maturation decision most accurately.

  14. Propolis inhibits osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Roberta; Antony, Kathryn; Johnson, Kristie; Zuo, Jian; Shannon Holliday, L

    2009-12-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honey bee, has been successfully used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent. Traumatic injuries to the teeth, especially avulsion injuries, present a challenging situation for the clinician because of post-treatment complications, such as inflammatory and/or replacement resorption. Agents that reduce osteoclast numbers and activity may be useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries to the teeth. In this study, we evaluated propolis as an anti-resorptive agent. Calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures, which contain both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were exposed to the ethanol extracts of propolis or vehicle control and stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-activity to identify osteoclasts. A significant, dose-dependent reduction in multinuclear TRAP+ cells was demonstrated, although the propolis treatment accommodated cell growth and survival (P < 0.05). Propolis also reduced the formation of actin rings in pure cultures of RAW 264.7 osteoclast-like cells, suggesting that it exerts direct actions on osteoclast maturation. In summary, our data suggest that propolis inhibits late stages of osteoclast maturation including fusion of osteoclasts precursors to form giant cells and formation of actin rings. This supports the hypothesis that it may prove useful as a medicament to reduce resorption associated with traumatic injuries to the teeth. PMID:19843135

  15. Evaluating Hass Avocado Maturity Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maturity of avocado fruit is usually assessed by measuring its dry matter content(DM), which is a destructive and time consuming process. The aim of this study is tointroduce a non-destructive and quick technique that can estimate the DM content of an avocado fruit. 'Hass' avocado fruits at diff...

  16. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  17. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  18. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  19. The maturation of ovulatory potential in man.

    PubMed

    Kulin, H E

    1980-01-01

    The maturation of the potential for ovulation in man is reviewed in the light of recent data quantitating gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in the prepubertal child. The primary limitations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are seen as related to feedback control mechanisms. Based on preliminary data obtained in patients with gonadal dysgenesis, a hypothesis which links positive and negative feedback maturation is proposed. The development of full reproductive potential in man is clearly a process which extends over a decade or more.

  20. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  1. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  2. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo.

  3. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16231.001 PMID:27542195

  4. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. PMID:27542195

  5. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  6. Hormone-initiated maturation of rat liver mitochondria after birth.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R; Pollak, J K

    1980-01-01

    1. The injection of adrenaline, glucagon or cyclic AMP into foetal rats in utero initiates the maturation of energy transduction in rat liver mitochondria before birth. 2. The injection of the beta-blocker, propranolol, prevents this maturation process. 3. The maturation of mitochondrial energy transduction is measured in terms of the increase in the respiratory control index and mitochondrial adenine nucleotide concentration. 4. It is postulated that the actions of the hormones, acting through cyclic AMP, affect glycogenolysis and glycolysis to give rise to transient localized high concentrations of ATP. 5. It is the ATP that acts as the molecular trigger, effecting mitochondrial maturation. PMID:6245641

  7. Evaluation system of negative electron affinity photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongguo; Chang, Benkang; Qian, Yunsheng; Wang, Guihua; Zong, Zhiyuan

    2001-10-01

    This article first describes the background of the research and manufacture of evaluation system of Negative Electron Affinity photocathode. This article designs a set of super high vacuum system for activating NEA photocathode on the base of activation theory, the process of design and debugging is given. The system is composed of three parts: super high vacuum system for GaAs material activation, multi-meter testing system, surface analysis system. The system is used for on-line evaluation of activating of NEA photocathode. The technical parameters and structure of the evaluation system of NEA photocathode are given in the paper. The system is finished and experiments are made. At last the picture of the system is given.

  8. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  9. Engineering antibody affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Webster, D M; Roberts, S; Cheetham, J C; Griest, R; Rees, A R

    1988-01-01

    A combination of ab initio calculations, "knowledge-based prediction", molecular graphics and site-directed mutagenesis has enabled us to probe the molecular details of antibody:antigen recognition and binding and to alter the affinity and specificity of an antibody for its antigen. The significance of electrostatic hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic/hydrophobic patch matching and van der Waals interactions as well as CDR:CDR interactions are discussed in relation to the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the anti-lysozyme antibody Gloop2. The ability to generate reconstructed antibodies, chimeric antibodies, catalytic antibodies and the use of modelled antibodies for the design of drugs is discussed. PMID:3209295

  10. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  11. High affinity ligands from in vitro selection: Complex targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin N.; Jensen, Kirk B.; Julin, Carol M.; Weil, Michael; Gold, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Human red blood cell membranes were used as a model system to determine if the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) methodology, an in vitro protocol for isolating high-affinity oligonucleotides that bind specifically to virtually any single protein, could be used with a complex mixture of potential targets. Ligands to multiple targets were generated simultaneously during the selection process, and the binding affinities of these ligands for their targets are comparable to those found in similar experiments against pure targets. A secondary selection scheme, deconvolution-SELEX, facilitates rapid isolation of the ligands to targets of special interest within the mixture. SELEX provides high-affinity compounds for multiple targets in a mixture and might allow a means for dissecting complex biological systems. PMID:9501188

  12. Mature Students Speak Up: Career Exploration and the Working Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pott, Terilyn

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was undertaken to learn more about how mature students perceive the career counselling process in a post-secondary institution. Through the use of critical incident technique this study examined how three mature students interpret their relationship between themselves and their counsellors. Significant factors identified as…

  13. Spiritual Maturation and Religious Behaviors in Christian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ronald D.; Mellberg, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual maturation processes of internalization and questing were assessed at a Christian university to determine their relationship to year in school and certain religious behaviors. This was a first step toward the development of a new model of Christian higher education that will intentionally facilitate spiritual maturation. A group of 179…

  14. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  15. Antiviral agent based on the non-structural protein targeting the maturation process of HIV-1: expression and susceptibility of chimeric Vpr as a substrate for cleavage by HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Serio, D; Singh, S P; Cartas, M A; Weber, I T; Harrison, R W; Louis, J M; Srinivasan, A

    2000-06-01

    The processing of precursor proteins (Gag and Gag-pol) by the viral protease is absolutely required in order to generate infectious particles. This prompted us to consider novel strategies that target viral maturation. Towards this end, we have engineered an HIV-1 virion associated protein, Vpr, to contain protease cleavage signal sequences from Gag and Gag-pol precursor proteins. We previously reported that virus particles derived from HIV-1 proviral DNA, encoding chimeric Vpr, showed a lack of infectivity, depending on the fusion partner. As an extension of that work, the potential of chimeric Vpr as a substrate for HIV-1 protease was tested utilizing an epitope-based assay. Chimeric Vpr molecules were modified such that the Flag epitope is removed following cleavage, thus allowing us to determine the efficiency of protease cleavage. Following incubation with the protease, the resultant products were analyzed by radioimmunoprecipitation using antibodies directed against the Flag epitope. Densitometric analysis of the autoradiograms showed processing to be both rapid and specific. Further, the analysis of virus particles containing chimeric Vpr by immunoblot showed reactivities to antibodies against the Flag epitope similar to the data observed in vitro. These results suggest that the pseudosubstrate approach may provide another avenue for developing antiviral agents.

  16. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  17. Non-affine deformations in polymer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qi; Basu, Anindita; Janmey, Paul A.; Yodh, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Most theories of soft matter elasticity assume that the local strain in a sample after deformation is identical everywhere and equal to the macroscopic strain, or equivalently that the deformation is affine. We discuss the elasticity of hydrogels of crosslinked polymers with special attention to affine and non-affine theories of elasticity. Experimental procedures to measure non-affine deformations are also described. Entropic theories, which account for gel elasticity based on stretching out individual polymer chains, predict affine deformations. In contrast, simulations of network deformation that result in bending of the stiff constituent filaments generally predict non-affine behavior. Results from experiments show significant non-affine deformation in hydrogels even when they are formed by flexible polymers for which bending would appear to be negligible compared to stretching. However, this finding is not necessarily an experimental proof of the non-affine model for elasticity. We emphasize the insights gained from experiments using confocal rheoscope and show that, in addition to filament bending, sample micro-inhomogeneity can be a significant alternative source of non-affine deformation. PMID:23002395

  18. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  19. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  20. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  1. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests. PMID:24832237

  2. Work Maturity Skills Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina; And Others

    This teaching guide is a part of those materials developed for the Work Maturity Skills Training Program. (The Work Maturity Skills Training Program is a set of individualized competency-based units that are designed to help participants develop the competencies they need to find and retain jobs.) Following a brief description of the purpose and…

  3. Career Education and Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebilco, Geoffrey R.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between career maturity and career curriculum in 38 Melbourne metropolitan secondary schools (N=2280 students) using an Australian adaption of the Career Development Inventory. Results confirmed that schools with career education programs achieved higher gains in student career maturity. (JAC)

  4. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  5. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation via fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the results of fractal analysis can be used as criteria for midpalatal suture maturation evaluation. Methods The study included 131 subjects aged over 18 years of age (range 18.1–53.4 years) who underwent cone-beam computed tomography. Skeletonized images of the midpalatal suture were obtained via image processing software and used to calculate fractal dimensions. Correlations between maturation stage and fractal dimensions were calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Optimal fractal dimension cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results The distribution of maturation stages of the midpalatal suture according to the cervical vertebrae maturation index was highly variable, and there was a strong negative correlation between maturation stage and fractal dimension (−0.623, p < 0.001). Fractal dimension was a statistically significant indicator of dichotomous results with regard to maturation stage (area under curve = 0.794, p < 0.001). A test in which fractal dimension was used to predict the resulting variable that splits maturation stages into ABC and D or E yielded an optimal fractal dimension cut-off value of 1.0235. Conclusions There was a strong negative correlation between fractal dimension and midpalatal suture maturation. Fractal analysis is an objective quantitative method, and therefore we suggest that it may be useful for the evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation. PMID:27668195

  7. Quantitative evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation via fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the results of fractal analysis can be used as criteria for midpalatal suture maturation evaluation. Methods The study included 131 subjects aged over 18 years of age (range 18.1–53.4 years) who underwent cone-beam computed tomography. Skeletonized images of the midpalatal suture were obtained via image processing software and used to calculate fractal dimensions. Correlations between maturation stage and fractal dimensions were calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Optimal fractal dimension cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results The distribution of maturation stages of the midpalatal suture according to the cervical vertebrae maturation index was highly variable, and there was a strong negative correlation between maturation stage and fractal dimension (−0.623, p < 0.001). Fractal dimension was a statistically significant indicator of dichotomous results with regard to maturation stage (area under curve = 0.794, p < 0.001). A test in which fractal dimension was used to predict the resulting variable that splits maturation stages into ABC and D or E yielded an optimal fractal dimension cut-off value of 1.0235. Conclusions There was a strong negative correlation between fractal dimension and midpalatal suture maturation. Fractal analysis is an objective quantitative method, and therefore we suggest that it may be useful for the evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation.

  8. Peptides@mica: from affinity to adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, A; John, T; Gladytz, T; Hassert, R; Pagel, M; Risselada, H J; Naumov, S; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Abel, B

    2016-09-14

    Investigating the adsorption of peptides on inorganic surfaces, on the molecular level, is fundamental for medicinal and analytical applications. Peptides can be potent as linkers between surfaces and living cells in biochips or in implantation medicine. Here, we studied the adsorption process of the positively charged pentapeptide RTHRK, a recently identified binding sequence for surface oxidized silicon, and novel analogues thereof to negatively charged mica surfaces. Homogeneous formation of monolayers in the nano- and low micromolar peptide concentration range was observed. We propose an alternative and efficient method to both quantify binding affinity and follow adhesion behavior. This method makes use of the thermodynamic relationship between surface coverage, measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the concomitant free energy of adhesion. A knowledge-based fit to the autocorrelation of the AFM images was used to correct for a biased surface coverage introduced by the finite lateral resolution of the AFM. Binding affinities and mechanisms were further explored by large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The combination of well validated MD simulations with topological data from AFM revealed a better understanding of peptide adsorption processes on the atomistic scale. We demonstrate that binding affinity is strongly determined by a peptide's ability to form salt bridges and hydrogen bonds with the surface lattice. Consequently, differences in hydrogen bond formation lead to substantial differences in binding affinity despite conservation of the peptide's overall charge. Further, MD simulations give access to relative changes in binding energy of peptide variations in comparison to a lead compound. PMID:27491508

  9. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  10. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  11. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  12. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm. PMID:26556802

  13. TCR affinity for thymoproteasome-dependent positively selecting peptides conditions antigen responsiveness in CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kensuke; Van Laethem, Francois; Xing, Yan; Akane, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Jameson, Stephen C; Singer, Alfred; Takahama, Yousuke

    2015-10-01

    In the thymus, low-affinity T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement facilitates positive selection of a useful T cell repertoire. Here we report that TCR responsiveness of mature CD8(+) T cells is fine tuned by their affinity for positively selecting peptides in the thymus and that optimal TCR responsiveness requires positive selection on major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides produced by the thymoproteasome, which is specifically expressed in the thymic cortical epithelium. Thymoproteasome-independent positive selection of monoclonal CD8(+) T cells results in aberrant TCR responsiveness, homeostatic maintenance and immune responses to infection. These results demonstrate a novel aspect of positive selection, in which TCR affinity for positively selecting peptides produced by thymic epithelium determines the subsequent antigen responsiveness of mature CD8(+) T cells in the periphery.

  14. Identification of Candidate Angiogenic Inhibitors Processed by Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) in Cell-Based Proteomic Screens: Disruption of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/Heparin Affin Regulatory Peptide (Pleiotrophin) and VEGF/Connective Tissue Growth Factor Angiogenic Inhibitory Complexes by MMP-2 Proteolysis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Richard A.; Butler, Georgina S.; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Brigstock, David R.; Courty, José; Overall, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert both pro- and antiangiogenic functions by the release of cytokines or proteolytically generated angiogenic inhibitors from extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling. In the Mmp2−/− mouse neovascularization is greatly reduced, but the mechanistic aspects of this remain unclear. Using isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of proteins analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry we explored proteome differences between Mmp2−/− cells and those rescued by MMP-2 transfection. Proteome signatures that are hallmarks of proteolysis revealed cleavage of many known MMP-2 substrates in the cellular context. Proteomic evidence of MMP-2 processing of novel substrates was found. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6, follistatin-like 1, and cystatin C protein cleavage by MMP-2 was biochemically confirmed, and the cleavage sites in heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP; pleiotrophin) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. MMP-2 processing of HARP and CTGF released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from angiogenic inhibitory complexes. The cleaved HARP N-terminal domain increased HARP-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HARP C-terminal domain was antagonistic and decreased cell proliferation and migration. Hence the unmasking of cytokines, such as VEGF, by metalloproteinase processing of their binding proteins is a new mechanism in the control of cytokine activation and angiogenesis. PMID:17908800

  15. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  16. A Drosophila model to image phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Shandala, Tetyana; Lim, Chiaoxin; Sorvina, Alexandra; Brooks, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24709696

  17. Meristem maturation and inflorescence architecture--lessons from the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Park, Soon Ju; Eshed, Yuval; Lippman, Zachary B

    2014-02-01

    Plant apical meristems (AMs) grow continuously by delicately balancing cells leaving at the periphery to form lateral organs with slowly dividing central domain cells that replenish reservoirs of pluripotent cells. This balance can be modified by signals originating from within and outside the meristem, and their integration results in a gradual maturation process that often culminates with the meristem differentiating into a flower. Accompanying this 'meristem maturation' are changes in spacing and size of lateral organs and in rates at which lateral meristems are released from apical dominance. Modulation of distinct meristem maturation parameters through environmental and genetic changes underlies the remarkable diversity of shoot architectures. Here, we discuss recent studies relating the dynamics of meristem maturation with organization of floral branching systems--inflorescences--in the nightshades. From this context, we suggest general principles on how factors coordinating meristem maturation impact shoot organization more broadly.

  18. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  19. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  20. Maturation of the Human Papillomavirus 16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Giovanni; Moyer, Adam L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Dvoretzky, Israel; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Papillomaviruses are a family of nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect the skin or mucosa of their vertebrate hosts. The viral life cycle is closely tied to the differentiation of infected keratinocytes. Papillomavirus virions are released into the environment through a process known as desquamation, in which keratinocytes lose structural integrity prior to being shed from the surface of the skin. During this process, virions are exposed to an increasingly oxidative environment, leading to their stabilization through the formation of disulfide cross-links between neighboring molecules of the major capsid protein, L1. We used time-lapse cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis to study the maturation of HPV16 capsids assembled in mammalian cells and exposed to an oxidizing environment after cell lysis. Initially, the virion is a loosely connected procapsid that, under in vitro conditions, condenses over several hours into the more familiar 60-nm-diameter papillomavirus capsid. In this process, the procapsid shrinks by ~5% in diameter, its pentameric capsomers change in structure (most markedly in the axial region), and the interaction surfaces between adjacent capsomers are consolidated. A C175S mutant that cannot achieve normal inter-L1 disulfide cross-links shows maturation-related shrinkage but does not achieve the fully condensed 60-nm form. Pseudoatomic modeling based on a 9-Å resolution reconstruction of fully mature capsids revealed C-terminal disulfide-stabilized “suspended bridges” that form intercapsomeric cross-links. The data suggest a model in which procapsids exist in a range of dynamic intermediates that can be locked into increasingly mature configurations by disulfide cross-linking, possibly through a Brownian ratchet mechanism. PMID:25096873

  1. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  2. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  3. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  4. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  5. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  6. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  7. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  8. Oocyte Maturation and Development

    PubMed Central

    Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is essential for many organisms to propagate themselves. It requires the formation of haploid female and male gametes: oocytes and sperms. These specialized cells are generated through meiosis, a particular type of cell division that produces cells with recombined genomes that differ from their parental origin. In this review, we highlight the end process of female meiosis, the divisions per se, and how they can give rise to a functional female gamete preparing itself for the ensuing zygotic development. In particular, we discuss why such an essential process in the propagation of species is so poorly controlled, producing a strong percentage of abnormal female gametes in the end. Eventually, we examine aspects related to the lack of centrosomes in female oocytes, the asymmetry in size of the mammalian oocyte upon division, and in mammals the direct consequences of these long-lived cells in the ovary. PMID:26998245

  9. Effects of Short-Term Counseling on Career Maturity of Tenth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flake, Muriel H.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The effectiveness of short-term counseling on Career Maturity of tenth-grade students as measured by the Career Maturity Inventory was studied. Results indicate that career maturity as a developmental process can be measured and facilitated through counseling. (Author)

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms in pubertal brain maturation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kathleen E.; Rodgers, Ali B.; Morgan, Christopher P.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a critical period of development during which the reemergence of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion from the hypothalamus triggers a cascade of hormone-dependent processes. Maturation of specific brain regions including the prefrontal cortex occurs during this window, but the complex mechanisms underlying these dynamic changes are not well understood. Particularly, the potential involvement of epigenetics in this programming has been under-examined. The epigenome is known to guide earlier stages of development, and it is similarly poised to regulate vital pubertal-driven brain maturation. Further, as epigenetic machinery is highly environmentally responsive, its involvement may also lend this period of growth to greater vulnerability to external insults, resulting in reprogramming and increased disease risk. Importantly, neuropsychiatric diseases commonly present in individuals during or immediately following puberty, and environmental perturbations including stress may precipitate disease onset by disrupting the normal trajectory of pubertal brain development via epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, we discuss epigenetic processes involved in pubertal brain maturation, the potential points of derailment, and the importance of future studies for understanding this dynamic developmental window and gaining a better understanding of neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:24239720

  11. Miniature Neurotransmission Regulates Drosophila Synaptic Structural Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ben Jiwon; Imlach, Wendy L.; Jiao, Wei; Wolfram, Verena; Wu, Ying; Grbic, Mark; Cela, Carolina; Baines, Richard A.; Nitabach, Michael N.; McCabe, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Miniature neurotransmission is the transsynaptic process where single synaptic vesicles spontaneously released from presynaptic neurons induce miniature postsynaptic potentials. Since their discovery over 60 years ago, miniature events have been found at every chemical synapse studied. However, the in vivo necessity for these small-amplitude events has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that miniature neurotransmission is required for the normal structural maturation of Drosophila glutamatergic synapses in a developmental role that is not shared by evoked neurotransmission. Conversely, we find that increasing miniature events is sufficient to induce synaptic terminal growth. We show that miniature neurotransmission acts locally at terminals to regulate synapse maturation via a Trio guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and Rac1 GTPase molecular signaling pathway. Our results establish that miniature neurotransmission, a universal but often-overlooked feature of synapses, has unique and essential functions in vivo. PMID:24811381

  12. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  13. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  14. Designing Chaotic Systems by Piecewise Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Li, Qingdu; Yang, Xiao-Song

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of homoclinic orbits in a class of three-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, two chaotic generators are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  15. General approach for characterizing in vitro selected peptides with protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Gillig, Annabelle; Shah, Pankti; Sau, Sujay P; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2014-08-01

    In vitro selection technologies are important tools for identifying high affinity peptides to proteins of broad medical and biological interest. However, the technological advances that have made it possible to generate long lists of candidate peptides have far outpaced our ability to characterize the binding properties of individual peptides. Here, we describe a low cost strategy to rapidly synthesize, purify, screen, and characterize peptides for high binding affinity. Peptides are assayed in a 96-well dot blot apparatus using membranes that enable partitioning of bound and unbound peptide-protein complexes. We have validated the binding affinity constants produced by this method using known peptide ligands and applied this process to discover five new peptides with nanomolar affinity to human α-thrombin. Given the need for new analytical tools that can accelerate peptide discovery and characterization, we feel that this approach would be useful to a wide range of technologies that utilize high affinity peptides.

  16. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  17. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  18. Generation of high-performance binding proteins for peptide motifs by affinity clamping

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Shohei; Huang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    We describe concepts and methodologies for generating “Affinity Clamps”, a new class of recombinant binding proteins that achieve high affinity and high specificity toward short peptide motifs of biological importance, which is a major challenge in protein engineering. The Affinity Clamping concept exploits the potential of nonhomologous recombination of protein domains in generating large changes in protein function and the inherent binding affinity and specificity of the so-called modular interaction domains toward short peptide motifs. Affinity Clamping creates a clamshell architecture that clamps onto a target peptide. The design processes involve (i) choosing a starting modular interaction domain appropriate for the target and applying structure-guided modifications, (ii) attaching a second domain, termed “enhancer domain” and (iii) optimizing the peptide-binding site located between the domains by directed evolution. The two connected domains work synergistically to achieve high levels of affinity and specificity that are unattainable with either domain alone. Because of the simple and modular architecture, affinity clamps are particularly well suited as building blocks for designing more complex functionalities. Affinity Clamping represents a major advance in protein design that is broadly applicable to the recognition of peptide motifs. PMID:23422435

  19. Positional cloning reaches maturity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D L

    1995-06-01

    The identification of genes involved in human genetic disease is no longer the province of those who would make a career of 'not finding' a gene. Developments from the human genome initiative have vastly facilitated the process of localizing genetic intervals segregating mutations, as well as that of obtaining the physical regents necessary for characterizing the region. In a few years' time, efforts aimed at the assignment of genes to the physical map, coupled with increasing quantities of sequence data from both cDNA and genomic sources, will provide numerous candidate genes for analysis, with consequences for the approaches used to define the gene and mutations(s) involved in the disease of interest. PMID:7549422

  20. Final pre-40S maturation depends on the functional integrity of the 60S subunit ribosomal protein L3.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Juan J; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Lebaron, Simon; Rosado, Iván V; Tollervey, David; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Ribosomal protein L3 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in the assembly of early pre-60S particles. We report that the rpl3[W255C] allele, which affects the affinity and function of translation elongation factors, impairs cytoplasmic maturation of 20S pre-rRNA. This was not seen for other mutations in or depletion of L3 or other 60S ribosomal proteins. Surprisingly, pre-40S particles containing 20S pre-rRNA form translation-competent 80S ribosomes, and translation inhibition partially suppresses 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The GTP-dependent translation initiation factor Fun12 (yeast eIF5B) shows similar in vivo binding to ribosomal particles from wild-type and rpl3[W255C] cells. However, the GTPase activity of eIF5B failed to stimulate processing of 20S pre-rRNA when assayed with ribosomal particles purified from rpl3[W255C] cells. We conclude that L3 plays an important role in the function of eIF5B in stimulating 3' end processing of 18S rRNA in the context of 80S ribosomes that have not yet engaged in translation. These findings indicate that the correct conformation of the GTPase activation region is assessed in a quality control step during maturation of cytoplasmic pre-ribosomal particles.

  1. Improving affinity chromatography resin efficiency using semi-continuous chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ekta; George, Anupa; Wolk, Bradley

    2012-03-01

    Protein A affinity chromatography is widely used for purification of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF). At the manufacturing scale, the HCCF is typically loaded on a single Protein A affinity chromatography column in cycles until all of the HCCF is processed. Protein A resin costs are significant, comprising a substantial portion of the raw material costs in MAb manufacturing. Cost can be reduced by operating the process continuously using multiple smaller columns to a higher binding capacity in lieu of one industrial scale column. In this study, a series of experiments were performed using three 1-ml Hi-Trap™ MabSelect SuRe™ columns on a modified ÄKTA™ system operated according to the three Column Periodic Counter Current Chromatography (3C PCC) principle. The columns were loaded individually at different times until the 70% breakthrough point was achieved. The HCCF with unbound protein from the column was then loaded onto the next column to capture the MAb, preventing any protein loss. At any given point, all three columns were in operation, either loading or washing, enabling a reduction in processing time. The product yield and quality were evaluated and compared with a batch process to determine the effect of using the three column continuous process. The continuous operation shows the potential to reduce both resin volume and buffer consumption by ∼40%, however the system hardware and the process is more complex than the batch process. Alternative methods using a single standard affinity column, such as recycling load effluent back to the tank or increasing residence time, were also evaluated to improve Protein A resin efficiency. These alternative methods showed similar cost benefits but required longer processing time. PMID:22265178

  2. Femtomolar Fab binding affinities to a protein target by alternative CDR residue co-optimization strategies without phage or cell surface display

    PubMed Central

    Plittersdorf, Hanna; Hesse, Oliver; Scheidig, Andreas; Strerath, Michael; Gritzan, Uwe; Pellengahr, Klaus; Scholz, Peter; Eicker, Andrea; Myszka, David; Haupts, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In therapeutic or diagnostic antibody discovery, affinity maturation is frequently required to optimize binding properties. In some cases, achieving very high affinity is challenging using the display-based optimization technologies. Here we present an approach that begins with the creation and clonal, quantitative analysis of soluble Fab libraries with complete diversification in adjacent residue pairs encompassing every complementarity-determining region position. This was followed by alternative recombination approaches and high throughput screening to co-optimize large sets of the found improving mutations. We applied this approach to the affinity maturation of the anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody adalimumab and achieved ~500-fold affinity improvement, resulting in femtomolar binding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the in vitro engineering of a femtomolar affinity antibody against a protein target without display screening. We compare our findings to a previous report that employed extensive mutagenesis and recombination libraries with yeast display screening. The present approach is widely applicable to the most challenging of affinity maturation efforts. PMID:22531438

  3. Decelerating Mature Adipocyte Dedifferentiation by Media Composition.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-12-01

    The establishment of adipose tissue test systems is still a major challenge in the investigation of cellular and molecular interactions responsible for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving adipose tissue. Mature adipocytes are mainly involved in these pathologies, but rarely used in vitro, due to the lack of an appropriate culture medium which inhibits dedifferentiation and maintains adipocyte functionality. In our study, we showed that Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Ham's F-12 with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) reported for the culture of mature adipocytes favors dedifferentiation, which was accompanied by a high glycerol release, a decreasing release of leptin, and a low expression of the adipocyte marker perilipin A, but high expression of CD73 after 21 days. Optimized media containing FCS, biotin, pantothenate, insulin, and dexamethasone decelerated the dedifferentiation process. These cells showed a lower lipolysis rate, a high level of leptin release, as well as a high expression of perilipin A. CD73-positive dedifferentiated fat cells were only found in low quantity. In this work, we showed that mature adipocytes when cultured under optimized conditions could be highly valuable for adipose tissue engineering in vitro. PMID:26228997

  4. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  5. Evolution based on chromosome affinity from a network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, R. L. S.; Fontoura, J. R. A.; Carneiro, T. K. G.; Moret, M. A.; Pereira, H. B. B.

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have focused on models to simulate the complex phenomenon of evolution of species. Several studies have been performed with theoretical models based on Darwin's theories to associate them with the actual evolution of species. However, none of the existing models include the affinity between individuals using network properties. In this paper, we present a new model based on the concept of affinity. The model is used to simulate the evolution of species in an ecosystem composed of individuals and their relationships. We propose an evolutive algorithm that incorporates the degree centrality and efficiency network properties to perform the crossover process and to obtain the network topology objective, respectively. Using a real network as a starting point, we simulate its evolution and compare its results with the results of 5788 computer-generated networks.

  6. Molecular modeling of the affinity chromatography of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paloni, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a methodology that offers the possibility of studying complex systems such as protein-ligand complexes from an atomistic point of view, making available information that can be difficultly obtained from experimental studies. Here, a protocol for the construction of molecular models of the interaction between antibodies and ligands that can be used for an affinity chromatography process is presented. The outlined methodology focuses mostly on the description of a procedure that may be adopted to determine the structure and free energy of interaction between the antibody and the affinity ligand. A procedure to extend the proposed methodology to include the effect of the environment (buffer solution, spacer, support matrix) is also briefly outlined. PMID:25749965

  7. Synapse Maturation by Activity-Dependent Ectodomain Shedding of SIRPα

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Terauchi, Akiko; Zhang, Lily Y.; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M.; Larsen, David J.; Sutton, Michael A.; Umemori, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Formation of appropriate synaptic connections is critical for proper functioning of the brain. After initial synaptic differentiation, active synapses are stabilized by neural activity-dependent signals to establish functional synaptic connections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synapse maturation remain to be elucidated. Here we show that activity-dependent ectodomain shedding of SIRPα mediates presynaptic maturation. Two target-derived molecules, FGF22 and SIRPα, sequentially organize the glutamatergic presynaptic terminals during the initial synaptic differentiation and synapse maturation stages, respectively, in the mouse hippocampus. SIRPα drives presynaptic maturation in an activity-dependent fashion. Remarkably, neural activity cleaves the extracellular domain of SIRPα, and the shed ectodomain, in turn, promotes the maturation of the presynaptic terminal. This process involves CaM kinase, matrix metalloproteinases, and the presynaptic receptor CD47. Finally, SIRPα-dependent synapse maturation has significant impacts on synaptic function and plasticity. Thus, ectodomain shedding of SIRPα is an activity-dependent trans-synaptic mechanism for the maturation of functional synapses. PMID:24036914

  8. In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ilyas M.; Francis, Lewis; Theobald, Peter S.; Perni, Stefano; Young, Robert D.; Prokopovich, Polina; Conlan, R. Steven; Archer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects. PMID:23182922

  9. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  10. BC(50): a generalized, unifying affinity descriptor.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Alberto; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Assessing binding affinities is an unavoidable step that we come across any time interactions between binding species are investigated. A quantitative evaluation of binding affinities relies on the determination of binding constants but, whilst the binding constant fully defines the affinity of a reagent for a ligand when only one complex species is formed, the same is not true when the interacting partners form more than one complex of different stoichiometry, because all complexes contribute to the overall binding affinity. Unfortunately, this situation is the rule rather than the exception in chemical systems, but a generally accepted solution for this issue has not yet been settled. In this Personal Account, we describe the evolution, from the initial idea to a fully developed stage, of a binding descriptor that has been developed with the aim of filling this gap, thereby providing scientists in all fields of chemistry with a unifying tool for the assessment of binding affinities based on the knowledge of the binding constants in systems that involve any number of complex species.

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  12. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  13. Novel maturity parameters for mature to over-mature source rocks and oils based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixiang; Wang, Yongli; Wu, Baoxiang; Wang, Gen; Sun, Zepeng; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Shenzhen; Sun, Lina; Wei, Zhifu

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis experiments of a low-mature bitumen sample originated from Cambrian was conducted in gold capsules. Abundance and distribution of phenanthrene series compounds in pyrolysis products were measured by GC-MS to investigate their changes with thermal maturity. Several maturity parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds have been discussed. The results indicate that the distribution changes of phenanthrene series compounds are complex, and cannot be explained by individual reaction process during thermal evolution. The dealkylation cannot explain the increase of phenanthrene within the EasyRo range of 0.9% ∼ 2.1%. Adding of phenanthrene into maturity parameters based on the methylphenanthrene isomerization is unreasonable, even though MPI 1 and MPI 2 could be used to some extent. Two additional novel and an optimized maturation parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds are proposed and their relationships to EasyRo% (x) are established: log(MPs/P) = 0.19x + 0.08 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 2.1%); log(MPs/P) = 0.64x - 0.86 (2.1% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(DMPs/TMPs) = 0.71x - 0.55 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(MTR) = 0.84x - 0.75 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%). These significant positive correlations are strong argument for using log(MPs/P), log(DMPs/TMPs) and log(MTR) as maturity parameters, especially for mature to over-mature source rocks. PMID:27441263

  14. Molecular modeling of oscillating GHz electric field influence on the kinesin affinity to microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R. Saeidi, H.; S. Setayandeh, S.; Lohrasebi, A.

    2015-08-01

    Kinesin is a microtubule-associated motor protein which can respond to the external electric field due to its polarity. Using a molecular dynamics simulation method, the effect of such a field on the affinity of kinesin to the αβ-tubulin is investigated in this study. To consider kinesin affinity, the system is exposed to an electric field of 0.03 V/nm with frequency values of 1, 2, …, 9, and 10 GHz. It is found that the applied electric field can change kinesin affinity to the microtubule. These changes could perturb the normal operation of kinesin, such as the processive motility of kinesin on the microtubule.

  15. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  16. Steps to Maturity Program. Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanaimo School District #68 (British Columbia).

    In fall 1989, the Nanaimo (British Columbia) School District No. 68 asked five people, selected from the school system and community, to evaluate the "Steps to Maturity" Program (STMP), a district-wide family life education and affective development program that has developed gradually since 1972. The evaluation team interviewed a large number of…

  17. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  18. Adolescent Maturation in Transitioning Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin; Palacios, Anna; Reid, Robert E.

    This is a theoretical study of adolescent maturation within a cultural context. Personality development and disintegration due to the pressure of a dominant culture on a minority culture is considered. An attempt is made to understand how teachers might assist students to work out their psychological growth by story telling. The need for cultural…

  19. College Freshmen: Turmoil or Maturity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Administered the Personal Orientation Inventory, Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, a group Rorschach, and a biographical questionnaire to 24 randomly selected freshmen from a small Northwest liberal arts college. Results indicated that the young adults responded differently from either children or mature adults. Findings support contention that…

  20. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  1. Rhetorical Maturity: Definition and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan

    Lawrence Kohlberg's stages of moral development, when applied to theories of teaching composition, support any method or material that refers to the age and prior experience of the writer and the newness of the task the writer is attempting. Rhetorical development and maturation in the ability to write and argue persuasively are partly conceptual…

  2. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  3. Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data

  4. Antigen-affinity controls pre-germinal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn HA; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism behind pre-GC affinity-mediated B cell selection. We applied affinity mutants of HEL antigen and found that rapidly after activation B cells become highly dependent on the cytokine BAFF. Moreover, expression of BAFF receptor CD268 is regulated in a BCR-affinity dependent fashion. High affinity responses via BAFF correlated with PI3K activation, which controlled expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1, and thereby increased survival. In the presence of excess BAFF, or in absence of the Mcl-1 antagonist Noxa, more low-affinity B cells survived the first two days after antigen encounter. This resulted in increased numbers of antigen-specific B cells of low affinity upon immunization and reduced the overall affinity of cells that contributed to the germinal center reaction. Our findings elucidate a crucial molecular pathway of B cell selection in the earliest phases of activation by identifying a novel link between BCR affinity and BAFF-R signaling towards Mcl-1. PMID:27762293

  5. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-01-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  6. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-06-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  7. European and international collaboration in affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    In affinity proteomics, specific protein-binding molecules (a.k.a. binders), principally antibodies, are applied as reagents in proteome analysis. In recent years, advances in binder technologies have created the potential for an unprecedented view on protein expression and distribution patterns in plasma, cells and tissues and increasingly on protein function. Particular strengths of affinity proteomics methods include detecting proteins in their natural environments of cell or tissue, high sensitivity and selectivity for detection of low abundance proteins and exploiting binding actions such as functional interference in living cells. To maximise the use and impact of affinity reagents, it will be essential to create comprehensive, standardised binder collections. With this in mind, the EU FP7 programme AFFINOMICS (http://www.affinomics.org), together with the preceding EU programmes ProteomeBinders and AffinityProteome, aims to extend affinity proteomics research by generating a large-scale resource of validated protein-binding molecules for characterisation of the human proteome. Activity is directed at producing binders to about 1000 protein targets, primarily in signal transduction and cancer, by establishing a high throughput, coordinated production pipeline. An important aspect of AFFINOMICS is the development of highly efficient recombinant selection methods, based on phage, cell and ribosome display, capable of producing high quality binders at greater throughput and lower cost than hitherto. The programme also involves development of innovative and sensitive technologies for specific detection of target proteins and their interactions, and deployment of binders in proteomics studies of clinical relevance. The need for such binder generation programmes is now recognised internationally, with parallel initiatives in the USA for cancer (NCI) and transcription factors (NIH) and within the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). The papers in this volume of New

  8. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  9. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. > The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. > Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. > f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy theories to

  10. Maturation of human auditory cortex: implications for speech perception.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jean K

    2002-05-01

    This project traced the maturation of the human auditory cortex from midgestation to young adulthood, using immunostaining of axonal neurofilaments to determine the time of onset of rapid conduction. The study identified 3 developmental periods, each characterized by maturation of a different axonal system. During the perinatal period (3rd trimester to 4th postnatal month), neurofilament expression occurs only in axons of the marginal layer. These axons drive the structural and functional development of cells in the deeper cortical layers, but do not relay external stimuli. In early childhood (6 months to 5 years), maturing thalamocortical afferents to the deeper cortical layers are the first source of input to the auditory cortex from lower levels of the auditory system. During later childhood (5 to 12 years), maturation of commissural and association axons in the superficial cortical layers allows communication between different subdivisions of the auditory cortex, thus forming a basis for more complex cortical processing of auditory stimuli. PMID:12018354

  11. Calcium signals and oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Takeda, Noriyo; Stricker, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    In various oocytes and eggs of animals, transient elevations in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentrations are known to regulate key processes during fertilization and the completion of meiosis. However, whether or not calcium transients also help to reinitiate meiotic progression at the onset of oocyte maturation remains controversial. This article summarizes reports of calcium signals playing essential roles during maturation onset (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in several kinds of marine invertebrate oocytes. Conversely, other data from the literature, as well as previously unpublished findings for jellyfish oocytes, fail to support the view that calcium signals are required for GVBD. In addition to assessing the effects of calcium transients on GVBD in marine invertebrate oocytes, the ability of maturing oocytes to enhance their calcium-releasing capabilities after GVBD is also reviewed. Furthermore, possible explanations are proposed for the contradictory results that have been obtained regarding calcium signals during oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates. PMID:26679945

  12. Retroviral proteases and their roles in virion maturation.

    PubMed

    Konvalinka, Jan; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Proteolytic processing of viral polyproteins is essential for retrovirus infectivity. Retroviral proteases (PR) become activated during or after assembly of the immature, non-infectious virion. They cleave viral polyproteins at specific sites, inducing major structural rearrangements termed maturation. Maturation converts retroviral enzymes into their functional form, transforms the immature shell into a metastable state primed for early replication events, and enhances viral entry competence. Not only cleavage at all PR recognition sites, but also an ordered sequence of cleavages is crucial. Proteolysis is tightly regulated, but the triggering mechanisms and kinetics and pathway of morphological transitions remain enigmatic. Here, we outline PR structures and substrate specificities focusing on HIV PR as a therapeutic target. We discuss design and clinical success of HIV PR inhibitors, as well as resistance development towards these drugs. Finally, we summarize data elucidating the role of proteolysis in maturation and highlight unsolved questions regarding retroviral maturation.

  13. Calcium signals and oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Takeda, Noriyo; Stricker, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    In various oocytes and eggs of animals, transient elevations in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentrations are known to regulate key processes during fertilization and the completion of meiosis. However, whether or not calcium transients also help to reinitiate meiotic progression at the onset of oocyte maturation remains controversial. This article summarizes reports of calcium signals playing essential roles during maturation onset (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in several kinds of marine invertebrate oocytes. Conversely, other data from the literature, as well as previously unpublished findings for jellyfish oocytes, fail to support the view that calcium signals are required for GVBD. In addition to assessing the effects of calcium transients on GVBD in marine invertebrate oocytes, the ability of maturing oocytes to enhance their calcium-releasing capabilities after GVBD is also reviewed. Furthermore, possible explanations are proposed for the contradictory results that have been obtained regarding calcium signals during oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

  14. Biological maturation of youth athletes: assessment and implications.

    PubMed

    Malina, Robert M; Rogol, Alan D; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho e Silva, Manuel J; Figueiredo, Antonio J

    2015-07-01

    The search for talent is pervasive in youth sports. Selection/exclusion in many sports follows a maturity-related gradient largely during the interval of puberty and growth spurt. As such, there is emphasis on methods for assessing maturation. Commonly used methods for assessing status (skeletal age, secondary sex characteristics) and estimating timing (ages at peak height velocity (PHV) and menarche) in youth athletes and two relatively recent anthropometric (non-invasive) methods (status-percentage of predicted near adult height attained at observation, timing-predicted maturity offset/age at PHV) are described and evaluated. The latter methods need further validation with athletes. Currently available data on the maturity status and timing of youth athletes are subsequently summarised. Selection for sport and potential maturity-related correlates are then discussed in the context of talent development and associated models. Talent development from novice to elite is superimposed on a constantly changing base-the processes of physical growth, biological maturation and behavioural development, which occur simultaneously and interact with each other. The processes which are highly individualised also interact with the demands of a sport per se and with involved adults (coaches, trainers, administrators, parents/guardians).

  15. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  16. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  17. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  18. Phosphorylation-Dependent Interaction of Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase/Tryptophan 5-Monooxygenase Activation Protein (YWHA) with PADI6 Following Oocyte Maturation in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Alan J.; Puri, Pawan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan; Kline, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Proteins in the tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein family (YWHA; also known as 14-3-3) are involved in the regulation of many intracellular processes. We have examined the interaction of YWHA with peptidylarginine deiminase type VI (PADI6), an abundant protein in mammalian oocytes, eggs, and early embryos. Peptidylarginine deiminases catalyze the posttranslational modification of peptidylarginine to citrulline. PADI6 is associated with oocyte cytoplasmic sheets, and PADI6-deficient mice are infertile because of disruption of development beyond the two-cell stage. We found that PADI6 undergoes a dramatic developmental change in phosphorylation during oocyte maturation. This change in phosphorylation is linked to an interaction of PADI6 with YWHA in the mature egg. Recombinant glutathione S-transferase YWHA pull-down experiments and transgenic tandem affinity purification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrate a binding interaction between YWHA and PADI6 in mature eggs. YWHA proteins modulate or complement intracellular events involving phosphorylation-dependent switching or protein modification. These results indicate that phosphorylation and/or YWHA binding may serve as a means of intracellular PADI6 regulation. PMID:18463355

  19. Affine transformations capture beak shape variation in Darwin's Finches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael; Campas, Otger; Mallarino, Riccardo; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2009-11-01

    Evolution by natural selection has resulted in extraordinary morphological complexity of living organisms, whose description has thus far defied any precise mathematical characterization linked to the underlying developmental genetics. Here we demonstrate that the morphological diversity of the beaks of Darwin's finches, the classical example of adaptive morphological radiation, is quantitatively accounted for through the mathematical group of affine transformations. Specifically, we show that all beak shapes of Ground Finches (genus Geospiza) are related by scaling transformations (a subgroup of the affine group), and the same scheme occurs for all the beak shapes of Tree and Warbler finches. This analysis shows that the beak shapes within each of these groups differ only by their scales, such as length and depth, each of which is knownto be under genetic control.The complete morphological variability within the beaks of Darwin's finches can be explained by extending the scaling transformations to the entire affine group, by including shear transformations. Altogether our results suggest that the mathematical theory of groups can help decode morphological variability, and points to a potentially hierarchical structure of morphological diversity and the underlying developmental processes.

  20. Negative Enrichment of Target Cells by Microfluidic Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Gao, Yan; Pappas, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional microfluidic channel was developed for high purity cell separations. This system featured high capture affinity using multiple vertical inlets to an affinity surface. In cell separations, positive selection (capture of the target cell) is usually employed. Negative enrichment, the capture of non-target cells and elution of target cells, has distinct advantages over positive selection. In negative enrichment, target cells are not labeled, and are not subjected to strenuous elution conditions or dilution. As a result, negative enrichment systems are amenable to multi-step processes in microfluidic systems. In previous work, we reported cell capture enhancement effects at vertical inlets to the affinity surface. In this study, we designed a chip that has multiple vertical and horizontal channels, forming a three-dimensional separation system. Enrichment of target cells showed separation purities of 92-96%, compared with straight-channel systems (77% purity). A parallelized chip was also developed for increased sample throughput. A two-channel showed similar separation purity with twice the sample flow rate. This microfluidic system, featuring high separation purity, ease of fabrication and use, is suitable for cell separations when subsequent analysis of target cells is required. PMID:21939198

  1. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ∼30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs. PMID:27101778

  2. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ~30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs.

  3. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ∼30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs. PMID:27101778

  4. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  5. Optimization of affinity, specificity and function of designed influenza inhibitors using deep sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Timothy A.; Chevalier, Aaron; Song, Yifan; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Fleishman, Sarel J.; De Mattos, Cecilia; Myers, Chris A.; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Blair, Patrick; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    We show that comprehensive sequence-function maps obtained by deep sequencing can be used to reprogram interaction specificity and to leapfrog over bottlenecks in affinity maturation by combining many individually small contributions not detectable in conventional approaches. We use this approach to optimize two computationally designed inhibitors against H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin and, in both cases, obtain variants with subnanomolar binding affinity. The most potent of these, a 51-residue protein, is broadly cross-reactive against all influenza group 1 hemagglutinins, including human H2, and neutralizes H1N1 viruses with a potency that rivals that of several human monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating that computational design followed by comprehensive energy landscape mapping can generate proteins with potential therapeutic utility.

  6. cDNA cloning, bacterial expression, in vitro renaturation and affinity purification of the zinc endopeptidase astacin.

    PubMed Central

    Reyda, S; Jacob, E; Zwilling, R; Stöcker, W

    1999-01-01

    Astacin (EC 3.4.24.21) from the freshwater crayfish (Astacus astacus) is a prototype for the metzincin superfamily and for the astacin family of zinc peptidases, enzymes which are involved in hatching processes, embryonic patterning and tissue remodelling. Here we report on the cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli of an astacin cDNA which was reverse-transcribed from crayfish midgut-gland mRNA. A cDNA construct based on this clone was generated which comprised the nucleotide sequence encoding mature astacin devoid of the signal and propeptide. This construct was cloned into the pET3a vector and used to transform E. coli BL21(DE3) cells. Recombinant astacin was purified from inclusion bodies and dissolved under reducing conditions. For folding, the protein was diluted into neutral buffer containing l-arginine, GSH and EDTA. Eventually, Zn(2+) was added by dialysis and the fraction of active enzyme was affinity-purified on immobilized Pro-Leu-Gly hydroxamate. As shown by superimposition of the corresponding three-dimensional structures, this inhibitor binds to a region of the active-site cleft that is conserved in most metzincins. Therefore this principle behind this affinity technique, originally introduced for fibroblast collagenase by Moore and Spilburg [Biochemistry (1986) 25, 5189-5195], is applicable throughout the metzincin superfamily of metalloproteases, despite their otherwise differing cleavage specificities. Recombinant astacin is active on gelatine zymograms and in a quenched fluorescence assay, yielding kinetic parameters comparable with those of wild-type astacin purified from crayfish stomach. PMID:10585873

  7. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  8. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  9. Two bradykinin binding sites with picomolar affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, D.C.; Vavrek, R.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and related peptides exert a wide range of effects on several organ systems. We have attempted to sort out these effects by studying the binding interaction of (/sup 3/H)BK at the membrane level with in vitro receptor binding techniques. High specific activity (/sup 3/H)BK and an enzyme inhibitor cocktail has enabled us to label two BK binding sites with different affinity and peptide specificity in several guinea-pig tissues. In the guinea-pig ileum the high-affinity site has an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (/sup 3/H)BK of 13 pM and a maximal number of binding sites of 8.3 pmol/g of tissue wet weight. The low-affinity guinea-pig ileum site displays a Kd of 910 pM, a maximum number of binding sites of 14 pmol/g of tissue wet weight and shows a greater selectivity for BK analogs over Lysyl-BK analogs. Two similar sites can also be discriminated in kidney and heart. The potencies of a series of BK analogs at the high-affinity guinea-pig ileum site correlate well with their potencies in contracting ileal smooth muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)BK in the guinea-pig ileum is inhibited by physiological concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations.

  10. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain’s region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex

  11. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  12. XGef Mediates Early CPEB Phosphorylation during Xenopus Oocyte Meiotic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Susana E.; Yuan, Lei; Lacza, Charlemagne; Ransom, Heather; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Whitehead, Ian P.; Hake, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyadenylation-induced translation is an important regulatory mechanism during metazoan development. During Xenopus oocyte meiotic progression, polyadenylation-induced translation is regulated by CPEB, which is activated by phosphorylation. XGef, a guanine exchange factor, is a CPEB-interacting protein involved in the early steps of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation. We find that XGef influences early oocyte maturation by directly influencing CPEB function. XGef and CPEB interact during oogenesis and oocyte maturation and are present in a c-mos messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP). Both proteins also interact directly in vitro. XGef overexpression increases the level of CPEB phosphorylated early during oocyte maturation, and this directly correlates with increased Mos protein accumulation and acceleration of meiotic resumption. To exert this effect, XGef must retain guanine exchange activity and the interaction with CPEB. Overexpression of a guanine exchange deficient version of XGef, which interacts with CPEB, does not enhance early CPEB phosphorylation. Overexpression of a version of XGef that has significantly reduced interaction with CPEB, but retains guanine exchange activity, decreases early CPEB phosphorylation and delays oocyte maturation. Injection of XGef antibodies into oocytes blocks progesterone-induced oocyte maturation and early CPEB phosphorylation. These findings indicate that XGef is involved in early CPEB activation and implicate GTPase signaling in this process. PMID:15635100

  13. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  14. Induction of high-affinity GM-CSF receptors during all-trans retinoic acid treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Gentile, A; Toubert, M E; Dubois, C; Krawice, I; Schlageter, M H; Balitrand, N; Castaigne, S; Degos, L; Rain, J D; Najean, Y

    1994-10-01

    Differentiation of normal myeloid cells is accompanied by the increase of high-affinity GM-CSF receptors necessary for progenitor proliferation/differentiation and mature neutrophil function. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces terminal differentiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (AML3 subtype). We report in this study that AML3 cells, like other AML subtypes, harbor high-affinity GM-CSF R (n = 138.3 +/- 69.3 sites/cell, Kd = 76.9 +/- 68.8 pM). In all cases, incubation with ATRA induces either an increase in the number of affinity of GM-CSF R (n = 212.7 +/- 116.2 sites/cell, Kd = 43.2 +/- 22.5 pM). The data presented show that modulation of GM-CSF receptors cells is correlated to the degree of ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation but not to increased cell growth.

  15. Kinetic analysis of drug-protein interactions by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-10-01

    Information on the kinetics of drug-protein interactions is of crucial importance in drug discovery and development. Several methods based on affinity chromatography have been developed in recent years to examine the association and dissociation rates of these processes. These techniques include band-broadening measurements, the peak decay method, peak fitting methods, the split-peak method, and free fraction analysis. This review will examine the general principles and applications of these approaches and discuss their use in the characterization, screening and analysis of drug-protein interactions in the body. PMID:26724332

  16. Representations of affine superalgebras and mock theta functions. III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kac, V. G.; Wakimoto, M.

    2016-08-01

    We study modular invariance of normalized supercharacters of tame integrable modules over an affine Lie superalgebra, associated to an arbitrary basic Lie superalgebra g. For this we develop a several step modification process of multivariable mock theta functions, where at each step a Zwegers' type 'modifier' is used. We show that the span of the resulting modified normalized supercharacters is \\operatorname{SL}_2( Z)-invariant, with the transformation matrix equal, in the case the Killing form on g is non-degenerate, to that for the basic defect 0 subalgebra g^! of g, orthogonal to a maximal isotropic set of roots of g.

  17. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  18. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO.

  19. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Richard P.; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F.; Maki, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO’s single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO’s unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  20. Thermal Maturation of Gas Shale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sylvain; Horsfield, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Shale gas systems serve as sources, reservoirs, and seals for unconventional natural gas accumulations. These reservoirs bring numerous challenges to geologists and petroleum engineers in reservoir characterization, most notably because of their heterogeneous character due to depositional and diagenetic processes but also because of their constituent rocks' fine-grained nature and small pore size -- much smaller than in conventional sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. Significant advances have recently been achieved in unraveling the gaseous hydrocarbon generation and retention processes that occur within these complex systems. In addition, cutting-edge characterization technologies have allowed precise documentation of the spatial variability in chemistry and structure of thermally mature organic-rich shales at the submicrometer scale, revealing the presence of geochemical heterogeneities within overmature gas shale samples and, notably, the presence of nanoporous pyrobitumen. Such research advances will undoubtedly lead to improved performance, producibility, and modeling of such strategic resources at the reservoir scale.

  1. Epididymal protein Rnase10 is required for post-testicular sperm maturation and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Krutskikh, Anton; Poliandri, Ariel; Cabrera-Sharp, Victoria; Dacheux, Jean Louis; Poutanen, Matti; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2012-10-01

    Eutherian spermatozoa are dependent on the environment of the proximal epididymis to complete their maturation; however, no specific epididymal factors that mediate this process have so far been identified. Here, we show that targeted disruption of the novel gene Rnase10 encoding a secreted proximal epididymal protein in the mouse results in a binding defect in spermatozoa and their inability to pass through the uterotubal junction in the female. The failure to gain the site of fertilization in the knockout spermatozoa is associated with a gradual loss of ADAM3 and ADAM6 proteins during epididymal transit. In the distal epididymis, these spermatozoa appear to lack calcium-dependent associations with the immobilizing glutinous extracellular material and are released as single, vigorously motile cells that display no tendency for head-to-head agglutination and lack affinity to the oviductal epithelium. In sperm-egg binding assay, they are unable to establish a tenacious association with the zona pellucida, yet they are capable of fertilization. Furthermore, these sperm show accelerated capacitation resulting in an overall in vitro fertilizing ability superior to that of wild-type sperm. We conclude that the physiological role of sperm adhesiveness is in the mechanism of restricted sperm entry into the oviduct rather than in sperm-egg interaction. PMID:22750516

  2. Targeted inhibition of oncogenic miR-21 maturation with designed RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Yang, Fan; Zubovic, Lorena; Pavelitz, Tom; Yang, Wen; Godin, Katherine; Walker, Matthew; Zheng, Suxin; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    The RNA recognition motif (RRM) is the largest family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins. Engineered RRMs with well-defined specificity would provide valuable tools and an exacting test of the current understanding of specificity. We have redesigned the specificity of an RRM using rational methods and demonstrated retargeting of its activity in cells. We engineered the conserved RRM of human Rbfox proteins to specifically bind to the terminal loop of a microRNA precursor (pre-miR-21) with high affinity and inhibit its processing by Drosha and Dicer. We further engineered Giardia Dicer by replacing its PAZ domain with the designed RRM. The reprogrammed enzyme degrades pre-miR-21 specifically in vitro and suppresses mature miR-21 levels in cells, which results in increased expression of the tumor suppressor PDCD4 and significantly decreased viability for cancer cells. The results demonstrate the feasibility of rationally engineering the sequence-specificity of RRMs and of using this ubiquitous platform for diverse biological applications. PMID:27428511

  3. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or...

  6. Career Maturity in High School Age Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Joan Daniels

    1982-01-01

    Examined career maturity in high school females by using a set of general career-maturity and gender-specific, career-related measures, and an alternate career-maturity criterion measure, career-planning involvement. Results indicated significant relationships between achievement orientation and occupational information and knowledge of women's…

  7. Toward a Concept of Psychosocial Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen; Sorensen, Aage B.

    The first in a series of related reports (see TM 000 775), this paper attempts to define a concept of psychosocial maturity which would be appropriate as a comprehensive educational goal. Biological, sociological, psychological and temporal formulations of maturity are discussed and compared. Am interdisciplinary model of maturity is evolved which…

  8. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or...

  9. Affinity-based screening techniques for enhancing lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Comess, Kenneth M; Schurdak, Mark E

    2004-07-01

    Contemporary, rational small-molecule lead discovery methods, comprising target identification, assay development, high-throughput screening (HTS), hit characterization and medicinal chemistry optimization, dominate early-stage drug discovery strategies in many pharmaceutical companies. There is a growing disparity between the increasing cost of funding these methods and the decreasing number of new drugs reaching the market. New strategies must be adopted to reverse this trend. The use of genomics- and proteomics-based target discovery efforts can aid the process by dramatically increasing the number of novel, more highly validated targets entering the discovery process, but HTS must meet this increased demand with faster, cheaper technologies. Although activity-based screening strategies are typically efficient, allowing one scientist to interrogate tens of thousands of compounds per day, affinity-based screening strategies can allow much greater efficiency in the overall process. Affinity-based methods can play a role in both facilitating the screening of a greater number of targets and in efficiently characterizing the primary hits discovered.

  10. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  11. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  12. Smooth big bounce from affine quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Hervé; Dapor, Andrea; Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Małkiewicz, Przemysław

    2014-04-01

    We examine the possibility of dealing with gravitational singularities on a quantum level through the use of coherent state or wavelet quantization instead of canonical quantization. We consider the Robertson-Walker metric coupled to a perfect fluid. It is the simplest model of a gravitational collapse, and the results obtained here may serve as a useful starting point for more complex investigations in the future. We follow a quantization procedure based on affine coherent states or wavelets built from the unitary irreducible representation of the affine group of the real line with positive dilation. The main issue of our approach is the appearance of a quantum centrifugal potential allowing for regularization of the singularity, essential self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian, and unambiguous quantum dynamical evolution.

  13. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  14. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Béhar, Ghislaine; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized. PMID:25647098

  15. Pitch perception prior to cortical maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Bonnie K.

    Pitch perception plays an important role in many complex auditory tasks including speech perception, music perception, and sound source segregation. Because of the protracted and extensive development of the human auditory cortex, pitch perception might be expected to mature, at least over the first few months of life. This dissertation investigates complex pitch perception in 3-month-olds, 7-month-olds and adults -- time points when the organization of the auditory pathway is distinctly different. Using an observer-based psychophysical procedure, a series of four studies were conducted to determine whether infants (1) discriminate the pitch of harmonic complex tones, (2) discriminate the pitch of unresolved harmonics, (3) discriminate the pitch of missing fundamental melodies, and (4) have comparable sensitivity to pitch and spectral changes as adult listeners. The stimuli used in these studies were harmonic complex tones, with energy missing at the fundamental frequency. Infants at both three and seven months of age discriminated the pitch of missing fundamental complexes composed of resolved and unresolved harmonics as well as missing fundamental melodies, demonstrating perception of complex pitch by three months of age. More surprisingly, infants in both age groups had lower pitch and spectral discrimination thresholds than adult listeners. Furthermore, no differences in performance on any of the tasks presented were observed between infants at three and seven months of age. These results suggest that subcortical processing is not only sufficient to support pitch perception prior to cortical maturation, but provides adult-like sensitivity to pitch by three months.

  16. Permeability of self-affine rough fractures

    PubMed

    Drazer; Koplik

    2000-12-01

    The permeability of two-dimensional fractures with self-affine fractal roughness is studied via analytic arguments and numerical simulations. The limit where the roughness amplitude is small compared with average fracture aperture is analyzed by a perturbation method, while in the opposite case of narrow aperture, we use heuristic arguments based on lubrication theory. Numerical simulations, using the lattice Boltzmann method, are used to examine the complete range of aperture sizes, and confirm the analytic arguments. PMID:11138092

  17. The Relationship Between Cognitive Career Maturity and Self-Reported Career Maturity of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated relationship between scores on measures of cognitive career maturity and self-reported career maturity in high school sophomores (N=391) and juniors (N=283). Results suggest that there is no relationship between measured career maturity competencies and self-reported career maturity competencies of high school students. (Author/NB)

  18. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  19. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field.

  20. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field. PMID:16792079

  1. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  2. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  3. Trematode hemoglobins show exceptionally high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Kiger, L; Rashid, A K; Griffon, N; Haque, M; Moens, L; Gibson, Q H; Poyart, C; Marden, M C

    1998-08-01

    Ligand binding studies were made with hemoglobin (Hb) isolated from trematode species Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gc), Paramphistomum epiclitum (Pe), Explanatum explanatum (Ee), parasitic worms of water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, and Isoparorchis hypselobagri (Ih) parasitic in the catfish Wallago attu. The kinetics of oxygen and carbon monoxide binding show very fast association rates. Whereas oxygen can be displaced on a millisecond time scale from human Hb at 25 degrees C, the dissociation of oxygen from trematode Hb may require a few seconds to over 20 s (for Hb Pe). Carbon monoxide dissociation is faster, however, than for other monomeric hemoglobins or myoglobins. Trematode hemoglobins also show a reduced rate of autoxidation; the oxy form is not readily oxidized by potassium ferricyanide, indicating that only the deoxy form reacts rapidly with this oxidizing agent. Unlike most vertebrate Hbs, the trematodes have a tyrosine residue at position E7 instead of the usual distal histidine. As for Hb Ascaris, which also displays a high oxygen affinity, the trematodes have a tyrosine in position B10; two H-bonds to the oxygen molecule are thought to be responsible for the very high oxygen affinity. The trematode hemoglobins display a combination of high association rates and very low dissociation rates, resulting in some of the highest oxygen affinities ever observed.

  4. Improved oxygen release: an adaptation of mature red cells to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Miles J.; Novy, Miles J.; Walters, Carrie-Lou; Metcalfe, James

    1968-01-01

    Blood from patients with erythrocytosis secondary to arterial hypoxemia due either to congenital heart disease or to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was shown to have a decreased affinity for oxygen; the average oxygen pressure required to produce 50% saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen was 29.8 mm Hg (average normal, 26.3 mm Hg). Such a displacement of the blood oxygen equilibrium curve promotes the release of oxygen from blood to the tissues. Studies were also performed upon blood from a man with complete erythrocyte aplasia who received all of his red cells by transfusion from presumably normal persons. With mild anemia (hematocrit, 28%), the affinity of his blood for oxygen was slightly diminished (an oxygen pressure of 27.0 mm Hg was required to produce 50% saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen). With severe anemia (hematocrit, 13.5%), however, his blood had a markedly decreased oxygen affinity (an oxygen pressure of 29.6 mm Hg was required to produce 50% saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen). We conclude that patients with various conditions characterized by an impairment in the oxygen supply system to tissues respond with a diminished affinity of their blood for oxygen. Although the mechanism which brings about this adaptation is not known, the displacement of the oxygen equilibrium curve is associated with an increase in heme-heme interaction. The decrease in blood oxygen affinity need not occur during erythropoiesis, but may be imposed upon mature circulating red cells. PMID:5666114

  5. ELISA-mimic screen for synthetic polymer nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Hoshino, Yu; Shea, Kenneth J

    2012-09-10

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) that display high affinity to protein targets have significant potential for medical and biotechnological applications as protein capture agents or functional replacements of antibodies ("plastic antibodies"). In this study, we modified an immunological assay (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: ELISA) into a high-throughput screening method to select nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins. Histone and fibrinogen were chosen as target proteins to demonstrate this concept. The selection process utilized a biotinylated NP library constructed with combinations of functional monomers. The screen identified NPs with distinctive functional group compositions that exhibited high affinity to either histone or fibrinogen. The variation of protein affinity with changes in the nature and amount of functional groups in the NP provided chemical insight into the principle determinants of protein-NP binding. The NP affinity was semiquantified using the ELISA-mimic assay by varying the NP concentrations. The screening results were found to correlate with solution-based assay results. This screening system utilizing a biotinylated NP is a general approach to optimize functional monomer compositions and can be used to rapidly search for synthetic polymers with high (or low) affinity for target biological macromolecules. PMID:22813352

  6. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  7. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  8. Affinity Enhancement by Ligand Clustering Effect Inspired by Peptide Dendrimers−Shank PDZ Proteins Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity binders are desirable tools to probe the function that specific protein−protein interactions play in cell. In the process of seeking a general strategy to design high-affinity binders, we found a clue from the βPIX (p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor)−Shank PDZ interaction in synaptic assembly: three PDZ-binding sites are clustered by a parallel coiled-coil trimer but bind to Shank PDZ protein with 1:1 stoichiometry (1 trimer/1 PDZ). Inspired by this architecture, we proposed that peptide dendrimer, mimicking the ligand clustering in βPIX, will also show enhanced binding affinity, yet with 1:1 stoichiometry. This postulation has been proven here, as we synthesized a set of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric peptides and measured their binding affinity and stoichiometry with Shank PDZ domains by isothermal titration calorimetry, native mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance. This affinity enhancement, best explained by proximity effect, will be useful to guide the design of high-affinity blockers for protein−protein interactions. PMID:26918521

  9. Sexual maturation in kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, S.D.; Scarnecchia, D.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We used observational and experimental approaches to obtain information on factors affecting the timing of maturation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka, a semelparous, landlocked salmon. Gonadal staging criteria were developed and applied to three kokanee populations in Idaho lakes and reservoirs. Testes were classified into three stages: immature (stage one, S1), maturing (S2), and mature (S3). Ovaries were classified into eight stages: immature (S1-S3), transitional (stage S4), maturing (S5-S7), and mature (S8). Males entered the maturing stage (S2) in February through April of the spawning year. Females entered maturing stage (S5) as early as July of the year before the spawning year, and as late as March of the spawning year. Three hatchery experiments demonstrated that attainment of a larger body size 10 to 16 months before spawning increased the likelihood of initiation of maturation in both sexes. No gonads in a state of regression were observed. A gonadosomatic index above 0.1 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing male, and a gonadosomatic index above 1.0 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing female. Instantaneous growth rates were not good predictors of maturation, but attaining a size threshold of 18 to 19 cm in the fall was a good predictor of maturation the following year. This improved knowledge of kokanee maturation will permit more effectively management of the species for age, growth and size at maturity as well as for contributions to fisheries. ?? 2008 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  10. EF5 Is the High-Affinity Mg(2+) Site in ALG-2.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J; Frey, Benjamin B; Pemberton, Travis; Henzl, Michael T

    2016-09-13

    The penta-EF-hand (PEF) protein ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2) has been implicated in several important physiological processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi vesicular transport and endosomal biogenesis/transport. ALG-2 was recently shown to harbor a metal ion-binding site with a high affinity for Mg(2+) and a low affinity for Ca(2+). We herein present the X-ray structure of Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2des23(wt). Although the C(α) trace is nearly indistinguishable from that of the Ca(2+)-free protein, the orientation of the C-terminal helix differs in the two structures. Consistent with that observation, replacement of the +x ligand in EF5, D169, with alanine eliminates high-affinity Mg(2+) binding. It also eliminates the low-affinity Ca(2+) site and lowers the affinity of the remaining Ca(2+)-binding sites, EF3 and EF1. The coordination environment in EF5 approaches ideal Mg(2+) octahedral geometry. The ligand array, consisting of three carboxylates (+x, +y, +z), a backbone carbonyl (-y), and two water molecules (-x, -z), may offer a recipe for a high-affinity, high-selectivity Mg(2+)-binding site. Sequence data for other PEF proteins indicate that select calpain large subunits, notably CAPN1 and CAPN8, may also possess a high-affinity Mg(2+)-binding site. In Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2, the carbonyl of F188 and the C-terminal carboxylate of V191 interact with the ε-ammonium group of K137 in the opposing subunit, suggesting that Mg(2+) binding could have an impact on dimerization. Interestingly, EF1 and EF3 are also occupied in the crystal, despite having modest affinity for Mg(2+). The results of a calorimetry-based analysis indicate that their Mg(2+) binding constants are 2 orders of magnitude lower than that determined for EF5. PMID:27541325

  11. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  12. Neuropeptides as endogenous neuronal growth regulatory factors on serotonergic maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Davila-Garcia, M.I.

    1989-01-01

    Products of the proopiomelanocortin molecule as well as leu- and met-enkephalin were tested for their effects on serotonergic neuronal maturation. High affinity uptake of ({sup 3}H)5-HT and morphometrics using immunocytochemistry specific for serotonergic neurons were used to monitor neuronal maturation. Cultured brainstem raphe neurons from 14 day fetuses, in the presence or absence of target tissue, were administered neuropeptides at various concentrations for 1,3 or 5 days in culture. ACTH peptides stimulate neurite length and, with the endorphins, the expression of ({sup 3}H)5-HT uptake by serotonergic fetal neurons cultured alone but had no effect when these neurons were cocultured with hippocampal target cells. A daily dose of leu-enkephalin to these cells inhibited neuronal uptake after 5 days of exposure and decreased neurite cell length in 24 hr cultures. In contrast, a single dose of leu-enkephalin at plating stimulated uptake after 5 days while co-administration of bacitracin inhibited uptake expression. Naloxone reversed the opioid effect and stimulated uptake when administered alone. Desulfated-CCK, which resembles leu-enkephalin, was equally potent as leu-enkephalin in inhibiting uptake.

  13. Comments and Criticism. Comments: The Maturity of Science Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Lon

    1994-01-01

    Responds to an article written regarding the maturity of educational research. Contends that, to achieve a democratic research process, the local needs and conditions of the public (including teachers, students, parents, and the community) must be the driving force in deciding what to research. (ZWH)

  14. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  15. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  16. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  17. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody. PMID:24475232

  18. Pulse-chase analysis for studying protein synthesis and maturation.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, Susanne; Springer, Sebastian

    2014-11-03

    Pulse-chase analysis is a well-established and highly adaptable tool for studying the life cycle of endogenous proteins, including their synthesis, folding, subunit assembly, intracellular transport, post-translational processing, and degradation. This unit describes the performance and analysis of a radiolabel pulse-chase experiment for following the folding and cell surface trafficking of a trimeric murine MHC class I glycoprotein. In particular, the unit focuses on the precise timing of pulse-chase experiments to evaluate early/short-time events in protein maturation in both suspended and strictly adherent cell lines. The advantages and limitations of radiolabel pulse-chase experiments are discussed, and a comprehensive section for troubleshooting is provided. Further, ways to quantitatively represent pulse-chase results are described, and feasible interpretations on protein maturation are suggested. The protocols can be adapted to investigate a variety of proteins that may mature in very different ways.

  19. Treatments affecting maturation and germination of American chestnut somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Rodney L; Lessard, Veronica C; Merkle, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    The effects of amino acids, abscisic acid (ABA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and elevated sucrose were tested on the maturation and germination of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) somatic embryos. Somatic embryos from three lines were matured over an eight week period through a two-stage process. After maturation, somatic embryos were randomly divided into three groups to measure dry weight/ fresh weight ratios, starch levels, and germination rates. Prior to transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos received a four week cold treatment. While some treatments with amino acids, elevated sucrose, PEG or ABA increased either dry weight/fresh weight ratios, starch content or both, only addition of 25mM L-asparagine significantly increased germination rate and taproot length, and this response was only obtained with one of the three lines tested. Six plants survived the transfer to potting mix, acclimatization to greenhouse conditions and field planting. PMID:15384407

  20. Treatments affecting maturation and germination of American chestnut somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Rodney L; Lessard, Veronica C; Merkle, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    The effects of amino acids, abscisic acid (ABA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and elevated sucrose were tested on the maturation and germination of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) somatic embryos. Somatic embryos from three lines were matured over an eight week period through a two-stage process. After maturation, somatic embryos were randomly divided into three groups to measure dry weight/ fresh weight ratios, starch levels, and germination rates. Prior to transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos received a four week cold treatment. While some treatments with amino acids, elevated sucrose, PEG or ABA increased either dry weight/fresh weight ratios, starch content or both, only addition of 25mM L-asparagine significantly increased germination rate and taproot length, and this response was only obtained with one of the three lines tested. Six plants survived the transfer to potting mix, acclimatization to greenhouse conditions and field planting.

  1. Pronuclear synchronization and nuclear morphology of mature and in vitro matured oocytes in the rat: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Cincik, M; Baykal, B; Zeteroglu, S; Onalan, G; Ceyhan, S T; Ergur, R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate synchronous and asynchronous pronucleus (PN) formation and the related patterns of juxtapositional nucleolus (n) formation in immature (prophase I [PI] and metaphase I [MI]) and mature (metaphase II [MII]) oocytes after fertilization, both ultrastructurally and at the level of light microscope. A single dose of 15 IU gonadotrophin was injected subcutaneously to twenty four 26-wk-old, female Wistar rats to induce ovulation. Human chorionic gonadotrophin (4 IU) was administered 40 h later, and after 4-6 h the ovaries were dissected, and the oocytes were aspirated. A total of 214 rat oocytes were classified according to a maturation index as follows: group I, 80 PI oocytes; group II, 50 MI oocytes; and group III, 84 MII oocytes. Immature oocytes were in vitro matured for 18-36 h. Spermatozoa were acquired by microepididymal sperm aspiration and processed using swim-up technique. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection was performed on mature oocytes after 2 h of incubation and on in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes 4 h after maturation. Pronuclear synchronization [both pronucleases (PNs) centrally located, equal sized, with equal numbers and sizes of juxtapositional nucleoli (Nn)] was observed in fertilized oocytes. Asynchronous PN formation (diversity between male and female PNs, related to dimensions, localization, and the number of Nn) in groups I, II, and III was found in 75, 86, and 47% of preembryos, respectively. There was a significant difference of synchronous pronuclear formation between mature and IVM oocytes (P < 0.05). In IVM oocytes, asynchronous PN formation is high, and juxtapositional pronucleolar patterns are observed to be low by transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  2. Genomics of mature and immature olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Melissa D; Breheny, Patrick; Stromberg, Arnold J; McClintock, Timothy S

    2012-08-15

    The continuous replacement of neurons in the olfactory epithelium provides an advantageous model for investigating neuronal differentiation and maturation. By calculating the relative enrichment of every mRNA detected in samples of mature mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), immature OSNs, and the residual population of neighboring cell types, and then comparing these ratios against the known expression patterns of >300 genes, enrichment criteria that accurately predicted the OSN expression patterns of nearly all genes were determined. We identified 847 immature OSN-specific and 691 mature OSN-specific genes. The control of gene expression by chromatin modification and transcription factors, and neurite growth, protein transport, RNA processing, cholesterol biosynthesis, and apoptosis via death domain receptors, were overrepresented biological processes in immature OSNs. Ion transport (ion channels), presynaptic functions, and cilia-specific processes were overrepresented in mature OSNs. Processes overrepresented among the genes expressed by all OSNs were protein and ion transport, ER overload response, protein catabolism, and the electron transport chain. To more accurately represent gradations in mRNA abundance and identify all genes expressed in each cell type, classification methods were used to produce probabilities of expression in each cell type for every gene. These probabilities, which identified 9,300 genes expressed in OSNs, were 96% accurate at identifying genes expressed in OSNs and 86% accurate at discriminating genes specific to mature and immature OSNs. This OSN gene database not only predicts the genes responsible for the major biological processes active in OSNs, but also identifies thousands of never before studied genes that support OSN phenotypes.

  3. Genomics of Mature and Immature Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Melissa D.; Breheny, Patrick; Stromberg, Arnold J.; McClintock, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous replacement of neurons in the olfactory epithelium provides an advantageous model for investigating neuronal differentiation and maturation. By calculating the relative enrichment of every mRNA detected in samples of mature mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), immature OSNs, and the residual population of neighboring cell types, and then comparing these ratios against the known expression patterns of >300 genes, enrichment criteria that accurately predicted the OSN expression patterns of nearly all genes were determined. We identified 847 immature OSN-specific and 691 mature OSN-specific genes. The control of gene expression by chromatin modification and transcription factors, and neurite growth, protein transport, RNA processing, cholesterol biosynthesis, and apoptosis via death domain receptors, were overrepresented biological processes in immature OSNs. Ion transport (ion channels), presynaptic functions, and cilia-specific processes were overrepresented in mature OSNs. Processes overrepresented among the genes expressed by all OSNs were protein and ion transport, ER overload response, protein catabolism, and the electron transport chain. To more accurately represent gradations in mRNA abundance and identify all genes expressed in each cell type, classification methods were used to produce probabilities of expression in each cell type for every gene. These probabilities, which identified 9,300 genes expressed in OSNs, were 96% accurate at identifying genes expressed in OSNs and 86% accurate at discriminating genes specific to mature and immature OSNs. This OSN gene database not only predicts the genes responsible for the major biological processes active in OSNs, but also identifies thousands of never before studied genes that support OSN phenotypes. PMID:22252456

  4. Ecological and evolutionary patterns of freshwater maturation in Pacific and Atlantic salmonines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, Matthew R.; Fraser, Dylan J.; Dunham, Jason B.; Falke, Jeffery A.; Jordan, Chris E.; McMillan, John R.; Ohms, Haley A.

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive tactics and migratory strategies in Pacific and Atlantic salmonines are inextricably linked through the effects of migration (or lack thereof) on age and size at maturity. In this review, we focus on the ecological and evolutionary patterns of freshwater maturation in salmonines, a key process resulting in the diversification of their life histories. We demonstrate that the energetics of maturation and reproduction provides a unifying theme for understanding both the proximate and ultimate causes of variation in reproductive schedules among species, populations, and the sexes. We use probabilistic maturation reaction norms to illustrate how variation in individual condition, in terms of body size, growth rate, and lipid storage, influences the timing of maturation. This useful framework integrates both genetic and environmental contributions to conditional strategies for maturation and, in doing so, demonstrates how flexible life histories can be both heritable and subject to strong environmental influences. We review evidence that the propensity for freshwater maturation in partially anadromous species is predictable across environmental gradients at geographic and local spatial scales. We note that growth is commonly associated with the propensity for freshwater maturation, but that life-history responses to changes in growth caused by temperature may be strikingly different than changes caused by differences in food availability. We conclude by exploring how contemporary management actions can constrain or promote the diversity of maturation phenotypes in Pacific and Atlantic salmonines and caution against underestimating the role of freshwater maturing forms in maintaining the resiliency of these iconic species.

  5. Monoclonal IgM antibody exhibiting high-affinity binding and cryoglobulin properties.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, D W; Kranz, D M; Voss, E W

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal IgM antibody (18-2-3) derived from cell fusion of (NZB X NZW) F1 splenocytes following secondary immunization with fluorescein-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin was shown to exhibit high intrinsic binding affinity and cryoinsolubility. Affinity-purified preparations were determined to be IgM by immunochemical, electrophoretic, and chromatographic analyses. An intrinsic association constant (Ka) of 2.9 X 10(10) M-1 (at 2 degrees C) was measured by first-order dissociation-rate analysis. Antibody solubility at low concentration (approximately equal to 50 micrograms/ml) was shown, by absorption spectroscopy, to be temperature dependent between 4 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Insolubility at low temperature (4 degrees C) was reversible in the presence of homologous fluorescyl hapten, indicative of active site involvement in the mechanism of cryoglobulin-18-2-3 complex formation. Characteristics of clone 18-2-3 are discussed in terms of (i) its potential use as a model for examining the mechanism of cryoprecipitation and (ii) the proposed relationship between affinity maturation and the IgM to IgG class switch. Images PMID:6348779

  6. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  7. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  8. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  9. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  10. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  11. Effects of inhibitors on 1-methyladenine induced maturation of starfish oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harold H.; Xu, Quanhan

    1986-12-01

    1-methladenine (1-MA) induces starfish oocytes maturation via surface reaction followed by the appearance of a cytoplasmic maturation factor which in turn induces germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) to resume meiosis. Cellular mechanisms involved in GVBD were investigated by microinjection of metabolic inhibitors. Colchicine (Co) inhibited maturation, cytochalasin-B (CB) delayed GVBD and actinomycin-D-(Act-D) and puromycin (Pu) had no effect. It appears that the microtubule and the microfilament systems are associated with the nuclear membrane dissolution during the process of oocyte maturation of starfish.

  12. In boys with abnormal developmental tempo, maturation of the skeleton and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis remains synchronous.

    PubMed

    Flor-Cisneros, Armando; Leschek, Ellen W; Merke, Deborah P; Barnes, Kevin M; Coco, Marilena; Cutler, Gordon B; Baron, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    The primary mechanism that initiates puberty is unknown. One possible clue is that pubertal maturation often parallels skeletal maturation. Conditions that delay skeletal maturation also tend to delay the onset of puberty, whereas conditions that accelerate skeletal maturation tend to hasten the onset of puberty. To examine this relationship, we studied boys with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (n = 13) and familial male-limited precocious puberty (n = 22), two conditions that accelerate maturational tempo, and boys with idiopathic short stature (n = 18) in which maturational tempo is sometimes delayed. In all three conditions, the onset of central puberty generally occurred at an abnormal chronological age but a normal bone age. Boys with the greatest skeletal advancement began central puberty at the earliest age, whereas boys with the greatest skeletal delay began puberty at the latest age. Furthermore, the magnitude of the skeletal advancement or delay matched the magnitude of the pubertal advancement or delay. This synchrony between skeletal maturation and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis maturation was observed among patients within each condition and also between conditions. In contrast, the maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis did not remain synchronous with other maturational processes including weight, height, or body mass index. We conclude that in boys with abnormal developmental tempo, maturation of the skeleton and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis remains synchronous. This synchrony is consistent with the hypothesis that in boys, skeletal maturation influences hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis maturation.

  13. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method. PMID:25608306

  14. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  15. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  16. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  17. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  18. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  19. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Droms, K.; Sueoka, N.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of three derivative cell types, RT4-B, RT4-D, or RT4-E, with a frequency of about 10(-5). The RT4-AC cells express some properties characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Of these neural properties expressed by RT4-AC cells, only the neuronal properties are expressed by the RT4-B and RT4-E cells, and only the glial properties are expressed by the RT4-D cells. This in vitro cell-type conversion of RT4-AC to three derivative cell types is a branch point for the coordinate regulation of several properties and seems to resemble determination in vivo. In our standard culture conditions, several other neuronal and glial properties are not expressed by these cell types. However, addition of dibutyryl-cAMP induces expression of additional properties, in a cell-type-specific manner: formation of long cellular processes in the RT4-B8 and RT4-E5 cell lines and expression of high-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid, by a glial-cell-specific mechanism, in the RT4-D6-2 cell line. These new properties are maximally expressed 2-3 days after addition of dibutyryl-cAMP.

  20. Sport training and the growth and pubertal maturation of young athletes.

    PubMed

    Matina, Robert M; Rogol, Alan D

    2011-09-01

    Growth and pubertal maturation of youth athletes are overwhelmingly within the broad range of normal variability. These include many successful male athletes who mature earlier than average, and many successful female athletes, especially in the "aesthetic" sports (artistic gymnastics, ice-skating, ballet) and distance running, who mature later than average. Artistic gymnasts generally receive the most attention, but their growth and maturation characteristics fall largely within the physiologic range and are indistinguishable from short, late maturing girls. It is difficult to ascribe causality to intensive training for sport as a factor in the later pubertal maturation of heavily training athletes. The alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary function for the GH/IGF-I and gonadal axes are likely appropriate for the stage of adolescent maturation. The selection and sorting processes for elite sport, including ballet, need critical evaluation. If intensive training is a factor affecting growth and pubertal maturation, its effects must be partitioned from (a) other factors known to influence these biological processes, and (b) other components of the overall sport training environment before causality can be established. Other factors which play an indeterminate role include: genetics/epigenetics, stress, psychosocial interactions, family environment and caloric intake, among others. These factors together with the energy expenditure of intensive training may influence the growth and pubertal maturation of some adolescent athletes. The effect is not necessarily attributable to training per se; rather, it is likely embedded in the elite sport training environment which is essentially an adult dominated enterprise.

  1. A Maturity Model for Assessing the Use of ICT in School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Mauricio; Sabattin, Jorge; Parada, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an ICT-based and capability-driven model for assessing ICT in education capabilities and maturity of schools. The proposed model, called ICTE-MM (ICT in School Education Maturity Model), has three elements supporting educational processes: information criteria, ICT resources, and leverage domains. Changing the traditional…

  2. Near infrared measurement of cotton fiber micronaire, maturity and fineness--a comparative investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key cotton fiber quality property is micronaire, which is an air flow resistance measurement that is highly correlated to the fiber’s maturity and fineness. Fiber maturity and fineness can impact the downstream processing of the fiber into yarn and fabric and the fiber’s dyeability. Previous studi...

  3. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  4. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  5. Exploring Fluorous Affinity by Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Catani, Martina; Guzzinati, Roberta; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Terms such as "fluorous affinity" and "fluorophilicity" have been used to describe the unique partition and sorption properties often exhibited by highly fluorinated organic compounds, that is molecules rich in sp(3) carbon-fluorine bonds. In this work, we made use of a highly fluorinated stationary phase and a series of benzene derivatives to study the effect of one single perfluorinated carbon on the chromatographic behavior and adsorption properties of molecules. For this purpose, the adsorption equilibria of α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, toluene, and other alkylbenzenes have been studied by means of nonlinear chromatography in a variety of acetonitrile/water eluents. Our results reveal that one single perfluorinated carbon is already enough to induce a drastic change in the adsorption properties of molecules on the perfluorinated stationary phase. In particular, it has been found that adsorption is monolayer if the perfluoroalkyl carbon is present but that, when this unit is missing, molecules arrange as multilayer stack structures. These findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of fluorous affinity. PMID:26047527

  6. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  7. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  8. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  9. Negative homotropic cooperativity and affinity heterogeneity: preparation of yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with maximal affinity homogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Gennis, L S

    1976-01-01

    A three-step procedure including affinity chromatography on NAD+-azobenzamidopropyl-Sepharose has been designed for the purification of yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12] with maximized specific activity and maximized homogeneity with respect to affinity for the coenzyme, NAD+.Binding isotherms allow the analysis of cooperativity patterns that disclose both the average ligand affinity in the system and the distribution of ligands among the sites, only for systems with complete affinity homogeneity. The presence of affinity heterogeneity, resulting from multiple oligomeric species differing only in their affinity for coenzyme, gives rise to isotherms which falsely manifest apparent negative cooperativity. A method for distinguishing negative homotropic cooperativity from affinity heterogeneity is suggested. PMID:186779

  10. Embryonic Cardiac Chamber Maturation: Trabeculation, Conduction and Cardiomyocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Leigh Ann; Yang, Betsy; Liu, Jiandong

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are one of the most common human birth defects. Though some congenital heart defects can be surgically corrected, treatment options for other congenital heart diseases are very limited. In many congenital heart diseases, genetic defects lead to impaired embryonic heart development or growth. One of the key development processes in cardiac development is chamber maturation, and alterations in this maturation process can manifest as a variety of congenital defects including noncompaction, systolic dysfunction, diastolic dysfunction, and arrhythmia. During development, to meet the increasing metabolic demands of the developing embryo, the myocardial wall undergoes extensive remodeling characterized by the formation of muscular luminal protrusions called cardiac trabeculae, increased cardiomyocyte mass, and development of the ventricular conduction system. Though the basic morphological and cytological changes involved in early heart development are clear, much remains unknown about the complex biomolecular mechanisms governing chamber maturation. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that a wide variety of basic signaling pathways and biomechanical forces are involved in cardiac wall maturation. PMID:23720419

  11. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Erguen, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecting demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  12. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecing demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  13. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  14. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations.

  15. Sexual maturation of the hypothalamus: pathophysiological aspects and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Forest, M G

    1985-01-01

    Sexual maturation in humans begins early in fetal life and culminates in adulthood when the gonads have acquired a full capacity for reproduction. It is remarkable that during this long process, the pituitary gonadal function, hence its hypothalamic control presents an alternative of activation and inhibition periods, during which the interrelations of the 3 components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis change gradually and inversely. The ontogeny of the hypothalamic-pituitary system, the varying activity of the reproductive endocrine system throughout sexual maturation and the developmental changes in the interrelations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are reviewed: the most striking feature of human sexual development is the long inhibition of hypothalamo-pituitary function during childhood. Much indirect evidence points to the determining role of the CNS in the maturation of hypothalamic function: the occurrence of rhythms of secretion, the amplitude of secretions and peripubertal specific sleep-related nycthemeral rhythm of secretion at the onset of puberty. Despite the reality of a negative feedback control, these changes do occur independently of gonadal secretions since they are observed (qualitatively if not strictly quantitatively) in agonadal children. It is likely that neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonine) and opiates have an inhibitory effect on Gn-RH release. But we still don't know their evolution during sexual maturation. It does not appear that melatonine plays any determinant role in the onset of human puberty. The clinical implications of our present understanding of the physiological events occurring during sexual maturation are several. Considering the major problems related to abnormal sexual maturation we will discuss successively: (1) diagnosis of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in early infancy; (2) differential diagnosis between premature thelarche and true sexual precocity; (3) the usefulness of endocrine investigations

  16. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  17. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  18. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Growth and Maturation of Relevance to Physical Activity, Performance, and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malina, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Growth, maturation, and development dominate the daily lives of children and adolescents for approximately the first 2 decades of life. Growth and maturation are biological processes, while development is largely a behavioral process. The 3 processes occur simultaneously and interact. They can be influenced by physical activity and also can…

  19. TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27

    This Technology Maturation Plan schedules the development process that will bring the Lithium Hydrotalcite waste pretreatment process from its current estimated Technology Readiness Level of 3, to a level of 6. This maturation approach involves chemical and engineering research and development work, from laboratory scale to pilot scale testing, to incrementally make the process progress towards its integration in a fully qualified industrial system.

  20. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  1. Common and novel transcriptional routes to behavioral maturation in worker and male honey bees.

    PubMed

    Zayed, A; Naeger, N L; Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Robinson, G E

    2012-04-01

    Worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) undergo a process of behavioral maturation leading to their transition from in-hive tasks to foraging--a process which is associated with profound transcriptional changes in the brain. Changes in brain gene expression observed during worker behavioral maturation could represent either a derived program underlying division of labor or a general program unrelated to sociality. Male bees (drones) undergo a process of behavioral maturation associated with the onset of mating flights, but do not partake in division of labor. Drones thus provide an excellent reference point for polarizing transcriptional changes associated with behavioral maturation in honey bees. We assayed the brain transcriptomes of adult drones and workers to compare and contrast differences associated with behavioral maturation in the two sexes. Both behavioral maturation and sex were associated with changes in expression of thousands of genes in the brain. Many genes involved in neuronal development, behavior, and the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters regulating the perception of reward showed sex-biased gene expression. Furthermore, most of the transcriptional changes associated with behavioral maturation were common to drones and workers, consistent with common genetic and physiological regulation. Our study suggests that there is a common behavioral maturation program that has been co-opted and modified to yield the different behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of worker and drone bees.

  2. Decision-Making Style and Vocational Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susan D.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the relationship between decision-making style, scholastic achievement, and vocational maturity for college students (N=64). Results did not support the hypothesized relationship between rationality and attitudinal and cognitive maturity. Scholastic achievement and lack of dependent decision style were found to be moderately predictive of…

  3. Motivation and Maturity Patterns in Marital Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Married couples rated their marital satisfaction and played interpersonal competitive games which revealed the success with which they interacted. Younger husbands who scored more maturely on the Stewart measure of psychosocial maturity belonged to more successful marriages, as did college-educated wives who showed less immaturity and more phallic…

  4. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.)...

  5. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in...

  6. The FMI: Dimensions of Follower Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Loren I.

    1976-01-01

    The Follower Maturity Index (FMI) is an instrument derived from leadership theory and based on observations of verbal and nonverbal behavior of followers in task groups. Dimensions of follower maturity--achievement, responsibility, experience, activity, dependence, variety, interests, perspective, position, and awareness--are discussed. For…

  7. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to quantify "semantic linguistic maturity" (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human…

  8. Vocational Maturity among Inner-City Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Peter E.; Hansen, James C.

    1970-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of the Vocational Development Inventory in measuring the vocational maturity of inner city boys. Intelligence test results were converted to standardized T scores. Mean vocational maturity scores indicate large differences which disappear when intelligence is controlled by analysis of convariance. A variety of…

  9. Career Maturity and College Student Persistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Stephen R.; Cabrera, Alberto F.; Vogt, W. Paul

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the role of career maturity in the college persistence of 307 freshmen at a public, residential, four-year college. Results indicate that the My Vocational Situation instrument is reliable and valid, although theoretical formulations should be reexamined. Career maturity was positively associated with several variables important…

  10. Canopy temperature and maturity in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat units are a widely used indicator of maturity in cotton. It is generally assumed that it takes approximately 2200°F (1222°C) heat units for a cotton plant on the South High Plains of Texas to mature. This value is based on a typical planting date of May 15 with ample irrigation. As water for c...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as...

  12. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  13. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  17. A novel 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based affinity probe for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yingying; Shi, Yanxia; Li, Xitao; Teng, Yingqi; Pan, Zhengying

    2015-01-01

    As a critical regulator of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has attracted intensive drug discovery efforts for treating B-cell lineage cancers and autoimmune disorders. In particular, covalent inhibitors targeting Cys481 in Btk have demonstrated impressive clinical benefits, and their companion affinity probes have been crucial in the drug development process. Recently, we have discovered a novel series of 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based covalent irreversible inhibitors of Btk. Here, we present the discovery of a novel affinity Btk probe based on the aforementioned scaffold and demonstrate its usage in evaluating the target engagement of Btk inhibitors in live cells. PMID:26531233

  18. A novel 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based affinity probe for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yingying; Shi, Yanxia; Li, Xitao; Teng, Yingqi; Pan, Zhengying

    2015-11-01

    As a critical regulator of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has attracted intensive drug discovery efforts for treating B-cell lineage cancers and autoimmune disorders. In particular, covalent inhibitors targeting Cys481 in Btk have demonstrated impressive clinical benefits, and their companion affinity probes have been crucial in the drug development process. Recently, we have discovered a novel series of 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based covalent irreversible inhibitors of Btk. Here, we present the discovery of a novel affinity Btk probe based on the aforementioned scaffold and demonstrate its usage in evaluating the target engagement of Btk inhibitors in live cells.

  19. Robust template matching for affine resistant image watermarks.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S; Pun, T

    2000-01-01

    Digital watermarks have been proposed as a method for discouraging illicit copying and distribution of copyrighted material. This paper describes a method for the secure and robust copyright protection of digital images. We present an approach for embedding a digital watermark into an image using the Fourier transform. To this watermark is added a template in the Fourier transform domain to render the method robust against general linear transformations. We detail a new algorithm based on polar maps for the accurate and efficient recovery of the template in an image which has undergone a general affine transformation. We also present results which demonstrate the robustness of the method against some common image processing operations such as compression, rotation, scaling, and aspect ratio changes. PMID:18255481

  20. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  1. Scoring Large Scale Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Datasets with MIST

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, Erik; Von Dollen, John; Cimermancic, Peter; Gulbahce, Natali; Sali, Andrej; Krogan, Nevan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments can identify a large number of protein interactions but only a fraction of these interactions are biologically relevant. Here, we describe a comprehensive computational strategy to process raw AP-MS data, perform quality controls and prioritize biologically relevant bait-prey pairs in a set of replicated AP-MS experiments with Mass spectrometry interaction STatistics (MiST). The MiST score is a linear combination of prey quantity (abundance), abundance invariability across repeated experiments (reproducibility), and prey uniqueness relative to other baits (specificity); We describe how to run the full MiST analysis pipeline in an R environment and discuss a number of configurable options that allow the lay user to convert any large-scale AP-MS data into an interpretable, biologically relevant protein-protein interaction network. PMID:25754993

  2. 3D affine registration using teaching-learning based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Ashish; Savsani, Vimal; Pandya, Abhijit

    2013-09-01

    3D image registration is an emerging research field in the study of computer vision. In this paper, two effective global optimization methods are considered for the 3D registration of point clouds. Experiments were conducted by applying each algorithm and their performance was evaluated with respect to rigidity, similarity and affine transformations. Comparison of algorithms and its effectiveness was tested for the average performance to find the global solution for minimizing the error in the terms of distance between the model cloud and the data cloud. The parameters for the transformation matrix were considered as the design variables. Further comparisons of the considered methods were done for the computational effort, computational time and the convergence of the algorithm. The results reveal that the use of TLBO was outstanding for image processing application involving 3D registration. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Genetic affinities of Ukrainians from the maternal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnov, Andrey; Balanovsky, Oleg; Utevska, Olga; Metspalu, Ene; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Agdzhoyan, Anastasia; Churnosov, Mikhail; Atramentova, Lyubov; Balanovska, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The area of what is now the Ukraine has been the arena of large-scale demographic processes that may have left their traces in the contemporary gene pool of Ukrainians. In this study, we present new mitochondrial DNA data for 607 Ukrainians (hypervariable segment I sequences and coding region polymorphisms). To study the maternal affinities of Ukrainians at the level of separate mitochondrial haplotypes, we apply an original technique, the haplotype co-occurrence analysis. About 20% of the Ukrainian maternal gene pool is represented by lineages highly specific to Ukrainians, but is scarcely found in other populations. About 9% of Ukrainian mtDNA lineages are typical for peoples of the Volga region. We also identified minor gene pool strata (1.6-3.3%), each of which is common in Lithuanians, Estonians, Saami, Nenets, Cornish, and the populations of the North Caucasus.

  4. Political ideology: its structure, functions, and elective affinities.

    PubMed

    Jost, John T; Federico, Christopher M; Napier, Jaime L

    2009-01-01

    Ideology has re-emerged as an important topic of inquiry among social, personality, and political psychologists. In this review, we examine recent theory and research concerning the structure, contents, and functions of ideological belief systems. We begin by defining the construct and placing it in historical and philosophical context. We then examine different perspectives on how many (and what types of) dimensions individuals use to organize their political opinions. We investigate (a) how and to what extent individuals acquire the discursive contents associated with various ideologies, and (b) the social-psychological functions that these ideologies serve for those who adopt them. Our review highlights "elective affinities" between situational and dispositional needs of individuals and groups and the structure and contents of specific ideologies. Finally, we consider the consequences of ideology, especially with respect to attitudes, evaluations, and processes of system justification. PMID:19035826

  5. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  6. Political ideology: its structure, functions, and elective affinities.

    PubMed

    Jost, John T; Federico, Christopher M; Napier, Jaime L

    2009-01-01

    Ideology has re-emerged as an important topic of inquiry among social, personality, and political psychologists. In this review, we examine recent theory and research concerning the structure, contents, and functions of ideological belief systems. We begin by defining the construct and placing it in historical and philosophical context. We then examine different perspectives on how many (and what types of) dimensions individuals use to organize their political opinions. We investigate (a) how and to what extent individuals acquire the discursive contents associated with various ideologies, and (b) the social-psychological functions that these ideologies serve for those who adopt them. Our review highlights "elective affinities" between situational and dispositional needs of individuals and groups and the structure and contents of specific ideologies. Finally, we consider the consequences of ideology, especially with respect to attitudes, evaluations, and processes of system justification.

  7. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  8. Affinity chromatography with an immobilized RNA enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Vioque, A; Altman, S

    1986-01-01

    M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of Escherichia coli RNase P, has been covalently linked at its 3' terminus to agarose beads. Unlike M1 RNA, which is active in solution in the absence of the protein component (C5) of RNase P, the RNA linked to the beads is active only in the presence of C5 protein. Affinity chromatography of crude extracts of E. coli on a column prepared from the beads to which the RNA has been crosslinked results in the purification of C5 protein in a single step. The protein has been purified in this manner from cells that contain a plasmid, pINIIIR20, which includes the gene that codes for C5 protein. A 6-fold amplification of the expression of C5 protein is found in these cells after induction as compared to cells that do not harbor the plasmid. Images PMID:3526344

  9. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  10. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  11. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  12. Selection is more intelligent than design: improving the affinity of a bivalent ligand through directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Kareem M; Xiao, Yi; Soh, H Tom

    2012-12-01

    Multivalent molecular interactions can be exploited to dramatically enhance the performance of an affinity reagent. The enhancement in affinity and specificity achieved with a multivalent construct depends critically on the effectiveness of the scaffold that joins the ligands, as this determines their positions and orientations with respect to the target molecule. Currently, no generalizable design rules exist for construction of an optimal multivalent ligand for targets with known structures, and the design challenge remains an insurmountable obstacle for the large number of proteins whose structures are not known. As an alternative to such design-based strategies, we report here a directed evolution-based method for generating optimal bivalent aptamers. To demonstrate this approach, we fused two thrombin aptamers with a randomized DNA sequence and used a microfluidic in vitro selection strategy to isolate scaffolds with exceptionally high affinities. Within five rounds of selection, we generated a bivalent aptamer that binds thrombin with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) <10 pM, representing a ∼200-fold improvement in binding affinity over the monomeric aptamers and a ∼15-fold improvement over the best designed bivalent construct. The process described here can be used to produce high-affinity multivalent aptamers and could potentially be adapted to other classes of biomolecules.

  13. Computational protocol for predicting the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun; Jayaram, B

    2007-06-01

    Zinc is one of the most important metal ions found in proteins performing specific functions associated with life processes. Coordination geometry of the zinc ion in the active site of the metalloprotein-ligand complexes poses a challenge in determining ligand binding affinities accurately in structure-based drug design. We report here an all atom force field based computational protocol for estimating rapidly the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes, considering electrostatics, van der Waals, hydrophobicity, and loss in conformational entropy of protein side chains upon ligand binding along with a nonbonded approach to model the interactions of the zinc ion with all the other atoms of the complex. We examined the sensitivity of the binding affinity predictions to the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters, partial atomic charges, and dielectric treatments adopted for system preparation and scoring. The highest correlation obtained was R2 = 0.77 (r = 0.88) for the predicted binding affinity against the experiment on a heterogenous dataset of 90 zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes consisting of five unique protein targets. Model validation and parameter analysis studies underscore the robustness and predictive ability of the scoring function. The high correlation obtained suggests the potential applicability of the methodology in designing novel ligands for zinc-metalloproteins. The scoring function has been web enabled for free access at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/bapplz.jsp as BAPPL-Z server (Binding Affinity Prediction of Protein-Ligand complexes containing Zinc metal ions).

  14. How Much Binding Affinity Can be Gained by Filling a Cavity?

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yuko; Chufan, Eduardo E.; Lafont, Virginie; Hidaka, Koushi; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Amzel, L. Mario; Freire, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Binding affinity optimization is critical during drug development. Here we evaluate the thermodynamic consequences of filling a binding cavity with functionalities of increasing van der Waals radii (-H, -F, -Cl and CH3) that improve the geometric fit without participating in hydrogen bonding or other specific interactions. We observe a binding affinity increase of two orders of magnitude. There appears to be three phases in the process. The first phase is associated with the formation of stable van der Waals interactions. This phase is characterized by a gain in binding enthalpy and a loss in binding entropy, attributed to a loss of conformational degrees of freedom. For the specific case presented in this paper, the enthalpy gain amounts to −1.5 kcal/mol while the entropic losses amount to +0.9 kcal/mol resulting in a net 3.5-fold affinity gain. The second phase is characterized by simultaneous enthalpic and entropic gains. This phase improves the binding affinity 25-fold. The third phase represents the collapse of the trend and is triggered by the introduction of chemical functionalities larger than the binding cavity itself (CH(CH3)2). It is characterized by large enthalpy and affinity losses. The thermodynamic signatures associated with each phase provide guidelines for lead optimization. PMID:20028396

  15. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  16. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  17. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  18. [Eco-physiology and regulation of leaf senescence and maturity performance in cotton: A review].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-zhen; Dong, He-zhong

    2016-02-01

    Senescence is a natural termination process at the plant or organ level of cotton, leading to the inevitable end of the growth and development process. Maturity performance is termed as senescence performance and results of a cotton plant during boll opening, including normal maturity, premature senescence and late-maturity in cotton. Senescence and maturity performance are influenced by genotype and environment interactions. This paper summarized and reviewed the research progress in eco-physiology and molecular biology of cotton leaf senescence. Strategies were proposed to regulate cotton growth and aging through breeding of stably-developed varieties, rational application of plant growth regulators and agronomic cultivation measures, to realize normal maturity and improve yield and quality of cotton. PMID:27396141

  19. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time.

  20. Spitzer IRS Observations of ``Mature'' Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, L. Andrew; Woodward, C. E.; Evans, A.; Gehrz, R. D.; Lynch, D. L.; Rudy, R.; Schwarz, G. J.; Vanlandingham, K.; Spitzer Nova Team

    2009-01-01

    Many facets of astrophysics are captured in classical nova (CN) eruptions, making them unique laboratories in which we may observe several poorly understood astrophysical processes including mass transfer, thermonuclear runaway, optically thick winds, common envelope evolution, molecule and grain formation, coronal line emission, and gas cooling by fine structure lines. Many of these phenomena evolve in real time. Therefore, a better understanding of CNe has far-reaching applications and underpins several related and important areas of astrophysics. Here we present preliminary results of our Cycle 5 Spitzer IRS study of ``mature'' novae (several 100s of days post-outburst), complemented by extensive multi-wavelength data from other facilities. We present data on V2361 Cyg, V2467 Cyg and V378 Ser. In particular, V2361 Cyg displays a strong dust continuum with possible Aromatic Emission Features (AEF) superimposed, the first dusty CN observed to do so since 1993 and the first to be observed spectroscopically in the far IR. This object presents us with an outstanding opportunity to investigate how the dust is processed by the UV radiation from the stellar remnant. Support for this work was provided in part by NASA through Spitzer contracts issued by JPL/Caltech to the University of Minnesota.

  1. Deficits in sialylation impair podocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Birgit; Sellmeier, Melanie; Schaper, Wiebke; Blume, Linda; Philippens, Brigitte; Kats, Elina; Bernard, Ulrike; Galuska, Sebastian P; Geyer, Hildegard; Geyer, Rudolf; Worthmann, Kirstin; Schiffer, Mario; Groos, Stephanie; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Münster-Kühnel, Anja K

    2012-08-01

    The role of sialylation in kidney biology is not fully understood. The synthesis of sialoglycoconjugates, which form the outermost structures of animal cells, requires CMP-sialic acid, which is a product of the nuclear enzyme CMAS. We used a knock-in strategy to create a mouse with point mutations in the canonical nuclear localization signal of CMAS, which relocated the enzyme to the cytoplasm of transfected cells without affecting its activity. Although insufficient to prevent nuclear entry in mice, the mutation led to a drastically reduced concentration of nuclear-expressed enzyme. Mice homozygous for the mutation died from kidney failure within 72 hours after birth. The Cmas(nls) mouse exhibited podocyte foot process effacement, absence of slit diaphragms, and massive proteinuria, recapitulating features of nephrin-knockout mice and of patients with Finnish-type congenital nephrotic syndrome. Although the Cmas(nls) mouse displayed normal sialylation in all organs including kidney, a critical shortage of CMP-sialic acid prevented sialylation of nephrin and podocalyxin in the maturing podocyte where it is required during the formation of foot processes. Accordingly, the sialylation defects progressed with time and paralleled the morphologic changes. In summary, sialylation is critical during the development of the glomerular filtration barrier and required for the proper function of nephrin. Whether altered sialylation impairs nephrin function in human disease requires further study.

  2. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time. PMID:17549936

  3. Laboratory and outside the laboratory measurements of ginned and ot ginned cotton for fiber micronaire and maturity by portable Near Infrared (NIR) Instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key cotton quality assessment property, impacting downstream fiber processing and dye consistency. A component of micronaire is fiber maturity (degree of secondary wall development). Historically, micronaire and maturity are measured in a laboratory under tight environmental condit...

  4. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  5. [Affine transformation-based automatic registration for peripheral digital subtraction angiography (DSA)].

    PubMed

    Kong, Gang; Dai, Dao-Qing; Zou, Lu-Min

    2008-07-01

    In order to remove the artifacts of peripheral digital subtraction angiography (DSA), an affine transformation-based automatic image registration algorithm is introduced here. The whole process is described as follows: First, rectangle feature templates are constructed with their centers of the extracted Harris corners in the mask, and motion vectors of the central feature points are estimated using template matching technology with the similarity measure of maximum histogram energy. And then the optimal parameters of the affine transformation are calculated with the matrix singular value decomposition (SVD) method. Finally, bilinear intensity interpolation is taken to the mask according to the specific affine transformation. More than 30 peripheral DSA registrations are performed with the presented algorithm, and as the result, moving artifacts of the images are removed with sub-pixel precision, and the time consumption is less enough to satisfy the clinical requirements. Experimental results show the efficiency and robustness of the algorithm.

  6. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  7. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection. PMID:25271333

  8. Development and Characterization of High Affinity Leptins and Leptin Antagonists*

    PubMed Central

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin. PMID:21119198

  9. Development and characterization of high affinity leptins and leptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-02-11

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin.

  10. Purification of glycolytic enzymes by using affinity-elution chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Scopes, R K

    1977-01-01

    1. A systematic procedure for the purification of enzymes by affinity-elution chromatography is described. Enzymes are adsorbed on a cation-exchanger, and eluted with ligands specific for the enzyme concerned. 2. All of the glycolytic and some related enzymes present in rabbit muscle can be purified by the affinity-elution technique. The pH range for adsorption and elution of each enzyme was found, and the effects of minor variations of conditions are described. 3. A description of experimental conditions suitable for affinity elution of each enzyme is given, together with special features relevant to each individual enzyme. 4. Theoretical considerations of affinity elution chromatography are discussed, including its limitations, advantages and disadvantages compared with affinity-adsorption chromatography. Possible developments are suggested to cover enzymes which because of their adsorption characteristics are not at present amenable to affinity-elution procedures. PMID:192194

  11. Antibody-based affinity cryo-EM grid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Li, Kunpeng; Jiang, Wen

    2016-05-01

    The Affinity Grid technique combines sample purification and cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) grid preparation into a single step. Several types of affinity surfaces, including functionalized lipids monolayers, streptavidin 2D crystals, and covalently functionalized carbon surfaces have been reported. More recently, we presented a new affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, which applies the traditional Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) technique to cryo-EM. This approach significantly simplifies the preparation of affinity grids and directly works with native macromolecular complexes without need of target modifications. With wide availability of high affinity and high specificity antibodies, the antibody-based affinity grid would enable cryo-EM studies of the native samples directly from cell cultures, targets of low abundance, and unstable or short-lived intermediate states.

  12. Prediction of Neutral Salt Elution Profiles for Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1981-04-01

    Neutral salts exhibit very marked differences as eluants of proteins from affinity columns. We observe: (i) that the relative potencies of neutral salts as eluants are independent of the protein or the affinity ligand in the systems studied, (ii) that the absolute salt concentration necessary to elute any given protein bound to the affinity matrix is proportional to the algebraic sum of a set of elution coefficients defined herein for the separate ions present in the solution, and (iii) that the proportionality between elution potency and elution coefficient is a function of the affinity of the protein for the immobilized ligand. Given the concentration of one neutral salt required for elution of a protein of interest from an affinity column, the elution capability of any neutral salt at any temperature can be quantitatively predicted for that protein. Accordingly, application and elution protocols for affinity chromatography can be designed to optimize the yield and fold purification of proteins.

  13. Activation of latent human GDF9 by a single residue change (Gly 391 Arg) in the mature domain.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Courtney M; Stanton, Peter G; Walton, Kelly L; Chan, Karen L; Ritter, Lesley J; Gilchrist, Robert B; Harrison, Craig A

    2012-03-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) controls granulosa cell growth and differentiation during early ovarian folliculogenesis and regulates cumulus cell function and ovulation rate in the later stages of this process. Similar to other TGF-β superfamily ligands, GDF9 is secreted from the oocyte in a noncovalent complex with its prodomain. In this study, we show that prodomain interactions differentially regulate the activity of GDF9 across species, such that murine (m) GDF9 is secreted in an active form, whereas human (h) GDF9 is latent. To understand this distinction, we used site-directed mutagenesis to introduce nonconserved mGDF9 residues into the pro- and mature domains of hGDF9. Activity-based screens of the resultant mutants indicated that a single mature domain residue (Gly(391)) confers latency to hGDF9. Gly(391) forms part of the type I receptor binding site on hGDF9, and this residue is present in all species except mouse, rat, hamster, galago, and possum, in which it is substituted with an arginine. In an adrenocortical cell luciferase assay, hGDF9 (Gly(391)Arg) had similar activity to mGDF9 (EC(50) 55 ng/ml vs. 28 ng/ml, respectively), whereas wild-type hGDF9 was inactive. hGDF9 (Gly(391)Arg) was also a potent stimulator of murine granulosa cell proliferation (EC(50) 52 ng/ml). An arginine at position 391 increases the affinity of GDF9 for its signaling receptors, enabling it to be secreted in an active form. This important species difference in the activation status of GDF9 may contribute to the variation observed in follicular development, ovulation rate, and fecundity between mammals.

  14. MicroRNA Expression during Bovine Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Graham C; Tscherner, Allison; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Merico, Daniele; LaMarre, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Successful fertilization and subsequent embryo development rely on complex molecular processes starting with the development of oocyte competence through maturation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that function as gene regulators in many biological systems, including the oocyte and embryo. In order to further explore the roles of miRNAs in oocyte maturation, we employed small RNA sequencing as a screening tool to identify and characterize miRNA populations present in pools of bovine germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes, metaphase II (MII) oocytes, and presumptive zygotes (PZ). Each stage contained a defined miRNA population, some of which showed stable expression while others showed progressive changes between stages that were subsequently confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bta-miR-155, bta-miR-222, bta-miR-21, bta-let-7d, bta-let-7i, and bta-miR-190a were among the statistically significant differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05). To determine whether changes in specific primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts were responsible for the observed miRNA changes, we evaluated pri-miR-155, -222 and let-7d expression. Pri-miR-155 and -222 were not detected in GV oocytes but pri-miR-155 was present in MII oocytes, indicating transcription during maturation. In contrast, levels of pri-let-7d decreased during maturation, suggesting that the observed increase in let-7d expression was likely due to processing of the primary transcript. This study demonstrates that both dynamic and stable populations of miRNAs are present in bovine oocytes and zygotes and extend previous studies supporting the importance of the small RNA landscape in the maturing bovine oocyte and early embryo. PMID:26999121

  15. MicroRNA Expression during Bovine Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Graham C.; Tscherner, Allison; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Merico, Daniele; LaMarre, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Successful fertilization and subsequent embryo development rely on complex molecular processes starting with the development of oocyte competence through maturation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that function as gene regulators in many biological systems, including the oocyte and embryo. In order to further explore the roles of miRNAs in oocyte maturation, we employed small RNA sequencing as a screening tool to identify and characterize miRNA populations present in pools of bovine germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes, metaphase II (MII) oocytes, and presumptive zygotes (PZ). Each stage contained a defined miRNA population, some of which showed stable expression while others showed progressive changes between stages that were subsequently confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bta-miR-155, bta-miR-222, bta-miR-21, bta-let-7d, bta-let-7i, and bta-miR-190a were among the statistically significant differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05). To determine whether changes in specific primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts were responsible for the observed miRNA changes, we evaluated pri-miR-155, -222 and let-7d expression. Pri-miR-155 and -222 were not detected in GV oocytes but pri-miR-155 was present in MII oocytes, indicating transcription during maturation. In contrast, levels of pri-let-7d decreased during maturation, suggesting that the observed increase in let-7d expression was likely due to processing of the primary transcript. This study demonstrates that both dynamic and stable populations of miRNAs are present in bovine oocytes and zygotes and extend previous studies supporting the importance of the small RNA landscape in the maturing bovine oocyte and early embryo. PMID:26999121

  16. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T L; Sacha, C R; Pollara, J; Himes, J; Jaeger, F H; Dennison, S M; McGuire, E; Kunz, E; Eudailey, J A; Trama, A M; LaBranche, C; Fouda, G G; Wiehe, K; Montefiori, D C; Haynes, B F; Liao, H-X; Ferrari, G; Alam, S M; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2016-03-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants because of beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution, and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell-mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B-cell lineage evolution with respect to crossreactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B-cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  17. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas L; Sacha, CR; Pollara, Justin; Himes, Jon; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; McGuire, Erin; Kunz, Erika; Eudailey, Joshua A; Trama, Ashley M; LaBranche, Celia; Fouda, Genevieve G; Wiehe, Kevin; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants due to beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Interestingly, we also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B cell lineage evolution with respect to cross-reactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk IgG repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  18. Affinity chromatography for purification of two urokinases from human urine.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Akiba, K; Koike, M; Noguchi, T; Ezure, Y

    2000-05-26

    A new affinity chromatography (hydrophobic-mediated affinity chromatography), which was characterized by the matrix having both affinity site to urokinase and hydrophobic site, was established for the purification of urokinase from human urine. The hydrophobic affinity matrix (tentatively named PAS in the text) was prepared by immobilizing 6-aminocaproic acid on Sepharose CL-6B, followed by a coupling p-aminobenzamidine to a part of the hydrophobic site on the matrix. The PAS matrix was applied to the purification of urokinase from human urine, and high- and low-molecular weight pure urokinases were efficiently obtained in high yield by the present method. PMID:10892585

  19. Late maturers at a performance disadvantage to their more mature peers in junior Australian football.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; Bennett, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents mature at different rates such that individuals competing in the same competition may differ in physical and biological maturity despite being of similar chronological age. Whether or not differences translate into on-field performance in competition is relatively unknown. This study investigated the influence of biological maturity on fitness and match running performance in junior Australian football. Eighty-seven under-15 years players were categorised into early (n = 20), average (n = 45) and late (n = 22) maturity groups based on self-reported and anthropometric assessment of biological maturity. Running movements during competition were collected using GPS (5 Hz) technology. Early maturers were heavier and taller than all other boys (P < 0.05), while biological maturity was significantly correlated to 20 m sprint (r = 0.53, P < 0.01). Total distance, high-intensity (>14.4 km · h(-1)) running distance and number of high-intensity efforts were significantly greater (20.8%, 53.6%, 31.7%, respectively; P < 0.01) in early compared to late maturers. Number of sprints and peak speed in competition were not different. Pubertal development and maturity status partially explained the differences between players in physical size, functional running fitness and match running performance. Late maturing players in this Australian football under-15 age group were at a physical and performance disadvantage to their earlier maturing peers.

  20. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286