Science.gov

Sample records for affinity maturation process

  1. Co-administration of CpG oligonucleotides enhances the late affinity maturation process of human anti-hepatitis B vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pihlgren, Maria; Tougne, Chantal; Efler, Sue M; Morris, Mary Lou; AlAdhami, Mohammed J; Cameron, D William; Cooper, Curtis L; Heathcote, Jenny; Davis, Heather L; Lambert, Paul-Henri

    2004-12-16

    We assessed the avidity maturation process elicited by human immunization with alum-adsorbed HBsAg alone or with a novel adjuvant containing CpG motifs (CpG 7909). Mean avidity indexes and distribution of low- and high-avidity anti-HBs indicated that avidity maturation essentially takes place late after priming. CpG 7909 markedly enhanced this affinity maturation process, increasing the pool of high-avidity antibodies. The influence of CpG 7909 was antigen-specific, isotype-specific and distinct from the influence on anti-HBs production, as avidity did not correlate with anti-HBs IgG titers. This is the first demonstration that a novel human adjuvant may induce antibodies with higher antigen-binding affinity.

  2. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  3. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  4. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  5. Limits for antibody affinity maturation and repertoire diversification in hypervaccinated humans.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tine Rugh; Jensen, Allan; Haurum, John S; Andersen, Peter S

    2011-10-15

    The immune system is known to generate a diverse panel of high-affinity Abs by adaptively improving the recognition of pathogens during ongoing immune responses. In this study, we report the biological limits for Ag-driven affinity maturation and repertoire diversification by analyzing Ab repertoires in two adult volunteers after each of three consecutive booster vaccinations with tetanus toxoid. Maturation of on-rates and off-rates occurred independently, indicating a kinetically controlled affinity maturation process. The third vaccination induced no significant changes in the distribution of somatic mutations and binding rate constants implying that the limits for affinity maturation and repertoire diversification had been reached. These fully matured Ab repertoires remained similar in size, genetically diverse, and dynamic. Somatic mutations and kinetic rate constants showed normal and log-normal distribution profiles, respectively. Mean values can therefore be considered as biological constants defining the observed boundaries. At physiological temperature, affinity maturation peaked at k(on) = 1.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 1.7 × 10(-4) s(-1) leading to a maximum mean affinity of K(D) = 1.0 × 10(-9) M. At ambient temperature, the average affinity increased to K(D) = 3.4 × 10(-10) M mainly due to slower off-rates. This experimentally determined set of constants can be used as a benchmark for analysis of the maturation level of human Abs and Ab responses.

  6. Genetic and structural analyses of affinity maturation in the humoral response to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Wiehe, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Most broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) elicited in response to HIV-1 infection are extraordinarily mutated. One goal of HIV-1 vaccine development is to induce antibodies that are similar to the most potent and broad BNAbs isolated from infected subjects. The most effective BNAbs have very high mutation frequencies, indicative of the long periods of continual activation necessary to acquire the BNAb phenotype through affinity maturation. Understanding the mutational patterns that define the maturation pathways in BNAb development is critical to vaccine design efforts to recapitulate through vaccination the successful routes to neutralization breadth and potency that have occurred in natural infection. Studying the mutational changes that occur during affinity maturation, however, requires accurate partitioning of sequence data into B-cell clones and identification of the starting point of a B-cell clonal lineage, the initial V(D)J rearrangement. Here, we describe the statistical framework we have used to perform these tasks. Through the recent advancement of these and similar computational methods, many HIV-1 ancestral antibodies have been inferred, synthesized and their structures determined. This has allowed, for the first time, the investigation of the structural mechanisms underlying the affinity maturation process in HIV-1 antibody development. Here, we review what has been learned from this atomic-level structural characterization of affinity maturation in HIV-1 antibodies and the implications for vaccine design.

  7. Manipulating the selection forces during affinity maturation to generate cross-reactive HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenshen; Mata-Fink, Jordi; Kriegsman, Barry; Hanson, Melissa; Irvine, Darrell J.; Eisen, Herman N.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Generation of potent antibodies by a mutation-selection process called affinity maturation is a key component of effective immune responses. Antibodies that protect against highly mutable pathogens must neutralize diverse strains. Developing effective immunization strategies to drive their evolution requires understanding how affinity maturation happens in an enviroment where variants of the same antigen are present. We present an in silico model of affinity maturation driven by antigen variants which reveals that induction of cross-reactive antibodies often occurs with low probability because conflicting selection forces, imposed by different antigen variants, can frustrate affinity maturation. We describe how variables such as temporal pattern of antigen administration influence the outcome of this frustrated evolutionary process. Our calculations predict, and experiments in mice with variant gp120 constructs of the HIV envelope protein confirm, that sequential immunization with antigen variants is preferred over a cocktail for induction of cross-reactive antibodies focused on the shared CD4 binding site epitope. PMID:25662010

  8. Reconstructing a B-Cell Clonal Lineage. II. Mutation, Selection, and Affinity Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Munshaw, Supriya; Wiehe, Kevin; Zhang, Ruijun; Yu, Jae-Sung; Woods, Christopher W.; Denny, Thomas N.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Alam, S. Munir; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of the antibody response is a fundamental process in adaptive immunity during which B-cells activated by infection or vaccination undergo rapid proliferation accompanied by the acquisition of point mutations in their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and selection for increased affinity for the eliciting antigen. The rate of somatic hypermutation at any position within an Ig gene is known to depend strongly on the local DNA sequence, and Ig genes have region-specific codon biases that influence the local mutation rate within the gene resulting in increased differential mutability in the regions that encode the antigen-binding domains. We have isolated a set of clonally related natural Ig heavy chain–light chain pairs from an experimentally infected influenza patient, inferred the unmutated ancestral rearrangements and the maturation intermediates, and synthesized all the antibodies using recombinant methods. The lineage exhibits a remarkably uniform rate of improvement of the effective affinity to influenza hemagglutinin (HA) over evolutionary time, increasing 1000-fold overall from the unmutated ancestor to the best of the observed antibodies. Furthermore, analysis of selection reveals that selection and mutation bias were concordant even at the level of maturation to a single antigen. Substantial improvement in affinity to HA occurred along mutationally preferred paths in sequence space and was thus strongly facilitated by the underlying local codon biases. PMID:24795717

  9. Reconstructing a B-Cell Clonal Lineage. II. Mutation, Selection, and Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Munshaw, Supriya; Wiehe, Kevin; Zhang, Ruijun; Yu, Jae-Sung; Woods, Christopher W; Denny, Thomas N; Tomaras, Georgia D; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of the antibody response is a fundamental process in adaptive immunity during which B-cells activated by infection or vaccination undergo rapid proliferation accompanied by the acquisition of point mutations in their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and selection for increased affinity for the eliciting antigen. The rate of somatic hypermutation at any position within an Ig gene is known to depend strongly on the local DNA sequence, and Ig genes have region-specific codon biases that influence the local mutation rate within the gene resulting in increased differential mutability in the regions that encode the antigen-binding domains. We have isolated a set of clonally related natural Ig heavy chain-light chain pairs from an experimentally infected influenza patient, inferred the unmutated ancestral rearrangements and the maturation intermediates, and synthesized all the antibodies using recombinant methods. The lineage exhibits a remarkably uniform rate of improvement of the effective affinity to influenza hemagglutinin (HA) over evolutionary time, increasing 1000-fold overall from the unmutated ancestor to the best of the observed antibodies. Furthermore, analysis of selection reveals that selection and mutation bias were concordant even at the level of maturation to a single antigen. Substantial improvement in affinity to HA occurred along mutationally preferred paths in sequence space and was thus strongly facilitated by the underlying local codon biases.

  10. Deficient for endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors Stim1 and Stim2 affects aberrant antibody affinity maturation in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuhua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Han, Yue; Luan, Chao; Hu, Yu; Hao, Zhimin; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Antigen specific B cells undergo a process termed affinity maturation in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs where B cells with high affinity receptors are selected to mature into antibody-producing cells or to the memory B cell pool. It is known that B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling plays pivotal role in this selection process. Calcium influx is an essential component of BCR signaling. The current report is to determine the effect of calcium influx on antibody affinity maturation. In our studies, mice deficient for both endoplasmic reticulum calciumsensor Stim1 and Stim2 was immunized with T-cell dependent and independent antigens. Antibody affinity was measured by ELISA. We demonstrated that Stim1 &Stim2 deficient B cells exhibit accelerated pace of affinity maturation compared to wild type controls while the overall antibody production was not dramatically impaired to T-independent antigen immunization. In conclusion, calcium influx plays an important role in antibody affinity maturation in humoral immune responses. The knowledge can be used in manipulate humoral immune response for the design of effective vaccines. PMID:27572320

  11. Local BLyS production by T follicular cells mediates retention of high affinity B cells during affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Radhika; Matthews, Andrew H.; Zhang, Bochao; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Scholz, Jean L.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Leonard, Warren J.; Stohl, William; Hershberg, Uri

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the role of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and its receptors in the germinal center (GC) reaction and affinity maturation. Despite ample BLyS retention on B cells in follicular (FO) regions, the GC microenvironment lacks substantial BLyS. This reflects IL-21–mediated down-regulation of the BLyS receptor TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) on GC B cells, thus limiting their capacity for BLyS binding and retention. Within the GC, FO helper T cells (TFH cells) provide a local source of BLyS. Whereas T cell–derived BLyS is dispensable for normal GC cellularity and somatic hypermutation, it is required for the efficient selection of high affinity GC B cell clones. These findings suggest that during affinity maturation, high affinity clones rely on TFH-derived BLyS for their persistence. PMID:24367004

  12. Efficient affinity maturation of antibody variable domains requires co-selection of compensatory mutations to maintain thermodynamic stability

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Mark C.; Li, Lijuan; Garde, Shekhar; Wilen, Rebecca; Tessier, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of antibodies to accumulate affinity-enhancing mutations in their complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) without compromising thermodynamic stability is critical to their natural function. However, it is unclear if affinity mutations in the hypervariable CDRs generally impact antibody stability and to what extent additional compensatory mutations are required to maintain stability during affinity maturation. Here we have experimentally and computationally evaluated the functional contributions of mutations acquired by a human variable (VH) domain that was evolved using strong selections for enhanced stability and affinity for the Alzheimer’s Aβ42 peptide. Interestingly, half of the key affinity mutations in the CDRs were destabilizing. Moreover, the destabilizing effects of these mutations were compensated for by a subset of the affinity mutations that were also stabilizing. Our findings demonstrate that the accumulation of both affinity and stability mutations is necessary to maintain thermodynamic stability during extensive mutagenesis and affinity maturation in vitro, which is similar to findings for natural antibodies that are subjected to somatic hypermutation in vivo. These findings for diverse antibodies and antibody fragments specific for unrelated antigens suggest that the formation of the antigen-binding site is generally a destabilizing process and that co-enrichment for compensatory mutations is critical for maintaining thermodynamic stability. PMID:28349921

  13. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies.

  14. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  15. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  16. Generation of high-affinity fully human anti-interleukin-8 antibodies from its cDNA by two-hybrid screening and affinity maturation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Azam, Mark; Lin, Yu-Huei; Sheridan, James; Wei, Shuanghong; Gupta, Gigi; Singh, Rakesh K; Pauling, Michelle H; Chu, Waihei; Tran, Antares; Yu, Nai-Xuan; Hu, Jiefeng; Wang, Wei; Long, Hao; Xiang, Dong; Zhu, Li; Hua, Shao-Bing

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a technology for rapidly generating novel and fully human antibodies by simply using the antigen DNA. A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was constructed in a yeast two-hybrid vector with high complexity. After cloning cDNA encoding the mature sequence of human interleukin-8 (hIL8) into the yeast two-hybrid system vector, we have screened the human scFv antibody library and obtained three distinct scFv clones that could specifically bind to hIL8. One clone was chosen for further improvement by a novel affinity maturation process using the error-prone PCR of the scFv sequence followed by additional rounds of yeast two-hybrid screening. The scFv antibodies of both primary and affinity-matured scFv clones were expressed in E. coli. All purified scFvs showed specific binding to hIL8 in reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and ELISA assays. All scFvs, as well as a fully human IgG antibody converted from one of the scFv clones and expressed in the mammalian cells, were able to effectively inhibit hIL8 in neutrophil chemotaxis assays. The technology described can generate fully human antibodies with high efficiency and low cost.

  17. First molecular and biochemical analysis of in vivo affinity maturation in an ectothermic vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Helen; Stanfield, Robyn L; Brady, Rebecca A; Flajnik, Martin F

    2006-02-07

    The cartilaginous fish are the oldest phylogenetic group in which Igs have been found. Sharks produce a unique Ig isotype, IgNAR, a heavy-chain homodimer that does not associate with light chains. Instead, the variable (V) regions of IgNAR bind antigen as soluble single domains. Our group has shown that IgNAR plays an integral part in the humoral response of nurse sharks (Ginglymostoma cirratum) upon antigen challenge. Here, we generated phage-displayed libraries of IgNAR V regions from an immunized animal and found a family of clones derived from the same rearrangement event but differentially mutated during expansion. Because of the cluster organization of shark Ig genes and the paucicopy nature of IgNAR, we were able to construct the putative ancestor of this family. By studying mutations in the context of clone affinities, we found evidence that affinity maturation occurs for this isotype. Subsequently, we were able to identify mutations important in the affinity improvement of this family. Because the family clones were all obtained after immunization, they provide insight into the in vivo maturation mechanisms, in general, and for single-domain antibody fragments.

  18. Guiding the evolution to catch the virus: An in silico study of affinity maturation against rapidly mutating antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Burton, Dennis; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    2014-03-01

    The immune system comprises an intricate and evolving collection of cells and molecules that enables a defense against pathogenic agents. Its workings present a rich source of physical problems that impact human health. One intriguing example is the process of affinity maturation (AM) through which an antibody (Ab)--a component of the host immune system--evolves to more efficiently bind an antigen (Ag)--a unique part of a foreign pathogen such as a virus. Sufficiently strong binding to the Ag enables recognition and neutralization. A major challenge is to contain a diversifying mixture of Ag variants, that arise in natural infection, from evading Ab neutralization. This entails a thorough understanding of AM against multiple Ag species and mutating Ag. During AM, Ab-encoding cells undergo cycles of mutation and selection, a process reminiscent of Darwinian evolution yet occurring in real time. We first cast affinity-dependent selection into an extreme value problem and show how the binding characteristics scale with Ag diversity. We then develop an agent-based residue-resolved computational model of AM which allows us to track the evolutionary trajectories of individual cells. This dynamic model not only reveals significant stochastic effects associated with the relatively small and highly dynamic population size, it also uncovers the markedly distinct maturation outcomes if designed Ag variants are presented in different temporal procedures. Insights thus obtained would guide rational design of vaccination protocols.

  19. Structure-based affinity maturation of a chimeric anti-ricin antibody C4C13.

    PubMed

    Luo, Longlong; Luo, Qun; Guo, Leiming; Lv, Ming; Lin, Zhou; Geng, Jing; Li, Xinying; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen; Qiao, Chunxia; Feng, Jiannan

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is a highly lethal toxin. Anti-ricin chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) C4C13 was prepared in our lab; however, its binding affinity was much weaker than that of the parent antibody 4C13. In this study, based on the computer-guided homology modeling and conformational optimization methods, the 3-D structure of C4C13 variable regions Fv was constructed and optimized. Using molecular docking and dynamics simulation methods, the 3-D complex structure of ricin and C4C13 Fv was obtained. Considering the orientation property, surface electrostatic distribution, residues chemical and physical character and intermolecular hydrogen bond, the binding mode and key residues were predicted. According to C4C13 Fv fragment and ricin complementary binding surface, electrostatic attraction periphery and van der Waals interaction interface, three mutants (i.e., M1 (N(H102)F, W(H103)Y); M2 (W(H103)Y) and M3 (R(L90)G)) were designed, in which M1 and M2 were predicted to possess higher antigen-binding activity than C4C13, while M3 was weaker. The relative affinity assays by ELISA showed that M1 and M2 mutations had higher affinity (9.6 and 18.3 nmol/L) than C4C13 (130 nmol/L) and M3 had weaker affinity (234.5 nmol/L) than C4C13. The results showed that the modeling complex structure of the antigen (ricin) and antibody (C4C13) is reasonable. Our work offered affinity maturated antibodies by site mutations, which were beneficial for valuable anti-ricin antibody design and preparation in future.

  20. Low antigen dose favours selection of somatic mutants with hallmarks of antibody affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, A; Milstein, C

    1998-01-01

    The immunization schedule is critical for the derivation of high-affinity antibodies, low antigen dose being particularly favourable for the development of a more efficient memory response. To analyse the molecular events underpinning this preference, we analysed the early maturation of the response to the hapten 2-phenyloxazolone (phOx) using low and high doses of immunogen. The phOx response is initially dominated by antibodies expressing the VkOx1-Jk5 light chain and the hallmark of the early stages of maturation is the substitution of His 34 by Asn or Gln increasing affinity 10- or eightfold, respectively, and of Tyr 36 by Phe. High-affinity antibodies express mutations at both sites. We cloned and sequenced VkOx1-Jk5 light chains from antigen-specific B cells taken 14 and 21 days after immunization with high and low antigen doses. We found that overall, the derived sequences were more mutated both at longer times and at higher dose. At day 14, His 34 was more frequently mutated at the higher than at the lower dose, while at day 21 the reverse was true. On the other hand, the His 34/Tyr 36 mutation pair was more frequent at low than high doses at both 14 and 21 days. Furthermore, at both times, the low immunization protocol yielded double mutants in cells with a lower mutation background. It appears therefore that while the higher dose may favour the acquisition of individual critical mutations, low-dose immunization favours the selection of a more focused mutational pattern, whereby advantageous mutations are associated with a low mutational background. Images Figure 1 PMID:9616362

  1. Shark immunity bites back: affinity maturation and memory response in the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Helen; Flajnik, Martin F

    2005-03-01

    The cartilaginous fish are the oldest phylogenetic group in which all of the molecular components of the adaptive immune system have been found. Although early studies clearly showed that sharks could produce an IgM-based response following immunization, evidence for memory, affinity maturation and roles for the other isotypes (notably IgNAR) in this group remained inconclusive. The data presented here illustrate that the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) is able to produce not only an IgM response, but we also show for the first time a highly antigen-specific IgNAR response. Additionally, under appropriate conditions, a memory response for both isotypes can be elicited. Analysis of the response shows differential expression of pentameric and monomeric IgM. Pentameric IgM provides the 'first line of defense' through high-avidity, low-affinity interaction with antigen. In contrast, monomeric IgM and IgNAR seem responsible for the specific, antigen-driven response. We propose the presence of distinct lineages of B cells in sharks. As there is no conventional isotype switching, each lineage seems pre-determined to express a single isotype (IgM versus IgNAR). However, our data suggest that there may also be specific lineages for the different forms (pentameric versus monomeric) of the IgM isotype.

  2. Strategy for affinity maturation of an antibody with high evolvability to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl hapten.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Koji; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Kono, Ryo; Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Sagawa, Takuma; Yamato, Ichiro; Azuma, Takachika

    2007-03-01

    In order to quantitate the contribution of amino acid replacements to an increase in affinity during affinity maturation, we measured thermodynamic parameters of the antigen-antibody interaction for a group of anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl monoclonal antibodies whose differences in amino acid sequences had arisen only from somatic hypermutation. We prepared a common ancestor and hypothetical intermediate clones that might occur on the affinity maturation pathway, by employing site-directed mutagenesis. Isothermal calorimetric titration of the antigen-antibody reaction revealed that antibody evolution proceeds in two steps. The first step is driven by a decrease in enthalpy, in which two amino acid replacements in the VL region play an essential role. Further accumulation of amino acid replacements in VH and VL regions during the second step induce a progressive increase in affinity, which is driven by an increase in entropy, which has a cooperative mutational effect.

  3. Selection and affinity maturation of IgNAR variable domains targeting Plasmodium falciparum AMA1.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Stewart D; Humberstone, Karen S; Krishnan, Usha V; Carmichael, Jennifer A; Doughty, Larissa; Hattarki, Meghan; Coley, Andrew M; Casey, Joanne L; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Irving, Robert A; Hudson, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    The new antigen receptor (IgNAR) is an antibody unique to sharks and consists of a disulphide-bonded dimer of two protein chains, each containing a single variable and five constant domains. The individual variable (V(NAR)) domains bind antigen independently, and are candidates for the smallest antibody-based immune recognition units. We have previously produced a library of V(NAR) domains with extensive variability in the CDR1 and CDR3 loops displayed on the surface of bacteriophage. Now, to test the efficacy of this library, and further explore the dynamics of V(NAR) antigen binding we have performed selection experiments against an infectious disease target, the malarial Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1) from Plasmodium falciparum. Two related V(NAR) clones were selected, characterized by long (16- and 18-residue) CDR3 loops. These recombinant V(NAR)s could be harvested at yields approaching 5mg/L of monomeric protein from the E. coli periplasm, and bound AMA1 with nanomolar affinities (K(D)= approximately 2 x 10(-7) M). One clone, designated 12Y-2, was affinity-matured by error prone PCR, resulting in several variants with mutations mapping to the CDR1 and CDR3 loops. The best of these variants showed approximately 10-fold enhanced affinity over 12Y-2 and was Plasmodium falciparum strain-specific. Importantly, we demonstrated that this monovalent V(NAR) co-localized with rabbit anti-AMA1 antisera on the surface of malarial parasites and thus may have utility in diagnostic applications.

  4. Affinity maturation of a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody that prevents acute hepatitis C virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Wang, Yong; Lau, Patrick; Lund, Garry; Rangarajan, Sneha; Fauvelle, Catherine; Liao, Grant C; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad; Pierce, Brian G; Fuerst, Thomas R; Bailey, Justin R; Baumert, Thomas F; Mariuzza, Roy A; Kneteman, Norman M; Foung, Steven K H

    2016-12-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have led to a high cure rate in treated patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but this still leaves a large number of treatment failures secondary to the emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs). To increase the barrier to resistance, a complementary strategy is to use neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) to prevent acute infection. However, earlier efforts with the selected antibodies led to RAVs in animal and clinical studies. Therefore, we identified an HMAb that is less likely to elicit RAVs for affinity maturation to increase potency and, more important, breadth of protection. Selected matured antibodies show improved affinity and neutralization against a panel of diverse HCV isolates. Structural and modeling studies reveal that the affinity-matured HMAb mediates virus neutralization, in part, by inducing conformational change to the targeted epitope, and that the maturated light chain is responsible for the improved affinity and breadth of protection. A matured HMAb protected humanized mice when challenged with an infectious HCV human serum inoculum for a prolonged period. However, a single mouse experienced breakthrough infection after 63 days when the serum HMAb concentration dropped by several logs; sequence analysis revealed no viral escape mutation.

  5. Antibody Fragments for On-Site Testing of Cannabinoids Generated via in Vitro Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Izumi; Oyama, Hiroyuki; Yasuo, Mayumi; Matsuda, Kazuhisa; Katagi, Kengo; Ito, Aya; Tatsuda, Hiroka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Norihiro

    2017-01-01

    Law enforcement against illicit use of cannabis and related substances requires rapid, feasible, and reliable tools for on-site testing of cannabinoids. Notably, methods based on cannabinoid-specific antibodies enable efficient screening of multiple specimens. Antibody engineering may accelerate development of modern and robust testing systems. Here, we used in vitro affinity maturation to generate a single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) that recognizes with high affinity the psychoactive cannabinoid, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A mouse monoclonal antibody against THC, Ab-THC#33, with Ka 6.2×10(7) M(-1) (as Fab fragment) was established by the hybridoma technique. Then, a "wild-type" scFv (wt-scFv) with Ka, 1.1×10(7) M(-1) was prepared by bacterial expression of a fusion gene combining the VH and VL genes for Ab-THC#33. Subsequently, random point mutations in VH and VL were generated separately, and the resulting products were assembled into mutant scFv genes, which were then phage-displayed. Repeated panning identified a mutant scFv (scFv#m1-36) with 10-fold enhanced affinity (Ka 1.1×10(8) M(-1)) for THC, in which only a single conservative substitution (Ser50Thr) was present at the N-terminus of the VH-complementarity-determining region 2 (CDR2) sequence. In competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the mutant scFv generated dose-response curves with midpoint 0.27 ng/assay THC, which was 3-fold lower than that of wt-scFv. Even higher reactivity with a major THC metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, indicated that the mutant scFv will be useful for testing not only THC in confiscated materials, but also the metabolite in urine. Indeed, the antibody fragment is potentially suitable for use in advanced on-site testing platforms for cannabinoids.

  6. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5' and 3' ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  7. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M.; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5‧ and 3‧ ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  8. In vitro improvement of a shark IgNAR antibody by Qbeta replicase mutation and ribosome display mimics in vivo affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Kopsidas, George; Roberts, Anthony S; Coia, Gregory; Streltsov, Victor A; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2006-11-15

    We have employed a novel mutagenesis system, which utilizes an error-prone RNA dependent RNA polymerase from Qbeta bacteriophage, to create a diverse library of single domain antibody fragments based on the shark IgNAR antibody isotype. Coupling of these randomly mutated mRNA templates directly to the translating ribosome allowed in vitro selection of affinity matured variants showing enhanced binding to target, the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from Plasmodium falciparum. One mutation mapping to the IgNAR CDR1 loop was not readily additive to other changes, a result explained by structural analysis of aromatic interactions linking the CDR1, CDR3, and Ig framework regions. This combination appeared also to be counter-selected in experiments, suggesting that in vitro affinity maturation is additionally capable of discriminating against incorrectly produced protein variants. Interestingly, a further mutation was directed to a position in the IgNAR heavy loop 4 which is also specifically targeted during the in vivo shark response to antigen, providing a correlation between natural processes and laboratory-based affinity maturation systems.

  9. Affinity enhancement of an in vivo matured therapeutic antibody using structure-based computational design.

    PubMed

    Clark, Louis A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Eldredge, John; Fitch, Christopher; Friedman, Bethany; Hanf, Karl J M; Jarpe, Matthew; Liparoto, Stefano F; Li, You; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Miller, Stephan; Rushe, Mia; Sherman, Woody; Simon, Kenneth; Van Vlijmen, Herman

    2006-05-01

    Improving the affinity of a high-affinity protein-protein interaction is a challenging problem that has practical applications in the development of therapeutic biomolecules. We used a combination of structure-based computational methods to optimize the binding affinity of an antibody fragment to the I-domain of the integrin VLA1. Despite the already high affinity of the antibody (Kd approximately 7 nM) and the moderate resolution (2.8 A) of the starting crystal structure, the affinity was increased by an order of magnitude primarily through a decrease in the dissociation rate. We determined the crystal structure of a high-affinity quadruple mutant complex at 2.2 A. The structure shows that the design makes the predicted contacts. Structural evidence and mutagenesis experiments that probe a hydrogen bond network illustrate the importance of satisfying hydrogen bonding requirements while seeking higher-affinity mutations. The large and diverse set of interface mutations allowed refinement of the mutant binding affinity prediction protocol and improvement of the single-mutant success rate. Our results indicate that structure-based computational design can be successfully applied to further improve the binding of high-affinity antibodies.

  10. A comparison of two strategies for affinity maturation of a BH3 peptide toward pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyan; Long, Angel; Link, A James

    2012-03-16

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins regulates apoptosis at the level of mitochondrial permeabilization. Pro-death members of the family, including Bak and Bax, initiate apoptosis, whereas pro-survival members such as Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1 antagonize the function of Bak and Bax via heterodimeric interactions. These heterodimeric interactions are primarily mediated by the binding of the helical amphipathic BH3 domain from a pro-death protein to a hydrophobic cleft on the surface of the pro-survival protein. Since high levels of pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins are present in many cancers, peptides corresponding to pro-death BH3 domains hold promise as therapeutics. Here we apply a high-throughput flow cytometry assay to engineer the Bak BH3 domain for improved affinity toward the pro-survival proteins Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Two strategies, engineering the hydrophobic face of the Bak BH3 peptide and increasing its overall helicity, are successful in identifying Bak BH3 variants with improved affinity to Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Hydrophobic face engineering of the Bak BH3 peptide led to variants with up to a 15-fold increase in affinity for Bcl-x(L) and increased specificity toward Bcl-x(L). Engineering of the helicity of Bak BH3 led to modest (3- to 4-fold) improvements in affinity with retention of promiscuous binding to all pro-survival proteins. HeLa cell killing studies demonstrate that the affinity matured Bak BH3 variants retain their expected biological function.

  11. Tandem affinity purification combined with inducible shRNA expression as a tool to study the maturation of macromolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Wyler, Emanuel; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Widmann, Barbara; Gstaiger, Matthias; Pfannstiel, Jens; Kutay, Ulrike; Zemp, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an efficient method for the purification and characterization of large macromolecular complexes. To elucidate the role of specific components of such complexes, it is important to address the question of how loss of a specific factor affects complex composition. Here, we introduce a method that combines TAP of large macromolecular assemblies with inducible shRNA-mediated protein depletion in human somatic cells. As a proof of principle, we have applied this method to the purification of human pre-ribosomal particles. Using inducible expression of ribosome assembly factors as bait proteins, different pre-40S particles could be isolated and characterized, revealing high conservation of the ribosome biogenesis pathway from yeast to human cells. Besides known ribosome maturation factors, C21orf70 was identified as a novel pre-40S component. By combining TAP of pre-40S particles with shRNA-mediated depletion of the pre-40S-associated protein kinase Rio2, we observed that increased levels of the nuclear HEAT-repeat protein Rrp12 are associated with 40S precursors in absence of Rio2. Further analyses revealed that Rrp12 is partially mislocalized to the cytoplasm and trapped on late 40S precursors upon loss of Rio2, and therefore fails to efficiently recycle to the nucleus. Thus, the combination of tandem affinity purification and shRNA induction provided further insights into late cytoplasmic 40S maturation steps, demonstrating the high potential of this method. PMID:21097556

  12. Tandem affinity purification combined with inducible shRNA expression as a tool to study the maturation of macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Emanuel; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Widmann, Barbara; Gstaiger, Matthias; Pfannstiel, Jens; Kutay, Ulrike; Zemp, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an efficient method for the purification and characterization of large macromolecular complexes. To elucidate the role of specific components of such complexes, it is important to address the question of how loss of a specific factor affects complex composition. Here, we introduce a method that combines TAP of large macromolecular assemblies with inducible shRNA-mediated protein depletion in human somatic cells. As a proof of principle, we have applied this method to the purification of human pre-ribosomal particles. Using inducible expression of ribosome assembly factors as bait proteins, different pre-40S particles could be isolated and characterized, revealing high conservation of the ribosome biogenesis pathway from yeast to human cells. Besides known ribosome maturation factors, C21orf70 was identified as a novel pre-40S component. By combining TAP of pre-40S particles with shRNA-mediated depletion of the pre-40S-associated protein kinase Rio2, we observed that increased levels of the nuclear HEAT-repeat protein Rrp12 are associated with 40S precursors in absence of Rio2. Further analyses revealed that Rrp12 is partially mislocalized to the cytoplasm and trapped on late 40S precursors upon loss of Rio2, and therefore fails to efficiently recycle to the nucleus. Thus, the combination of tandem affinity purification and shRNA induction provided further insights into late cytoplasmic 40S maturation steps, demonstrating the high potential of this method.

  13. Altered Affinity Maturation in Primary Response to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) Acetyl (NP) after Autologous Reconstitution of Irradiated C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Trez, Carl; Van Acker, Annette; Vansanten, Georgette; Urbain, Jacques; Brait, Maryse

    2002-01-01

    Immune responses developing in irradiated environment are profoundly altered. The memory anti-arsonate response of A/J mice is dominated by a major clonotype encoded by a single gene segment combination called CRIA. In irradiated and autoreconstituted A/J mice, the level of anti-ARS antibodies upon secondary immunization is normal but devoid of CRIA antibodies. The affinity maturation process and the somatic mutation frequency are reduced. Isotype switching and development of germinal centers (GC) are delayed. The primary antibody response of C57BL/6 mice to the hapten (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl (NP)-Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH) is dominated by antibodies encoded by a family of closely related VH genes associated with the expression of the λ1 light chain.We investigated the anti-NP primary response in irradiated and autoreconstituted C57BL/6 mice. We observed some splenic alterations as previously described in the irradiated A/J model. Germinal center reaction is delayed although the extrafollicular foci appearance is unchanged. Irradiated C57BL/6 mice are able to mount a primary anti-NP response dominated by λ1 positive antibodies but fail to produce high affinity NP-binding IgGl antibodies. Following a second antigenic challenge, irradiated mice develop enlarged GC and foci. Furthermore, higher affinity NP-binding IgG1 antibodies are detected. PMID:12885152

  14. Antibody affinity maturation through combining display of two-chain paired antibody and precision flow cytometric sorting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuang; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Haifeng; Zhao, Yun; Lin, Yan; Ye, Chen; Fang, Xiangdong; Hang, Haiying

    2016-07-01

    Recombination of antibody light and heavy chain libraries greatly increases the size of a two-chain paired antibody library, thus easing the construction of large antibody libraries. Here, light and heavy chain variable domains paired by a coiled coil were applied to a bacterial inner membrane display system. However, the probability of the correct pairing of light and heavy chains through random recombination after each round of flow cytometric sorting and cloning was very low in the presence of mostly unmatched light and heavy chain genes, resulting in inefficient enrichment; a target antibody clone in the ratio of 1:100,000 negative control spheroplasts was unable to be enriched by six rounds of sorting and cloning by a conventional sorting strategy (sorting the top 1 %). By just sorting the top 0.000025 % of spheroplasts, we succeeded in enriching the target antibody clone mixed with negative control spheroplasts in a ratio of 1:10(8) by just one round of sorting and cloning. Furthermore, using this gating strategy, we efficiently enriched for an antibody clone with an affinity slightly better than the parent antibody clone from mixed spheroplasts which were present in the ratio of 1 better affinity clone to 10 parent clones to 10(6) negative control clones after just two rounds of sorting and cloning, suggesting that this gating strategy is highly sensitive in distinguishing between clones with a small difference in affinity and also enriching for clones with a higher affinity. Taken together, the combination of the display of a two-chain paired antibody library and the use of stringent gating has significantly increased the efficiency of the antibody maturation system.

  15. Evidence that TSH Receptor A-Subunit Multimers, Not Monomers, Drive Antibody Affinity Maturation in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit shed from the cell surface contributes to the induction and/or affinity maturation of pathogenic TSHR autoantibodies in Graves' disease. Objective: This study aimed to determine whether the quaternary structure (multimerization) of shed A-subunits influences pathogenic TSHR autoantibody generation. Design: The isolated TSHR A-subunit generated by transfected mammalian cells exists in two forms; one (active) is recognized only by Graves' TSHR autoantibodies, the second (inactive) is recognized only by mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3BD10. Recent evidence suggests that both Graves' TSHR autoantibodies and mAb 3BD10 recognize the A-subunit monomer. Therefore, if the A-subunit monomer is an immunogen, Graves' sera should have antibodies to both active and inactive A-subunits. Conversely, restriction of TSHR autoantibodies to active A-subunits would be evidence of a role for shed A-subunit multimers, not monomers, in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Therefore, we tested a panel of Graves' sera for their relative recognition of active and inactive A-subunits. Results: Of 34 sera from unselected Graves' patients, 28 were unequivocally positive in a clinical TSH binding inhibition assay. None of the latter sera, as well as 8/9 sera from control individuals, recognized inactive A-subunits on ELISA. In contrast to Graves' sera, antibodies induced in mice, not by shedding from the TSHR holoreceptor, but by immunization with adenovirus expressing the free human A-subunit, were directed to both the active and inactive A-subunit forms. Conclusions: The present study supports the concept that pathogenic TSHR autoantibody affinity maturation in Graves' disease is driven by A-subunit multimers, not monomers. PMID:25856215

  16. Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for Software Process Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Robert Y.

    2000-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Avionic Systems Division's implementation of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for improvements in the software development process. The presentation reviews the process involved in implementing the model and the benefits of using CMM to improve the software development process.

  17. Case Study and Maturity Model for Business Process Management Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohloff, Michael

    This paper presents the implementation of Business Process Management in a large international company. The business case illustrates the main objectives and approach taken with the BPM initiative. It introduces a process management maturity assessment which was developed to assess the implementation of Business Process Management and the achievements. The maturity model is based on nine categories which comprehensively cover all aspects which impact the success of Business Process Management. Some findings of the first assessment cycle are pinpointed to illustrate the benefits and best practice exchange as a result of the assessment.

  18. Maturation of Cognitive Processes From Late Childhood to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna,Beatriz; Garver,Krista E.; Urban,Trinity A.; Lazar,Nicole A.; Sweeney,John A.

    2004-01-01

    To characterize cognitive maturation through adolescence, processing speed, voluntary response suppression, and spatial working memory were measured in 8- to 30-year-old (N=245) healthy participants using oculomotor tasks. Development progressed with a steep initial improvement in performance followed by stabilization in adolescence. Adult-level…

  19. The maturation of incentive processing and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Charles; Luna, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how immaturities in the reward system affect decision-making can inform us on adolescent vulnerabilities to risk-taking, which is a primary contributor to mortality and substance abuse in this age group. In this paper, we review the literature characterizing the neurodevelopment of reward and cognitive control and propose a model for adolescent reward processing. While the functional neuroanatomy of the mature reward system has been well-delineated, adolescent reward processing is just beginning to be understood. Results indicate that adolescents relative to adults demonstrate decreased anticipatory processing and assessment of risk, but an increased consummatory response. Such differences could result in suboptimal representations of reward valence and value and bias adolescent decision-making. These functional differences in reward processing occur in parallel with on-going structural and pharmacological maturation in the adolescent brain. In addition to limitations in incentive processing, basic cognitive control abilities, including working memory and inhibitory control, continue to mature during adolescence. Consequently, adolescents may be limited, relative to adults, in their abilities to inhibit impulsive behaviors and reliably hold ‘on-line’ comparisons of potential rewards/punishments during decision-making. PMID:19593842

  20. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  1. Process maturity progress at Motorola Cellular Systems Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgstahl, Ron; Criscione, Mark; Dobson, Kim; Willey, Allan

    1994-01-01

    We believe that the key success elements are related to our recognition that Software Process Improvement (SPI) can and should be organized, planned, managed, and measured as if it were a project to develop a new process, analogous to a software product. We believe that our process improvements have come as the result of these key elements: use of a rigorous, detailed requirements set (Capability Maturity Model, CMM); use of a robust, yet flexible architecture (IEEE 1074); use of a SPI project, resourced and managed like other work, to produce the specifications and implement them; and development of both internal and external goals, with metrics to support them.

  2. Electrophysiological evidence for late maturation of strategic episodic retrieval processes.

    PubMed

    Sprondel, Volker; Kipp, Kerstin H; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Improvement in source memory performance throughout development is thought to be mediated by strategic processes that facilitate the retrieval of task-relevant information. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we examined developmental changes in these processes during adolescence. Adolescents (13-14 years) and adults (19-29 years) completed a memory exclusion task which required the discrimination between words studied in one color ('targets') and words studied in the alternative color ('non-targets') under two conditions that put different demands on strategic control. Memory accuracy improved with age and also increased with decreasing control demands in both age groups. The parietal old/new effect, an ERP correlate of recollection, was reliable for targets across conditions in both age groups. By contrast, ERP correlates of non-target recollection were present in adolescents across conditions but not in adults. This suggests that adults implemented a strategy to prioritize recollection of target information with greater success than adolescents regardless of control demands, presumably reflecting maturational differences in cognitive control. In support of this view, the ERP amplitude difference between targets and non-targets was positively correlated with a measure of working memory capacity (WMC) in adults but not in adolescents. A further age-related difference was that ERP correlates of post-retrieval processing, including late right-frontal old/new effects and late posterior negativities, were observed in adults only. Together, our data suggest protracted maturation in the strategic processes that underlie selective recollection and post-retrieval control.

  3. Moral Judgment Maturity of Process and Reactive Schizophrenics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, William G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Premorbid adjustment, paranoid symptomatology, and orientation were examined as major predictors of moral judgment maturity in 40 schizophrenics. Results suggest the importance of cognitive and social skills in the development of schizophrenics' moral judgment maturity. (Author/RH)

  4. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv.

  5. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Juergen M.; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J.; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H.; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the “knobs-into-holes” technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2–3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  6. Remodeling dynamics in the alveolar process in skeletally mature dogs.

    PubMed

    Huja, Sarandeep S; Fernandez, Soledad A; Hill, Kara J; Li, Yan

    2006-12-01

    Bone turnover rates can be altered by metabolic and mechanical demands. Due to the difference in the pattern of loading, we hypothesized that there are differences in bone remodeling rates between the maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes. Furthermore, in a canine model, the alveolar process of teeth that lack contact (e.g., second premolars) would have a different turnover rate than bone supporting teeth with functional contact (e.g., first molars). Six skeletally mature male dogs were given a pair of calcein labels. After sacrifice, specimens representing the anterior and posterior locations of both jaws were prepared for examination by histomorphometric methods to evaluate the bone volume/total volume (BV/TV; %), bone volume (mm2), mineral apposition rate (MAR; microm/day), and bone formation rate (BFR; %/year) in the alveolar process. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in the BV/TV within the jaws. The bone volume within the alveolar process of the mandible was 2.8-fold greater than in the maxilla. The MAR was not significantly different between the jaws and anteroposterior locations. However, the BFR was significantly (P<0.0001) greater in the mandible than in the maxilla. The anterior location had higher (P=0.002) remodeling than the posterior location in the maxilla but not in the mandible. While there was a greater bone mass and increased remodeling in the mandible, no remodeling gradient in the coronal-apical direction was apparent in the alveolar process. Bone adaptation probably involves a complex interplay of bone turnover, mass, and architecture.

  7. F-actin flow drives affinity maturation and spatial organization of LFA-1 at the immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Comrie, William A.; Babich, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Integrin-dependent interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells are vital for proper T cell activation, effector function, and memory. Regulation of integrin function occurs via conformational change, which modulates ligand affinity, and receptor clustering, which modulates valency. Here, we show that conformational intermediates of leukocyte functional antigen 1 (LFA-1) form a concentric array at the immunological synapse. Using an inhibitor cocktail to arrest F-actin dynamics, we show that organization of this array depends on F-actin flow and ligand mobility. Furthermore, F-actin flow is critical for maintaining the high affinity conformation of LFA-1, for increasing valency by recruiting LFA-1 to the immunological synapse, and ultimately for promoting intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) binding. Finally, we show that F-actin forces are opposed by immobilized ICAM-1, which triggers LFA-1 activation through a combination of induced fit and tension-based mechanisms. Our data provide direct support for a model in which the T cell actin network generates mechanical forces that regulate LFA-1 activity at the immunological synapse. PMID:25666810

  8. Long-term antibody synthesis in vitro. VI. Anti-allotype sera as probes of clonal products in affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Conway de Macario, E; Macario, A J; Tosi, R M; Celada, F; Landucci-Tosi, S

    1978-08-01

    A new experimental system is described for measuring the allotypic product of rabbit B cells during long-lasting in vitro antibody responses. The immunoenzymatic assays described allow determination of several parameters mapping in different regions of the same molecule, which can be measured and combined to yield a multidimensional picture of the time-course dynamics of antibody synthesis. The rabbit immune system responding to Escherichia coli beta-D-galactosidase was sample and disassembled by (a) culturing lymph node microfragments and (b) sorting out from among all anti-enzyme antibodies only those activating a mutant enzyme, AMEF, which bore the b4 or b9 allotype. A considerable simplification of the response was achieved in the microcultures as documented by cultures of heterozygous cells which produced only one allotype and by the fact that each culture showed a distinctive pattern when antibody titre, association constant, heterogeneity index, L-chain type, and k-chain allotype were considered together. This array of patterns was not an artifact but the result of disassembling a representative sample of the rabbit immune system into small components, since the b4/b9 ratio obtained by averaging the results of all cultures from a heterozygous rabbit lymph node was the same as the serum ratio. Despite the Poisson distribution of the responder microcultures, none of them was monoclonal; i.e. no antibodies homogeneous by all parameters tested were observed, This finidng supports the notion that in normal lymphoid tissue in its native tridimensional arrangement, one T cell can trigger several B cells clustered in one antibody-forming unit. This natural arrangement would ensure the monospecificity of the cluster (dictated by the T cell) while allowing for variation in affinity (depending upon the array of B cells in the unit). Accordingly our findings would results from the fact that as the size of the microfragments was reduced, the cells diluted out first were

  9. Long-term antibody synthesis in vitro. VI. Anti-allotype sera as probes of clonal products in affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Conway de Macario, E; Macario, A J; Tosi, R M; Celada, F; Landucci-Tosi, S

    1978-01-01

    A new experimental system is described for measuring the allotypic product of rabbit B cells during long-lasting in vitro antibody responses. The immunoenzymatic assays described allow determination of several parameters mapping in different regions of the same molecule, which can be measured and combined to yield a multidimensional picture of the time-course dynamics of antibody synthesis. The rabbit immune system responding to Escherichia coli beta-D-galactosidase was sample and disassembled by (a) culturing lymph node microfragments and (b) sorting out from among all anti-enzyme antibodies only those activating a mutant enzyme, AMEF, which bore the b4 or b9 allotype. A considerable simplification of the response was achieved in the microcultures as documented by cultures of heterozygous cells which produced only one allotype and by the fact that each culture showed a distinctive pattern when antibody titre, association constant, heterogeneity index, L-chain type, and k-chain allotype were considered together. This array of patterns was not an artifact but the result of disassembling a representative sample of the rabbit immune system into small components, since the b4/b9 ratio obtained by averaging the results of all cultures from a heterozygous rabbit lymph node was the same as the serum ratio. Despite the Poisson distribution of the responder microcultures, none of them was monoclonal; i.e. no antibodies homogeneous by all parameters tested were observed, This finidng supports the notion that in normal lymphoid tissue in its native tridimensional arrangement, one T cell can trigger several B cells clustered in one antibody-forming unit. This natural arrangement would ensure the monospecificity of the cluster (dictated by the T cell) while allowing for variation in affinity (depending upon the array of B cells in the unit). Accordingly our findings would results from the fact that as the size of the microfragments was reduced, the cells diluted out first were

  10. Naturally occurring human phosphorylcholine antibodies are predominantly products of affinity-matured B cells in the adult.

    PubMed

    Fiskesund, Roland; Steen, Johanna; Amara, Khaled; Murray, Fiona; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Liu, Anquan; Douagi, Iyadh; Malmström, Vivianne; Frostegård, Johan

    2014-05-15

    Phosphorylcholine (PC) is a classic T-independent Ag that is exposed on apoptotic cells, oxidized phospholipids, and bacterial polysaccharides. Experimental as well as epidemiological studies have over the past decade implicated Abs against PC (anti-PC) as anti-inflammatory and a strong protective factor in cardiovascular disease. Although clinically important, little is known about the development of anti-PC in humans. This study was conceived to dissect the human anti-PC repertoire and generate human mAbs. We designed a PC-specific probe to identify, isolate, and characterize PC-reactive B cells from 10 healthy individuals. The donors had all mounted somatically mutated Abs toward PC using a broad variety of Ig genes. PC-reactive B cells were primarily found in the IgM(+) memory subset, although significant numbers also were detected among naive, IgG(+), and CD27(+)CD43(+) B cells. Abs from these subsets were clonally related, suggesting a common origin. mAbs derived from the same donors exhibited equivalent or higher affinity for PC than the well-characterized murine T-15 clone. These results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular ontogeny of atheroprotective PC Abs, thereby offering new opportunities for Ab-based therapeutic interventions.

  11. Twin-column CaptureSMB: a novel cyclic process for protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Baur, Daniel; Lievrouw, Roel; Lissens, Geert; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-04-10

    A twin-column counter-current chromatography processes, CaptureSMB, was used for the protein A affinity capture of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). By means of sequential loading, the process improves the utilization of the stationary phase by achieving loadings much closer to the static binding capacity of the resin in comparison to batch chromatography. Using a mAb capture case study with protein A affinity chromatography, the performance and product quality obtained from CaptureSMB and batch processes were compared. The effect of the flow rate, column length and titer concentration on the process performance and product quality were evaluated. CaptureSMB showed superior performance compared to batch chromatography with respect to productivity, capacity utilization, product concentration and buffer consumption. A simplified economic evaluation showed that CaptureSMB could decrease resin costs of 10-30% depending on the manufacturing scenario.

  12. Initial differences in lipid processing leading to pig-and beef-derived mature adipocyte differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clonal cultures of pig-derived mature adipocytes are capable of dedifferentiating and forming proliferative-competent progeny cells in vitro. Initial lipid processing, is different to that observed in cultures of beef-derived adipocytes. Mature pig adipocytes extrude lipid before proliferation, wher...

  13. Using the Assessment Process to Overcome Imposter Syndrome in Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    This research draws on the experience of a group of mature students' studies during their first year at university. All experienced varying degrees of Imposter Syndrome, feelings of fraudulence and a lack of confidence in their ability. The process of "becoming" a mature student is one of identity change and risk. Gaining a sense of…

  14. Corn silage management: effects of hybrid, maturity, inoculation, and mechanical processing on fermentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of hybrid, maturity, mechanical processing, and inoculation of corn silage on fermentation characteristics. In experiment 1, Pioneer hybrid 3845 corn silage was harvested at three maturities (hard dough, one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline). In experiment 2, Pioneer hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at three maturities (one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline). In both experiments, corn silage was harvested at each maturity with and without mechanical processing and with and without inoculation. In experiments 1 and 2, corn silage was harvested at a theoretical length-of-cut of 6.4 and 12.7 mm, respectively. Maturity at harvest tended to have a greater impact on silage fermentation characteristics of corn silage than mechanical processing and inoculation. In experiments 1 and 2, corn silage harvested at the earliest maturity tended to have decreased dry matter content and increased water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations during the ensiling process than corn silage harvested at advanced maturities. In experiment 2, pH levels were lower for corn silage harvested at the early maturity (one-third milkline) compared with advanced maturities (two-thirds milkline and blackline) by 57 d after ensiling. The difference in pH can be explained by the greater concentration of water-soluble carbohydrates at the early maturity (one-third ML) soon after ensiling (2, 3, 6 and 10 d after ensiling) compared with advanced maturities (two-thirds ML and BL). The increased water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations in the less mature corn silage provided nutrients for bacteria to grow and produce primarily lactic acid (6, 10, and 57 d after ensiling) and some acetic acid (2, 3, 6, and 10 d after ensiling) which reduced the pH of corn silage more than at the advanced maturities. There was a slight change in silage fermentation characteristics when corn silage was inoculated with Pioneer 1132 inoculant in

  15. Effects of adherence, activation and distinct serum proteins on the in vitro human monocyte maturation process.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Y; Griffith, R; Miller, P; Stevenson, G W; Lund, S; Kanapa, D J; Stevenson, H C

    1988-03-01

    Elutriator-purified human monocytes were cultured in a serum-free (SF) medium, and various serum proteins and functional activating agents were assessed for their effects on the in vitro maturation of human monocytes to macrophages. Following 3 days of suspension culture in Teflon labware, 60% of the monocytes were easily recovered. When varying concentrations of human AB serum (HuAB) were employed, human monocyte maturation progressed rapidly; the kinetics of this maturation process during cell suspension culture were very similar to the pattern observed following adherence culture. In contrast, when SF medium was employed, a marked retardation of the monocyte maturation process was observed; this could not be attributed to any changes in cell recovery and/or viability. Thus, cells could be maintained in their monocytoid form for 3 days when cultured in SF medium. When HuAB was added after 3 days of culture, human monocyte maturation into macrophages proceeded at a normal rate. We attempted to characterize certain of the serum protein(s) found in HuAB which promoted the monocyte maturation process. Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be the most potent serum protein in increasing 5'-N activity and decreasing peroxidase activity of suspension cultured monocytes. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and albumin (Alb) were shown not to have significant monocyte maturation activity. Heat-treated human gamma globulin and IgG purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were shown to have patterns identical with that of untreated HGG and IgG with regard to promoting monocyte maturation; F(ab')2 was not an active maturation promoter, indicating the need for an intact Fc portion of the IgG molecule. Fibrinogen and fibronectin also had maturation promoting activity. Finally, addition of the potent monocyte functional activators, muramyl dipeptide (MDP), polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) had no effect on the monocyte

  16. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  17. Electrophysiological Evidence for Late Maturation of Strategic Episodic Retrieval Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprondel, Volker; Kipp, Kerstin H.; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Improvement in source memory performance throughout development is thought to be mediated by strategic processes that facilitate the retrieval of task-relevant information. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we examined developmental changes in these processes during adolescence. Adolescents (13-14 years) and adults (19-29 years) completed a…

  18. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  19. The maturing process: a vital element in the holistic care of women.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, C

    1993-09-01

    The maturing process is a powerful holistic method for removing childhood blocks, thus freeing us to develop our full potential in the present. This health-patterning modality is an imagery process that assists us in reshaping the holograms in our memory banks. This process is effective with women coming from a variety of dysfunctional backgrounds, dealing with codependency, sexual abuse, and grief and loss issues. Female relationships and interactions are explored through the use of two case studies. The maturing process represents a missing and vital element in the holistic care of women.

  20. Aspergillus carbonarius polygalacturonases purified by integrated membrane process and affinity precipitation for apple juice production.

    PubMed

    Nakkeeran, Ekambaram; Umesh-Kumar, Sukumaran; Subramanian, Rangaswamy

    2011-02-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius, when grown by submerged and solid-state fermentation, produces different molecular forms of polygalacturonase (PG; EC 3.2.1.15), among them a 42 kDa PG with a high specific activity of 7000 U/mg protein. When the enzymes were purified by integrated membrane process (IMP) and alginate affinity precipitation (AAP), the two processes concentrated different forms of the enzyme. The AAP process selectively purified and concentrated the high active PG whereas the IMP yielded different PGs and also amylase and protease. Evaluation of the AAP enzyme preparations for apple juice preparation under conditions usually employed commercially demonstrated that the high activity PG did not result in good juice clarity. With IMP processed enzymes, juice yields and clarity were similar to that obtained with commercial PG from A. niger.

  1. System Maturity and Architecture Assessment Methods, Processes, and Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-02

    1 For a detailed description of the SRL methodology see Sauser, B., J.E. Ramirez- Marquez , D. Nowicki, A...and Ramirez- Marquez 2009; Magnaye, Sauser et al. 2010). Although there are guidelines and tools to support the assessment process (Nolte, Kennedy...employ these metrics (Tan, Sauser et al. 2011). Graettinger, et al. (Graettinger, Garcia et al. 2002) reports that approaches for readiness level

  2. A conceptual framework and classification of capability areas for business process maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Looy, Amy; De Backer, Manu; Poels, Geert

    2014-03-01

    The article elaborates on business process maturity, which indicates how well an organisation can perform based on its business processes, i.e. on its way of working. This topic is of paramount importance for managers who try to excel in today's competitive world. Hence, business process maturity is an emerging research field. However, no consensus exists on the capability areas (or skills) needed to excel. Moreover, their theoretical foundation and synergies with other fields are frequently neglected. To overcome this gap, our study presents a conceptual framework with six main capability areas and 17 sub areas. It draws on theories regarding the traditional business process lifecycle, which are supplemented by recognised organisation management theories. The comprehensiveness of this framework is validated by mapping 69 business process maturity models (BPMMs) to the identified capability areas, based on content analysis. Nonetheless, as a consensus neither exists among the collected BPMMs, a classification of different maturity types is proposed, based on cluster analysis and discriminant analysis. Consequently, the findings contribute to the grounding of business process literature. Possible future avenues are evaluating existing BPMMs, directing new BPMMs or investigating which combinations of capability areas (i.e. maturity types) contribute more to performance than others.

  3. MicroRNAs: Processing, Maturation, Target Recognition and Regulatory Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girish C.; Singh, Jagjit; Barik, Sailen

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable discovery of small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) and their role in posttranscriptional gene regulation have revealed another fine-tuning step in the expression of genetic information. A large number of cellular pathways, which act in organismal development and are important in health and disease, appear to be modulated by miRNAs. At the molecular level, miRNAs restrain the production of proteins by affecting the stability of their target mRNA and/or by down-regulating their translation. This review attempts to offer a snapshot of aspects of miRNA coding, processing, target recognition and function in animals. Our goal here is to provide the readers with a thought-provoking and mechanistic introduction to the miRNA world rather than with a detailed encyclopedia. PMID:22468167

  4. Maturation of Fibrinolytic Bacillopeptidase F Involves both Hetero- and Autocatalytic Processes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dongheng; Dai, Meihong; Xu, Bi-Lin; Zhao, Zhong-Shu; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Mingqiu; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Bing

    2015-10-23

    Bacillopeptidase F (Bpr) is a fibrinolytic serine protease produced by Bacillus subtilis. Its precursor is composed of a signal peptide, an N-terminal propeptide, a catalytic domain, and a long C-terminal extension (CTE). Several active forms of Bpr have been previously reported, but little is known about the maturation of this enzyme. Here, a gene encoding a Bpr (BprL) was cloned from B. subtilis LZW and expressed in B. subtilis WB700, and three fibrinolytic mature forms with apparent molecular masses of 45, 75, and 85 kDa were identified in the culture supernatant. After treatment with urea, the 75-kDa mature form had the same molecular mass as the 85-kDa mature form, from which we infer that they adopt different conformations. Mutational analysis revealed that while the 85-kDa mature form is generated via heterocatalytic processing of a BprL proform by an unidentified protease of B. subtilis, the production of the 75- and 45-kDa mature forms involves both hetero- and autocatalytic events. From in vitro analysis of BprL and its sequential C-terminal truncation variants, it appears that partial removal of the CTE is required for the initiation of autoprocessing of the N-terminal propeptide, which is composed of a core domain (N*) and a 15-residue linker peptide, thereby yielding the 45-kDa mature form. These data suggest that the differential processing of BprL, either heterocatalytically or autocatalytically, leads to the formation of multiple mature forms with different molecular masses or conformations.

  5. Maturation of Fibrinolytic Bacillopeptidase F Involves both Hetero- and Autocatalytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Dongheng; Dai, Meihong; Xu, Bi-Lin; Zhao, Zhong-Shu; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Mingqiu; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Bacillopeptidase F (Bpr) is a fibrinolytic serine protease produced by Bacillus subtilis. Its precursor is composed of a signal peptide, an N-terminal propeptide, a catalytic domain, and a long C-terminal extension (CTE). Several active forms of Bpr have been previously reported, but little is known about the maturation of this enzyme. Here, a gene encoding a Bpr (BprL) was cloned from B. subtilis LZW and expressed in B. subtilis WB700, and three fibrinolytic mature forms with apparent molecular masses of 45, 75, and 85 kDa were identified in the culture supernatant. After treatment with urea, the 75-kDa mature form had the same molecular mass as the 85-kDa mature form, from which we infer that they adopt different conformations. Mutational analysis revealed that while the 85-kDa mature form is generated via heterocatalytic processing of a BprL proform by an unidentified protease of B. subtilis, the production of the 75- and 45-kDa mature forms involves both hetero- and autocatalytic events. From in vitro analysis of BprL and its sequential C-terminal truncation variants, it appears that partial removal of the CTE is required for the initiation of autoprocessing of the N-terminal propeptide, which is composed of a core domain (N*) and a 15-residue linker peptide, thereby yielding the 45-kDa mature form. These data suggest that the differential processing of BprL, either heterocatalytically or autocatalytically, leads to the formation of multiple mature forms with different molecular masses or conformations. PMID:26497454

  6. Neural classifier in the estimation process of maturity of selected varieties of apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniecki, P.; Piekarska-Boniecka, H.; Koszela, K.; Zaborowicz, M.; Przybył, K.; Wojcieszak, D.; Zbytek, Z.; Ludwiczak, A.; Przybylak, A.; Lewicki, A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper seeks to present methods of neural image analysis aimed at estimating the maturity state of selected varieties of apples which are popular in Poland. An identification of the degree of maturity of selected varieties of apples has been conducted on the basis of information encoded in graphical form, presented in the digital photos. The above process involves the application of the BBCH scale, used to determine the maturity of apples. The aforementioned scale is widely used in the EU and has been developed for many species of monocotyledonous plants and dicotyledonous plants. It is also worth noticing that the given scale enables detailed determinations of development stage of a given plant. The purpose of this work is to identify maturity level of selected varieties of apples, which is supported by the use of image analysis methods and classification techniques represented by artificial neural networks. The analysis of graphical representative features based on image analysis method enabled the assessment of the maturity of apples. For the utilitarian purpose the "JabVis 1.1" neural IT system was created, in accordance with requirements of the software engineering dedicated to support the decision-making processes occurring in broadly understood production process and processing of apples.

  7. Single-step affinity purification of enzyme biotherapeutics: a platform methodology for accelerated process development.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kevin P; Ryakala, Venkat K; Bird, Ryan; Godawat, Rahul; Riske, Frank J; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Warikoo, Veena; Gamble, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Downstream sample purification for quality attribute analysis is a significant bottleneck in process development for non-antibody biologics. Multi-step chromatography process train purifications are typically required prior to many critical analytical tests. This prerequisite leads to limited throughput, long lead times to obtain purified product, and significant resource requirements. In this work, immunoaffinity purification technology has been leveraged to achieve single-step affinity purification of two different enzyme biotherapeutics (Fabrazyme® [agalsidase beta] and Enzyme 2) with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, respectively, as ligands. Target molecules were rapidly isolated from cell culture harvest in sufficient purity to enable analysis of critical quality attributes (CQAs). Most importantly, this is the first study that demonstrates the application of predictive analytics techniques to predict critical quality attributes of a commercial biologic. The data obtained using the affinity columns were used to generate appropriate models to predict quality attributes that would be obtained after traditional multi-step purification trains. These models empower process development decision-making with drug substance-equivalent product quality information without generation of actual drug substance. Optimization was performed to ensure maximum target recovery and minimal target protein degradation. The methodologies developed for Fabrazyme were successfully reapplied for Enzyme 2, indicating platform opportunities. The impact of the technology is significant, including reductions in time and personnel requirements, rapid product purification, and substantially increased throughput. Applications are discussed, including upstream and downstream process development support to achieve the principles of Quality by Design (QbD) as well as integration with bioprocesses as a process analytical technology (PAT).

  8. N-terminal processing of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins purified by IMAC procedures.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jane T; Fredericks, Dale P; Christensen, Thorkild; Bruun Schiødt, Christine; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-07-01

    The ability of a new class of metal binding tags to facilitate the purification of recombinant proteins, exemplified by the tagged glutathione S-transferase and human growth hormone, from Escherichia coli fermentation broths and lysates has been further investigated. These histidine-containing tags exhibit high affinity for borderline metal ions chelated to the immobilised ligand, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tacn). The use of this tag-tacn immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) system engenders high selectivity with regard to host cell protein removal and permits facile tag removal from the E. coli-expressed recombinant protein. In particular, these tags were specifically designed to enable their efficient removal by the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 (DAP-1), thus capturing the advantages of high substrate specificity and rates of cleavage. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the cleaved products from the DAP-1 digestion of the recombinant N-terminally tagged proteins confirmed the complete removal of the tag within 4-12 h under mild experimental conditions. Overall, this study demonstrates that the use of tags specifically designed to target tacn-based IMAC resins offers a comprehensive and flexible approach for the purification of E. coli-expressed recombinant proteins, where complete removal of the tag is an essential prerequisite for subsequent application of the purified native proteins in studies aimed at delineating the molecular and cellular basis of specific biological processes.

  9. Evidence for a novel cytoplasmic processing event in ribosome maturation in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Barbieri, Rainer

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the existence of a cytoplasmic processing step, never before described, involving both the pre-ribosomal subunits in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Northern-blot hybridization, primer extension, S1 mapping experiments and in situ hybridizations allowed us to demonstrate that cytoplasmic processed particles are successively re-imported into the nucleus where maturation of their RNAs is completed prior to being exported to the cytoplasm. Our findings lead to the proposal of a new model of ribosome maturation and shuttling.

  10. Maturational Constraints on the Recruitment of Early Processes for Syntactic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J.

    2011-01-01

    An enduring question in the study of second language acquisition concerns the relative contributions of age of acquisition (AOA) and ultimate linguistic proficiency to neural organization for second language processing. Several event-related potential (ERP) and neuroimaging studies of second language learners have found that neural organization for syntactic processing is sensitive to delays in second language acquisition. However, such delays in second language acquisition are typically associated with lower language proficiency, rendering it difficult to assess whether differences in AOA or proficiency lead to these effects. Here we examined the effects of delayed second language acquisition while controlling for proficiency differences by examining participants who differ in AOA but who were matched for proficiency in the same language. We compared the ERP response to auditory English phrase structure violations in a group of late learners of English matched for grammatical proficiency with a group of English native speakers. In the native speaker group violations elicited a bilateral and prolonged anterior negativity, with onset at 100 ms, followed by a posterior positivity (P600). In contrast, in the non-native speaker group violations did not elicit the early anterior negativity, but did elicit a P600 which was more widespread spatially and temporally than that of the native speaker group. These results suggest that neural organization for syntactic processing is sensitive to delays in language acquisition independently of proficiency level. More specifically they suggest that both early and later syntactic processes are sensitive to maturational constraints. These results also suggest that late learners who reach a high level of second language proficiency rely on different neural mechanisms than native speakers of that language. PMID:20964590

  11. CEval: All-in-one software for data processing and statistical evaluations in affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Ördögová, Magda; Malý, Michal; Riesová, Martina

    2016-05-06

    We introduce CEval software (downloadable for free at echmet.natur.cuni.cz) that was developed for quicker and easier electrophoregram evaluation and further data processing in (affinity) capillary electrophoresis. This software allows for automatic peak detection and evaluation of common peak parameters, such as its migration time, area, width etc. Additionally, the software includes a nonlinear regression engine that performs peak fitting with the Haarhoff-van der Linde (HVL) function, including automated initial guess of the HVL function parameters. HVL is a fundamental peak-shape function in electrophoresis, based on which the correct effective mobility of the analyte represented by the peak is evaluated. Effective mobilities of an analyte at various concentrations of a selector can be further stored and plotted in an affinity CE mode. Consequently, the mobility of the free analyte, μA, mobility of the analyte-selector complex, μAS, and the apparent complexation constant, K('), are first guessed automatically from the linearized data plots and subsequently estimated by the means of nonlinear regression. An option that allows two complexation dependencies to be fitted at once is especially convenient for enantioseparations. Statistical processing of these data is also included, which allowed us to: i) express the 95% confidence intervals for the μA, μAS and K(') least-squares estimates, ii) do hypothesis testing on the estimated parameters for the first time. We demonstrate the benefits of the CEval software by inspecting complexation of tryptophan methyl ester with two cyclodextrins, neutral heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and charged heptakis(6-O-sulfo)-β-CD.

  12. Corn silage management II: effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing on digestion and energy content.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Swift, M; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2002-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of maturity and mechanical processing of two hybrids of whole plant corn on starch, fiber, and ether extract digestibilities and energy content of the total mixed ration fed to lactating Holstein cows. In the first experiment, Pioneer hybrid 3845 whole plant corn was harvested at hard dough, one-third milkline, and two-thirds milkline with a theoretical length of cut of 6.4 mm. At each stage of maturity, corn was harvested with and without mechanical processing. In the second experiment, Pioneer hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline stages of maturity with and without mechanical processing. The theoretical length of cut was 12.7 mm. The measured TDN and NEL concentrations were lower for diets containing processed corn silage in experiment 1 and greater for diets containing processed corn silage in experiment 2, compared with diets containing unprocessed corn silage. The lower energy content for diets containing processed corn silage in experiment 1 can be explained by the lower total tract NDF, ether extract, and CP digestibilities. The greater energy content for diets containing processed corn silage in experiment 2 can be attributed to greater total tract starch and NDF digestibilities for cows fed processed corn silage diets. In experiment 2, diets containing processed corn silage (1.59 Mcal/kg) had approximately 2.6% more energy available per kilogram of DM consumed compared with diets containing unprocessed corn silage (1.55 Mcal/kg). For hybrid Quanta in experiment 2, the TDN and NEL concentrations of diets containing corn silage harvested at two-thirds ML were greater than at other maturities.

  13. Capture of micrococcin biosynthetic intermediates reveals C-terminal processing as an obligatory step for in vivo maturation.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Kathryn D; Bennallack, Philip R; Burlingame, Mark A; Robison, Richard A; Griffitts, Joel S; Miller, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    Thiopeptides, including micrococcins, are a growing family of bioactive natural products that are ribosomally synthesized and heavily modified. Here we use a refactored, modular in vivo system containing the micrococcin P1 (MP1) biosynthetic genes (TclIJKLMNPS) from Macrococcus caseolyticus str 115 in a genetically tractable Bacillus subtilis strain to parse the processing steps of this pathway. By fusing the micrococcin precursor peptide to an affinity tag and coupling it with catalytically defective enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates were easily captured for analysis. We found that two major phases of molecular maturation are separated by a key C-terminal processing step. Phase-I conversion of six Cys residues to thiazoles (TclIJN) is followed by C-terminal oxidative decarboxylation (TclP). This TclP-mediated oxidative decarboxylation is a required step for the peptide to progress to phase II. In phase II, Ser/Thr dehydration (TclKL) and peptide macrocycle formation (TclM) occurs. A C-terminal reductase, TclS, can optionally act on the substrate peptide, yielding MP1, and is shown to act late in the pathway. This comprehensive characterization of the MP1 pathway prepares the way for future engineering efforts.

  14. Capture of micrococcin biosynthetic intermediates reveals C-terminal processing as an obligatory step for in vivo maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Kathryn D.; Bennallack, Philip R.; Burlingame, Mark A.; Robison, Richard A.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Thiopeptides, including micrococcins, are a growing family of bioactive natural products that are ribosomally synthesized and heavily modified. Here we use a refactored, modular in vivo system containing the micrococcin P1 (MP1) biosynthetic genes (TclIJKLMNPS) from Macrococcus caseolyticus str 115 in a genetically tractable Bacillus subtilis strain to parse the processing steps of this pathway. By fusing the micrococcin precursor peptide to an affinity tag and coupling it with catalytically defective enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates were easily captured for analysis. We found that two major phases of molecular maturation are separated by a key C-terminal processing step. Phase-I conversion of six Cys residues to thiazoles (TclIJN) is followed by C-terminal oxidative decarboxylation (TclP). This TclP-mediated oxidative decarboxylation is a required step for the peptide to progress to phase II. In phase II, Ser/Thr dehydration (TclKL) and peptide macrocycle formation (TclM) occurs. A C-terminal reductase, TclS, can optionally act on the substrate peptide, yielding MP1, and is shown to act late in the pathway. This comprehensive characterization of the MP1 pathway prepares the way for future engineering efforts. PMID:27791142

  15. Affinity maturation of human CD4 by yeast surface display and crystal structure of a CD4–HLA-DR1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin Xiang; Li, Yili; Yin, Yiyuan; Mo, Min; Wang, Qian; Gao, Wei; Wang, Lili; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2011-01-01

    Helper T-cell activation generally requires the coreceptor CD4, which binds MHC class II molecules. A remarkable feature of the CD4–MHC class II interaction is its exceptionally low affinity, which ranges from KD = ∼200 μM to >2 mM. Investigating the biological role of the much lower affinity of this interaction than those of other cell–cell recognition molecules will require CD4 mutants with enhanced binding to MHC class II for testing in models of T-cell development. To this end, we used in vitro-directed evolution to increase the affinity of human CD4 for HLA-DR1. A mutant CD4 library was displayed on the surface of yeast and selected using HLA-DR1 tetramers or monomers, resulting in isolation of a CD4 clone containing 11 mutations. Reversion mutagenesis showed that most of the affinity increase derived from just two substitutions, Gln40Tyr and Thr45Trp. A CD4 variant bearing these mutations bound HLA-DR1 with KD = 8.8 μM, compared with >400 μM for wild-type CD4. To understand the basis for improved affinity, we determined the structure of this CD4 variant in complex with HLA-DR1 to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure provides an atomic-level description of the CD4-binding site on MHC class II and reveals how CD4 recognizes highly polymorphic HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ molecules by targeting invariant residues in their α2 and β2 domains. In addition, the CD4 mutants reported here constitute unique tools for probing the influence of CD4 affinity on T-cell activation and development. PMID:21900604

  16. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yujie; Chang, Benkang; Yunsheng, Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode. First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-O photocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses. The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  17. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yujie; Chang, Benkang; Yunsheng, Qian

    2006-08-01

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode. First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-O photocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses. The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  18. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lei; Du Yujie; Chang Benkang; Yunsheng Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode.First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-Ophotocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses.The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  19. Crystal structure of an in vitro affinity- and specificity-matured anti-testosterone Fab in complex with testosterone. Improved affinity results from small structural changes within the variable domains.

    PubMed

    Valjakka, Jarkko; Hemminki, Ari; Niemi, Seija; Söderlund, Hans; Takkinen, Kristiina; Rouvinen, Juha

    2002-11-15

    A highly selective, high affinity recombinant anti-testosterone Fab fragment has been generated by stepwise optimization of the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) by random mutagenesis and phage display selection of a monoclonal antibody (3-C(4)F(5)). The best mutant (77 Fab) was obtained by evaluating the additivity effects of different independently selected CDR mutations. The 77 Fab contains 20 mutations and has about 40-fold increased affinity (K(d) = 3 x 10(-10) m) when compared with the wild-type (3-C(4)F(5)) Fab. To obtain structural insight into factors, which are needed to improve binding properties, we have determined the crystal structures of the mutant 77 Fab fragment with (2.15 A) and without testosterone (2.10 A) and compared these with previously determined wild-type structures. The overall testosterone binding of the 77 Fab is similar to that of the wild-type. The improved affinity and specificity of the 77 Fab fragment are due to more comprehensive packing of the testosterone with the protein, which is the result of small structural changes within the variable domains. Only one important binding site residue Glu-95 of the heavy chain CDR3 is mutated to alanine in the 77 Fab fragment. This mutation, originally selected from the phage library based on improved specificity, provides more free space for the testosterone D-ring. The light chain CDR1 of 77 Fab containing eight mutations has the most significant effect on the improved affinity, although it has no direct contact with the testosterone. The mutations of CDR-L1 cause a rearrangement in its conformation, leading to an overall fine reshaping of the binding site.

  20. Coconut water of different maturity stages ameliorates inflammatory processes in model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Coconut water is a natural beverage that is a part of daily diet of many people. This study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of coconut water of different maturation stages (young and mature) with rat paw edema model of inflammation using plethysmometer. Methodology: For this study, albino rats were selected and divided into four equal groups (10 rats in each group). Group 1 was set as control and administered distilled water 1 ml orally; Groups 2 and 3 were treated with young and mature coconut water, respectively, at 4 ml/100 g dose orally. Group 4 was treated with the standard drug (ibuprofen) at 400 mg/70 kg. 0.1 ml of 1% w/v acetic acid was administered in the subplantar tissue of rat paw 30 min after oral treatments of groups. Plethysmometer was used to measure rat paw edema. Results: Results revealed that both coconut water possess significant anti-inflammatory activity (P < 0.001). In comparison to control, percent inhibition by young coconut water was 20.22%, 35.13%, 42.52%, and 36% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (42.52%) was observed in the second phase of the inflammatory process. On the other hand, percent inhibition by mature coconut water was 18.80%, 25.94%, 24.13%, and 18.66% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (25.94%) was observed in the first phase of the inflammatory process. Conclusions: This study strongly suggests the use of young coconut water for potent anti-inflammatory effect and mature coconut water for moderate anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:27366350

  1. Formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen residues during maturation processes within the Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, S.; Wirth, R.; Schreiber, A.; Schulz, H.-M.; Horsfield, B.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrocarbon generation processes occur within organic-rich shales as a response to increases in thermal maturation. Shale gas reservoir quality is thought to be largely dependent on the extent to which solid organic material has been converted to pore space during catagenesis. Although pores may drastically vary in variety and abundance within differing shales, the occurrence of nanopores within organic particles has recently been documented for an important number of gas shale systems (i.e., Barnett, Haynesville, Utica, Eagle Ford, Woodford, Horn River, Marcellus, Posidonia …). However, despite their ubiquitous nature, the formation and the geochemical nature of these nanoporous organic compounds remain unclear. Here, we present the characterization of samples from the organic-rich Mississippian Barnett shale gas system (Fort Worth Basin, Texas, USA) at varying stages of thermal maturation. Using a combination of compositional organic geochemistry and spectromicroscopy techniques, including synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM - data collected using the CLS 10ID-1 STXM beamline) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we document a net increase in sample geochemical heterogeneity with increasing maturity. In addition to the presence of bitumen in samples of oil window maturity, very likely genetically derived from thermally degraded kerogen, the formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen has been inferred for samples of gas window maturity, likely resulting from the formation of gaseous hydrocarbons by secondary cracking of bitumen compounds. By providing in-situ insights into the fate of bitumen and pyrobitumen as a response to the thermal evolution of the macromolecular structure of kerogen, the present contribution constitutes an important step towards better constraining hydrocarbon generation processes occurring within unconventional gas shale systems.

  2. A Software Process Framework for the SEI Capability Maturity Model: Repeatable Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Vilfredo Pareto , that most effects I come from relatively few causes, i.e., 80% of the effects come from 20% of the possible causes. peer review - A review...to the next maturity level. Using the Pareto principle [Juran88b], the CMM prescribes the "vital few" key process areas to focus on depending on an...or interfacing with the individuals responsible for performing in the topic area. (See train for contrast.) Pareto analysis - The analysis of defects

  3. Enhanced humanization and affinity maturation of neutralizing anti-hepatitis B virus preS1 antibody based on antigen-antibody complex structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hong; Gripon, Philippe; Bouezzedine, Fidaa; Jeong, Mun Sik; Chi, Seung-Wook; Ryu, Seong-Eon; Hong, Hyo Jeong

    2015-01-16

    To improve a previously constructed broadly neutralizing hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific preS1 humanized antibody (HzKR127), we further humanized it through specificity-determining residue (SDR) grafting. Moreover, we improved affinity by mutating two residues in heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions (CDR), on the basis of the crystal structure of the antigen-antibody complex. HzKR127-3.2 exhibited 2.5-fold higher affinity and enhanced virus-neutralizing activity compared to the original KR127 antibody and showed less immunogenic potential than HzKR127. Enhanced virus-neutralizing activity was achieved by the increased association rate, providing insights into engineering potent antibody therapeutics for HBV immunoprophylaxis. HzKR127-3.2 may be a good candidate for HBV immunoprophylaxis.

  4. Corn silage management I: effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing on chemical and physical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Robutti, J L; Swift, M; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2002-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing of whole plant corn on chemical and physical characteristics, particle size, pack density, and dry matter recovery. In the first experiment, hybrid 3845 whole plant corn was harvested at hard dough, one-third milkline, and two-thirds milkline with a theoretical length-of-cut of 6.4 mm. In the second experiment, hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline stages of maturity with a theoretical length-of-cut of 12.7 mm. At each stage of maturity, corn was harvested with and without mechanical processing by using a John Deere 5830 harvester with an onboard kernel processor. The percentage of intact corn kernels present in unprocessed corn silage explained 62% of variation in total tract starch digestibility. As the amount of intact kernels increased, total tract starch digestibility decreased. Post-ensiled vitreousness of corn kernels within the corn silage explained 31 and 48% of the variation of total tract starch digestibility for processed and unprocessed treatments, respectively. For a given amount of vitreous starch in corn kernels, total tract starch digestibility was lower for cows fed unprocessed corn silage compared with processed corn silage. This suggests that processing corn silage disrupts the dense protein matrix within the corn kernel where starch is embedded, therefore making the starch more available for digestion. Particle size of corn silage and orts that contained corn silage was reduced when it was processed. Wet pack density was greater for processed compared with unprocessed corn silage.

  5. Sustaining a Mature Risk Management Process: Ensuring the International Space Station for a Vibrant Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raftery, Michael; Carter-Journet, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) risk management methodology is an example of a mature and sustainable process. Risk management is a systematic approach used to proactively identify, analyze, plan, track, control, communicate, and document risks to help management make risk-informed decisions that increase the likelihood of achieving program objectives. The ISS has been operating in space for over 14 years and permanently crewed for over 12 years. It is the longest surviving habitable vehicle in low Earth orbit history. Without a mature and proven risk management plan, it would be increasingly difficult to achieve mission success throughout the life of the ISS Program. A successful risk management process must be able to adapt to a dynamic program. As ISS program-level decision processes have evolved, so too has the ISS risk management process continued to innovate, improve, and adapt. Constant adaptation of risk management tools and an ever-improving process is essential to the continued success of the ISS Program. Above all, sustained support from program management is vital to risk management continued effectiveness. Risk management is valued and stressed as an important process by the ISS Program.

  6. Corn silage management III: effects of hybrid, maturity, and processing on nitrogen metabolism and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Swift, M; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2002-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of maturity and mechanical processing of two hybrids of whole plant corn silage on DM and OM digestibility, nitrogen metabolism, ruminal fermentation, and milk production and composition in lactating Holstein cows. In the first experiment, Pioneer hybrid 3845 whole plant corn was harvested at hard dough, one-third milkline, and two-thirds milkline with a theoretical length-of-cut of 6.4 mm. At each stage of maturity, corn was harvested with (1-mm roll clearance) and without (15.9-mm roll clearance) mechanical processing using a John Deere 5830 harvester with an on-board kernel processor. In the second experiment, Pioneer hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline stages of maturity with and without mechanical processing. The theoretical length-of-cut was 12.7 mm. Total tract DM and OM digestibilities were lower for cows fed diets containing processed corn silage in experiment 1, and tended to be lower for cows fed diets containing unprocessed corn silage in experiment 2. Ruminal acetate concentrations were greater and ruminal propionate concentrations were lower 2 and 6 h after feeding for cows fed diets containing corn silage harvested at physiological maturity in experiment 2. This was due to decreased digestion of starch at advanced maturities in experiment 2. Ruminal pH tended to decline rapidly after feeding for cows fed hybrid Quanta (2 h) compared to hybrid 3845 (5 h) corn silage based diets. Ruminal acetate concentrations decreased and ruminal propionate concentrations increased 2 and 6 h after feeding for cows fed diets containing hybrid Quanta corn silage compared to hybrid 3845 corn silage. This was related to a greater starch concentration in the corn silage, greater starch intake, and increased rate of starch digestion for cows fed hybrid Quanta corn silage-based diets. Microbial nitrogen flow was lower and feed nitrogen flow was greater for

  7. Effects of drying process on the physicochemical properties of nopal cladodes at different maturity stages.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Padilla, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Valderrama-Bravo, María Del Carmen; Rojas-Molina, Isela; Espinosa-Arbeláez, Diego Germán; Suárez-Vargas, Raúl; Rodríguez-García, Mario Enrique

    2012-03-01

    Chemical proximate analysis was done in order to determine the changes of nutritional characteristics of nopal powders from three different maturity stages 50, 100, and 150 days and obtained by three different drying processes: freeze dried, forced air oven, and tunnel. Results indicate that nopal powder obtained by the process of freeze dried retains higher contents of protein, soluble fiber, and fat than the other two processes. Also, freeze dried process had less effect on color hue variable. No changes were observed in insoluble fiber content, chroma and lightness with the three different drying processes. Furthermore, the soluble fibers decreased with the age of nopal while insoluble fibers and ash content shows an opposite trend. In addition, the luminosity and hue values did not show differences among the maturity stages studied. The high content of dietary fibers of nopal pad powder could to be an interesting source of these important components for human diets and also could be used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry.

  8. Nutritive value of corn silage as affected by maturity and mechanical processing: a contemporary review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; Harrison, J H; Hunt, C; Shinners, K; Doggett, C G; Sapienza, D

    1999-12-01

    Stage of maturity at harvest and mechanical processing affect the nutritive value of corn silage. The change in nutritive value of corn silage as maturity advances can be measured by animal digestion and macro in situ degradation studies among other methods. Predictive equations using climatic data, vitreousness of corn grain in corn silage, starch reactivity, gelatinization enthalpy, dry matter (DM) of corn grain in corn silage, and DM of corn silage can be used to estimate starch digestibility of corn silage. Whole plant corn silage can be mechanically processed either pre- or postensiling with a kernel processor mounted on a forage harvester, a recutter screen on a forage harvester, or a stationary roller mill. Mechanical processing of corn silage can improve ensiling characteristics, reduce DM losses during ensiling, and improve starch and fiber digestion as a result of fracturing the corn kernels and crushing and shearing the stover and cobs. Improvements in milk production have ranged from 0.2 to 2.0 kg/d when cows were fed mechanically processed corn silage. A consistent improvement in milk protein yield has also been observed when mechanically processed corn silage has been fed. With the advent of mechanical processors, alternative strategies are evident for corn silage management, such as a longer harvest window.

  9. The Impact of Maturity Stage on Cell Membrane Integrity and Enzymatic Browning Reactions in High Pressure Processed Peaches (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Techakanon, Chukwan; Gradziel, Thomas M; Zhang, Lu; Barrett, Diane M

    2016-09-28

    Fruit maturity is an important factor associated with final product quality, and it may have an effect on the level of browning in peaches that are high pressure processed (HPP). Peaches from three different maturities, as determined by firmness (M1 = 50-55 N, M2 = 35-40 N, and M3 = 15-20 N), were subjected to pressure levels at 0.1, 200, and 400 MPa for 10 min. The damage from HPP treatment results in loss of fruit integrity and the development of browning during storage. Increasing pressure levels of HPP treatment resulted in greater damage, particularly in the more mature peaches, as determined by shifts in transverse relaxation time (T2) of the vacuolar component and by light microscopy. The discoloration of peach slices of different maturities processed at the same pressure was comparable, indicating that the effect of pressure level is greater than that of maturity in the development of browning.

  10. Implementing NASA's Capability-Driven Approach: Insight into NASA's Processes for Maturing Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale; Rodgers, Erica; Antol, Jeff; Simon, Matthew; Hay, Jason; Larman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    NASA is engaged in transforming human spaceflight. The Agency is shifting from an exploration-based program with human activities focused on low Earth orbit (LEO) and targeted robotic missions in deep space to a more sustainable and integrated pioneering approach. Through pioneering, NASA seeks to address national goals to develop the capacity for people to work, learn, operate, live, and thrive safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time. However, pioneering space involves more than the daunting technical challenges of transportation, maintaining health, and enabling crew productivity for long durations in remote, hostile, and alien environments. This shift also requires a change in operating processes for NASA. The Agency can no longer afford to engineer systems for specific missions and destinations and instead must focus on common capabilities that enable a range of destinations and missions. NASA has codified a capability driven approach, which provides flexible guidance for the development and maturation of common capabilities necessary for human pioneers beyond LEO. This approach has been included in NASA policy and is captured in the Agency's strategic goals. It is currently being implemented across NASA's centers and programs. Throughout 2014, NASA engaged in an Agency-wide process to define and refine exploration-related capabilities and associated gaps, focusing only on those that are critical for human exploration beyond LEO. NASA identified 12 common capabilities ranging from Environmental Control and Life Support Systems to Robotics, and established Agency-wide teams or working groups comprised of subject matter experts that are responsible for the maturation of these exploration capabilities. These teams, called the System Maturation Teams (SMTs) help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the identified exploration capabilities. The SMTs are defining performance parameters and goals for each of the 12 capabilities

  11. Differentiating maturational and training influences on fMRI activation during music processing

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Norton, Andrea C.; Overy, Katie; Winner, Ellen; Alsop, David C.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Two major influences on how the brain processes music are maturational development and active musical training. Previous functional neuroimaging studies investigating music processing have typically focused on either categorical differences between “musicians versus nonmusicians” or “children versus adults.” In the present study, we explored a cross-sectional data set (n=84) using multiple linear regression to isolate the performance-independent effects of age (5 to 33 years) and cumulative duration of musical training (0 to 21,000 practice hours) on fMRI activation similarities and differences between melodic discrimination (MD) and rhythmic discrimination (RD). Age-related effects common to MD and RD were present in three left hemisphere regions: temporofrontal junction, ventral premotor cortex, and the inferior part of the intraparietal sulcus, regions involved in active attending to auditory rhythms, sensorimotor integration, and working memory transformations of pitch and rhythmic patterns. By contrast, training-related effects common to MD and RD were localized to the posterior portion of the left superior temporal gyrus/planum temporale, an area implicated in spectrotemporal pattern matching and auditory–motor coordinate transformations. A single cluster in right superior temporal gyrus showed significantly greater activation during MD than RD. This is the first fMRI which has distinguished maturational from training effects during music processing. PMID:22348885

  12. Cryptococcus gattii Capsule Blocks Surface Recognition Required for Dendritic Cell Maturation Independent of Internalization and Antigen Processing.

    PubMed

    Huston, Shaunna M; Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Xiang, Richard F; Ogbomo, Henry; Stack, Danuta; Li, Shu Shun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Kyei, Stephen K; Oykhman, Paul; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Mody, Christopher H

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an emerging fungal pathogen on the west coast of Canada and the United States that causes a potentially fatal infection in otherwise healthy individuals. In previous investigations of the mechanisms by which C. gattii might subvert cell-mediated immunity, we found that C. gattii failed to induce dendritic cell (DC) maturation, leading to defective T cell responses. However, the virulence factor and the mechanisms of evasion of DC maturation remain unknown. The cryptococcal polysaccharide capsule is a leading candidate because of its antiphagocytic properties. Consequently, we asked if the capsule of C. gattii was involved in evasion of DC maturation. We constructed an acapsular strain of C. gattii through CAP59 gene deletion by homologous integration. Encapsulated C. gattii failed to induce human monocyte-derived DC maturation and T cell proliferation, whereas the acapsular mutant induced both processes. Surprisingly, encapsulation impaired DC maturation independent of its effect on phagocytosis. Indeed, DC maturation required extracellular receptor signaling that was dependent on TNF-α and p38 MAPK, but not ERK activation, and the cryptococcal capsule blocked this extracellular recognition. Although the capsule impaired phagocytosis that led to pH-dependent serine-, threonine-, and cysteine-sensitive protease-dependent Ag processing, it was insufficient to impair T cell responses. In summary, C. gattii affects two independent processes, leading to DC maturation and Ag processing. The polysaccharide capsule masked extracellular detection and reduced phagocytosis that was required for DC maturation and Ag processing, respectively. However, the T cell response was fully restored by inducing DC maturation.

  13. Dissection of the IgNAR V domain: molecular scanning and orthologue database mining define novel IgNAR hallmarks and affinity maturation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fennell, B J; Darmanin-Sheehan, A; Hufton, S E; Calabro, V; Wu, L; Müller, M R; Cao, W; Gill, D; Cunningham, O; Finlay, W J J

    2010-07-09

    The shark antigen-binding V(NAR) domain has the potential to provide an attractive alternative to traditional biotherapeutics based on its small size, advantageous physiochemical properties, and unusual ability to target clefts in enzymes or cell surface molecules. The V(NAR) shares many of the properties of the well-characterised single-domain camelid V(H)H but is much less understood at the molecular level. We chose the hen-egg-lysozyme-specific archetypal Type I V(NAR) 5A7 and used ribosome display in combination with error-prone mutagenesis to interrogate the entire sequence space. We found a high level of mutational plasticity across the V(NAR) domain, particularly within the framework 2 and hypervariable region 2 regions. A number of residues important for affinity were identified, and a triple mutant combining A1D, S61R, and G62R resulted in a K(D) of 460 pM for hen egg lysozyme, a 20-fold improvement over wild-type 5A7, and the highest K(D) yet reported for V(NAR)-antigen interactions. These findings were rationalised using structural modelling and indicate the importance of residues outside the classical complementarity determining regions in making novel antigen contacts that modulate affinity. We also located two solvent-exposed residues (G15 and G42), distant from the V(NAR) paratope, which retain function upon mutation to cysteine and have the potential to be exploited as sites for targeted covalent modification. Our findings with 5A7 were extended to all known NAR structures using an in-depth bioinformatic analysis of sequence data available in the literature and a newly generated V(NAR) database. This study allowed us to identify, for the first time, both V(NAR)-specific and V(NAR)/Ig V(L)/TCR V(alpha) overlapping hallmark residues, which are critical for the structural and functional integrity of the single domain. Intriguingly, each of our designated V(NAR)-specific hallmarks align precisely with previously defined mutational 'cold spots' in

  14. Individual heterogeneity in growth and age at sexual maturity: A gamma process analysis of capture–mark–recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William; Hesed, Kyle Miller

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of organisms’ growth rates and ages at sexual maturity is important for conservation efforts and a wide variety of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology. However, these life history parameters may be difficult to obtain from natural populations: individuals encountered may be of unknown age, information on age at sexual maturity may be uncertain and interval-censored, and growth data may include both individual heterogeneity and measurement errors. We analyzed mark–recapture data for Red-backed Salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) to compare sex-specific growth rates and ages at sexual maturity. Aging of individuals was made possible by the use of a von Bertalanffy model of growth, complemented with models for interval-censored and imperfect observations at sexual maturation. Individual heterogeneity in growth was modeled through the use of Gamma processes. Our analysis indicates that female P. cinereus mature earlier and grow more quickly than males, growing to nearly identical asymptotic size distributions as males.

  15. White matter maturation supports the development of reasoning ability through its influence on processing speed.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Emilio; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Steele, Joel S; Green, Chloe T; Wendelken, Carter; Bunge, Silvia A

    2013-11-01

    The structure of the human brain changes in several ways throughout childhood and adolescence. Perhaps the most salient of these changes is the strengthening of white matter tracts that enable distal brain regions to communicate with one another more quickly and efficiently. Here, we sought to understand whether and how white matter changes contribute to improved reasoning ability over development. In particular, we sought to understand whether previously reported relationships between white matter microstructure and reasoning are mediated by processing speed. To this end, we analyzed diffusion tensor imaging data as well as data from standard psychometric tests of cognitive abilities from 103 individuals between the ages of 6 and 18. We used structural equation modeling to investigate the network of relationships between brain and behavior variables. Our analyses provide support for the hypothesis that white matter maturation (as indexed either by microstructural organization or volume) supports improved processing speed, which, in turn, supports improved reasoning ability.

  16. Maturational Constraints on the Recruitment of Early Processes for Syntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J.

    2011-01-01

    An enduring question in the study of second-language acquisition concerns the relative contributions of age of acquisition (AOA) and ultimate linguistic proficiency to neural organization for second-language processing. Several ERP and neuroimaging studies of second-language learners have found that neural organization for syntactic processing is…

  17. Complexes of neutralizing and non-neutralizing affinity matured Fabs with a mimetic of the internal trimeric coiled-coil of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter; Louis, John M; Pierson, Jason; Rao, Prashant; Subramaniam, Sriram; Gustchina, Alla; Clore, G Marius; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A series of mini-antibodies (monovalent and bivalent Fabs) targeting the conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 has been previously constructed and reported. Crystal structures of two closely related monovalent Fabs, one (Fab 8066) broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of HIV-1 subtype B and C viruses, and the other (Fab 8062) non-neutralizing, representing the extremes of this series, were previously solved as complexes with 5-Helix, a gp41 pre-hairpin intermediate mimetic. Binding of these Fabs to covalently stabilized chimeric trimers of N-peptides of HIV-1 gp41 (named (CCIZN36)3 or 3-H) has now been investigated using X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and a variety of biophysical methods. Crystal structures of the complexes between 3-H and Fab 8066 and Fab 8062 were determined at 2.8 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Although the structures of the complexes with the neutralizing Fab 8066 and its non-neutralizing counterpart Fab 8062 were generally similar, small differences between them could be correlated with the biological properties of these antibodies. The conformations of the corresponding CDRs of each antibody in the complexes with 3-H and 5-Helix are very similar. The adaptation to a different target upon complex formation is predominantly achieved by changes in the structure of the trimer of N-HR helices, as well as by adjustment of the orientation of the Fab molecule relative to the N-HR in the complex, via rigid-body movement. The structural data presented here indicate that binding of three Fabs 8062 with high affinity requires more significant changes in the structure of the N-HR trimer compared to binding of Fab 8066. A comparative analysis of the structures of Fabs complexed to different gp41 intermediate mimetics allows further evaluation of biological relevance for generation of neutralizing antibodies, as well as provides novel structural insights into immunogen design.

  18. Analyzing a Mature Software Inspection Process Using Statistical Process Control (SPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Julie; Carleton, Anita; Stamper, Darrell E. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a cooperative effort where the Software Engineering Institute and the Space Shuttle Onboard Software Project could experiment applying Statistical Process Control (SPC) analysis to inspection activities. The topics include: 1) SPC Collaboration Overview; 2) SPC Collaboration Approach and Results; and 3) Lessons Learned.

  19. Effect of hybrid, maturity, and mechanical processing of corn silage on intake and digestibility by beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Andrae, J G; Hunt, C W; Pritchard, G T; Kennington, L R; Harrison, J H; Kezar, W; Mahanna, W

    2001-09-01

    A study involving a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was conducted to evaluate effects of hybrid (Pioneer 3335 and 3489), maturity (half milkline and blacklayer), and mechanical processing (field chopper with and without on-board rollers engaged) on intake and digestibility of corn silage. Forty Angus steers (322 +/- 5.2 kg BW) were assigned to the eight silage treatments (five steers per treatment) and individually fed using electronic gates. Diets consisted of 60% corn silage and 40% chopped alfalfa hay (DM basis). Following a 5-d adaptation period, intake was measured for 7 d and subsequently fecal samples were collected for 5 d. Chromic oxide (5 g/d) was fed beginning 7 d before fecal sample collection and digestibility was determined by the ratio of Cr in the feed and feces. Steers were reallocated to treatments and these procedures were repeated, providing 10 observations per treatment. In addition, all silages were ruminally incubated in six mature cows for 0, 8, 16, 24, 48, and 96 h to determine extent and rate of DM, starch, NDF, and ADF disappearance. Processing increased DMI of hybrid 3489 but did not affect DMI of hybrid 3335 (hybrid x processing; P < 0.06). Total tract digestibility of DM, starch, NDF, and ADF decreased (P < 0.01) as plant maturity increased. Maturity tended to decrease starch digestibility more for hybrid 3489 than for hybrid 3335 (hybrid x maturity; P < 0.10). Processing increased (P < 0.01) starch digestibility but decreased (P < 0.01) NDF and ADF digestibility, resulting in no processing effect on DM digestibility. There was a numerical trend for processing to increase starch digestibility more for latethan for early-maturity corn silage (maturity x processing; P = 0.11). Processing increased in situ rates of DM and starch disappearance and maturity decreased in situ disappearance rates of starch and fiber. These data indicate that hybrid, maturity, and processing all affect corn silage digestibility. Mechanical

  20. Partial and total actuator faults accommodation for input-affine nonlinear process plants.

    PubMed

    Mihankhah, Amin; Salmasi, Farzad R; Salahshoor, Karim

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a new fault-tolerant control system is proposed for input-affine nonlinear plants based on Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) structure. The proposed method has the capability to accommodate both partial and total actuator failures along with bounded external disturbances. In this methodology, the conventional MRAS control law is modified by augmenting two compensating terms. One of these terms is added to eliminate the nonlinear dynamic, while the other is reinforced to compensate the distractive effects of the total actuator faults and external disturbances. In addition, no Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) unit is needed in the proposed method. Moreover, the control structure has good robustness capability against the parameter variation. The performance of this scheme is evaluated using a CSTR system and the results were satisfactory.

  1. Digestive processes of dairy cows fed silages harvested at four stages of grass maturity.

    PubMed

    Rinne, M; Huhtanen, P; Jaakkola, S

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to quantify ruminal digestive processes that could help to identify factors limiting DMI when silages differing in grass maturity were fed to dairy cows. Four silages were harvested at 1-wk intervals from a primary growth of a timothy-meadow fescue sward, resulting in feeds with digestible OM content in DM (D-value) of 739, 730, 707, and 639 g/kg in the order of succeeding harvest date. Four ruminally cannulated dairy cows were given ad libitum access to these silages supplemented with 7 kg concentrate per day in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Rumen function was clearly affected by decreasing digestibility of silage fed. Passage rate of digestible NDF (DNDF) and indigestible NDF (INDF) increased, but it could not prevent the accumulation of DM, NDF, DNDF, and INDF into the rumen when silages of progressing grass maturity were fed. The greatest proportional increases in rumen pool were found in INDF and in medium particles (separated by wet sieving and measuring 315 to 2,500 microm). The passage of medium INDF particles decreased (P < 0.01) linearly (from 0.0365/h to 0.0281/h) with increasing maturity of grass ensiled, and it was slower than passage of small (80 to 315 microm) particles (on average 0.0524/h). Particle size reduction of large INDF particles to medium INDF particles was slower (P < 0.001) in the early cut silages (0.0216/h to 0.0484/h) but reduction of medium INDF particles to small INDF particles was faster (P < 0.001) in early cut silages (0.0436 to 0.0305). Passage of medium size particles and(or) rate of medium particle breakdown to small particles were potential intake-constraining properties of low digestibility forages, whereas large particle reduction to medium particles seemed not to be limiting. The increased feed intake of the early-cut silages was accompanied by decreased rumen fill, suggesting that rumen fill was not at least solely responsible for feed intake control.

  2. Microbial diversity during maturation and natural processing of coffee cherries of Coffea arabica in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silv, C F; Schwan, R F; Sousa Dias, E S; Wheals, A E

    2000-09-25

    The magnitude and diversity of the microbial population associated with dry (natural) processing of coffee (Coffea arabica) has been assessed during a 2-year period on 15 different farms in the Sul de Minas region of Brazil. Peptone water-washed samples were taken of maturing cherries on trees (cherries, raisins and dried cherries) and from ground fermentations. The microbial load varied from 3 x 10(4) to 2.2 x 10(9) cfu/cherry with a median value of 1.6 x 10(7) cfu/cherry. The microbial load increased after heavy rainfall on cherries that were drying on the ground. At all stages, bacteria were usually the most abundant group, followed by filamentous fungi and finally yeasts. Counts of bacteria, yeasts and fungi varied considerably between farms and at different stages of maturation and processing and no consistent pattern could be seen. Yeasts showed an increase during the fermentation process. Median counts were not significantly different for fungi, yeasts and bacteria between the 2 years although Gram-negative bacteria dominated in the wet year and Gram-positive bacteria dominated in the dry year. Of a total of 754 isolates, 626 were identified to at least genus level comprising 44 genera and 64 different species. The 164 isolates of Gram-negative bacteria included 17 genera and 26 species, the most common of which were members of the genera Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter and Serratia. Of 191 isolates of Gram-positive bacteria, 23 were spore-forming and included six Bacillus species, and 118 were non-spore-formers of which over half were Cellulomonas with lesser numbers of Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Brochothrix, Dermabacter and Lactobacillus. Of the 107 yeast isolates, 90 were identified into 12 genera and 24 different species and almost all were fermentative. The most common genera, in decreasing frequency, were Pichia, Candida, Arxula and Saccharomycopsis. There were many rarely described yeasts including Pichia lynferdii and Arxula adeninivorans

  3. Pedagogical Formation Students' Resistance Behaviors towards Teaching-Learning Processes and Their Moral Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argon, Türkan; Sezen-Gültekin, Gözde

    2016-01-01

    Moral maturity, defined as the competence in moral emotions, thoughts, judgments, attitudes and behaviors, is one of the most important qualities that the would-be teachers at Faculties of Education must possess. Teachers with moral maturity will train students with the qualities of reliability, responsibility, fairness, objectivity, consistency…

  4. Corn silage management: effects of hybrid, maturity, chop length, and mechanical processing on rate and extent of digestion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Hunt, C; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2003-10-01

    Five experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of hybrid, chop length, maturity, and mechanical processing of corn silage on dry matter and nutrient disappearance in the rumen. Corn silage that had not been dried or ground was incubated in macro in situ bags (30 x 35 cm) for 8, 16, 24,48, and 96 h. Experiments la and 2 evaluated the effects of maturity and mechanical processing for two corn silage hybrids harvested at two theoretical lengths-of-cut. Experiments 3 through 5 evaluated the effects of chop length and mechanical processing for two corn silage hybrids harvested at two-thirds milkline. The hybrid with low neutral fiber (NDF) concentrations had greater dry matter and starch disappearance than the hybrid with high NDF concentrations. The effect of chop length on nutrient disappearance was variable across experiments 3 through 5. Processing improved dry matter disappearance in experiments la, 2 (two-thirds milkline and blackline), 3, 4, and 5 at the majority of ruminal incubation timepoints. Starch disappearance was greater for unprocessed corn silage in experiment la (hard dough and two-thirds milkline) and was greater for processed corn silage in experiments 2 and 5. However, there was no consistent trend in starch disappearance between processed and unprocessed corn silage in experiments 3 and 4. This can be partially explained by the high disappearance of starch (experiment 3, > or = 98% and experiment 4, > or = 94%) by 24 h of ruminal incubation. Minimal differences were detected in NDF disappearance between processed and unprocessed corn silage across maturities. In experiments 2 and 5, crude protein disappearance was improved due to processing at some incubation timepoints. Rate of dry matter, starch (one-third milkline and two-thirds milkline), and NDF disappearance tended to increase when corn silage was mechanically processed in experiment 2. Dry matter, starch, and crude protein disappearance tended to be greater for corn silage harvested

  5. Use of advanced oxidation processes to improve the biodegradability of mature landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Josmaria Lopes; Zamora, Patricio Peralta

    2005-08-31

    Two advanced oxidative processes (Fe2+/H2O2/UV and H2O2/UV systems) were used for the pre-treatment of mature landfill leachate with the objective of improving its overall biodegradability, evaluated in terms of BOD5/COD ratio, up to a value compatible with biological treatment. At optimized experimental conditions (2000 mgL(-1) of H2O2 and 10 mgL(-1) of Fe2+ for the photo-Fenton system, and 3000 mgL(-1) of H2O2 for the H2O2/UV system), both methods showed suitability for partial removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and color. The biodegradability was significantly improved (BOD5/COD from 0.13 to 0.37 or 0.42) which allowed an almost total removal of COD and color by a sequential activated sludge process. In addition, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) has showed a substantial agreement on the cleavage of large organic compound into smaller ones.

  6. Mature fine tailings from oil sands processing harbour diverse methanogenic communities.

    PubMed

    Penner, Tara J; Foght, Julia M

    2010-06-01

    Processing oil sands to extract bitumen produces large volumes of a tailings slurry comprising water, silt, clays, unrecovered bitumen, and residual solvent used in the extraction process. Tailings are deposited into large settling basins, where the solids settle by gravity to become denser mature fine tailings (MFT). A substantial flux of methane, currently estimated at ~40 million L/day, is being emitted from the Mildred Lake Settling Basin. To better understand the biogenesis of this greenhouse gas, the methanogenic consortia in MFT samples from depth profiles in 2 tailings deposits (Mildred Lake Settling Basin and West In-Pit) were analyzed by constructing clone libraries of amplified archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The archaeal sequences, whose closest matches were almost exclusively cultivated methanogens, were comparable within and between basins and were predominantly (87% of clones) affiliated with acetoclastic Methanosaeta spp. In contrast, bacterial clone libraries were unexpectedly diverse, with the majority (~55%) of sequences related to Proteobacteria, including some presumptive nitrate-, iron-, or sulfate-reducing, hydrocarbon-degrading genera (e.g., Thauera, Rhodoferax, and Desulfatibacillum). Thus, MFT harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes presumptively responsible for producing methane from substrates indigenous to the MFT. These findings contribute to our understanding of biogenic methane production and densification of MFT in oil sands tailings deposits.

  7. Bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic composting process enhancing compost maturity of dewatered sludge with synchronous electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Jiang, Junqiu; Zhao, Qingliang; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Yunshu; Zheng, Zhen; Hao, Xiaodi

    2015-10-01

    Bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic composting process (AnCBE) with dewatered sludge as the anode fuel was constructed to accelerate composting of dewatered sludge, which could increase the quality of the compost and harvest electric energy in comparison with the traditional anaerobic composting (AnC). Results revealed that the AnCBE yielded a voltage of 0.60 ± 0.02 V, and total COD (TCOD) removal reached 19.8 ± 0.2% at the end of 35 d. The maximum power density was 5.6 W/m(3). At the end of composting, organic matter content (OM) reduction rate increased to 19.5 ± 0.2% in AnCBE and to 12.9 ± 0.1% in AnC. The fuzzy comprehensive assessment (FCA) result indicated that the membership degree of class I of AnCBE compost (0.64) was higher than that of AnC compost (0.44). It was demonstrated that electrogenesis in the AnCBE could improve the sludge stabilization degree, accelerate anaerobic composting process and enhance composting maturity with bioelectricity generation.

  8. Maturation of the Central Auditory Nervous System in Children with Auditory Processing Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Dani; Rance, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental delay has been proposed as the underlying cause of the majority of cases of auditory processing disorder (APD). The current study employs the cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) to assess if maturational differences of the central auditory nervous system (CANS) can be identified between children who do and do not meet the diagnostic criterion for APD. The P1-N1 complex of the CAEP has previously been used for tracking development of the CANS in children with hearing impairment. Twenty-seven children (7 to 12 years old) who failed an APD behavioral test battery were age-matched (within 3 months) to children who had passed the same battery. CAEP responses to 500-Hz tone burst stimuli were recorded and analyzed for latency and amplitude measures. The P1-N1 complex of the CAEP, which has previously been used for tracking development of the CANS in children with hearing impairment, showed significant group differences. The children diagnosed with APD showed significantly increased latency (∼10 milliseconds) and significantly reduced amplitude (∼10 μV) of the early components of the CAEP compared with children with normal auditory processing. No significant differences were seen in the later P2 wave. The normal developmental course is for a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude as a function of age. The results of this study are, therefore, consistent with an immaturity of the CANS as an underlying cause of APD in children. PMID:27587924

  9. Coregulation of processing and translation: mature 5' termini of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA form in polysomes.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1988-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the final maturation of rRNA occurs in precursor particles, and recent experiments have suggested that ongoing protein synthesis may somehow be required for maturation to occur. The protein synthesis requirement for the formation of the 5' terminus of 23S rRNA has been clarified in vitro by varying the substrate of the reaction. In cell extracts, pre-23S rRNA in free ribosomes was not matured, but that in polysomes was efficiently processed. The reaction occurred in polysomes without the need for an energy source or other additives required for protein synthesis. Furthermore, when polysomes were dissociated into ribosomal subunits, they were no longer substrates for maturation; but the ribosomes became substrates again when they once more were incubated in the conditions for protein synthesis. All of these results are consistent with the notion that protein synthesis serves to form a polysomal complex that is the true substrate for maturation. Ribosomes in polysomes, possibly in the form of 70S initiation complexes, may more easily adopt a conformation that facilitates maturation cleavage. As a result, the rates of ribosome formation and protein synthesis could be coregulated. Images PMID:3050989

  10. Whey protein processing influences formula-induced gut maturation in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Østergaard, Mette V; Jiang, Pingping; Chatterton, Dereck E W; Thymann, Thomas; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Sangild, Per T

    2013-12-01

    Immaturity of the gut predisposes preterm infants to nutritional challenges potentially leading to clinical complications such as necrotizing enterocolitis. Feeding milk formulas is associated with greater risk than fresh colostrum or milk, probably due to loss of bioactive proteins (e.g., immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-β) during industrial processing (e.g., pasteurization, filtration, spray-drying). We hypothesized that the processing method for whey protein concentrate (WPC) would affect gut maturation in formula-fed preterm pigs used as a model for preterm infants. Fifty-five caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were distributed into 4 groups given 1 of 4 isoenergetic diets: formula containing conventional WPC (filtration, multi-pasteurization, standard spray-drying) (CF); formula containing gently treated WPC (reduced filtration and pasteurization, gentle spray-drying) (GF); formula containing minimally treated WPC (rennet precipitation, reduced filtration, heat treatment <40°C, freeze-drying) (MF); and bovine colostrum (used as a positive reference group) (BC). Relative to CF, GF, and MF pigs, BC pigs had greater villus heights, lactose digestion, and absorption and lower gut permeability (P < 0.05). MF and BC pigs had greater plasma citrulline concentrations than CF and GF pigs and intestinal interleukin-8 was lower in BC pigs than in the other groups (P < 0.05). MF pigs had lower concentrations of intestinal claudin-4, cleaved caspase-3, and phosphorylated c-Jun than CF pigs (P < 0.05). The conventional and gently treated WPCs had similar efficacy in stimulating proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that processing of WPC affects intestinal structure, function, and integrity when included in formulas for preterm pigs. Optimization of WPC processing technology may be important to preserve the bioactivity and nutritional value of formulas for sensitive newborns.

  11. Development of an ELP-Z based mAb affinity precipitation process using scaled-down filtration techniques.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Rahul D; Bhut, Bharat V; Jin, Mi; Li, Zhengjian; Chen, Wilfred; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-12-20

    In this work, a proof of concept elastin-like polypeptide-Z domain fusion (ELP-Z) based monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity precipitation process is developed using scaled-down filtration techniques. Tangential flow filtration (TFF) is examined for the recovery of ELP-Z-mAb precipitates formed during the mAb binding step and the ELP-Z precipitates formed during the mAb elution step. TFF results in complete precipitate recovery during both stages of the process and high host cell protein and DNA impurity clearance after diafiltration. Total recycle TFF experiments are then employed to determine permeate flux as a function of the precipitate concentration for both stages of the process. While the ELP-Z-mAb precipitate recovery step resulted in high permeate flux (550-600L/m(2)/h/bar), the ELP-Z precipitates are shown to severely foul the TFF membrane, causing rapid flux decay. Confocal microscopy of the ELP-Z-mAb and ELP-Z precipitates suggests significant differences in the morphology and the kinetics of formation of these precipitates, which is likely responsible for their different behavior during TFF. Finally, an alternative normal flow filtration strategy is developed for the ELP-Z precipitate recovery step during mAb elution, using a combination of 5μm and a 0.45/0.2μm filters. Using this approach, the ELP-Z precipitates are separated from the final mAb elution pool at high volumetric throughputs and high ELP-Z recovery (96%) is obtained after resolubilization from the filter. This study demonstrates that the ELP-Z affinity precipitation process can be readily scaled up using conventional membrane processing.

  12. The Native Form and Maturation Process of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Wakita, Takaji; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Funahashi, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Masumi; Kajita, Tadahiro; Moradpour, Darius; Wands, Jack R.; Kohara, Michinori

    1998-01-01

    The maturation and subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein were investigated with both a vaccinia virus expression system and CHO cell lines stably transformed with HCV cDNA. Two HCV core proteins, with molecular sizes of 21 kDa (p21) and 23 kDa (p23), were identified. The C-terminal end of p23 is amino acid 191 of the HCV polyprotein, and p21 is produced as a result of processing between amino acids 174 and 191. The subcellular localization of the HCV core protein was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although HCV core protein resided predominantly in the cytoplasm, it was also found in the nucleus and had the same molecular size as p21 in both locations, as determined by subcellular fractionation. The HCV core proteins had different immunoreactivities to a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Antibody 5E3 stained core protein in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, C7-50 stained core protein only in the cytoplasm, and 499S stained core protein only in the nucleus. These results clearly indicate that the p23 form of HCV core protein is processed to p21 in the cytoplasm and that the core protein in the nucleus has a higher-order structure different from that of p21 in the cytoplasm. HCV core protein in sera of patients with HCV infection was analyzed in order to determine the molecular size of genuinely processed HCV core protein. HCV core protein in sera was found to have exactly the same molecular weight as the p21 protein. These results suggest that p21 core protein is a component of native viral particles. PMID:9621068

  13. Pre-adolescent alcohol expectancies: critical shifts and associated maturational processes.

    PubMed

    Bekman, Nicole M; Goldman, Mark S; Worley, Matthew J; Anderson, Kristen G

    2011-12-01

    Children's alcohol expectancies shift in late childhood/early adolescence in ways thought to lead to increased risk for adolescent alcohol use. The precise nature of this shift and the maturational processes that may influence it remain to be clarified. To these ends, we compared expectancy endorsement by grade across four expectancy domains: positive, negative, arousal, and sedation, in a cross-sectional sample of 3rd-6th grade children attending afterschool programs (n = 299). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was then used to describe the relationships between expectancies and differences in (a) cognitive ability and concept formation, (b) risk-taking personality traits, and (c) social exposure or values regarding alcohol-related information. Results showed those children in higher grades endorsed significantly more positive, negative, and sedating expectancies for alcohol than their younger peers. Concept formation partially and fully mediated the relationships between grade and both positive and sedating expectancies, respectively, but not the relationship between grade and negative expectancies. Sensation seeking did not increase across grades in this sample, and the relationship between sensation seeking and positive expectancies was fully mediated by reported alcohol exposure and values. This study provides a basis for future exploration of developmental influences on alcohol expectancies, an understanding of which may be helpful in the design of prevention efforts targeting high-risk youth before adolescence.

  14. Phagosomal processing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85B is modulated independently of mycobacterial viability and phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Smialek, Jamie L; Shank, Sam S; Convery, Marilyn; Boom, W Henry; Harding, Clifford V

    2005-02-01

    Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection requires CD4 T-cell responses and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) processing of M. tuberculosis antigens (Ags). We have previously demonstrated that macrophages process heat-killed (HK) M. tuberculosis more efficiently than live M. tuberculosis. These observations suggested that live M. tuberculosis may inhibit Ag processing by inhibiting phagosome maturation or that HK M. tuberculosis may be less resistant to Ag processing. In the present study we examined the correlation between M. tuberculosis viability and phagosome maturation and efficiency of Ag processing. Since heat treatment could render M. tuberculosis Ags more accessible to proteolysis, M. tuberculosis was additionally killed by antibiotic treatment and radiation. Processing of HK, live, radiation-killed (RadK), or rifampin-killed (RifK) M. tuberculosis in activated murine bone marrow macrophages was examined by using an I-A(b)-restricted T-cell hybridoma cell line (BB7) that recognizes an epitope derived from Ag 85B. Macrophages processed HK M. tuberculosis more rapidly and efficiently than they processed live, RadK, or RifK M. tuberculosis. Live, RadK, and RifK M. tuberculosis cells were processed with similar efficiencies for presentation to BB7 T hybridoma cells. Furthermore, phagosomes containing live or RadK M. tuberculosis expressed fewer M. tuberculosis peptide-MHC-II complexes than phagosomes containing HK M. tuberculosis expressed. Since only live M. tuberculosis was able to prevent acidification of the phagosome, our results suggest that regulation of phagosome maturation does not explain the differences in processing of different forms of M. tuberculosis. These findings suggest that the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to inhibit phagosomal maturation differ from the mechanisms involved in modulating phagosome Ag processing.

  15. 3'end maturation of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast atpB mRNA is a two-step process.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Kindle, K L

    1993-01-01

    Inverted repeat (IR) sequences are found at the 3' ends of most chloroplast protein coding regions, and we have previously shown that the 3'IR is important for accumulation of atpB mRNA in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (D. B. Stern, E.R. Radwanski, and K. L. Kindle, Plant Cell 3:285-297, 1991). In vitro studies indicate that 3' IRs are inefficient transcription termination signals in higher plants and have furthermore defined processing activities that act on the 3' ends of chloroplast transcripts, suggesting that most chloroplast mRNAs are processed at their 3' ends in vivo. To investigate the mechanism of 3' end processing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts, the maturation of atpB mRNA was examined in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, a synthetic atpB mRNA precursor is rapidly cleaved at a position 10 nucleotides downstream from the mature 3' terminus. This cleavage is followed by exonucleolytic processing to generate the mature 3' end. In vivo run-on transcription experiments indicate that a maximum of 50% of atpB transcripts are transcriptionally terminated at or near the IR, while the remainder are subject to 3' end processing. Analysis of transcripts derived from chimeric atpB genes introduced into Chlamydomonas chloroplasts by biolistic transformation suggests that in vivo processing and in vitro processing occur by similar or identical mechanisms. Images PMID:8455609

  16. [Using UV-Vis Absorbance for Characterization of Maturity in Composting Process with Different Materials].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wei, Yu-quan; Li, Yang; Xi, Bei-dou; Wei, Zi-min; Wang, Xing-lei; Zhao, Zhi-nan; Ding, Jei

    2015-04-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the degree of humification in DOM during composting using different raw materials, and their effect on maturity of compost based on UV-Vis spectra measurements and chemometrics method. The raw materials of composting studied included chicken manure, pig manure, kitchen waste, lawn waste, fruits and vegetables waste, straw waste, green waste, sludge, and municipal solid waste. During composting, the parameters of UV-Vis spectra of DOM, including SUVA254 , SUVA280 , E250/E365, E4/E6, E2/E4, E2/E6, E253/E203, E253/E220, A226-400, S275-295 and S350-400 were calculated, Statistical analysis indicated that all the parameter were significantly changed during composting. SUVA254 and SUVA280 of DOM were continuously increased, E250/E365 and E4/E6 were continuously decreased in DOM, while A226-400, S275-295 and S350-400 of DOM at the final stage were significantly different with those at other stages of composting. Correlation analysis indicated that the parameters were significantly correlated with each other except for E2/E4 and E235/E203. Furthermore, principal component analysis suggested that A226-400, SUVA254, S350-400, SUVA280 and S275~295 were reasonable parameters for assessing the compost maturity. To distinguish maturity degree among different composts, hierarchical cluster analysis, an integrated tool utilizing multiple UV-Vis parameters, was performed based on the data (A226-400, SUVA254, S350-400, SUVA280 and S275-295) of DOM derived from the final stage of composting. Composts from different sources were clustered into 2 groups. The first group included chicken manure, pig manure, lawn waste, fruits and vegetables waste, green waste, sludge, and municipal solid waste characterized by a lower maturity degree, and the second group contained straw waste and kitchen waste associated with a higher maturity degree. The above results suggest that a multi-index of UV-Vis spectra could accurately evaluate the compost maturity

  17. [Pharmaceutical Assistance in the Family Healthcare Program: points of affinity and discord in the organization process].

    PubMed

    Silva Oliveira, Tatiana de Alencar; Maria, Tatiane de Oliveira Silva; Alves do Nascimento, Angela Maria; do Nascimento, Angela Alves

    2011-09-01

    The scope of this study was to discuss the organization of the pharmaceutical assistance service in the family healthcare program. Qualitative research from a critical/analytical perspective was conducted in family healthcare units in a municipality of the state of Bahia, Brazil. Data was collected on the basis of systematic observation, semi-structured interviews and documents analysis from a dialectic standpoint. The organization of Pharmaceutical Assistance consisted of selection, planning, acquisition, storage and dispensing activities. The process was studied in the implementation phase, which was occurring in a centralized and uncoordinated fashion, without the proposed team work. An excess of activity was observed among the healthcare workers and there was an absence of a continued education policy for the workers. For the transformation of this situation and to ensure the organization of pharmaceutical assistance with quality and in an integrated manner, a reworking of the manner of thinking and action of the players concerned (managers, health workers and users), who participate directly in the organization, is necessary. Furthermore, mechanical, bureaucratic and impersonal work practices need to be abandoned.

  18. Construction of a dual-tag system for gene expression, protein affinity purification and fusion protein processing.

    PubMed

    Motejadded, Hassan; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2009-04-01

    An E. coli vector system was constructed which allows the expression of fusion genes via a L: -rhamnose-inducible promotor. The corresponding fusion proteins consist of the maltose-binding protein and a His-tag sequence for affinity purification, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Smt3 protein for protein processing by proteolytic cleavage and the protein of interest. The Smt3 gene was codon-optimized for expression in E. coli. In a second rhamnose-inducible vector, the S. cerevisiae Ulp1 protease gene for processing Smt3 fusion proteins was fused in the same way to maltose-binding protein and His-tag sequence but without the Smt3 gene. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was used as reporter and protein of interest. Both fusion proteins (MalE-6xHis-Smt3-eGFP and MalE-6xHis-Ulp1) were efficiently produced in E. coli and separately purified by amylose resin. After proteolytic cleavage the products were applied to a Ni-NTA column to remove protease and tags. Pure eGFP protein was obtained in the flow-through of the column in a yield of around 35% of the crude cell extract.

  19. Maturation of auditory neural processes in autism spectrum disorder — A longitudinal MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Port, Russell G.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Ku, Matthew; Bloy, Luke; Murray, Rebecca; Blaskey, Lisa; Levy, Susan E.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show atypical brain activity, perhaps due to delayed maturation. Previous studies examining the maturation of auditory electrophysiological activity have been limited due to their use of cross-sectional designs. The present study took a first step in examining magnetoencephalography (MEG) evidence of abnormal auditory response maturation in ASD via the use of a longitudinal design. Methods Initially recruited for a previous study, 27 children with ASD and nine typically developing (TD) children, aged 6- to 11-years-old, were re-recruited two to five years later. At both timepoints, MEG data were obtained while participants passively listened to sinusoidal pure-tones. Bilateral primary/secondary auditory cortex time domain (100 ms evoked response latency (M100)) and spectrotemporal measures (gamma-band power and inter-trial coherence (ITC)) were examined. MEG measures were also qualitatively examined for five children who exhibited “optimal outcome”, participants who were initially on spectrum, but no longer met diagnostic criteria at follow-up. Results M100 latencies were delayed in ASD versus TD at the initial exam (~ 19 ms) and at follow-up (~ 18 ms). At both exams, M100 latencies were associated with clinical ASD severity. In addition, gamma-band evoked power and ITC were reduced in ASD versus TD. M100 latency and gamma-band maturation rates did not differ between ASD and TD. Of note, the cohort of five children that demonstrated “optimal outcome” additionally exhibited M100 latency and gamma-band activity mean values in-between TD and ASD at both timepoints. Though justifying only qualitative interpretation, these “optimal outcome” related data are presented here to motivate future studies. Conclusions Children with ASD showed perturbed auditory cortex neural activity, as evidenced by M100 latency delays as well as reduced transient gamma-band activity. Despite evidence for maturation

  20. H5 N-terminal β sheet promotes oligomerization of H7-HA1 that induces better antibody affinity maturation and enhanced protection against H7N7 and H7N9 viruses compared to inactivated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Verma, Swati; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; Crevar, Corey J; Carter, Donald M; Ross, Ted M; Golding, Hana

    2014-11-12

    Initiation of mass vaccination is critical in response to influenza pandemic. There is an urgent need of a simple, rapid method for production of influenza vaccine that is more effective than current traditional influenza vaccines. Recent H7N9 transmissions to humans in China with high morbidity/mortality initiated extensive vaccine evaluation. We produced the HA1 domains (amino acids 1-320) from H7N9 and H7N7 strains in E. coli. Both were found to contain primarily monomers/trimers with low oligomeric content. However, when residues from the N-terminal β sheet (first 8 amino acid) of H7 HA1 domains were swapped with the corresponding amino acids from H5N1, functional oligomeric H7 HA1 were produced (HA1-DS), demonstrating strong receptor binding and hemagglutination. In rabbits, the HA1-DS from either H7N9 or H7N7 generated high neutralization titers against both homologous and heterologous H7 strains, superior to the unmodified H7 HA1 proteins. In ferrets, HA1-DS from H7N7 elicited higher (and faster) HI titers, better protected ferrets from lethality, weight loss, and reduced viral loads following challenge with wild-type highly pathogenic H7N7 virus compared with inactivated H7N7 subunit vaccine. HA1-DS vaccinated ferrets were also better protected from weight loss after challenge with the heterologous H7N9 virus compared with inactivated H7N7 subunit vaccine. Importantly, the H7N7 HA1-DS vaccine induced antibody affinity maturation far superior to the inactivated H7N7 subunit vaccine, which strongly correlated with control of viral loads in the nasal washes after challenge with either H7N7 or H7N9 strains. We conclude that N-terminus β sheet domain-swap can be used to produce stable functional oligomeric forms of better recombinant HA1 vaccines in simple, inexpensive bacterial system for rapid response to emerging pandemic threat for the global population.

  1. [The development of attention, memory and the inhibitory processes: the chronological relation with the maturation of brain structure and functioning].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, E; Ostrosky-Solís, F; Próspero-García, O

    Development during childhood and adolescence is characterized by greater efficiency in performing cognitive tasks. The correlations between cognitive and brain development are not altogether clear and have not been studied in depth. The aim of this study is to survey the research carried out into the development of cognitive functioning in children, adolescents and adults, and its chronological relation with brain development. Anatomofunctional and cognitive-behavioural studies are presented. Anatomical studies have shown that the white matter increases linearly throughout childhood and adolescence, whereas cortical and subcortical grey matter increases in the pre-adolescent period and later diminishes in the post adolescent stage. It has been claimed that these changes are regional and that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is one of the last areas to mature. Functional research has studied cognitive processes attributed to the functioning of the PFC, such as attention, working memory and the inhibition of irrelevant responses. The findings from these studies have shown a behavioural and physiological development of these three processes during childhood and adolescence. Behavioural results have evidenced greater efficiency in capacities such as discriminating between relevant and irrelevant information, storing and handling information in the memory and the inhibition of unsuitable responses during the performance of a task. The physiological results have presented changes in the magnitude, spread and integration of the regions activated during task performance. Cognitive and behavioural maturation is consecutive to structural and physiological maturing and this is produced in a chronologically and qualitatively different way in the distinct regions of the brain.

  2. Epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP Signaling Regulates Multiple Biological Processes during Perinatal Lung Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, James P.; Schehr, Angelica; Wang, Yanhua; Huo, Liya; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout postnatal life. Defects in the surfactant system are associated with common pulmonary disorders including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults. Lipogenesis is essential for the synthesis of pulmonary surfactant by type II epithelial cells lining the alveoli. This study sought to identify the role of pulmonary epithelial SREBP, a transcriptional regulator of cellular lipid homeostasis, during a critical time period of perinatal lung maturation in the mouse. Genome wide mRNA expression profiling of lung tissue from transgenic mice with epithelial-specific deletions of Scap (ScapΔ/Δ, resulting in inactivation of SREBP signaling) or Insig1 and Insig2 (Insig1/2Δ/Δ, resulting in activation of SREBP signaling) was assessed. Differentially expressed genes responding to SREBP perturbations were identified and subjected to functional enrichment analysis, pathway mapping and literature mining to predict upstream regulators and transcriptional networks regulating surfactant lipid homeostasis. Through comprehensive data analysis and integration, time dependent effects of epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP deletion and defined SCAP/INSIG/SREBP-associated genes, bioprocesses and downstream pathways were identified. SREBP signaling influences epithelial development, cell death and cell proliferation at E17.5, while primarily influencing surfactant physiology, lipid/sterol synthesis, and phospholipid transport after birth. SREBP signaling integrated with the Wnt/β-catenin and glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathways during perinatal lung maturation. SREBP regulates perinatal lung lipogenesis and maturation through multiple mechanisms by interactions with distinct sets of regulatory partners. PMID:24806461

  3. Functional domains of the 50S subunit mature late in the assembly process

    PubMed Central

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Jain, Nikhil; Davis, Joseph H.; Williamson, James R.; Britton, Robert A.; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the identification of many factors that facilitate ribosome assembly, the molecular mechanisms by which they drive ribosome biogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we analyze the late stages of assembly of the 50S subunit using Bacillus subtilis cells depleted of RbgA, a highly conserved GTPase. We found that RbgA-depleted cells accumulate late assembly intermediates bearing sub-stoichiometric quantities of ribosomal proteins L16, L27, L28, L33a, L35 and L36. Using a novel pulse labeling/quantitative mass spectrometry technique, we show that this particle is physiologically relevant and is capable of maturing into a complete 50S particle. Cryo-electron microscopy and chemical probing revealed that the central protuberance, the GTPase associating region and tRNA-binding sites in this intermediate are unstructured. These findings demonstrate that key functional sites of the 50S subunit remain unstructured until late stages of maturation, preventing the incomplete subunit from prematurely engaging in translation. Finally, structural and biochemical analysis of a ribosome particle depleted of L16 indicate that L16 binding is necessary for the stimulation of RbgA GTPase activity and, in turn, release of this co-factor, and for conversion of the intermediate to a complete 50S subunit. PMID:24335279

  4. Identification of new participants in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) oocyte maturation and ovulation processes using cDNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Julien; Montfort, Jerôme; Nguyen, Thaovi; Fostier, Alexis

    2006-01-01

    Background The hormonal control of oocyte maturation and ovulation as well as the molecular mechanisms of nuclear maturation have been thoroughly studied in fish. In contrast, the other molecular events occurring in the ovary during post-vitellogenesis have received far less attention. Methods Nylon microarrays displaying 9152 rainbow trout cDNAs were hybridized using RNA samples originating from ovarian tissue collected during late vitellogenesis, post-vitellogenesis and oocyte maturation. Differentially expressed genes were identified using a statistical analysis. A supervised clustering analysis was performed using only differentially expressed genes in order to identify gene clusters exhibiting similar expression profiles. In addition, specific genes were selected and their preovulatory ovarian expression was analyzed using real-time PCR. Results From the statistical analysis, 310 differentially expressed genes were identified. Among those genes, 90 were up-regulated at the time of oocyte maturation while 220 exhibited an opposite pattern. After clustering analysis, 90 clones belonging to 3 gene clusters exhibiting the most remarkable expression patterns were kept for further analysis. Using real-time PCR analysis, we observed a strong up-regulation of ion and water transport genes such as aquaporin 4 (aqp4) and pendrin (slc26). In addition, a dramatic up-regulation of vasotocin (avt) gene was observed. Furthermore, angiotensin-converting-enzyme 2 (ace2), coagulation factor V (cf5), adam 22, and the chemokine cxcl14 genes exhibited a sharp up-regulation at the time of oocyte maturation. Finally, ovarian aromatase (cyp19a1) exhibited a dramatic down-regulation over the post-vitellogenic period while a down-regulation of Cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (cmah) was observed at the time of oocyte maturation. Conclusion We showed the over or under expression of more that 300 genes, most of them being previously unstudied or unknown in the

  5. Atrazine and malathion shorten the maturation process of Xenopus laevis oocytes and have an adverse effect on early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qichao; Lee, Jessica; Lin, Yu-Huey; Jing, Guihua; Tsai, L Jillianne; Chen, Andrew; Hetrick, Lindsay; Jocoy, Dylan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-04-01

    The use of pesticides has a negative impact on the environment. Amphibians have long been regarded as indicator species to pollutants due to their permeable skin and sensitivity to the environment. Studies have shown that population declines of some amphibians are directly linked with exposure to agricultural contaminants. In the past, much of the studies have focused on the toxic effect of contaminants on larvae (tadpoles), juvenile and adult frogs. However, due to the nature of their life cycle, amphibian eggs and early embryos are especially susceptible to the contaminants, and any alteration during the early reproductive stages may have a profound effect on the health and population of amphibians. In this study, we analyzed the effect of atrazine and malathion, two commonly used pesticides, on Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis. We found that both atrazine and malathion shortened the frog oocyte maturation process and resulted in reduced Emi2 levels at cytostatic factor-mediated metaphase arrest, and a high level of Emi2 is critically important for oocyte maturation. Furthermore, frog embryos fertilized under the influence of atrazine and/or malathion displayed a higher rate of abnormal division that eventually led to embryo death during early embryogenesis.

  6. Theoretical study of catalytic efficiency of a Diels-Alderase catalytic antibody: an indirect effect produced during the maturation process.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Silla, Estanislao; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most important and versatile transformations available to organic chemists for the construction of complex natural products, therapeutics agents, and synthetic materials. Given the lack of efficient enzymes capable of catalyzing this kind of reaction, it is of interest to ask whether a biological catalyst could be designed from an antibody-combining site. In the present work, a theoretical study of the different behavior of a germline catalytic antibody (CA) and its matured form, 39 A-11, that catalyze a Diels-Alder reaction has been carried out. A free-energy perturbation technique based on a hybrid quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics scheme, together with internal energy minimizations, has allowed free-energy profiles to be obtained for both CAs. The profiles show a smaller barrier for the matured form, which is in agreement with the experimental observation. Free-energy profiles were obtained with this methodology, thereby avoiding the much more demanding two-dimensional calculations of the energy surfaces that are normally required to study this kind of reaction. Structural analysis and energy evaluations of substrate-protein interactions have been performed from averaged structures, which allows understanding of how the single mutations carried out during the maturation process can be responsible for the observed fourfold enhancement of the catalytic rate constant. The conclusion is that the mutation effect in this studied germline CA produces a complex indirect effect through coupled movements of the backbone of the protein and the substrate.

  7. Mature clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats RNA (crRNA) length is measured by a ruler mechanism anchored at the precursor processing site.

    PubMed

    Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Maniv, Inbal; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2011-12-27

    Precise RNA processing is fundamental to all small RNA-mediated interference pathways. In prokaryotes, clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci encode small CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that protect against invasive genetic elements by antisense targeting. CRISPR loci are transcribed as a long precursor that is cleaved within repeat sequences by CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. In many organisms, this primary processing generates crRNA intermediates that are subject to additional nucleolytic trimming to render mature crRNAs of specific lengths. The molecular mechanisms underlying this maturation event remain poorly understood. Here, we defined the genetic requirements for crRNA primary processing and maturation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. We show that changes in the position of the primary processing site result in extended or diminished maturation to generate mature crRNAs of constant length. These results indicate that crRNA maturation occurs by a ruler mechanism anchored at the primary processing site. We also show that maturation is mediated by specific cas genes distinct from those genes involved in primary processing, showing that this event is directed by CRISPR/Cas loci.

  8. Seafood-Processing Sludge Composting: Changes to Microbial Communities and Physico-Chemical Parameters of Static Treatment versus for Turning during the Maturation Stage

    PubMed Central

    Alves, David; Mato, Salustiano

    2016-01-01

    In general, in composting facilities the active, or intensive, stage of the process is done separately from the maturation stage, using a specific technology and time. The pre-composted material to be matured can contain enough biodegradable substrates to cause microbial proliferation, which in turn can cause temperatures to increase. Therefore, not controlling the maturation period during waste management at an industrial level can result in undesired outcomes. The main hypothesis of this study is that controlling the maturation stage through turning provides one with an optimized process when compared to the static approach. The waste used was sludge from a seafood-processing plant, mixed with shredded wood (1:2, v/v). The composting system consists of an intensive stage in a 600L static reactor, followed by maturation in triplicate in 200L boxes for 112 days. Two tests were carried out with the same process in reactor and different treatments in boxes: static maturation and turning during maturation when the temperature went above 55°C. PLFAs, organic matter, pH, electrical conductivity, forms of nitrogen and carbon, hydrolytic enzymes and respiratory activity were periodically measured. Turning significantly increased the duration of the thermophilic phase and consequently increased the organic-matter degradation. PCA differentiated significantly the two treatments in function of tracking parameters, especially pH, total carbon, forms of nitrogen and C/N ratio. So, stability and maturity optimum values for compost were achieved in less time with turnings. Whereas turning resulted in microbial-group stabilization and a low mono/sat ratio, static treatment produced greater variability in microbial groups and a high mono/sat ratio, the presence of more degradable substrates causes changes in microbial communities and their study during maturation gives an approach of the state of organic-matter degradation. Obtaining quality compost and optimizing the composting

  9. Changes in esculeoside A content in different regions of the tomato fruit during maturation and heat processing.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Akiko; Kimura, Mizuki; Saigo, Hiromi; Aburaya, Kei; Nakano, Masako; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Nagai, Ryoji

    2011-04-27

    We previously demonstrated that esculeogenin A, a new aglycone of the tomato sapogenol esculeoside A, inhibits both acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT)-1 and -2 and ameliorates the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in apoE deficient mice. Although we believe that daily intake of esculeoside A from tomato products can play a beneficial role in preventing the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the compound is not being used for preventive medicine due to the lack of information on methods for quantitative analysis and the content and stability of the compound in tomato products. In the present study, we report the development of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an instrument equipped with a refractive index (RI) detector for esculeoside A quantification. We used this method to measure the changes in esculeoside A content during maturation, its distribution in the fruit body, and its stability during the heating process. The contents of esculeoside A in cherry tomatoes and Momotaro tomatoes were 21- and 9-fold, respectively, higher than that of lycopene, which is the most well-known compound in tomatoes. Furthermore, the esculeoside A content in pericarp wall was higher than in the whole tomato fruit and increased in a time-dependent manner during maturation. Although the melting point of purified esculeoside A was 225 °C, the esculeoside A in crude tomato extract decreased in a temperature-dependent manner. Degradation due to the heating process was inhibited under a pH of 9. These results demonstrated that the esculeoside A content differs in the various types of tomatoes, during maturation, and during the heating process used for preservation.

  10. Large scale affinity calculations of cyclodextrin host-guest complexes: Understanding the role of reorganization in the molecular recognition process

    PubMed Central

    Wickstrom, Lauren; He, Peng; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    Host-guest inclusion complexes are useful models for understanding the structural and energetic aspects of molecular recognition. Due to their small size relative to much larger protein-ligand complexes, converged results can be obtained rapidly for these systems thus offering the opportunity to more reliably study fundamental aspects of the thermodynamics of binding. In this work, we have performed a large scale binding affinity survey of 57 β-cyclodextrin (CD) host guest systems using the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) with implicit solvation (OPLS-AA/AGBNP2). Converged estimates of the standard binding free energies are obtained for these systems by employing techniques such as parallel Hamitionian replica exchange molecular dynamics, conformational reservoirs and multistate free energy estimators. Good agreement with experimental measurements is obtained in terms of both numerical accuracy and affinity rankings. Overall, average effective binding energies reproduce affinity rank ordering better than the calculated binding affinities, even though calculated binding free energies, which account for effects such as conformational strain and entropy loss upon binding, provide lower root mean square errors when compared to measurements. Interestingly, we find that binding free energies are superior rank order predictors for a large subset containing the most flexible guests. The results indicate that, while challenging, accurate modeling of reorganization effects can lead to ligand design models of superior predictive power for rank ordering relative to models based only on ligand-receptor interaction energies. PMID:25147485

  11. Maturation of Visual and Auditory Temporal Processing in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Piers; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine development of sensitivity to auditory and visual temporal processes in children and the association with standardized measures of auditory processing and communication. Methods: Normative data on tests of visual and auditory processing were collected on 18 adults and 98 children aged 6-10 years of age. Auditory processes…

  12. The Drosophila chromosomal protein Mst77F is processed to generate an essential component of mature sperm chromatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In most animals, the bulk of sperm DNA is packaged with sperm nuclear basic proteins (SNBPs), a diverse group of highly basic chromosomal proteins notably comprising mammalian protamines. The replacement of histones with SNBPs during spermiogenesis allows sperm DNA to reach an extreme level of compaction, but little is known about how SNBPs actually function in vivo. Mst77F is a Drosophila SNBP with unique DNA condensation properties in vitro, but its role during spermiogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that Mst77F is required for the compaction of sperm DNA and the production of mature sperm, through its cooperation with protamine-like proteins Mst35Ba/b. We demonstrate that Mst77F is incorporated in spermatid chromatin as a precursor protein, which is subsequently processed through the proteolysis of its N-terminus. The cleavage of Mst77F is very similar to the processing of protamine P2 during human spermiogenesis and notably leaves the cysteine residues in the mature protein intact, suggesting that they participate in the formation of disulfide cross-links. Despite the rapid evolution of SNBPs, sperm chromatin condensation thus involves remarkably convergent mechanisms in distantly related animals. PMID:27810970

  13. Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase: cell-specific processing and altered maturation in HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Francí, C; Egea, G; Arribas, R; Reuser, A J; Real, F X

    1996-01-01

    We have previously described the abnormal localization of resident Golgi proteins and O-glycans in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of mucin-secreting HT-29 M6 colon cancer cells, suggesting altered protein trafficking in these cells [Egea, Francí, Gambús, Lesuffleur, Zweibaum and Real (1993) J. Cell Sci. 105, 819-830]. In the present work, we have chosen lysosomal alpha-glucosidase as a reporter to examine the intracellular traffic of glycoproteins in M6 cells. We have compared the synthesis and processing of alpha-glucosidase in mucin-secreting M6 cells and in Caco-2 colon cancer cells, the latter resembling normal absorptive intestinal epithelium. Our results show that alpha-glucosidase processing and secretion is markedly delayed in M6 cells as compared to Caco-2 cells or normal fibroblasts, and this delay is caused by an accumulation of alpha-glucosidase precursor form in the trans-Golgi network. Furthermore, treatment in Caco-2 cells with brefeldin A led to changes in alpha-glucosidase maturation similar to those observed in untreated M6 cells. To determine whether altered processing occurs in other cultured cells, a panel of cancer cell lines and cultures from normal exocrine pancreas were examined. In pancreas-derived cultures, alpha-glucosidase showed a processing pattern different from that described until now. Only HT-29 cells and HT-29-derived subpopulations displayed a defect in alpha-glucosidase maturation. In conclusion, alpha-glucosidase processing is more diverse than has previously been described; this finding may have tissue-specific functional implications. PMID:8660303

  14. Holistic Face Processing Is Mature at 4 Years of Age: Evidence from the Composite Face Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Heering, Adelaide; Houthuys, Sarah; Rossion, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Although it is acknowledged that adults integrate features into a representation of the whole face, there is still some disagreement about the onset and developmental course of holistic face processing. We tested adults and children from 4 to 6 years of age with the same paradigm measuring holistic face processing through an adaptation of the…

  15. Profibrillin-1 Maturation by Human Dermal Fibroblasts: Proteolytic Processing and Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Debra D.; Putnam, Elizabeth A.; Cretoiu, Jill S.; Carmical, Sonya G.; Cao, Shi-Nian; Thomas, Gary; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2006-01-01

    Fibrillin-1 is synthesized as a proprotein that undergoes proteolytic processing in the unique C-terminal domain by a member of the PACE/furin family of endoproteases. This family of endoproteases is active in the trans-Golgi network (TGN), but metabolic labeling studies have been controversial as to whether profibrillin-1 is processed intracellularly or after secretion. This report provides evidence that profibrillin-1 processing is not an intracellular event. Bafilomycin A1 and incubation of dermal fibroblasts at 22°C were used to block secretion in the TGN to confirm that profibrillin-1 processing did not occur in this compartment. Profibrillin-1 immunoprecipitation studies revealed that two endoplasmic reticulum-resident molecular chaperones, BiP and GRP94, interacted with profibrillin-1. To determine the proprotein convertase responsible for processing profibrillin-1, a specific inhibitor of furin, α-1-antitrypsin, Portland variant, was both expressed in the cells and added to cells exogenously. In both cases, the inhibitor blocked the processing of profibrillin-1, providing evidence that furin is the enzyme responsible for profibrillin-1 processing. These studies delineate the secretion and proteolytic processing of profibrillin-1, and identify the proteins that interact with profibrillin-1 in the secretory pathway. PMID:14523997

  16. Maturation of Rapid Auditory Temporal Processing and Subsequent Nonword Repetition Performance in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Allison M.; Reid, Corinne L.; Anderson, Mike; Richardson, Cassandra; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2012-01-01

    According to the rapid auditory processing theory, the ability to parse incoming auditory information underpins learning of oral and written language. There is wide variation in this low-level perceptual ability, which appears to follow a protracted developmental course. We studied the development of rapid auditory processing using event-related…

  17. Can bovine in vitro-matured oocytes selectively process X- or Y-sorted sperm differentially?

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, P; Rizos, D; Rath, D; Lonergan, P; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2008-10-01

    It has been reported that the mammalian female could have a preconceptual influence on the sex of her offspring, and it has been hypothesized that this influence could go some way toward accounting for the reported lower fertility following insemination with sex-sorted sperm. To test whether in vitro matured oocytes are able to select X- or Y-bearing spermatozoa following in vitro fertilization (IVF), we fertilized in vitro 1788 oocytes with X-sorted semen, Y-sorted semen, a mix of X- and Y-sorted semen, and unsorted semen from the same bull, and cultured until Day 9. Fertility was assessed by recording cleavage rate at 48 h postinsemination (hpi) and blastocyst development until Day 9. Embryos were sexed at the two- to four-cell stage and the blastocyst stage. The proportion of zygotes cleaving at 48 hpi was not different between X- and Y-sorted groups and the mix of X- and Y-sorted semen group; however, all were significantly lower than the unsorted group (P < 0.001). Blastocyst yield on Day 6 was significantly higher (P < or = 0.01) in the control group compared with the rest of the groups. Cumulative blastocyst yields on Days 7, 8, and 9 were also significantly higher (P < or = 0.01) in the unsorted group compared with the sorted groups. The proportion of female and male two- to four-cell embryos obtained following IVF with X- and Y-sorted sperm was 88% and 89%, respectively and the sex ratio at the two- to four-cell stage was not different following IVF with unsorted or sorted/recombined sperm (56.9% males vs. 57% males, respectively). At the blastocyst stage, similar percentages were obtained. In conclusion, the differences in cleavage and blastocyst development using sorted versus unsorted sperm are not due to the oocyte preferentially selecting sperm of one sex over another, but are more likely due to spermatic damage caused by the sorting procedure.

  18. Change in location and processing of inhibin alpha-subunit precursors during sexual maturation of the Djungarian hamster testis.

    PubMed

    Tuohimaa, P; Bläuer, M; Bergmann, M; Aumüller, G

    1993-02-01

    Immunohistochemical location and immunoblot of inhibin alpha-subunit peptides were analyzed in the testis of the Djungarian hamster from days 0-31 of postnatal development using a specific antibody. An intense immunoreaction was observed in the centrally located T1 prespermatogonia at day 0. The staining intensity decreased gradually in the spermatogonia when they make contact with the basal lamina at days 8-10. At days 13 and 15 there is no staining. Thereafter the immunoreactivity in Sertoli cells as well as in A spermatogonia gradually increased, being highest in sexually mature animals. The intensity of alpha-subunit staining in the seminiferous tubules was stage specific, being strongest at stages III and IV. Immunoblot analysis of testis homogenates with the anti-INH alpha 1-32 antibody showed several bands: 88K, 80K, and 43K in immature hamster testis (0-, 2-, 6-, 8-, or 10-day-old). In the adult hamster (31-day-old) 88K, 80K, 28K, and 20K bands were seen, but no 43K band. Dimeric inhibin was not detected. The 43-44K band most likely corresponds to the pro-alpha N alpha C, the 28K band to intermediate forms between alpha N alpha C and alpha C (alpha I alpha C), and the 20K band to mature alpha-subunit (alpha C). The shift from the immature pattern to mature occurs at about 20 days of age. Freezing of the samples was deleterious to alpha C, since it could be detected only in freshly homogenized samples. The results suggest that prespermatogonia produce predominantly monomeric alpha-subunit precursor pro-alpha N alpha C, whereas the mature Sertoli cells as well as A spermatogonia contain mainly monomeric alpha I alpha C. The alpha-inhibin precursors may act as auto-/paracrine regulators of spermatogenesis. Our results suggest that different alpha-subunit precursors, pro-alpha N alpha C and alpha I alpha C, might be involved in the differentiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis, respectively. The posttranslational processing of alpha-subunit precursors

  19. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  20. Role of ovarian theca and granulosa cell interaction in hormone productionand cell growth during the bovine follicular maturation process.

    PubMed

    Yada, H; Hosokawa, K; Tajima, K; Hasegawa, Y; Kotsuji, F

    1999-12-01

    We have investigated the possible role of theca and granulosa cell interaction in the control of the hormone-producing activity and growth of granulosa and theca cells during bovine ovarian follicular development, using a coculture system in which granulosa and theca cells were grown on opposite sides of a collagen membrane. When follicular cells were isolated from small follicles (3-5 mm), theca cells reduced estradiol, progesterone, and inhibin production by granulosa cells to 14 +/- 5%, 64 +/- 6%, and 27 +/- 4%, respectively, of the production by granulosa cells cultured alone. On the other hand, when the cells were isolated from large follicles (15-18 mm), theca cells increased these levels to 253 +/- 34%, 156 +/- 24%, and 287 +/- 45%, respectively. Theca cells did not affect the growth of granulosa cells. Androstenedione production by theca cells was augmented by granulosa cells to 861 +/- 190% (in small follicles) and 1298 +/- 414% (in large follicles), respectively. The growth of theca cells was also augmented by granulosa cells (small follicle, 210 +/- 43%, and large follicle, 194 +/- 24%, respectively). These results indicate that theca cells secrete factor(s) inhibiting the differentiation of immature while promoting that of matured granulosa cells; they also suggest that granulosa cells secrete factor(s) promoting both the differentiation and growth of theca cells throughout the follicular maturation process.

  1. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry Ih. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  2. Long-term performance and microbial ecology of a two-stage PN-ANAMMOX process treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Li, Huosheng; Zhou, Shaoqi; Ma, Weihao; Huang, Pengfei; Huang, Guotao; Qin, Yujie; Xu, Bin; Ouyang, Hai

    2014-05-01

    Long-term performance of a two-stage partial nitritation (PN)-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process treating mature landfill leachate was investigated. Stable partial nitritation performance was achieved in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using endpoint pH control, providing an effluent with a ratio of NO2(-)-N/NH4(+)-N at 1.23 ± 0.23. High rate nitrogen removal over 4 kg N/m(3)/d was observed in the ANAMMOX reactor in the first three months. However, during long-term operation, the ANAMMOX reactor can only stably operate under nitrogen load of 1 kg N/m(3)/d, with 85 ± 1% of nitrogen removal. The ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the PN-SBR were mainly affiliated to Nitrosomonas sp. IWT514, Nitrosomonas eutropha and Nitrosomonas eutropha, the anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) in the ANAMMOX reactor were mainly affiliated to Kuenenia stuttgartiensis.

  3. In situ Observation of Formation Process of Negative Electron Affinity Surface of GaAs by Surface Photo-Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Kazuya; Nishitani, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Katsunari; Imai, Hironobu; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Namba, Daiki; Meguro, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    We have used surface photo-absorption (SPA) to investigate the formation of negative electron affinity (NEA) surfaces on p-GaAs during the Yo-Yo method, under an alternating supply of Cs and O2. The SPA spectra showed that the surface during the first Cs step was different from those in the following Cs and O2 steps. This suggests that the surface structure did not change after the initial surface was formed, indicating that there could be two Cs adsorption sites on the GaAs surface, which is different from previously proposed models.

  4. Mature landfill leachate treatment by coagulation/flocculation combined with Fenton and solar photo-Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Amor, Carlos; De Torres-Socías, Estefanía; Peres, José A; Maldonado, Manuel I; Oller, Isabel; Malato, Sixto; Lucas, Marco S

    2015-04-09

    This work reports the treatment of a mature landfill leachate through the application of chemical-based treatment processes in order to achieve the discharge legal limits into natural water courses. Firstly, the effect of coagulation/flocculation with different chemicals was studied, evaluating the role of different initial pH and chemicals concentration. Afterwards, the efficiency of two different advanced oxidation processes for leachate remediation was assessed. Fenton and solar photo-Fenton processes were applied alone and in combination with a coagulation/flocculation pre-treatment. This physicochemical conditioning step, with 2 g L(-1) of FeCl3 · 6H2O at pH 5, allowed removing 63% of COD, 80% of turbidity and 74% of total polyphenols. Combining the coagulation/flocculation pre-treatment with Fenton reagent, it was possible to reach 89% of COD removal in 96 h. Moreover, coagulation/flocculation combined with solar photo-Fenton revealed higher DOC (75%) reductions than single solar photo-Fenton (54%). In the combined treatment (coagulation/flocculation and solar photo-Fenton), it was reached a DOC reduction of 50% after the chemical oxidation, with 110 kJ L(-1) of accumulated UV energy and a H2O2 consumption of 116 mM. Toxicity and biodegradability assays were performed to evaluate possible variations along the oxidation processes. After the combined treatment, the leachate under study presented non-toxicity but biodegradability increased.

  5. [Lipid- and protein-degrading processes during the maturation of ham].

    PubMed

    López Bote, C; Córdoba, J J; Antequera, T

    1993-02-01

    In the present work we review the main degradative pathways for lipids and proteins along the ripening of dry cured hams, with special emphasis on Iberian pig hams. Maximum proteolytic activity is found around the first stages (salting) and specially at the dryer. Lipolytic activity seems to be also higher in this stage. During the steps that follow the post-salting period the oxidation seems to be activated. The products from proteolytic and lipolytic processes might react among each other during the final steps in the cellar.

  6. Co-Optimization of CO2-EOR and Storage Processes in Mature Oil Reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Ampomah, William; Balch, Robert S.; Grigg, Reid B.; ...

    2016-08-02

    This article presents an optimization methodology for CO2 enhanced oil recovery in partially depleted reservoirs. A field-scale compositional reservoir flow model was developed for assessing the performance history of an active CO2 flood and for optimizing both oil production and CO2 storage in the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Ochiltree County, Texas. A geological framework model constructed from geophysical, geological, and engineering data acquired from the FWU was the basis for all reservoir simulations and the optimization method. An equation of state was calibrated with laboratory fluid analyses and subsequently used to predict the thermodynamic minimum miscible pressure (MMP). Initial history calibrationsmore » of primary, secondary and tertiary recovery were conducted as the basis for the study. After a good match was achieved, an optimization approach consisting of a proxy or surrogate model was constructed with a polynomial response surface method (PRSM). The PRSM utilized an objective function that maximized both oil recovery and CO2 storage. Experimental design was used to link uncertain parameters to the objective function. Control variables considered in this study included: water alternating gas cycle and ratio, production rates and bottom-hole pressure of injectors and producers. Other key parameters considered in the modeling process were CO2 purchase, gas recycle and addition of infill wells and/or patterns. The PRSM proxy model was ‘trained’ or calibrated with a series of training simulations. This involved an iterative process until the surrogate model reached a specific validation criterion. A sensitivity analysis was first conducted to ascertain which of these control variables to retain in the surrogate model. A genetic algorithm with a mixed-integer capability optimization approach was employed to determine the optimum developmental strategy to maximize both oil recovery and CO2 storage. The proxy model reduced the computational cost

  7. RRP1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene affecting rRNA processing and production of mature ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, G R; Hopper, A K

    1987-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ts351 had been shown to affect processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs (C. Andrew, A. K. Hopper, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Gen. Genet. 144:29-37, 1976). We showed that this strain contains two mutations leading to temperature-sensitive lethality. The rRNA-processing defect, however, is a result of only one of the two mutations. We designated the lesion responsible for the rRNA-processing defect rrp1 and showed that it is located on the right arm of chromosome IV either allelic to or tightly linked to mak21. This rrp1 lesion also results in hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics and a reduced 25S/18S rRNA ratio at semipermissive temperatures. We cloned the RRP1 gene and provide evidence that it encodes a moderately abundant mRNA which is in lower abundance and larger than most mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:3549696

  8. MicroRNA-155 controls affinity-based selection by protecting c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Rinako; Leyland, Rebecca; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Lu, Dong; Turner, Martin; Arbore, Giuseppina; Phan, Tri Giang; Brink, Robert; Vigorito, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The production of high-affinity antibodies by B cells is essential for pathogen clearance. Antibody affinity for antigen is increased through the affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). This is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation coupled with the acquisition of mutations and antigen-based positive selection, resulting in retention of the highest-affinity B cell clones. The posttranscriptional regulator microRNA-155 (miR-155) is critical for efficient affinity maturation and the maintenance of the GCs; however, the cellular and molecular mechanism by which miR-155 regulates GC responses is not well understood. Here, we utilized a miR-155 reporter mouse strain and showed that miR-155 is coexpressed with the proto-oncogene encoding c-MYC in positively selected B cells. Functionally, miR-155 protected positively selected c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis, allowing clonal expansion of this population, providing an explanation as to why Mir155 deletion impairs affinity maturation and promotes the premature collapse of GCs. We determined that miR-155 directly inhibits the Jumonji family member JARID2, which enhances B cell apoptosis when overexpressed, and thereby promotes GC B cell survival. Our findings also suggest that there is cooperation between c-MYC and miR-155 during the normal GC response, a cooperation that may explain how c-MYC and miR-155 can collaboratively function as oncogenes. PMID:26657861

  9. Residual effects of low oxygen storage of mature green fruit on ripening processes and ester biosynthesis during ripening in bananas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature green banana (Musa sapientum L. cv. Cavendish) fruit were stored in 0.5%, 2 %, or 21% O2 for 7 days at 20 °C before ripening was initiated by ethylene. Residual effects of low O2 storage in mature green fruit on ripening and ester biosynthesis in fruit were investigated during ripening period...

  10. Rapid maturation of voice and linguistic processing systems in preschool children: a near-infrared spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Takao; Ogata, Katsuya; Maekawa, Toshihiko; Ijichi, Ikue; Katagiri, Masatoshi; Mitsudo, Takako; Kamio, Yoko; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2013-12-01

    To better understand how voice and linguistic processing systems develop during the preschool years, changes in cerebral oxygenation were measured bilaterally from temporal areas using multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS was recorded while children listened to their mothers' voice (MV), an unfamiliar female voice (UV) and environmental sound (ES) stimuli. Twenty typical children (aged 3-6years) were divided into younger (Y) (n=10, male=5; aged 3-4.5years) and older (O) (n=10, male=5; aged 4.5-6years) groups. In the Y group, while MV stimuli significantly activated anterior temporal areas with a right predominance compared to ES stimuli, they significantly activated left mid-temporal areas compared to UV stimuli. These temporal activations were significantly higher in the Y group compared to the O group. Furthermore, only the O group exhibited significant habituation and gender differences in the left mid-temporal area during MV perception. These findings suggest that the right voice-related and the left language-related temporal areas already exist in the Y group, and that MV stimuli modulate these areas differently in the two age groups. Therefore, we conclude that a mother's voice plays an important role in the maturation of the voice and linguistic processing systems, particularly during the first half of the preschool-aged period. This role may decrease during the latter half of the preschool-aged period due to rapid development of these systems as children age.

  11. Folate content in faba beans (Vicia faba L.)-effects of cultivar, maturity stage, industrial processing, and bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hefni, Mohammed E; Shalaby, Mohamed T; Witthöft, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Faba beans are an important source of folate and commonly consumed in Egypt. This study examined the effects of Egyptian industrial food processing (e.g., canning and freezing), germination, cultivar, and maturity stages on folate content, with the aim to develop a candidate functional canned faba bean food with increased folate content. The folate content in four cultivars of green faba beans ranged from 110 to 130 μg 100 g(-1) fresh weight (535-620 μg 100 g(-1) dry matter [DM]), which was four- to sixfold higher than in dried seeds. Industrial canning of dried seeds resulted in significant folate losses of ∼20% (P = 0.004), while industrial freezing had no effect. Germination of faba beans increased the folate content by >40% (P < 0.0001). A novel industrial canning process involving pregermination of dried faba beans resulted in a net folate content of 194 μg 100 g(-1) DM, which is 52% more than in conventional canned beans. The consumption of green faba beans should be recommended, providing ∼120 μg dietary folate equivalents per 100 g/portion.

  12. A Single Aplysia Neurotrophin Mediates Synaptic Facilitation via Differentially Processed Isoforms Secreted as Mature or Precursor Forms

    PubMed Central

    Kassabov, Stefan R.; Choi, Yun-Beom; Karl, Kevin A.; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Bailey, Craig H.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurotrophins control the development and adult plasticity of the vertebrate nervous system. Failure to identify invertebrate neurotrophin orthologs, however, has precluded studies in invertebrate models, limiting understanding of fundamental aspects of neurotrophin biology and function. We identified a neurotrophin (ApNT) and Trk receptor (ApTrk) in the mollusk Aplysia and find they play a central role in learning related synaptic plasticity. ApNT increases the magnitude and lowers the threshold for induction of long-term facilitation and initiates the growth of new synaptic varicosities at the monosynaptic connection between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. Unlike vertebrate neurotrophins, ApNT has multiple coding exons and exerts distinct synaptic effects through differentially processed and secreted splice isoforms. Our findings demonstrate the existence of bona-fide neurotrophin signaling in invertebrates and reveal a novel, post-transcriptional mechanism, regulating neurotrophin processing and the release of pro- and mature neurotrophins which differentially modulate synaptic plasticity. PMID:23562154

  13. Gene expression programs during Brassica oleracea seed maturation, osmopriming, and germination are indicators of progression of the germination process and the stress tolerance level.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Yasutaka; Konings, Maurice C J M; Vorst, Oscar; van Houwelingen, Adele M M L; Stoopen, Geert M; Maliepaard, Chris A; Kodde, Jan; Bino, Raoul J; Groot, Steven P C; van der Geest, Apolonia H M

    2005-01-01

    During seed maturation and germination, major changes in physiological status, gene expression, and metabolic events take place. Using chlorophyll sorting, osmopriming, and different drying regimes, Brassica oleracea seed lots of different maturity, stress tolerance, and germination behavior were created. Through careful physiological analysis of these seed lots combined with gene expression analysis using a dedicated cDNA microarray, gene expression could be correlated to physiological processes that occurred within the seeds. In addition, gene expression was studied during early stages of seed germination, prior to radicle emergence, since very little detailed information of gene expression during this process is available. During seed maturation expression of many known seed maturation genes, such as late-embryogenesis abundant or storage-compound genes, was high. Notably, a small but distinct subgroup of the maturation genes was found to correlate to seed stress tolerance in osmoprimed and dried seeds. Expression of these genes rapidly declined during priming and/or germination in water. The majority of the genes on the microarray were up-regulated during osmopriming and during germination on water, confirming the hypothesis that during osmopriming, germination-related processes are initiated. Finally, a large group of genes was up-regulated during germination on water, but not during osmopriming. These represent genes that are specific to germination in water. Germination-related gene expression was found to be partially reversible by physiological treatments such as slow drying of osmoprimed seeds. This correlated to the ability of seeds to withstand stress.

  14. Efficient fabrication of high-capacity immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media: The role of the dextran-grafting process and its manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Jingfei; Huang, Yongdong; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Rongyue; Zhu, Kai; Suo, Jia; Su, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhigang; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-03-01

    Novel high-capacity Ni(2+) immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media were prepared through the dextran-grafting process. Dextran was grafted to an allyl-activated agarose-based matrix followed by functionalization for the immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic media. With elaborate regulation of the allylation degree, dextran was completely or partly grafted to agarose microspheres, namely, completely dextran-grafted agarose microspheres and partly dextran-grafted ones, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscope results demonstrated that a good adjustment of dextran-grafting degree was achieved, and dextran was distributed uniformly in whole completely dextran-grafted microspheres, while just distributed around the outside of the partly dextran-grafted ones. Flow hydrodynamic properties were improved greatly after the dextran-grafting process, and the flow velocity increased by about 30% compared with that of a commercial chromatographic medium (Ni Sepharose FF). A significant improvement of protein binding performance was also achieved by the dextran-grafting process, and partly dextran-grafted Ni(2+) chelating medium had a maximum binding capacity for His-tagged lactate dehydrogenase about 2.5 times higher than that of Ni Sepharose FF. The results indicated that this novel chromatographic medium is promising for applications in high-efficiency and large-scale protein purification.

  15. Toward Teacher Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickle, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The essence of teacher maturity can be synthesized into personal, professional, and process domains. Although overlapping, these categories add a multidimensional approach to the search for what is good in teaching and provide a model for professional development. (MT)

  16. Nutrient limitation on ecosystem productivity and processes of mature and old-growth subtropical forests in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; McGroddy, Megan E; Wen, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P) limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr) at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based) in foliage, litter (L) layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H) layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16-20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors). The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China.

  17. In-depth process understanding of RECOMBIVAX HB® maturation and potential epitope improvements with redox treatment: multifaceted biochemical and immunochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinjian; Towne, Victoria; Brown, Martha; Wang, Yang; Abraham, Dicky; Oswald, C Brent; Gimenez, Juan A; Washabaugh, Michael W; Kennedy, Ronald; Sitrin, Robert D

    2011-10-19

    Recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen virus-like particles (VLPs) produced in yeast undergo spontaneous maturation during the vaccine production process, and the biophysical characteristics of the particles with respect to maturation were described in Zhao et al. (2006) [13]. Here we report additional biochemical and immunochemical characterization by various techniques, including the use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that differ in their selectivity and conformation-sensitivity, for probing surface epitope structures. Crosslinking via interchain disulfide formation and binding of conformational specific antibodies in the mature particles were shown to be progressively enhanced. We show that redox-mediated VLP maturation is superior to heat-induced maturation in terms of generating VLPs which exhibit more complete crosslinking (>95%) and 2- to 3-fold higher antigenicity as defined by conformational antibodies. Therefore, the resulting VLPs from redox treatment resemble more closely their plasma-derived counterparts. The value of using multiple mAbs for probing surface epitopes was clearly demonstrated as different mAbs showed different degrees of sensitivity to the structural changes during HBsAg VLP maturation. The rapid, label-free technology of surface plasmon resonance performed at a single antigen concentration was shown to correlate well with a sandwich ELISA using parallel line analysis, currently implemented for product release and stability testing of RECOMBIVAX HB(®). Surface plasmon resonance offers both convenience and flexibility; multiple mAbs can be tested one at a time in the same set of experiments, providing a means to assess changes to individual epitopes. Taken together, these quantitative analytical tools enable more rapid, in-depth, and comprehensive process monitoring, process optimization, and assessment of product consistency and stability.

  18. Process for purification of monoclonal antibody expressed in transgenic Lemna plant extract using dextran-coated charcoal and hexamer peptide affinity resin.

    PubMed

    Naik, Amith D; Menegatti, Stefano; Reese, Hannah R; Gurgel, Patrick V; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2012-10-19

    The production of therapeutic proteins using transgenic plants offers several advantages, including low production cost, absence of human pathogens, presence of glycosylation mechanisms, and the ability to fold complex therapeutic proteins into their proper conformation. However, impurities such as phenolic compounds and pigments encountered during purification are quite different from those faced during purification from mammalian cell culture supernatants. This paper deals with the development of a pretreatment and affinity separation process for the purification of a monoclonal antibody from transgenic Lemna plant extract. A pretreatment step is described using dextran-coated charcoal for the removal of pigments and phenolic compounds without reducing the antibody concentration. Then, the peptide affinity ligand HWRGWV coupled to a commercial polymethacrylate resin is used for the capture and purification of MAb from the pretreated plant extract. The final yield and purity of the MAb obtained were 90% and 96% respectively. The performance of the hexamer peptide resin after the pretreatment step was found to be similar to that obtained with a commercial Protein A resin.

  19. Prenatal cocaine exposure and prolonged focus attention. Poor infant information processing ability or precocious maturation of attentional systems?

    PubMed

    Chiriboga, Claudia A; Starr, Denise; Kuhn, Louise; Wasserman, Gail A

    2009-01-01

    In experimental models, prenatal cocaine exposure has been found to perturb monoaminergic development of systems implicated in modulating attention. To determine whether prenatal cocaine exposure affects infant attention, we assessed visual recognition memory and focused attention during free play. We enrolled at birth 380 infants, 113 cocaine exposed, using multiple biomarkers to assess drug exposure. Behavior was videotaped and coded off-line for sustained looking time (i.e. focused attention), banging and intrusion. Prenatal cocaine exposure was not associated with visual recognition memory, but was significantly associated with longer sustained looking times (average focused attention) at ages 6 months (p = 0.02) and 12 months (p = 0.04) in analyses that adjusted for variables, including maternal intelligence, education, depressive scores and other exposures (alcohol, tobacco and marijuana). Cocaine-exposed infants at age 12 months also spent significantly less time in banging activity (p = 0.02) after adjusting for confounding variables. This finding was not explained through cocaine effects on motor development, neurological findings or time spent in focused attention. Prenatal cocaine exposure was significantly associated with longer periods of sustained looking or focused attention in infancy, a finding that could interpreted as a measure of poor processing efficiency, or alternatively as precocious maturation of attentional systems. Either interpretation has implications for later cognitive development. Lower banging activity among cocaine exposed was not explained through cocaine effects on motor development or neurological findings, suggesting that activity level itself is diminished in these infants. Whether focused attention findings impact long term development awaits further study.

  20. The Origin of Voluminous Dacite (vs. Andesite) at Mature, Thick Continental Arcs: A Reflection of Processes in the Deep Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    arc crust, but at melt fractions too low (≤15%) to permit efficient transport to the upper crust (Vigneresse and Tikoff, 1999). It is further proposed that the reason why dacite is so abundant at mature thick continental arcs (e.g., Altiplano-Puno complex) may be because mantle-derived basalts are primarily emplaced at similar depths (~30-40 km) in continental arc crustal columns. If so, in the central Andean arc, a depth of 30-40 km is within the middle dioritic crust (Graeber and Asch, 1999). Partial melts of hornblende diorite (vs. hornblende gabbro) are predicted to be dacitic (vs. andesitic) at melt fractions of 20-25%, which permits transport to the upper crust. It is therefore proposed that it is deep crustal processes that determine whether andesite or dacite is the most voluminous magma type emplaced into the upper crust and erupted at arcs.

  1. Effect of the maturation process of the olive fruit on the phenolic fraction of drupes and oils from Arbequina, Farga, and Morrut cultivars.

    PubMed

    Morelló, Jose-Ramón; Romero, Maria-Paz; Motilva, Maria-José

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of the work was to investigate the effect of the maturation process of the olive fruit on the phenolic fraction of drupes and oils from Arbequina, Farga, and Morrut cultivars. The level in the phenolic content of olive drupes declines rapidly during the black maturation phase. A general decreasing trend was observed too in the phenolic content of olive oils during the ripening process in the three varieties studied. Important differences in the high-performance liquid chromatography profile between varieties were observed. These included the presence of very low amounts of lignans in olive oils proceeding from the Morrut cultivar, and the presence of three peaks after elution of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA in the Farga and Morrut cultivars, which could be used as differentiating parameters. Sensory profile differences were observed between olive cultivars and due to the ripening process.

  2. Optimal model-based design of the twin-column CaptureSMB process improves capacity utilization and productivity in protein A affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Baur, Daniel; Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Multi-column chromatographic processes have recently been developed for protein A affinity chromatography to efficiently capture monoclonal antibodies from cell culture supernatant. In this work, the novel twin-column CaptureSMB process was compared to a batch capture process with dual loading flow rate to identify performance gains. As a case study, the isolation of a monoclonal antibody with the Amsphere JWT-203 protein A resin was investigated. Using model based optimization, both processes were optimized and compared over a wide range of operating conditions. A trade-off between productivity and capacity utilization was found, and the resulting pareto-curves showed that CaptureSMB dominates batch, except at very low productivity values. With a feed titer of 1.2 mg mL(-1) , CaptureSMB could reach a productivity of up to 19.5 mg mL(-1) h(-1) experimentally, while maintaining relatively high capacity utilization of 63.8%. On the other hand, at maximum capacity utilization of 95.5%, a productivity of 10.2 mg mL(-1) h(-1) could be reached. This corresponds to a performance improvement with respect batch operation of about 25% in capacity utilization and 40% in productivity, for given yield and purity. CaptureSMB therefore offers a greatly increased performance over batch capture.

  3. Processing of the L1 52/55k Protein by the Adenovirus Protease: a New Substrate and New Insights into Virion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Mangel, Walter F.; McGrath, William J.; Graziano, Vito; Flint, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Late in adenovirus assembly, the viral protease (AVP) becomes activated and cleaves multiple copies of three capsid and three core proteins. Proteolytic maturation is an absolute requirement to render the viral particle infectious. We show here that the L1 52/55k protein, which is present in empty capsids but not in mature virions and is required for genome packaging, is the seventh substrate for AVP. A new estimate on its copy number indicates that there are about 50 molecules of the L1 52/55k protein in the immature virus particle. Using a quasi-in vivo situation, i.e., the addition of recombinant AVP to mildly disrupted immature virus particles, we show that cleavage of L1 52/55k is DNA dependent, as is the cleavage of the other viral precursor proteins, and occurs at multiple sites, many not conforming to AVP consensus cleavage sites. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other capsid and core proteins, providing a mechanism for its removal during viral maturation. Our results support a model in which the role of L1 52/55k protein during assembly consists in tethering the viral core to the icosahedral shell and in which maturation proceeds simultaneously with packaging, before the viral particle is sealed. PMID:24227847

  4. T Cell Maturation Stage Prior to and During GMP Processing Informs on CAR T Cell Expansion in Patients.

    PubMed

    Klaver, Yarne; van Steenbergen, Sabine C L; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno; Lamers, Cor H J

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T cells were genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed toward carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) and used to treat patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In this study, we questioned whether the T cell maturation stage in the pre-infusion product affected CAIX CAR expression and function in vitro as well as in vivo CAR T cell numbers and expansion. During the 14 days expansion of CAR T cells prior to administration, we observed shifts from a predominant CD4 to a CD8 T cell phenotype and from a significant fraction of naïve to central effector T cells. Surface expression of the CAR was equally distributed among different T cell subsets and T cell maturation stages. During T cell culture days 14-18 (which covered patient treatment days 1-5), T cells demonstrated a decline in CAR expression level per cell irrespective of T cell maturation stage, although the proportion of CAR-positive T cells and CAR-mediated T cell effector functions remained similar for both CD4 and CD8 T cell populations. Notably, patients with a higher fraction of naïve CD8 T cells at baseline (prior to genetic modification) or central effector CD8 T cells at 2 weeks of CAR T cell culture demonstrated a higher fold expansion and absolute numbers of circulating CAR T cells at 1 month after start of therapy. We conclude that the T cell maturation stage prior to and during CAR T cell expansion culture is related to in vivo CAR T cell expansion.

  5. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in striped bass, Morone saxatilis: molecular characterization and processing during oocyte growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Williams, V N; Reading, B J; Hiramatsu, N; Amano, H; Glassbrook, N; Hara, A; Sullivan, C V

    2014-04-01

    The multiple vitellogenin (Vtg) system of striped bass, a perciform species spawning nearly neutrally buoyant eggs in freshwater, was investigated. Vitellogenin cDNA cloning, Western blotting of yolk proteins (YPs) using Vtg and YP type-specific antisera, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of the YPs revealed the complex mechanisms of yolk formation and maturation in this species. It was discovered that striped bass possesses a tripartite Vtg system (VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC) in which all three forms of Vtg make a substantial contribution to the yolk. The production of Vtg-derived YPs is generally similar to that described for other perciforms. However, novel amino-terminal labeling of oocyte YPs prior to MS/MS identified multiple alternative sites for cleavage of these proteins from their parent Vtg, revealing a YP mixture far more complex than reported previously. This approach also revealed that the major YP product of each form of striped bass Vtg, lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH), undergoes limited degradation to smaller polypeptides during oocyte maturation, unlike the case in marine fishes spawning buoyant eggs in which LvHAa undergoes extensive proteolysis to osmotically active free amino acids. These differences likely reflect the lesser need for hydration of pelagic eggs spawned in freshwater. The detailed characterization of Vtgs and their proteolytic fate(s) during oocyte growth and maturation establishes striped bass as a freshwater model for investigating teleost multiple Vtg systems.

  6. A Regulatory Network-Based Approach Dissects Late Maturation Processes Related to the Acquisition of Desiccation Tolerance and Longevity of Medicago truncatula Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Jerome; Lalanne, David; Pelletier, Sandra; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Righetti, Karima; Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Leprince, Olivier; Chatelain, Emilie; Vu, Benoit Ly; Gouzy, Jerome; Gamas, Pascal; Udvardi, Michael K.; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In seeds, desiccation tolerance (DT) and the ability to survive the dry state for prolonged periods of time (longevity) are two essential traits for seed quality that are consecutively acquired during maturation. Using transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling together with a conditional-dependent network of global transcription interactions, we dissected the maturation events from the end of seed filling to final maturation drying during the last 3 weeks of seed development in Medicago truncatula. The network revealed distinct coexpression modules related to the acquisition of DT, longevity, and pod abscission. The acquisition of DT and dormancy module was associated with abiotic stress response genes, including late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) genes. The longevity module was enriched in genes involved in RNA processing and translation. Concomitantly, LEA polypeptides accumulated, displaying an 18-d delayed accumulation compared with transcripts. During maturation, gulose and stachyose levels increased and correlated with longevity. A seed-specific network identified known and putative transcriptional regulators of DT, including ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE3 (MtABI3), MtABI4, MtABI5, and APETALA2/ ETHYLENE RESPONSE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN (AtAP2/EREBP) transcription factor as major hubs. These transcriptional activators were highly connected to LEA genes. Longevity genes were highly connected to two MtAP2/EREBP and two basic leucine zipper transcription factors. A heat shock factor was found at the transition of DT and longevity modules, connecting to both gene sets. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches of MtABI3 confirmed 80% of its predicted targets, thereby experimentally validating the network. This study captures the coordinated regulation of seed maturation and identifies distinct regulatory networks underlying the preparation for the dry and quiescent states. PMID:23929721

  7. A regulatory network-based approach dissects late maturation processes related to the acquisition of desiccation tolerance and longevity of Medicago truncatula seeds.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Jerome; Lalanne, David; Pelletier, Sandra; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Righetti, Karima; Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Leprince, Olivier; Chatelain, Emilie; Vu, Benoit Ly; Gouzy, Jerome; Gamas, Pascal; Udvardi, Michael K; Buitink, Julia

    2013-10-01

    In seeds, desiccation tolerance (DT) and the ability to survive the dry state for prolonged periods of time (longevity) are two essential traits for seed quality that are consecutively acquired during maturation. Using transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling together with a conditional-dependent network of global transcription interactions, we dissected the maturation events from the end of seed filling to final maturation drying during the last 3 weeks of seed development in Medicago truncatula. The network revealed distinct coexpression modules related to the acquisition of DT, longevity, and pod abscission. The acquisition of DT and dormancy module was associated with abiotic stress response genes, including late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) genes. The longevity module was enriched in genes involved in RNA processing and translation. Concomitantly, LEA polypeptides accumulated, displaying an 18-d delayed accumulation compared with transcripts. During maturation, gulose and stachyose levels increased and correlated with longevity. A seed-specific network identified known and putative transcriptional regulators of DT, including ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE3 (MtABI3), MtABI4, MtABI5, and APETALA2/ ETHYLENE RESPONSE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN (AtAP2/EREBP) transcription factor as major hubs. These transcriptional activators were highly connected to LEA genes. Longevity genes were highly connected to two MtAP2/EREBP and two basic leucine zipper transcription factors. A heat shock factor was found at the transition of DT and longevity modules, connecting to both gene sets. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches of MtABI3 confirmed 80% of its predicted targets, thereby experimentally validating the network. This study captures the coordinated regulation of seed maturation and identifies distinct regulatory networks underlying the preparation for the dry and quiescent states.

  8. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  9. Phagosome maturation: aging gracefully.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia V; Botelho, Roberto J; Grinstein, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Foreign particles and apoptotic bodies are eliminated from the body by phagocytic leucocytes. The initial stage of the elimination process is the internalization of the particles into a plasma membrane-derived vacuole known as the phagosome. Such nascent phagosomes, however, lack the ability to kill pathogens or to degrade the ingested targets. These properties are acquired during the course of phagosomal maturation, a complex sequence of reactions that result in drastic remodelling of the phagosomal membrane and contents. The determinants and consequences of the fusion and fission reactions that underlie phagosomal maturation are the topic of this review. PMID:12061891

  10. Effects of length of cut and mechanical processing on utilization of corn silage harvested at the black line stage of maturity by lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hara, Satoshi; Tanigawa, Tamako

    2010-04-01

    The effects of length of cut and mechanical processing on corn silage utilization by dairy cows were evaluated. Corn silage treatments were harvested at the black line stage of maturity and chopped at a theoretical length (TLC) of 9.5 mm without processing (Control) or at a TLC of 19 mm with processing at roller clearances of 1, 3, or 5 mm. Eight multiparous Holstein cows were assigned in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-day periods. Corn silage treatments were fed in diets containing 78.3% corn silage and 21.7% soybean meal (DM basis). Treatments had no significant effects on DMI, milk and 4% FCM production. The efficiency of converting DMI to FCM tended to be greater with processing at a roller clearance of 1 and 3 mm than at other clearances. Apparent total tract digestibility of starch tended to be lowest for cows fed control silage, and increased as roller clearance decreased. Ruminal ammonia concentrations in cows fed control silage were numerically higher than in cows fed proccesed silages. These results suggest that when corn silage is harvested at the black line of maturity, roller clearance should be 3 mm or less with a TLC of 19 mm.

  11. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  12. Picomolar affinity fibronectin domains engineered utilizing loop length diversity, recursive mutagenesis, and loop shuffling.

    PubMed

    Hackel, Benjamin J; Kapila, Atul; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-09-19

    The 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (Fn3) has been validated as an effective scaffold for molecular recognition. In the current work, it was desired to improve the robustness of selection of stable, high-affinity Fn3 domains. A yeast surface display library of Fn3 was created in which three solvent-exposed loops were diversified in terms of amino acid composition and loop length. The library was screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate binders to lysozyme. An affinity maturation scheme was developed to rapidly and broadly diversify populations of clones by random mutagenesis as well as homologous recombination-driven shuffling of mutagenized loops. The novel library and affinity maturation scheme combined to yield stable, monomeric Fn3 domains with 3 pM affinity for lysozyme. A secondary affinity maturation identified a stable 1.1 pM binder, the highest affinity yet reported for an Fn3 domain. In addition to extension of the affinity limit for this scaffold, the results demonstrate the ability to achieve high-affinity binding while preserving stability and the monomeric state. This library design and affinity maturation scheme is highly efficient, utilizing an initial diversity of 2x10(7) clones and screening only 1x10(8) mutants (totaled over all affinity maturation libraries). Analysis of intermediate populations revealed that loop length diversity, loop shuffling, and recursive mutagenesis of diverse populations are all critical components.

  13. Partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate using a pilot-scale continuous activated sludge process at low dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, YongYuan; Mirino, Markus W; Yuan, Yanlei

    2016-10-01

    Controlling of low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.1-0.5mg/L), a cost-effective strategy, was applied to a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic-oxic-anoxic process for partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate. High ammonium removal efficiency, stable nitrite accumulation rate and total nitrogen removal efficiency was higher than 95.0%, 90.0% and 66.4%, respectively, implying potential application of this process for nitrogen removal of mature landfill leachate. Efficient nitrite accumulation in the first oxic reactor depended on low DO conditions and sufficient alkalinity. However, operational limit was mainly decided by actual hydraulic retention time (AHRT) of the first oxic reactor and appeared with AHRT less than 13.9h under DO of 0.3-0.5mg/L. High-throughput sequencing analysis demonstrated significant change of bacterial diversity in the first oxic reactor after a long-term operation and dominant bacteria genus Nitrosomonas was shown to be responsible for NH4(+)-N removal and nitrite accumulation under low DO levels.

  14. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  15. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  16. New DAPI and FISH findings on egg maturation processes in related hybridogenetic and parthenogenetic Bacillus hybrids (Insecta, Phasmatodea).

    PubMed

    Marescalchi, O; Scali, V

    2001-10-01

    Bacillus stick insects have proved adequate for studying a wide array of reproductive modes: sexual, parthenogenetic, hybridogenetic, androgenetic. Hybridogenetic strains (B. rossius-grandii) were thought to discard the paternal "grandii" haploset during first meiotic division and keep the "rossius" hemiclone, whereas the clonal B. whitei (=rossius/grandii) would maintain its hybrid structure by fusing back two nonsister nuclei-each derived from previously segregated heterospecific complements-by the end of the 2(nd) meiotic division. New investigations on laid eggs and ovariole squashes, either DAPI stained or FISH labeled, revealed that in hybridogens the "grandii" set is excluded from the germ line prior to meiosis and that a DNA extra-synthesis should occur to produce hemiclonal eggs after two cytologically normal meiotic divisions. On the other hand, in B. whitei eggs no genome segregation appears to occur and an intrameiotic DNA extra-synthesis must take place to produce 2n tetrachromatidic oocytes I; these divide twice and give unreduced clonal eggs. The new findings bring hybridogenetic oogenesis of Bacillus to be coincident with that of the known hemiclonal organisms and point to an independent onset of B. whitei from hemiclonal strains. In addition, B. whitei gains a closer resemblance to B. lynceorum owing to the sharing of a cytologically identical egg maturation mechanism, of the same maternal ancestor and of peculiar chromosomal features. It is here suggested that B. lynceorum originated from the incorporation of an "atticus" genome into a B. whitei egg, according to a pathway of repeated hybridization often occurred with other polyploid hybrids.

  17. Synthesis of boronate-silica hybrid affinity monolith via a one-pot process for specific capture of glycoproteins at neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Mao, J; He, X W; Chen, L X; Zhang, Y K

    2013-08-01

    In this study, a boronate-silica hybrid affinity monolith was prepared for specific capture of glycoproteins at neutral pH condition. The monolith was synthesized via a facile one-pot procedure in a stainless steel column by concurrently mixing hydrolyzed alkoxysilanes tetramethoxysilane and vinyltrimethoxysilane, organic monomer 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid and initiator 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile together. The polycondensation of alkoxysilanes and copolymerization of organic monomer and vinyl-silica monolith were carried out successively by reacting at different temperatures. After optimizing the preparation conditions, the resulting hybrid affinity monolith was systematically characterized and exhibited excellent affinity to both cis-diol-containing small molecules and glycoproteins at neutral and physiological pH, including adenosine, horseradish peroxidase, transferrin and ovalbumin. The binding capacity of ovalbumin on monolith was measured to be 2.5 mg g(-1) at pH 7.0. Furthermore, the hybrid affinity monolith was applied to the separation of transferrin from bovine serum sample at a physiological condition. Good repeatability was obtained and the relative standard deviations of retention time were 1.15 and 4.77 % (n = 5) for run-to-run and column-to-column, respectively.

  18. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  19. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  20. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  1. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35−/− mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development of oligodendrocytes and myelination is essential for normal CNS function and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is critical for oligodendrocyte maturation, but how Cdk5 activity is controlled is unclear. Here we show that the coactivators of Cdk5, p35 and p39, regulate distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and myelination. Loss of p35 perturbs oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation, whereas loss of p39 delays oligodendrocyte maturation. Loss of both completely inhibits oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Disruption of oligodendrocyte development was more pronounced in p35−/−;p39

  2. Maturing Defense Support of Civil Authorities and the Dual Status Commander Arrangement Through the Lens of Process Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Dual Status Commander Arrangement Through the Lens of Process Improvement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...ARRANGEMENT THROUGH THE LENS OF PROCESS IMPROVEMENT Ryan Burke Sue McNeil April 2015 The views expressed in this report are those of the authors...the DSC- led response to Hurricane Sandy in New York. Using the data collected during the Sandy case study as a basis for analysis, the monograph

  3. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn; Miller, Robert H; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-09

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35(-/-) mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation.

  4. Treatment of nanofiltration concentrates of mature landfill leachate by a coupled process of coagulation and internal micro-electrolysis adding hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Chen, Jianjun; Xie, Zhengmiao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a coupled process of coagulation and aerated internal micro-electrolysis (IME) with the in situ addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated for the treatment of nanofiltration (NF) concentrate from mature landfill leachate. The acceptable operating conditions were determined as follows: initial pH 4, polymeric aluminium chloride dosage of 525 mg-Al2O3/L in the coagulation process, H2O2 dosage of 0.75 mM and an hydraulic retention time of 2 h in an aerated IME reactor. As a result, the removal efficiencies for chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon, UV254 and colour were 79.2%, 79.6%, 81.8% and 90.8%, respectively. In addition, the ratio of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD in the final effluent increased from 0.03 to 0.31, and that of E2/E4 from 12.4 to 38.5, respectively. The results indicate that the combined process is an effective and economical way to remove organic matters and to improve the biodegradability of the NF concentrate. Coagulation process reduces the adverse impact of high-molecular-weight organic matters such as humic acids, on the aerated IME process. A proper addition of H2O2 in the aerated IME can promote the corrosion of solid iron (Fe2+/Fe3+) and cause a likely domino effect in the enhancement of removal efficiencies.

  5. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same…

  6. Examining the process of de novo gene birth: an educational primer on "integration of new genes into cellular networks, and their structural maturation".

    PubMed

    Frietze, Seth; Leatherman, Judith

    2014-03-01

    New genes that arise from modification of the noncoding portion of a genome rather than being duplicated from parent genes are called de novo genes. These genes, identified by their brief evolution and lack of parent genes, provide an opportunity to study the timeframe in which emerging genes integrate into cellular networks, and how the characteristics of these genes change as they mature into bona fide genes. An article by G. Abrusán provides an opportunity to introduce students to fundamental concepts in evolutionary and comparative genetics and to provide a technical background by which to discuss systems biology approaches when studying the evolutionary process of gene birth. Basic background needed to understand the Abrusán study and details on comparative genomic concepts tailored for a classroom discussion are provided, including discussion questions and a supplemental exercise on navigating a genome database.

  7. The byssus of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha. I: Morphology and in situ protein processing during maturation.

    PubMed

    Rzepecki, L M; Waite, J H

    1993-10-01

    The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, owes its notoriety as a biofouler to its adhesive skills and opportunism. Adhesion by the adult mussel to hard substrata is mediated by a nonliving extracorporeal structure called the byssus, which is superficially similar to the byssus of marine mussels in that it consists of a tight bundle of sclerotized threads tipped by adhesive plaques. Juvenile zebra mussels secrete a homologous structure on settlement, but they also employ an elongated belaying byssus while climbing that consists of an elastic, mucous filament anchored at irregular intervals by a byssal thread and plaque. This multiply anchored belaying line can be 20 to 30 times the mussel length. Histochemical tests show that the thread and plaque of both kinds of byssus contains a complex distribution of proteins that are subject to chemical processing after secretion. This processing may result from the formation of crosslinks following the catecholoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of peptidyl 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine during sclerotization.

  8. Co-Optimization of CO2-EOR and Storage Processes in Mature Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ampomah, William; Balch, Robert S.; Grigg, Reid B.; McPherson, Brian; Will, Robert A.; Lee, Si-Yong; Dai, Zhenxue; Pan, Feng

    2016-08-02

    This article presents an optimization methodology for CO2 enhanced oil recovery in partially depleted reservoirs. A field-scale compositional reservoir flow model was developed for assessing the performance history of an active CO2 flood and for optimizing both oil production and CO2 storage in the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Ochiltree County, Texas. A geological framework model constructed from geophysical, geological, and engineering data acquired from the FWU was the basis for all reservoir simulations and the optimization method. An equation of state was calibrated with laboratory fluid analyses and subsequently used to predict the thermodynamic minimum miscible pressure (MMP). Initial history calibrations of primary, secondary and tertiary recovery were conducted as the basis for the study. After a good match was achieved, an optimization approach consisting of a proxy or surrogate model was constructed with a polynomial response surface method (PRSM). The PRSM utilized an objective function that maximized both oil recovery and CO2 storage. Experimental design was used to link uncertain parameters to the objective function. Control variables considered in this study included: water alternating gas cycle and ratio, production rates and bottom-hole pressure of injectors and producers. Other key parameters considered in the modeling process were CO2 purchase, gas recycle and addition of infill wells and/or patterns. The PRSM proxy model was ‘trained’ or calibrated with a series of training simulations. This involved an iterative process until the surrogate model reached a specific validation criterion. A sensitivity analysis was first conducted to ascertain which of these control variables to retain in the surrogate model. A genetic algorithm with a mixed-integer capability optimization approach was employed to determine the optimum developmental strategy to maximize both oil recovery and CO2

  9. The Cutting Edge of Affinity Electrophoresis Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is an important technique that is widely used to separate and analyze biomolecules in the fields of biology and medicine. Both quantitative and qualitative information can be gained through affinity electrophoresis. Affinity electrophoresis can be applied through a variety of strategies, such as mobility shift electrophoresis, charge shift electrophoresis or capillary affinity electrophoresis. These strategies are based on changes in the electrophoretic patterns of biological macromolecules that result from interactions or complex-formation processes that induce changes in the size or total charge of the molecules. Nucleic acid fragments can be characterized through their affinity to other molecules, for example transcriptional factor proteins. Hydrophobic membrane proteins can be identified by means of a shift in the mobility induced by a charged detergent. The various strategies have also been used in the estimation of association/disassociation constants. Some of these strategies have similarities to affinity chromatography, in that they use a probe or ligand immobilized on a supported matrix for electrophoresis. Such methods have recently contributed to profiling of major posttranslational modifications of proteins, such as glycosylation or phosphorylation. Here, we describe advances in analytical techniques involving affinity electrophoresis that have appeared during the last five years. PMID:28248262

  10. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  11. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis.

  12. How a CCA sequence protects mature tRNAs and tRNA precursors from action of the processing enzyme RNase BN/RNase Z.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Tanmay; Malhotra, Arun; Deutscher, Murray P

    2013-10-18

    In many organisms, 3' maturation of tRNAs is catalyzed by the endoribonuclease, RNase BN/RNase Z, which cleaves after the discriminator nucleotide to generate a substrate for addition of the universal CCA sequence. However, tRNAs or tRNA precursors that already contain a CCA sequence are not cleaved, thereby avoiding a futile cycle of removal and readdition of these essential residues. We show here that the adjacent C residues of the CCA sequence and an Arg residue within a highly conserved sequence motif in the channel leading to the RNase catalytic site are both required for the protective effect of the CCA sequence. When both of these determinants are present, CCA-containing RNAs in the channel are unable to move into the catalytic site; however, substitution of either of the C residues by A or U or mutation of Arg(274) to Ala allows RNA movement and catalysis to proceed. These data define a novel mechanism for how tRNAs are protected against the promiscuous action of a processing enzyme.

  13. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  14. Extraction of haemoglobin from human blood by affinity precipitation using a haptoglobin-based stimuli-responsive affinity macroligand.

    PubMed

    Stocker-Majd, Gisela; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-06-13

    Affinity precipitation was compared to affinity chromatography and batch adsorption as the final purification step in a protocol for the isolation of haemoglobin from human blood. Haptoglobin was the affinity ligand. The first steps on the process were realized by traditional methods (lyses of red blood cells followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation). For affinity chromatography (and batch adsorption) the ligand was linked to Sepharose, for affinity precipitation to a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Five haptoglobin-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bioconjugates (affinity macroligands) were constructed with different polymer: haptoglobin-coupling ratios. Conjugation of haptoglobin to the soluble poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) apparently does not change the interaction thermodynamics with haemoglobin, as the haemoglobin binding constants calculated by a Scatchard analysis for the affinity macroligand were of the same order of magnitude as those described in the literature for the haemoglobin-haptoglobin complex in solution. Two elution protocols were used for haemoglobin release from the various affinity materials, one at pH 2, the other with 5 M urea at pH 11. Both affinity chromatography and affinity precipitation yielded a pure haemoglobin of high quality. Compared to the affinity chromatography, affinity precipitation showed a significantly higher ligand efficiency (ratio of the experimental capacity to the theoretical one). The method thus makes better use of the expensive affinity ligands. As affinity precipitation only requires small temperature changes to bring about precipitation/redissolution of the affinity complexes and a centrifugation step for recovery of the precipitate, the method in addition has advantages in term of scalability and simplicity.

  15. Sexual maturation of female Saguinus oedipus oedipus

    SciTech Connect

    Tardif, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    This study is an examination of the process of female sexual maturation in the cotton-top tamarin, Saguinus oedipus oedipus, a South-American primate of the family, Callitrichidae. Two types of questions are addressed. The first question is whether the type of social grouping in which a young female lives affects the rate of her sexual maturation. Specifically, is there a difference between the maturation rate of a female housed with a strange adult male and a female housed with her natal group (i.e., her parents and various siblings). Second, the effect of sexual maturation on various social interactions is examined. Specifically are male-female interactions in mated pairs and mother-daughter interactions in natal groups changed by the sexual maturation of the young females. The mother's presence was not related to the daughter's maturation age. However, whether the natal group, as a whole, inhibited maturation, or unrelated males accelerated maturation, or both, remains unknown. Most of the behavioral interactions involving maturing females were unchanged by maturation. There was some indication that certain behaviors were affected by maturation, but only if a strange unrelated male was present.

  16. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  17. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie L; Pramparo, Tiziano; Winn, Mary E; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  18. Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number Anomalies in Autism Suggest Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  19. Ribosome maturation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Silengo, L; Altruda, F; Dotto, G P; Lacquaniti, F; Perlo, C; Turco, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1977-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that processing of ribosomal RNA is a late event in ribosome biogenesis. The precursor form of RNA is probably necessary to speed up the assembly of ribomal proteins. Newly formed ribosomal particles which have already entered polyribosomes differ from mature ribosomes not only in their RNA content but also in their susceptibility to unfolding in low Mg concentration and to RNase attack. Final maturation of new ribosomes is probably dependent on their functioning in protein synthesis. Thus only those ribosomes which have proven to be functional may be converted into stable cellular structures.

  20. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  1. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  2. An asparagines residue at the N-terminus affects the maturation process of low molecular weight glutenin subunits of wheat endosperm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) glutenin polymers are of two main types, high- (HMW-GS) and low- (LMW-GS) molecular weight subunits. The most common are the latter, based on the first amino acid of the mature sequence, are known as LMW-m and LMW-s types. They differ as a result of three extra amino acids (MET...

  3. The impact of water exchange rate and treatment processes on water-borne hormones in recirculation aquaculture systems containing sexually maturing Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A controlled seven-month study was conducted in six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS) to assess post-smolt Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) performance in relation to WRAS water exchange rate. Unexpectedly high numbers of precocious sexually mature fish were observed in all WRAS...

  4. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  5. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  6. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  7. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marcatili, Paolo; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10−6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models. PMID:27074145

  8. Nerve growth factor signal transduction in mature pig oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Althaus, H H; Hempel, R; Klöppner, S; Engel, J; Schmidt-Schultz, T; Kruska, L; Heumann, R

    1997-12-01

    It has previously been shown that nerve growth factor (NGF) is of functional significance for mature pig oligodendrocytes (OLs) in culture. The present data give evidence for the expression of TrkA, the so-called high-affinity NGF receptor, and of p75NTR, the so-called low-affinity NGF receptor. TrkA is upregulated during culturing, in contrast to the p75 receptor. Exposure of OLs to NGF induces an autophosphorylation of TrkA via its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. K-252a inhibits the TrkA autophosphorylation, which reduces the OL process formation to control levels. To the tyrosine-phosphorylated sites of TrkA several proteins, such as phospholipase C-gamma1, the adaptor protein SHC, the phosphotyrosine phosphatase SH-PTP2 (SYP) associate via their SH2 phosphotase SH-PTP2 domain. The association of SHC to TrkA is shown by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect evidence for a possible activation of PLC-gamma1 is given by an NGF-induced increase of oligodendroglial [Ca2+]i. Downstream from TrkA, a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, which includes Erk1 and Erk2, is operating. An in-gel myelin basic protein kinase assay revealed that NGF activates predominantly Erk1. Finally, it is shown that NGF stimulates expression of c-fos.

  9. [Adolescent brain maturation].

    PubMed

    Holzer, L; Halfon, O; Thoua, V

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in neuroscience has yielded major findings regarding brain maturation during adolescence. Unlike the body, which reaches adult size and morphology during this period, the adolescent brain is still maturing. The prefrontal cortex appears to be an important locus of maturational change subserving executive functions that may regulate emotional and motivational issues. The recent expansion of the adolescent period has increased the lag between the onset of emotional and motivational changes activated by puberty and the completion of cognitive development-the maturation of self-regulatory capacities and skills that are continuing to develop long after puberty has occurred. This "disconnect" predicts risk for a broad set of behavioral and emotional problems. Adolescence is a critical period for high-level cognitive functions such as socialization that rely on maturation of the prefrontal cortex. Intervention during the period of adolescent brain development provides opportunities and requires an interdisciplinary approach.

  10. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  11. Smooth affine shear tight frames: digitization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly discuss one of the recent developed directional multiscale representation systems: smooth affine shear tight frames. A directional wavelet tight frame is generated by isotropic dilations and translations of directional wavelet generators, while an affine shear tight frame is generated by anisotropic dilations, shears, and translations of shearlet generators. These two tight frames are actually connected in the sense that the affine shear tight frame can be obtained from a directional wavelet tight frame through subsampling. Consequently, an affine shear tight frame indeed has an underlying filter bank from the MRA structure of its associated directional wavelet tight frame. We call such filter banks affine shear filter banks, which can be designed completely in the frequency domain. We discuss the digitization of affine shear filter banks and their implementations: the forward and backward digital affine shear transforms. Redundancy rate and computational complexity of digital affine shear transforms are also investigated in this paper. Numerical experiments and comparisons in image/video processing show the advantages of digital affine shear transforms over many other state-of-art directional multiscale representation systems.

  12. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  13. MATURATION OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Macario, Alberto J. L.; de Macario, Everly Conway; Franceschi, Claudio; Celada, Franco

    1972-01-01

    We have cultivated lymph node microfragments from β-D-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) primed rabbits and have measured their secondary response directed towards the whole molecule (precipitating antibodies) and to a single determinant (activating antibodies) of the antigen. By decreasing the size of the fragments to 105 cells, we began to observe heterogeneity among identical cultures in terms of positivity of response, antibody specificity, and titers. The affinity of "early" activating antibodies was inversely proportional to the dose of challenge. While no maturation was seen in low and excessive challenge, in all cultures receiving intermediate doses the association constant was raised several orders of magnitude within periods of 20 days. The relevance of these data to the mechanism of affinity selection of antigen-sensitive cells is discussed. PMID:4557772

  14. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  15. Human oocyte maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coticchio, Giovanni; Dal-Canto, Mariabeatrice; Guglielmo, Maria-Cristina; Mignini-Renzini, Mario; Fadini, Rubens

    2012-01-01

    Oocytes from medium-sized antral follicles have already completed their growth phase and, if released from the follicular environment and cultured in vitro, are able to resume the meiotic process and mature. However, in vitro maturation (IVM) does not entirely support all the nuclear and cytoplasmic changes that occur physiologically as an effect of the ovulatory stimulus. Regardless, oocyte IVM is widely applied for the breeding of agriculturally important species. In assisted reproduction technology, IVM has been proposed as an alternative treatment to circumvent the drawbacks of standard ovarian stimulation regimens. Initially introduced to eliminate the risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome afflicting women presenting with polycystic ovaries, subsequently IVM has been suggested to represent an additional approach suitable also for normovulatory patients. So far, in children born from IVM cycles, no doubts of an increased incidence of congenital abnormalities have been raised. Many more births would be achieved if novel IVM systems, currently dominated by empiricism, could be conceived according to more physiological criteria. Recent findings shedding new light on the control of meiotic progression, the support of cumulus cells to the oocyte cellular reorganization occurring during maturation, and the modulation of the stimulus that promotes oocyte maturation downstream the mid-cycle gonadotropin signal are likely to provide crucial hints for the development of more efficient IVM systems.

  16. Miniature protein ligands for EVH1 domains: Interplay between affinity, specificity, and cell motility⊥

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Jennifer H.; Woronowicz, Kamil; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila; Schepartz, Alanna

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton power cell motility in contexts ranging from intracellular microbial pathogenesis to axon guidance. The Ena/VASP family proteins--Mena, VASP, and Evl--are believed to control cell motility by serving as a direct link between signaling events and the actin cytoskeleton. Our lab has previously reported a novel miniature protein, pGolemi, which binds with high affinity to the EVH1 domain of Mena (Mena1-112) but not to those of VASP (VASP1-115) or Evl (Evl1-115) and also causes an unusual defect in actin-driven L. monocytogenes motility. Here, we use scanning mutagenesis to examine the effects of single amino acid changes within pGolemi on EVH1 domain affinity and specificity, miniature protein secondary structure, and L. monocytogenes motility. The data suggest that pGolemi contains the expected aPP-like fold and binds Mena1-112 in a manner highly analogous to the proline-rich repeat region of L. monocytogenes ActA protein. Residues throughout pGolemi contribute to both EVH1 domain affinity and paralog specificity. Moreover, the affinities of pGolemi variants for Mena1-112 correlate with selectivity against the EVH1 domains of VASP and Evl. In L. monocytogenes motility assays, speed and speed variability correlate strongly with EVH1 paralog specificity, suggesting that the Ena/VASP paralogs do not play equivalent roles in the process of L. monocytogenes actin tail maturation. PMID:17973491

  17. Presenilin-1 Processing of ErbB4 in Fetal Type II Cells is Necessary for Control of Fetal Lung Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hoeing, Kristina; Zscheppang, Katja; Mujahid, Sana; Murray, Sandy; Volpe, MaryAnn V.; Dammann, Christiane E. L.; Nielsen, Heber C.

    2011-01-01

    Maturation of pulmonary fetal type II cells to initiate adequate surfactant production is crucial for postnatal respiratory function. Little is known about specific mechanisms of signal transduction controlling type II cell maturation. The ErbB4 receptor and its ligand neuregulin (NRG) are critical for lung development. ErbB4 is cleaved at the cell membrane by the γ-secretase enzyme complex whose active component is either presenilin-1 (PSEN-1) or presenilin-2. ErbB4 cleavage releases the 80 kDa intracellular domain (4ICD) which associates with chaperone proteins such as YAP (Yes associated protein) and translocates to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. We hypothesized that PSEN-1 and YAP have a development-specific expression in fetal type II cells and are important for ErbB4 signaling in surfactant production. In primary fetal mouse E16, E17, and E18 type II cells, PSEN-1 and YAP expression increased at E17 and E18 over E16. Subcellular fractionation showed a strong cytosolic and a weaker membrane location of both PSEN-1 and YAP. This was enhanced by NRG stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitations showed ErbB4 associated separately with PSEN-1 and with YAP. Their association, phosphorylation and co-localization were induced by NRG. Confocal immunofluorescence and nuclear fractionation confirmed these associations in a time-dependent manner after NRG stimulation. Primary ErbB4-deleted E17 type II cells were transfected with a mutant ErbB4 lacking the γ-secretase binding site. When compared to transfection with wild type ErbB4, the stimulatory effect of NRG on surfactant protein mRNA expression was lost. We conclude that PSEN-1 and YAP have crucial roles in ErbB4 signal transduction during type II cell maturation. PMID:21195117

  18. Camelid VHH affinity ligands enable separation of closely related biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Timothy M.; Wendeler, Michaela; Wang, Xiangyang; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interest in new and diverse classes of molecules such as recombinant toxins, enzymes, and blood factors continues to grow for use a biotherapeutics. Compared to monoclonal antibodies, these novel drugs typically lack a commercially available affinity chromatography option, which leads to greater process complexity, longer development timelines, and poor platformability. To date, for both monoclonal antibodies and novel molecules, affinity chromatography has been mostly reserved for separation of process‐related impurities such as host cell proteins and DNA. Reports of affinity purification of closely related product variants and modified forms are much rarer. In this work we describe custom affinity chromatography development using camelid VHH antibody fragments as "tunable" immunoaffinity ligands for separation of product‐related impurities. One example demonstrates high selectivity for a recombinant immunotoxin where no binding was observed for an undesired deamidated species. Also discussed is affinity purification of a coagulation factor through specific recognition of the gamma‐carboxylglutamic acid domain. PMID:27677057

  19. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  20. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  1. Sex Differences in a Causal Model of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Studied sex differences among high school students (N=318) in career development process to determine whether sex differences exist in way six independent variables interact in career maturity causal model of career maturity and to compare each variable's effect on career maturity. Results suggest significant sex differences consistent with…

  2. Histological analysis of the maturation of native and wound periderm in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Tuber.

    PubMed

    Sabba, Robert P; Lulai, Edward C

    2002-07-01

    guaiacol as a substrate. Peroxidase staining was strong in the phellogen walls of both immature and mature native periderm and we could not detect any differences in staining between them. Peroxidase staining was weak in the phellogen walls of immature wound periderm and was not detectably different in mature wound periderm. Peroxidase data imply that there are distinct differences between native and wound periderm, though our data do not indicate that changes in peroxidase activity are involved in the development of resistance to periderm abrasion that occurs upon maturation of the periderm. However, we cannot rule out the involvement in this process of peroxidase isozymes that have low affinity for the substrates utilized here.

  3. Maturation of Oocytes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2016-01-01

    Only a fraction of oocytes present in the ovaries at birth are ever ovulated during the lifetime of a female mammal. In vitro maturation (IVM) offers the possibility to exploit what is a largely untapped biological resource. Although IVM is used routinely for the in vitro production of embryos in domestic species, especially cattle, its clinical use in human-assisted reproduction is still evolving. The successful recapitulation in vitro of the events associated with successful oocyte maturation is not always achieved, with the majority of immature oocytes typically failing to develop to the blastocyst stage. Evidence suggests that although culture conditions throughout in vitro embryo production may have a modest influence on the developmental potential of the early embryo, the quality of the oocyte at the start of the process is the key factor determining the proportion of oocytes developing to the blastocyst stage.

  4. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  5. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin; Bhushan, Kumar R; Frangioni, John V; Wittrup, K Dane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to DOTA chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten binding affinity of 100 picomolar (pM) is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nanomolar (nM) to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2 ± 1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a 111In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals. PMID:21315278

  6. Proline substitutions and threonine pseudophosphorylation of the SH3 ligand of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein decrease its affinity for the Fyn-SH3 domain and alter process development and protein localization in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham S T; De Avila, Miguel; Paez, Pablo M; Spreuer, Vilma; Wills, Melanie K B; Jones, Nina; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2012-01-01

    The developmentally regulated myelin basic proteins (MBPs), which arise from the golli (gene of oligodendrocyte lineage) complex, are highly positively charged, intrinsically disordered, multifunctional proteins having several alternatively spliced isoforms and posttranslational modifications, and they play key roles in myelin compaction. The classic 18.5-kDa MBP isoform has a proline-rich region comprising amino acids 92-99 (murine sequence -T(92)PRTPPPS(99)-) that contains a minimal SH3 ligand domain. We have previously shown that 18.5-kDa MBP binds to several SH3 domains, including that of Fyn, a member of the Src family of tyrosine kinases involved in a number of signaling pathways during CNS development. To determine the physiological role of this binding as well as the role of phosphorylation of Thr92 and Thr95, in the current study we have produced several MBP variants specifically targeting phosphorylation sites and key structural regions of MBP's SH3 ligand domain. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we have demonstrated that, compared with the wild-type protein, these variants have lower affinity for the SH3 domain of Fyn. Moreover, overexpression of N-terminal-tagged GFP versions in immortalized oligodendroglial N19 and N20.1 cell cultures results in aberrant elongation of membrane processes and increased branching complexity and inhibits the ability of MBP to decrease Ca(2+) influx. Phosphorylation of Thr92 can also cause MBP to traffic to the nucleus, where it may participate in additional protein-protein interactions. Coexpression of MBP with a constitutively active form of Fyn kinase resulted in membrane process elaboration, a phenomenon that was abolished by point amino acid substitutions in MBP's SH3 ligand domain. These results suggest that MBP's SH3 ligand domain plays a key role in intracellular protein interactions in vivo and may be required for proper membrane elaboration of developing oligodendrocytes and, further, that phosphorylation

  7. The impact of the core transformation process on spirituality, symptom experience, and psychological maturity in a mixed age sample in India: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Dinesh; Piedmont, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that spiritual and religious constructs have the potential to influence a broad range of outcomes such as health, well-being, and meaning, both positively and negatively. This study looked at the effect of an under studied psycho-spiritual approach, Core Transformation (CT), in reducing symptoms and promoting well-being. This study also examined whether the impact of CT would be moderated by age, with older participants evidencing better outcomes. Participants from an Indian convenience sample (N = 189) ranging in age from 18 to 65 (M = 34) received group training in CT and completed a battery of measures pretest and 4 weeks post-training, which included personality, spirituality, and psychosocial outcomes scales. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicated significant improvements over time for both spirituality and symptom experience. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for the predictive effects of personality, reaffirmed the incremental validity of Spiritual Transcendence and religious variables in predicting symptom change and outcome ratings. CT did not appear to effect participants levels of psychological maturity. Age was not found to mediate any of these relationships, indicating the age universality of CT's therapeutic effects.

  8. Need for speed: Sexual maturation precedes social maturation in gray mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Sarah; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2015-10-01

    The life history of mammals underlies a fast-slow continuum, ranging from "slow" species with large body size, delayed sexual maturation, low fertility, and long lifespan, to "fast" species showing the opposite traits. Primates fall into the "slow" category, considering their relatively low offspring numbers and delayed juvenile development. However, social and sexual maturation processes do not necessarily have to be completed simultaneously. The comparison of the timeframes for sexual and social maturation is largely lacking for primates, with the prominent exception of humans. Here, we compare both maturation processes in a basal primate, the gray mouse lemur, which ranges in many aspects at the fast end of the slow-fast life history continuum among primates. We compared the patterns and frequencies of various social and solitary behaviors in young adults (YA, 12-13 months old) and older individuals (A, ≥2 years) of both sexes outside estrus. Observations were conducted during mix-sexed dyadic encounter experiments under controlled captive conditions (eight dyads per age class). Results indicate that although all young adults were sexually mature, social maturation was not yet completed in all behavioral domains: Age-dependent differences were found in the number of playing dyads, female marking behavior, female aggression, and social tolerance. Thus, this study provides a first indication that social maturation lags behind sexual maturation in an ancestral nocturnal primate model, indicating that these two developmental schemes may have been decoupled early and throughout the primate lineage.

  9. Brain maturation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dulac, Olivier; Milh, Mathieu; Holmes, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    At full term, both glutamate and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) are excitatory; cortical synapses are beginning to appear, there is little myelin in the cerebral hemispheres, and long tracts hardly start to develop. Neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy can result from premature activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) transmission. Benign neonatal seizures and migrating partial seizures in infancy could involve excessive or premature excitability of deep cortical layers. Benign rolandic epilepsy and continuous spike waves in slow sleep are consistent with an excess of both excitatory and inhibitory cortical synapses. West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes express age-related diffuse cortical hyperexcitability, the pattern depending on the age of occurrence; synchronization of spikes is becoming possible with maturation of the myelin. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is itself modulated by maturation that causes frontal hyperexcitability generating myoclonic-astatic seizures, between the ages of infantile and juvenile myoclonic epilepsies. Physiological delay of hippocampo-neocortical pathways maturation could account for the delayed occurrence of mesial temporal epilepsy following infantile damage, whereas premature maturation could contribute to fronto-temporal damage characteristic of fever-induced epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children, a dramatic school-age epileptic encephalopathy.

  10. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael S.; Hopper, Catherine A.; Hutchison, Keith W.

    1989-01-01

    The time course of maturation in eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi] K. Koch) was examined by grafting scions from trees of different ages onto 2-year-old root stock and following scion development for several years. Height, diameter, foliar chlorophyll content, and rooting ability of scion-derived cuttings all varied linearly as a function of log10 age. Chlorophyll content (milligrams per gram of dry weight) increased while height, diameter, and ability to root decreased with age (P < 0.01). The tendency toward orthotropic growth and branch formation per centimeter of main stem decreased abruptly between age 1 and 5 years (P < 0.01). Total chlorophyll content of both long and short shoot foliage increased by 30 to 50% with increasing age, but the chlorophyll a/b ratio did not change. Also, juvenile long shoot needles were significantly longer than mature (P < 0.01). Surprisingly, the juvenile scions produced more total strobili over two successive years, but the mature scions produced a significantly higher proportion of male strobili (P < 0.001 year 1; P < 0.02 year 2). The age-related changes in foliar traits were not associated with changes in DNA methylation between juvenile and mature scions. Using HPLC, we found that 20% of foliar DNA cytosine residues were methylated in both scion types. Images Figure 1 PMID:16666785

  11. Mature Students Studying Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Discusses mature students in the single subject area of mathematics in a single institution and makes comparisons with traditional universities. Reviews some features of the age distribution, entry qualifications, degree-class distribution, non-completion rates and gender distribution. (Author/ASK)

  12. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  13. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  14. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  15. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; Hargrove, Paul; Roman, Eric

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core maps and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.

  16. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    DOE PAGES

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; ...

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core mapsmore » and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.« less

  17. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF INORGANIC RADICALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    energy in the latter compound is 110 kcals/mole, distinctly higher than in ammonia. Cyanogen (CN)2 and hydrocyanic acid (HCN) yield values for the...ions very readily, and the electron affinity is 49 kcals/mole. A comparison with the results from thiocyanic acid (HNCS) indicates that the H-N bond

  18. The effect of different composition of ternary mixtures of emulsifying salts on the consistency of processed cheese spreads manufactured from Swiss-type cheese with different degrees of maturity.

    PubMed

    Salek, R N; Černíková, M; Maděrová, S; Lapčík, L; Buňka, F

    2016-05-01

    The scope of this work was to investigate the dependence of selected textural (texture profile analysis, TPA) and viscoelastic properties of processed cheese on the composition of ternary mixtures of emulsifying salts [disodium hydrogenphosphate, DSP; tetrasodium diphosphate, TSPP; sodium salt of polyphosphate (with mean length n ≈ 20), P20; and trisodium citrate, TSC] during a 60-d storage period (6±2°C). The processed cheese samples [40% wt/wt dry matter (DM) content, 50% wt/wt fat in DM content] were manufactured using Swiss-type cheese (as the main raw material) with 4 different maturity degrees (4, 8, 12, and 16 wk of ripening). Moreover, the pH of the samples was adjusted (the target values within the range of 5.60-5.80), corresponding to the standard pH values of spreadable processed cheese. With respect to the individual application of emulsifying salts (regardless of the maturity degree of the Swiss-type cheese applied), the samples prepared with P20 were the hardest, followed by those prepared with TSPP, TSC, and DSP. Furthermore, a specific ratio of DSP:TSPP (1:1) led to a significant increase in the hardness of the samples. On the whole, the hardness of all processed cheese samples increased with the prolonging storage period, whereas their hardness significantly dropped with the rising ripening stage of the raw material utilized. In all of the cases, the trends of hardness development remained analogous, and only the absolute values differed significantly. Moreover, the findings of TPA were in accordance with those of the rheological analysis. In particular, the specific ratio of DSP:TSPP (1:1) resulted in the highest gel strength and interaction factor values, followed by P20, TSPP, TSC, and DSP (used individually), reporting the same trend which was demonstrated by TPA. The monitored values of the gel strength and interaction factor decreased with the increasing maturity degree of the Swiss-type cheese used. The intensity of the rigidity of the

  19. Leveraging People-Related Maturity Issues for Achieving Higher Maturity and Capability Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buglione, Luigi

    During the past 20 years Maturity Models (MM) become a buzzword in the ICT world. Since the initial Crosby's idea in 1979, plenty of models have been created in the Software & Systems Engineering domains, addressing various perspectives. By analyzing the content of the Process Reference Models (PRM) in many of them, it can be noticed that people-related issues have little weight in the appraisals of the capabilities of organizations while in practice they are considered as significant contributors in traditional process and organizational performance appraisals, as stressed instead in well-known Performance Management models such as MBQA, EFQM and BSC. This paper proposes some ways for leveraging people-related maturity issues merging HR practices from several types of maturity models into the organizational Business Process Model (BPM) in order to achieve higher organizational maturity and capability levels.

  20. MATURE: A Model Driven bAsed Tool to Automatically Generate a langUage That suppoRts CMMI Process Areas spEcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, David; Castaño, Víctor; Calvo-Manzano, Jose A.; Garbajosa, Juan

    Many companies have achieved a higher quality in their processes by using CMMI. Process definition may be efficiently supported by software tools. A higher automation level will make process improvement and assessment activities easier to be adapted to customer needs. At present, automation of CMMI is based on tools that support practice definition in a textual way. These tools are often enhanced spreadsheets. In this paper, following the Model Driven Development paradigm (MDD), a tool that supports automatic generation of a language that can be used to specify process areas practices is presented. The generation is performed from a metamodel that represents CMMI. This tool, differently from others available, can be customized according to user needs. Guidelines to specify the CMMI metamodel are also provided. The paper also shows how this approach can support other assessment methods.

  1. Delayed visual maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G F; Hungerford, J; Jones, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen blind babies who were considered to be showing the characteristics of delayed visual maturation were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, and the criteria for this are discussed. All of these infants developed visual responses between 4 and 6 months of age and had normal or near normal visual acuities by 1 year of age. Long term follow up, however, has shown neurological abnormalities in some of these children. PMID:6200080

  2. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  3. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation.

    PubMed

    Mangel, Walter F; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a "molecular sled" to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  4. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  5. Structure, Function and Dynamics in Adenovirus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed. PMID:25421887

  6. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  7. Teaching To Promote Intellectual and Personal Maturity: Incorporating Students' Worldviews and Identities into the Learning Process. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magolda, Marcia B. Baxter, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume offers an alternative diagnosis of the expectations gap that exists between students and professors. Professors' expectations often go far beyond students' assumptions about the nature of knowledge. It is not what students think but rather how they think that is important in the learning process. How students make meaning mediates how…

  8. Vocational Maturity and Self Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Hans

    The relationship between separate dimensions of vocational maturity and different self-concept and identity variables were examined. Subjects were Dutch students, age 14-18 years. The vocational maturity dimensions were measured by Dutch adaptations of American vocational maturity scales. Instruments for self-concept and identity measurement were…

  9. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    PubMed Central

    Tosti, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed. PMID:16684344

  10. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  11. Membrane remodeling during reticulocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Xinhua; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    The transition of reticulocytes into erythrocytes is accompanied by extensive changes in the structure and properties of the plasma membrane. These changes include an increase in shear resistance, loss of surface area, and acquisition of a biconcave shape. The processes by which these changes are effected have remained largely undefined. Here we examine how the expression of 30 distinct membrane proteins and their interactions change during murine reticulocyte maturation. We show that tubulin and cytosolic actin are lost, whereas the membrane content of myosin, tropomyosin, intercellular adhesion molecule-4, glucose transporter-4, Na-K-ATPase, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, glycophorin A, CD47, Duffy, and Kell is reduced. The degradation of tubulin and actin is, at least in part, through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In regard to the protein-protein interactions, the formation of membrane-associated spectrin tetramers from dimers is unperturbed, whereas the interactions responsible for the formation of the membrane-skeletal junctions are weaker in reticulocytes, as is the attachment of transmembrane proteins to these structures. This weakness, in part, results from the elevated phosphorylation of 4.1R in reticulocytes, which leads to a decrease in shear resistance by reducing its interaction with spectrin and actin. These observations begin to unravel the mechanistic basis of crucial changes accompanying reticulocyte maturation. PMID:20038785

  12. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Keith W.; Sherman, Christopher D.; Weber, Jill; Smith, Sandra Schiller; Singer, Patricia B.; Greenwood, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of maturation on the morphological and photosynthetic characteristics, as well as the expression of two genes involved in photosynthesis in the developing, current year foliage of Eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi]) is described. These effects were observed on foliage during the third growing season after grafting of scions from trees of different ages onto 2 year old rootstock. Specific leaf weight (gram dry weight per square meter), leaf cross-sectional area (per square millimeter), and chlorophyll content (milligram per gram dry weight) all increase with increasing age in long shoot foliage from both indoor- and outdoor-grown trees. Net photosynthesis (NPS) (mole of CO2 per square millimeter per second) increases with age on indoor- but not outdoor-grown trees. NPS also increases with increased chlorophyll content, but outdoor-grown scions of all ages had higher chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll does not appear to be limiting for NPS outdoors. To extend these studies of maturation-related differences in foliar morphology and physiology to the molecular genetic level, sequences were cloned from the cab and rbsS gene families of larch. Both cab and rbcS gene families are expressed in foliage but not in roots, and they are expressed in light-grown seedlings of larch but only at very low levels in dark-grown seedlings (~2% of light-grown seedlings). Steady-state cab mRNA levels are relatively higher (~40%) in newly expanding short shoot foliage from juvenile plants compared to mature plants. Unlike cab, the expression of the rbcS gene family did not seem to vary with age. These data show that the maturation-related changes in morphological and physiological phenotypes are associated with changes in gene expression. No causal relationship has been established, however. Indeed, we conclude that the faster growth of juvenile scions reported previously (MS Greenwood, CA Hopper, KW Hutchison [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 406-412) is not due to increased NPS

  13. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  14. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  15. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  16. Manual for the Employability Maturity Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; Bolton, Brian

    The Employability Maturity Interview (EMI) is a 10-item structured interview developed to assess readiness for the vocational rehabilitation planning process and the need for additional vocational exploration and employability services. The items deal with occupational choice, self-appraisal of abilities, self-appraisal of personality…

  17. RNA-Seq analyses reveal the order of tRNA processing events and the maturation of C/D box and CRISPR RNAs in the hyperthermophile Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Su, Andreas A H; Tripp, Vanessa; Randau, Lennart

    2013-07-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri grows near the upper temperature limit for life. Genome analyses revealed strategies to adapt to these harsh conditions and elucidated a unique transfer RNA (tRNA) C-to-U editing mechanism at base 8 for 30 different tRNA species. Here, RNA-Seq deep sequencing methodology was combined with computational analyses to characterize the small RNome of this hyperthermophilic organism and to obtain insights into the RNA metabolism at extreme temperatures. A large number of 132 small RNAs were identified that guide RNA modifications, which are expected to stabilize structured RNA molecules. The C/D box guide RNAs were shown to exist as circular RNA molecules. In addition, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats RNA processing and potential regulatory RNAs were identified. Finally, the identification of tRNA precursors before and after the unique C8-to-U8 editing activity enabled the determination of the order of tRNA processing events with termini truncation preceding intron removal. This order of tRNA maturation follows the compartmentalized tRNA processing order found in Eukaryotes and suggests its conservation during evolution.

  18. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  19. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16231.001 PMID:27542195

  20. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  1. Sexual selection shapes development and maturation rates in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Brian; Keller, Laurent; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2017-02-01

    Explanations for the evolution of delayed maturity usually invoke trade-offs mediated by growth, but processes of reproductive maturation continue long after growth has ceased. Here, we tested whether sexual selection shapes the rate of posteclosion maturation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We found that populations maintained for more than 100 generations under a short generation time and polygamous mating system evolved faster posteclosion maturation and faster egg-to-adult development of males, when compared to populations kept under short generations and randomized monogamy that eliminated sexual selection. An independent assay demonstrated that more mature males have higher fitness under polygamy, but this advantage disappears under monogamy. In contrast, for females greater maturity was equally advantageous under polygamy and monogamy. Furthermore, monogamous populations evolved faster development and maturation of females relative to polygamous populations, with no detectable trade-offs with adult size or egg-to-adult survival. These results suggest that a major aspect of male maturation involves developing traits that increase success in sexual competition, whereas female maturation is not limited by investment in traits involved in mate choice or defense against male antagonism. Moreover, rates of juvenile development and adult maturation can readily evolve in opposite directions in the two sexes, possibly implicating polymorphisms with sexually antagonistic pleiotropy.

  2. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  3. Spiritual Maturation and Religious Behaviors in Christian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ronald D.; Mellberg, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual maturation processes of internalization and questing were assessed at a Christian university to determine their relationship to year in school and certain religious behaviors. This was a first step toward the development of a new model of Christian higher education that will intentionally facilitate spiritual maturation. A group of 179…

  4. Mature Students Speak Up: Career Exploration and the Working Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pott, Terilyn

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was undertaken to learn more about how mature students perceive the career counselling process in a post-secondary institution. Through the use of critical incident technique this study examined how three mature students interpret their relationship between themselves and their counsellors. Significant factors identified as…

  5. Maturational and Non-Maturational Factors in Heritage Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the maturational and non-maturational aspects of early bilingualism and language attrition in heritage speakers who have acquired their L1 incompletely in childhood. The study highlights the influential role of age and input dynamics in early L1 development, where the timing of reduction in L1 input and the…

  6. The Composing Processes of Mature Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabbe, Katharyn

    The study examined 41 students (24 male, 17 female) in a beginning writing course for adults. Data were collected by (1) taping four workshop sessions in which all students participated in small groups, (2) interviewing all the students, and (3) observing four students writing in the classroom. The adult writers composed in two models: the…

  7. Solid support resins and affinity purification mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Havis, Spencer; Moree, Wilna J; Mali, Sujina; Bark, Steven J

    2017-02-28

    Co-affinity purification-mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a primary technology for elucidating the protein-protein interactions that form the basis of all biological processes. A critical component of CoAP-MS is the affinity purification (AP) of the bait protein, usually by immobilization of an antibody to a solid-phase resin. This Minireview discusses common resins, reagents, tagging methods, and their consideration for successful AP of tagged proteins. We discuss our experiences with different solid supports, their impact in AP experiments, and propose areas where chemistry can advance this important technology.

  8. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  10. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  11. Interaction of natural polyphenols with α-amylase in vitro: molecular property-affinity relationship aspect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Kai, Guoyin; Ni, Xiaoling; Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between the structural properties of natural polyphenols and their affinities for α-amylase were investigated by fluorescence titration analysis. The binding process with α-amylase was strongly influenced by the structural differences of the compounds under study. For instance, the methylation of the hydroxyl group in flavonoids increased their binding affinities for α-amylase by 2.14 to 7.76 times. The hydroxylation on rings A, B, and C of flavonoids also significantly affected their affinities for α-amylase. The glycosylation of isoflavones and flavanones reduced their affinities for α-amylase and the glycosylation of flavones and flavonols enhanced their affinities for α-amylase. Hydrogenation of the C2=C3 double bond of flavonoids decreased the binding affinities. The galloylated catechins had higher binding affinities with α-amylase than non-galloylated catechins and the pyrogallol-type catechins had higher affinities than the catechol-type catechins. The presence of the galloyl moiety is the most decisive factor. The glycosylation of resveratrol decreased its affinity for α-amylase. The esterification of gallic acid significantly reduced the affinity for α-amylase. The binding interaction between polyphenols and α-amylase was mainly caused by hydrophobic forces.

  12. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank-p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n-dimensions is bounded by (n + 1)!/p!(n − p)!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes. PMID:26858463

  13. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, Kenneth Sherman

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  14. Career Maturity of Welfare Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckman, Carol M.

    To investigate the career maturity of welfare recipients, this thesis examines six independent variables: (1) race; (2) sex; (3) age; (4) level of formal education; (5) general intelligence; and (6) locus of control. Scales taken from the Career Maturity Inventory served as the dependent variables. The sample consisted of 83 welfare recipients who…

  15. Career Education and Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebilco, Geoffrey R.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between career maturity and career curriculum in 38 Melbourne metropolitan secondary schools (N=2280 students) using an Australian adaption of the Career Development Inventory. Results confirmed that schools with career education programs achieved higher gains in student career maturity. (JAC)

  16. Quantitative evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation via fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the results of fractal analysis can be used as criteria for midpalatal suture maturation evaluation. Methods The study included 131 subjects aged over 18 years of age (range 18.1–53.4 years) who underwent cone-beam computed tomography. Skeletonized images of the midpalatal suture were obtained via image processing software and used to calculate fractal dimensions. Correlations between maturation stage and fractal dimensions were calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Optimal fractal dimension cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results The distribution of maturation stages of the midpalatal suture according to the cervical vertebrae maturation index was highly variable, and there was a strong negative correlation between maturation stage and fractal dimension (−0.623, p < 0.001). Fractal dimension was a statistically significant indicator of dichotomous results with regard to maturation stage (area under curve = 0.794, p < 0.001). A test in which fractal dimension was used to predict the resulting variable that splits maturation stages into ABC and D or E yielded an optimal fractal dimension cut-off value of 1.0235. Conclusions There was a strong negative correlation between fractal dimension and midpalatal suture maturation. Fractal analysis is an objective quantitative method, and therefore we suggest that it may be useful for the evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation. PMID:27668195

  17. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  18. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  19. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  20. Yeast surface display for antibody isolation: library construction, library screening, and affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, James A; Wittrup, Karl Dane

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies play key roles as reagents, diagnostics, and therapeutics in numerous biological and biomedical research settings. Although many antibodies are commercially available, oftentimes, specific applications require the development of antibodies with customized properties. Yeast surface display is a robust, versatile, and quantitative method for generating these antibodies and is accessible to single-investigator laboratories. This protocol details the key aspects of yeast surface display library construction and screening.

  1. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  2. Electron affinity of p-quinones. Improved method of electrochemical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Jan S.

    1986-06-01

    Electron affinities of four p-quinones are estimated from enthalpy changes obtained on the basis of measured formal potentials and reaction entropies in the electroreduction process. A linear correlation between electron affinities of p-quinones and parent hydrocarbons is found.

  3. Role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Coppi, Elisabetta; Cellai, Lucrezia; Maraula, Giovanna; Dettori, Ilaria; Melani, Alessia; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pedata, Felicita

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of oligodendroglial cells are postnatal processes that involve specific morphological changes correlated with the expression of stage-specific surface antigens and functional voltage-gated ion channels. A small fraction of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) generated during development are maintained in an immature and slowly proliferative or quiescent state in the adult central nervous system (CNS) representing an endogenous reservoir of immature cells. Adenosine receptors are expressed by OPCs and a key role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte maturation has been recently recognized. As evaluated on OPC cultures, adenosine, by stimulating A1 receptors, promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and inhibits their proliferation; on the contrary, by stimulating A2A receptors, it inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation. A1 and A2A receptor-mediated effects are related to opposite modifications of outward delayed rectifying membrane K+ currents (IK) that are involved in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Brain A1 and A2A receptors might represent new molecular targets for drugs useful in demyelinating pathologies, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke and brain trauma. PMID:25964740

  4. Tomato seeds maturity detection system based on chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuiling; Wang, Xiu; Meng, Zhijun

    2016-10-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence intensity can be used as seed maturity and quality evaluation indicator. Chlorophyll fluorescence intensity of seed coats is tested to judge the level of chlorophyll content in seeds, and further to judge the maturity and quality of seeds. This research developed a detection system of tomato seeds maturity based on chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum technology, the system included an excitation light source unit, a fluorescent signal acquisition unit and a data processing unit. The excitation light source unit consisted of two high power LEDs, two radiators and two constant current power supplies, and it was designed to excite chlorophyll fluorescence of tomato seeds. The fluorescent signal acquisition unit was made up of a fluorescence spectrometer, an optical fiber, an optical fiber scaffolds and a narrowband filter. The data processing unit mainly included a computer. Tomato fruits of green ripe stage, discoloration stage, firm ripe stage and full ripe stage were harvested, and their seeds were collected directly. In this research, the developed tomato seeds maturity testing system was used to collect fluorescence spectrums of tomato seeds of different maturities. Principal component analysis (PCA) method was utilized to reduce the dimension of spectral data and extract principal components, and PCA was combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to establish discriminant model of tomato seeds maturity, the discriminant accuracy was greater than 90%. Research results show that using chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum technology is feasible for seeds maturity detection, and the developed tomato seeds maturity testing system has high detection accuracy.

  5. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  6. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  7. Maturation of shark single-domain (IgNAR) antibodies: evidence for induced-fit binding.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Dooley, Helen; Verdino, Petra; Flajnik, Martin F; Wilson, Ian A

    2007-03-23

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  8. Identification of candidate angiogenic inhibitors processed by matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) in cell-based proteomic screens: disruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/heparin affin regulatory peptide (pleiotrophin) and VEGF/Connective tissue growth factor angiogenic inhibitory complexes by MMP-2 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Richard A; Butler, Georgina S; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Brigstock, David R; Courty, José; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert both pro- and antiangiogenic functions by the release of cytokines or proteolytically generated angiogenic inhibitors from extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling. In the Mmp2-/- mouse neovascularization is greatly reduced, but the mechanistic aspects of this remain unclear. Using isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of proteins analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry we explored proteome differences between Mmp2-/- cells and those rescued by MMP-2 transfection. Proteome signatures that are hallmarks of proteolysis revealed cleavage of many known MMP-2 substrates in the cellular context. Proteomic evidence of MMP-2 processing of novel substrates was found. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6, follistatin-like 1, and cystatin C protein cleavage by MMP-2 was biochemically confirmed, and the cleavage sites in heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP; pleiotrophin) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. MMP-2 processing of HARP and CTGF released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from angiogenic inhibitory complexes. The cleaved HARP N-terminal domain increased HARP-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HARP C-terminal domain was antagonistic and decreased cell proliferation and migration. Hence the unmasking of cytokines, such as VEGF, by metalloproteinase processing of their binding proteins is a new mechanism in the control of cytokine activation and angiogenesis.

  9. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  10. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  11. Meristem maturation and inflorescence architecture--lessons from the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Park, Soon Ju; Eshed, Yuval; Lippman, Zachary B

    2014-02-01

    Plant apical meristems (AMs) grow continuously by delicately balancing cells leaving at the periphery to form lateral organs with slowly dividing central domain cells that replenish reservoirs of pluripotent cells. This balance can be modified by signals originating from within and outside the meristem, and their integration results in a gradual maturation process that often culminates with the meristem differentiating into a flower. Accompanying this 'meristem maturation' are changes in spacing and size of lateral organs and in rates at which lateral meristems are released from apical dominance. Modulation of distinct meristem maturation parameters through environmental and genetic changes underlies the remarkable diversity of shoot architectures. Here, we discuss recent studies relating the dynamics of meristem maturation with organization of floral branching systems--inflorescences--in the nightshades. From this context, we suggest general principles on how factors coordinating meristem maturation impact shoot organization more broadly.

  12. Achieving Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.

    Gaining career decision-making and world-of-work knowledge, and increasing career planning and exploratory behavior represent key tasks of adolescent career development. To better understand this process, the extent to which personality type relates to career development in high school students is examined in this report. A cohort of 64 high…

  13. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  14. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  15. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  16. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  17. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  18. Oocyte Maturation and Development

    PubMed Central

    Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is essential for many organisms to propagate themselves. It requires the formation of haploid female and male gametes: oocytes and sperms. These specialized cells are generated through meiosis, a particular type of cell division that produces cells with recombined genomes that differ from their parental origin. In this review, we highlight the end process of female meiosis, the divisions per se, and how they can give rise to a functional female gamete preparing itself for the ensuing zygotic development. In particular, we discuss why such an essential process in the propagation of species is so poorly controlled, producing a strong percentage of abnormal female gametes in the end. Eventually, we examine aspects related to the lack of centrosomes in female oocytes, the asymmetry in size of the mammalian oocyte upon division, and in mammals the direct consequences of these long-lived cells in the ovary. PMID:26998245

  19. Comparison of nir methods for measuring cotton fiber maturity and fineness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity and fineness are important cotton fiber properties, as they can impact the fiber’s downstream processability and dye performance. Maturity and fineness are often indicated indirectly by the fiber’s micronaire. Maturity and fineness can be measured directly, but most available methods are ...

  20. Epigenetic mechanisms in pubertal brain maturation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kathleen E.; Rodgers, Ali B.; Morgan, Christopher P.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a critical period of development during which the reemergence of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion from the hypothalamus triggers a cascade of hormone-dependent processes. Maturation of specific brain regions including the prefrontal cortex occurs during this window, but the complex mechanisms underlying these dynamic changes are not well understood. Particularly, the potential involvement of epigenetics in this programming has been under-examined. The epigenome is known to guide earlier stages of development, and it is similarly poised to regulate vital pubertal-driven brain maturation. Further, as epigenetic machinery is highly environmentally responsive, its involvement may also lend this period of growth to greater vulnerability to external insults, resulting in reprogramming and increased disease risk. Importantly, neuropsychiatric diseases commonly present in individuals during or immediately following puberty, and environmental perturbations including stress may precipitate disease onset by disrupting the normal trajectory of pubertal brain development via epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, we discuss epigenetic processes involved in pubertal brain maturation, the potential points of derailment, and the importance of future studies for understanding this dynamic developmental window and gaining a better understanding of neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:24239720

  1. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  2. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  3. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6.

  4. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  5. Objectives and Design of the Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Study

    PubMed Central

    Dember, Laura M.; Imrey, Peter B.; Beck, Gerald J.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Huber, Thomas S.; Kusek, John W.; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Alpers, Charles E.; Robbin, Michelle L.; Vita, Joseph A.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2014-01-01

    Background A large proportion of newly created arteriovenous fistulas cannot be used for dialysis because they fail to mature adequately to support the hemodialysis blood circuit. The Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation (HFM) Study was designed to elucidate clinical and biological factors associated with fistula maturation outcomes. Study Design Multicenter prospective cohort study. Setting & Participants Approximately 600 patients undergoing creation of a new hemodialysis fistula will be enrolled at 7 centers in the United States and followed up for as long as 4 years. Predictors Clinical, anatomical, biological, and process-of-care attributes identified pre-operatively, intra-operatively, or post-operatively. Outcomes The primary outcome is unassisted clinical maturation defined as successful use of the fistula for dialysis for four weeks without any maturation-enhancing procedures. Secondary outcomes include assisted clinical maturation, ultrasound-based anatomical maturation, fistula procedures, fistula abandonment, and central venous catheter use. Measurements Pre-operative ultrasound arterial and venous mapping, flow-mediated and nitroglycerin-mediated brachial artery dilation, arterial pulse wave velocity, and venous distensibility; intra-operative vein tissue collection for histopathological and molecular analyses; post-operative ultrasounds at 1 day, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and prior to fistula intervention and initial cannulation. Results Assuming complete data, no covariate adjustment, and unassisted clinical maturation of 50%, there will be 80% power to detect ORs of 1.83 and 1.61 for dichotomous predictor variables with exposure prevalences of 20% and 50%, respectively. Limitations Exclusion of two-stage transposition fistulas limits generalizability. The requirement for study visits may result in a cohort that is healthier than the overall population of patients undergoing fistula creation. Conclusions The HFM Study will be of sufficient size and scope to 1

  6. IA-2 autoantibody affinity in children at risk for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Stephanie; Chmiel, Ruth; Bonifacio, Ezio; Scholz, Marlon; Powell, Michael; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Rees Smith, Bernard; Ziegler, Anette-G; Achenbach, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Autoantibodies to insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA-2A) are associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes. Here we examined IA-2A affinity and epitope specificity to assess heterogeneity in response intensity in relation to pathogenesis and diabetes risk in 50 children who were prospectively followed from birth. At first IA-2A appearance, affinity ranged from 10(7) to 10(11)L/mol and was high (>1.0×10(9)L/mol) in 41 (82%) children. IA-2A affinity was not associated with epitope specificity or HLA class II haplotype. On follow-up, affinity increased or remained high, and IA-2A were commonly against epitopes within the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like IA-2 domain and the homologue protein IA-2β. IA-2A were preceded or accompanied by other islet autoantibodies in 49 (98%) children, of which 34 progressed to diabetes. IA-2A affinity did not stratify diabetes risk. In conclusion, the IA-2A response in children is intense with rapid maturation against immunogenic epitopes and a strong association with diabetes development.

  7. Affinity improvement by fine tuning of single-chain variable fragment against aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Na, Kang-In; Yoon, Jung-Hyun; Heo, Yoon-Jee; Lee, Daesang; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-10-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) produced in Aspergillus flavus is a major hepatocarcinogen found in foods and feed. For effective immunological detection of AFB1 at low concentrations, the development of high affinity antibody for AFB1 is required. Previously, an affinity-maturated single-chain variable fragment containing 6 mutations (scFv-M37) was isolated from an artificial mutagenic library, which showed a 9-fold higher affinity than its wild type scFv. In this study, the effect of the 6 mutated residues on the affinity improvement was characterized using surface plasmon resonance analysis, which identified a deleterious mutation (VH-A110T) located on a framework region of the scFv-M37. The back mutation of VH-A110T resulted in a 3.2-fold affinity improvement, which was attributed to decrease of dissociation rate constant (kd) in interaction between AFB1 and the back mutant scFv. The biophysical analyses using circular dichroism and gel filtration revealed that the back mutation of VH-A110T caused a subtle conformational change of the scFv toward tighter binding to AFB1.

  8. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  9. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  10. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  11. Affine Covariant Features for Fisheye Distortion Local Modelling.

    PubMed

    Furnari, Antonino; Farinella, Giovanni; Bruna, Arcangelo; Battiato, Sebastiano

    2016-11-10

    Perspective cameras are the most popular imaging sensors used in Computer Vision. However, many application fields including automotive, surveillance and robotics, require the use of wide angle cameras (e.g., fisheye), which allow to acquire a larger portion of the scene using a single device at the cost of the introduction of noticeable radial distortion in the images. Affine covariant feature detectors have proven successful in a variety of Computer Vision applications including object recognition, image registration and visual search. Moreover, their robustness to a series of variabilities related to both the scene and the image acquisition process has been thoroughly studied in the literature. In this paper, we investigate their effectiveness on fisheye images providing both theoretical and experimental analyses. As theoretical outcome, we show that the inherently non-linear radial distortion can be locally approximated by linear functions with a reasonably small error. The experimental analysis builds on Mikolajczyk's benchmark to assess the robustness of three popular affine region detectors (i.e., Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER), Harris and Hessian affine region detectors), with respect to different variabilities as well as to radial distortion. To support the evaluations, we rely on the Oxford dataset and introduce a novel benchmark dataset comprising 50 images depicting different scene categories. Experiments are carried out on rectilinear images to which radial distortion is artificially added, and on real-world images acquired using fisheye lenses. Our analysis points out that affine region detectors can be effectively employed directly on fisheye images and that the radial distortion is locally modelled as an additional affine variability.

  12. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  13. Two distinct functional high affinity receptors for mouse interleukin-3 (IL-3).

    PubMed Central

    Hara, T; Miyajima, A

    1992-01-01

    The human interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3R) is composed of an IL-3 specific alpha subunit (IL-3R alpha) and a common beta subunit (beta c) that is shared by IL-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 receptors. In contrast to the human, the mouse has two distinct but related genes, AIC2A and AIC2B, both of which are homologous to the human beta c gene. AIC2B has proved to encode a common beta subunit between mouse GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors. AIC2A is unique to the mouse and encodes a low affinity IL-3 binding protein. Based on the observation that the AIC2A protein is a component of a high affinity IL-3R, we searched for a cDNA encoding a protein which conferred high affinity IL-3 binding when coexpressed with the AIC2A protein in COS7 cells. We obtained such a cDNA (SUT-1) encoding a mature protein of 70 kDa that has weak homology to the human IL-3R alpha. The SUT-1 protein bound IL-3 with low affinity and formed high affinity receptors not only with the AIC2A protein but also with the AIC2B protein. Both high affinity IL-3Rs expressed on a mouse T cell line, CTLL-2, showed similar IL-3 binding properties and transmitted a growth signal in response to IL-3. Thus, the mouse has two distinct functional high affinity IL-3Rs, providing a molecular explanation for the differences observed between mouse and human IL-3Rs. Images PMID:1582416

  14. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  15. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  16. Computational Model Reveals Limited Correlation between Germinal Center B-Cell Subclone Abundancy and Affinity: Implications for Repertoire Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Reshetova, Polina; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Klarenbeek, Paul L.; Doorenspleet, Marieke E.; Esveldt, Rebecca E. E.; Tak, Paul-Peter; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; de Vries, Niek; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.

    2017-01-01

    Immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing has successfully been applied to identify expanded antigen-activated B-cell clones that play a role in the pathogenesis of immune disorders. One challenge is the selection of the Ag-specific B cells from the measured repertoire for downstream analyses. A general feature of an immune response is the expansion of specific clones resulting in a set of subclones with common ancestry varying in abundance and in the number of acquired somatic mutations. The expanded subclones are expected to have BCR affinities for the Ag higher than the affinities of the naive B cells in the background population. For these reasons, several groups successfully proceeded or suggested selecting highly abundant subclones from the repertoire to obtain the Ag-specific B cells. Given the nature of affinity maturation one would expect that abundant subclones are of high affinity but since repertoire sequencing only provides information about abundancies, this can only be verified with additional experiments, which are very labor intensive. Moreover, this would also require knowledge of the Ag, which is often not available for clinical samples. Consequently, in general we do not know if the selected highly abundant subclone(s) are also the high(est) affinity subclones. Such knowledge would likely improve the selection of relevant subclones for further characterization and Ag screening. Therefore, to gain insight in the relation between subclone abundancy and affinity, we developed a computational model that simulates affinity maturation in a single GC while tracking individual subclones in terms of abundancy and affinity. We show that the model correctly captures the overall GC dynamics, and that the amount of expansion is qualitatively comparable to expansion observed from B cells isolated from human lymph nodes. Analysis of the fraction of high- and low-affinity subclones among the unexpanded and expanded subclones reveals a limited correlation between

  17. Altered differentiation, diminished pathogenicity, and regulatory activity of myelin-specific T cells expressing an enhanced affinity TCR

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Rajshekhar; Nguyen, Phuong; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas increased affinity enhances T cell competitiveness after immunization, the role of affinity in modulating the pathogenicity of self-reactive T cells is less established. To assess this, we generated two myelin-specific, class II MHC-restricted TCR that differ only in a buried hydroxymethyl that forms a common TRBV variant. The variation, predicted to increase TCR stability, resulted in a ~3log10 difference in TCR sensitivity with preserved fine specificity. The high affinity TCR markedly diminished T cell pathogenicity. T cells were not deleted, did not upregulate Foxp3, and barring disease induction were predominantly naïve. However, high affinity CD4+ T cells showed an altered cytokine profile characterized by the production of protective cytokines prior to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis induction and decreased effector cytokines after. Further, the high affinity TCR promoted the development of CD4−CD8− and CD8+ T cells that possessed low intrinsic pathogenicity, were protective even in small numbers when transferred into wild type mice and in mixed chimeras, and outcompete CD4+ T cells during disease development. Therefore TCR affinities exceeding an upper affinity threshold may impede the development of autoimmunity through altered development and functional maturation of T cells, including diminished intrinsic CD4+ T-cell pathogenicity and the development of CD4− Foxp3− regulatory populations. PMID:22025553

  18. Synapse Maturation by Activity-Dependent Ectodomain Shedding of SIRPα

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Terauchi, Akiko; Zhang, Lily Y.; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M.; Larsen, David J.; Sutton, Michael A.; Umemori, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Formation of appropriate synaptic connections is critical for proper functioning of the brain. After initial synaptic differentiation, active synapses are stabilized by neural activity-dependent signals to establish functional synaptic connections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synapse maturation remain to be elucidated. Here we show that activity-dependent ectodomain shedding of SIRPα mediates presynaptic maturation. Two target-derived molecules, FGF22 and SIRPα, sequentially organize the glutamatergic presynaptic terminals during the initial synaptic differentiation and synapse maturation stages, respectively, in the mouse hippocampus. SIRPα drives presynaptic maturation in an activity-dependent fashion. Remarkably, neural activity cleaves the extracellular domain of SIRPα, and the shed ectodomain, in turn, promotes the maturation of the presynaptic terminal. This process involves CaM kinase, matrix metalloproteinases, and the presynaptic receptor CD47. Finally, SIRPα-dependent synapse maturation has significant impacts on synaptic function and plasticity. Thus, ectodomain shedding of SIRPα is an activity-dependent trans-synaptic mechanism for the maturation of functional synapses. PMID:24036914

  19. Novel maturity parameters for mature to over-mature source rocks and oils based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixiang; Wang, Yongli; Wu, Baoxiang; Wang, Gen; Sun, Zepeng; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Shenzhen; Sun, Lina; Wei, Zhifu

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis experiments of a low-mature bitumen sample originated from Cambrian was conducted in gold capsules. Abundance and distribution of phenanthrene series compounds in pyrolysis products were measured by GC-MS to investigate their changes with thermal maturity. Several maturity parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds have been discussed. The results indicate that the distribution changes of phenanthrene series compounds are complex, and cannot be explained by individual reaction process during thermal evolution. The dealkylation cannot explain the increase of phenanthrene within the EasyRo range of 0.9% ∼ 2.1%. Adding of phenanthrene into maturity parameters based on the methylphenanthrene isomerization is unreasonable, even though MPI 1 and MPI 2 could be used to some extent. Two additional novel and an optimized maturation parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds are proposed and their relationships to EasyRo% (x) are established: log(MPs/P) = 0.19x + 0.08 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 2.1%); log(MPs/P) = 0.64x - 0.86 (2.1% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(DMPs/TMPs) = 0.71x - 0.55 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(MTR) = 0.84x - 0.75 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%). These significant positive correlations are strong argument for using log(MPs/P), log(DMPs/TMPs) and log(MTR) as maturity parameters, especially for mature to over-mature source rocks.

  20. Adolescent Maturation in Transitioning Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin; Palacios, Anna; Reid, Robert E.

    This is a theoretical study of adolescent maturation within a cultural context. Personality development and disintegration due to the pressure of a dominant culture on a minority culture is considered. An attempt is made to understand how teachers might assist students to work out their psychological growth by story telling. The need for cultural…

  1. Psychosocial Maturity or Social Desirability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen

    The psychosocial maturity scale (PSM) described in several earlier papers is a self-report questionnaire. It is vulnerable, as are other questionnaires of this type, to respondents' wishes to present themselves in a socially desirable light. In this study, scores on two social desirability scales are examined in relation to PSM. Correlations…

  2. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  3. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  4. A fragment of alpha-actinin promotes monocyte/macrophage maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luikart, S; Wahl, D; Hinkel, T; Masri, M; Oegema, T

    1999-02-01

    Conditioned media (CM) from cultures of HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells grown on extracellular bone marrow matrix contains a factor that induces macrophage-like maturation of HL-60 cells. This factor was purified from the CM of HL-60 cells grown on bone marrow stroma by ammonium sulfate precipitation, then sequential chromatography on DEAE, affi-gel blue affinity, gel exclusion, and wheat germ affinity columns, followed by C-4 reverse phase HPLC, and SDS-PAGE. The maturation promoting activity of the CM was identified in a single 31 kD protein. Amino acid sequence analysis of four internal tryptic peptides of this protein confirmed significant homology with amino acid residues 48-60, 138-147, 215-220, and 221-236 of human cytoskeletal alpha-actinin. An immunoaffinity purified rabbit polyclonal anti-chicken alpha-actinin inhibited the activity of HL-60 conditioned media. A 27 kD amino-terminal fragment of alpha-actinin produced by thermolysin digestion of chicken gizzard alpha-actinin, but not intact alpha-actinin, had maturation promoting activity on several cell types, including blood monocytes, as measured by lysozyme secretion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. We conclude that an extracellular alpha-actinin fragment can promote monocyte/macrophage maturation. This represents the first example of a fragment of a cytoskeletal component, which may be released during tissue remodeling and repair, playing a role in phagocyte maturation.

  5. Model updating based on an affine scaling interior optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Jia, C. X.; Li, Jian; Spencer, B. F.

    2013-11-01

    Finite element model updating is usually considered as an optimization process. Affine scaling interior algorithms are powerful optimization algorithms that have been developed over the past few years. A new finite element model updating method based on an affine scaling interior algorithm and a minimization of modal residuals is proposed in this article, and a general finite element model updating program is developed based on the proposed method. The performance of the proposed method is studied through numerical simulation and experimental investigation using the developed program. The results of the numerical simulation verified the validity of the method. Subsequently, the natural frequencies obtained experimentally from a three-dimensional truss model were used to update a finite element model using the developed program. After updating, the natural frequencies of the truss and finite element model matched well.

  6. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  7. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method.

  8. Stability of flavin semiquinones in the gas phase: the electron affinity, proton affinity, and hydrogen atom affinity of lumiflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlan; Papson, Kaitlin; Ochran, Richard; Ridge, Douglas P

    2013-11-07

    Examination of electron transfer and proton transfer reactions of lumiflavin and proton transfer reactions of the lumiflavin radical anion by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. From the equilibrium constant determined for electron transfer between 1,4-naphthoquinone and lumiflavin the electron affinity of lumiflavin is deduced to be 1.86 ± 0.1 eV. Measurements of the rate constants and efficiencies for proton transfer reactions indicate that the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion is between that of difluoroacetate (331.0 kcal/mol) and p-formyl-phenoxide (333.0 kcal/mol). Combining the electron affinity of lumiflavin with the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion gives a lumiflavin hydrogen atom affinity of 59.7 ± 2.2 kcal/mol. The ΔG298 deduced from these results for adding an H atom to gas phase lumiflavin, 52.1 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with ΔG298 for adding an H atom to aqueous lumiflavin from electrochemical measurements in the literature, 51.0 kcal/mol, and that from M06-L density functional calculations in the literature, 51.2 kcal/mol, suggesting little, if any, solvent effect on the H atom addition. The proton affinity of lumiflavin deduced from the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction between lumiflavin and 2-picoline is 227.3 ± 2.0 kcal mol(-1). Density functional theory calculations on isomers of protonated lumiflavin provide a basis for assigning the most probable site of protonation as position 1 on the isoalloxazine ring and for estimating the ionization potentials of lumiflavin neutral radicals.

  9. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  10. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  12. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  13. Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data

  14. Megakaryopoiesis: transcriptional insights into megakaryocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Kostyak, John Creigh; Naik, Ulhas Pandurang

    2007-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cells that travel near the vessel wall during laminar flow. In response to vascular injury, platelets undergo alterations in morphology which allow them to aggregate and cover the injured site. Platelets are produced by megakaryocytes in a process that involves the formation of platelet precursors called proplatelets and subsequent release of these proplatelets into the circulation. By forming a demarcation membrane system within the cytosol, megakaryocytes contain a membrane reservoir which allows for the production of thousands of platelets per mature megakaryocyte. Interestingly, the above process known as megakaryopoiesis is not yet fully understood. However, several groups have contributed evidence to unveil the role of thrombopoietin (TPO), the principal regulator of megakaryopoiesis in vivo. TPO is necessary for megakaryocyte maturation in that TPO deficient mice display greatly reduced megakaryocyte production as well as reduced numbers of mature megakaryocytes. Several transcription factors have also been implicated in megakaryopoiesis including, GATA-1, friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1), nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2), and Fli-1. In fact, interactions among some of the transcription factors have been reported to produce synergistic effects. GATA-1 and Fli-1 interactions result in heightened GPIX and GPIb (2 components of von Willebrand Factor (vWF) receptor) expression, while GATA-1, RUNX1 and core-binding factor beta interactions result in improved alphaIIb promoter activity. Mutations in the vWF complex and alphaIIb beta3 have been linked to disorders such as Bernard-Soulier syndrome and Glazmann thrombasthenia respectively. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional control of megakaryopoiesis may lead to more effective treatments of platelet-related disorders.

  15. Maturing Technologies for Stirling Space Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dobbs, Michael W.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Huth, James

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint of the current state of the art. The RPS Program Office, working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), manages projects to develop thermoelectric and dynamic power systems, including Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs). The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project, located at Glenn Research Center (GRC), is developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controllers. The SCTD Project also performs research that focuses on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing convertor temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Research activity includes maturing subsystems, assemblies, and components to prepare them for infusion into future convertor and generator designs. The status of several technology development efforts are described here. As part of the maturation process, technologies are assessed for readiness in higher-level subsystems. To assess the readiness level of the Dual Convertor Controller (DCC), a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) was performed and the process and results are shown. Stirling technology research is being performed by the SCTD Project for NASA's RPS Program Office, where tasks focus on maturation of Stirling-based systems and subsystems for future space science missions.

  16. Mammalian enamel maturation: Crystallographic changes prior to tooth eruption

    PubMed Central

    Kallistová, Anna; Horáček, Ivan; Šlouf, Miroslav; Skála, Roman; Fridrichová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    Using the distal molar of a minipig as a model, we studied changes in the microstructural characteristics of apatite crystallites during enamel maturation (16-23 months of postnatal age), and their effects upon the mechanical properties of the enamel coat. The slow rate of tooth development in a pig model enabled us to reveal essential heterochronies in particular components of the maturation process. The maturation changes began along the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) of the trigonid, spreading subsequently to the outer layers of the enamel coat to appear at the surface zone with a 2-month delay. Correspondingly, at the distal part of the tooth the timing of maturation processes is delayed by 3-5 month compared to the mesial part of the tooth. The early stage of enamel maturation (16-20 months), when the enamel coat is composed almost exclusively of radial prismatic enamel, is characterized by a gradual increase in crystallite thickness (by a mean monthly increment of 3.8 nm); and an increase in the prism width and thickness of crystals composed of elementary crystallites. The late stage of maturation (the last two months prior to tooth eruption), marked with the rapid appearance of the interprismatic matrix (IPM) during which the crystals densely infill spaces between prisms, is characterized by an abrupt decrease in microstrain and abrupt changes in the micromechanical properties of the enamel: a rapid increase in its ability to resist long-term load and its considerable hardening. The results suggest that in terms of crystallization dynamics the processes characterizing the early and late stage of mammalian enamel maturation represent distinct entities. In regards to common features with enamel formation in the tribosphenic molar we argue that the separation of these processes could be a common apomorphy of mammalian amelogenetic dynamics in general. PMID:28196135

  17. Antigen-affinity controls pre-germinal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn HA; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism behind pre-GC affinity-mediated B cell selection. We applied affinity mutants of HEL antigen and found that rapidly after activation B cells become highly dependent on the cytokine BAFF. Moreover, expression of BAFF receptor CD268 is regulated in a BCR-affinity dependent fashion. High affinity responses via BAFF correlated with PI3K activation, which controlled expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1, and thereby increased survival. In the presence of excess BAFF, or in absence of the Mcl-1 antagonist Noxa, more low-affinity B cells survived the first two days after antigen encounter. This resulted in increased numbers of antigen-specific B cells of low affinity upon immunization and reduced the overall affinity of cells that contributed to the germinal center reaction. Our findings elucidate a crucial molecular pathway of B cell selection in the earliest phases of activation by identifying a novel link between BCR affinity and BAFF-R signaling towards Mcl-1. PMID:27762293

  18. Affine coherent states and Toeplitz operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutníková, Mária; Hutník, Ondrej

    2012-06-01

    We study a parameterized family of Toeplitz operators in the context of affine coherent states based on the Calderón reproducing formula (= resolution of unity on L_2( {R})) and the specific admissible wavelets (= affine coherent states in L_2( {R})) related to Laguerre functions. Symbols of such Calderón-Toeplitz operators as individual coordinates of the affine group (= upper half-plane with the hyperbolic geometry) are considered. In this case, a certain class of pseudo-differential operators, their properties and their operator algebras are investigated. As a result of this study, the Fredholm symbol algebras of the Calderón-Toeplitz operator algebras for these particular cases of symbols are described. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  19. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  20. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  1. Surface affinity role in graphoepitaxy of lamellar block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claveau, Guillaume; Quemere, Patrick; Argoud, Maxime; Hazart, Jerome; Barros, Patricia Pimenta; Sarrazin, Aurelien; Posseme, Nicolas; Tiron, Raluca; Chevalier, Xavier; Nicolet, Celia; Navarro, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Overcoming the optical limitations of 193-nm immersion lithography can be achieved using directed self-assembly (DSA) of block-copolymers (BCPs) as a low-cost and versatile complementary technique. The goal of this paper is to investigate the potential of DSA to address line and space (L/S) high-resolution patterning by performing the density multiplication of lines with the graphoepitaxy approach. As surface affinity is a key parameter in self-assembly, three variations, or "flavors," of DSA template affinity are investigated regarding several success criteria such as morphology control or defectivity. More precisely, both the methodology to register DSA defects and the impact of process parameters on defectivity are detailed. Using the 300-mm pilot line available in LETI and Arkema's advanced materials, we investigate process optimization of DSA line/space patterning of a 38-nm period lamellar PS-b-PMMA BCP (L38). Our integration scheme is based on BCP self-assembly inside organic hard mask guiding patterns obtained using 193i-nm lithography. Defect analysis coupled with the fine tuning of process parameters (annealing, brush material) provided the optimum conditions for the L38 self-assembly. Using such conditions, DSA using the three affinity flavors is investigated by means of SEM top-view and cross-section review. Lithographic performances of one selected flavor are then evaluated with the comparison of process windows function of either commensurability, morphology, or roughness. This work is meant as a guideline for the graphoepitaxy optimization of materials and process parameters on a 300-mm platform.

  2. Use of Affinity Diagrams as Instructional Tools in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselden, Polly G.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how the affinity diagram, a tool for gathering information and organizing it into natural groupings, can be used in inclusive classrooms. It discusses how students can be taught to use an affinity diagram, how affinity diagrams can be used to reflect many voices, and how affinity diagrams can be used to plan class projects.…

  3. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  4. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  5. On the electron affinity of B2

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vanda A.; Taylor, Peter

    2009-02-02

    We present the results of high-level ab initio calculations on the electron affinity of B2. Our new best estimate of 1.93±0.03 eV is in agreement with previous calculations as well as the sole existing experimental estimate of 1.8 eV, as derived from quantities with an uncertainty of 0.4 eV. The electron affinity of atomic boron, which is much smaller, is also calculated for comparison, and again found to be in good agreement with experiment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  7. Asymmetric conformational maturation of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xunhai; Perera, Lalith; Mueller, Geoffrey A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2015-06-03

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase utilizes a metamorphic polymerase domain that is able to adopt two alternate structures that fulfill catalytic and structural roles, thereby minimizing its coding requirements. This ambiguity introduces folding challenges that are met by a complex maturation process. We have investigated this conformational maturation using NMR studies of methyl-labeled RT for the slower processes in combination with molecular dynamics simulations for rapid processes. Starting from an inactive conformation, the p66 precursor undergoes a unimolecular isomerization to a structure similar to its active form, exposing a large hydrophobic surface that facilitates initial homodimer formation. The resulting p66/p66' homodimer exists as a conformational heterodimer, after which a series of conformational adjustments on different time scales can be observed. Formation of the inter-subunit RH:thumb' interface occurs at an early stage, while maturation of the connection' and unfolding of the RH' domains are linked and occur on a much slower time scale.

  8. Evidence of multi-affinity in the Japanese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    Fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (Tokyo Stock Price Index: TOPIX) are analyzed using a multi-affine analysis method. In the research to date, only some simulated self-affine models have shown multi-affinity. In most experiments using observations of self-affine fractal profiles, multi-affinity has not been found. However, we find evidence of multi-affinity in fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (TOPIX). The qth-order Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. This multi-affinity indicates that there are plural mechanisms that affect the same time scale as stock market price fluctuation dynamics.

  9. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain’s region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex

  10. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  11. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Kyra J E; van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Cabezón, Raquel; Cambi, Alessandra; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  12. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  13. Roles of the signal peptide and mature domains in the secretion and maturation of the neutral metalloprotease from Streptomyces cacaoi.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S C; Su, M H; Lee, Y H

    1997-01-01

    The neutral metalloprotease (Npr) of Streptomyces cacaoi is synthesized as a prepro-Npr precursor form consisting of a secretory signal peptide, a propeptide and the mature metalloprotease. The maturation of Npr occurs extracellularly via an autoproteolytic processing of the secreted pro-Npr. The integrity of the propeptide is essential for the formation of mature active Npr but not for its secretion [Chang, Chang and Lee (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 3548-3554]. In this study we investigated whether the secretion and maturation of Npr require the integrity of its signal peptide region and mature protease domain. Five signal peptide mutants were generated, including the substitution mutations at the positively charged region (mutant IR6LE), the central hydrophobic region (mutants GI19EL and G19N), the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage region (mutant P30L) and at the residues adjacent to the signal peptidase cleavage site (mutant YA33SM). All these lesions delayed the export of Npr to the growth medium and also resulted in a 2-10-fold decrease in Npr export. The most severe effect was noted in mutants GI19EL and P30L. When these signal peptide mutations were fused separately with the propeptide lacking the Npr mature domain, the secretory defect on the propeptide was also observed, and this impairment was again more severely expressed in mutants GI19EL and P30L. Thus the Npr signal peptide seems to have more constraints on the hydrophobic core region and at the proline residue within the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage site. Deletion mutations within the C-terminal mature protease domain that left its active site intact still blocked the proteolytic processing of mutant precursor forms of pro-Npr, although their secretions were unaffected. These results, together with our previous findings, strongly suggest that the signal peptide of Npr plays a pivotal role in the secretion of both Npr and the propeptide, but not in the maturation of Npr. On the

  14. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Richard P.; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F.; Maki, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO’s single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO’s unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  15. Optimization of affinity, specificity and function of designed influenza inhibitors using deep sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Timothy A.; Chevalier, Aaron; Song, Yifan; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Fleishman, Sarel J.; De Mattos, Cecilia; Myers, Chris A.; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Blair, Patrick; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    We show that comprehensive sequence-function maps obtained by deep sequencing can be used to reprogram interaction specificity and to leapfrog over bottlenecks in affinity maturation by combining many individually small contributions not detectable in conventional approaches. We use this approach to optimize two computationally designed inhibitors against H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin and, in both cases, obtain variants with subnanomolar binding affinity. The most potent of these, a 51-residue protein, is broadly cross-reactive against all influenza group 1 hemagglutinins, including human H2, and neutralizes H1N1 viruses with a potency that rivals that of several human monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating that computational design followed by comprehensive energy landscape mapping can generate proteins with potential therapeutic utility.

  16. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  17. 7 CFR 51.3058 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3058 Mature. Mature means that the avocado has reached a stage of growth which will insure a proper completion of...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  19. Career Maturity: The Construct and its Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickas, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    Describes vocational maturity and assists counselors in identifying what the various career maturity instruments measure. Discusses task variable measures, intervening variable measures, response variable measures, and methods of choosing an instrument. (JAC)

  20. On modality and complexity of affine embeddings

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    2001-08-31

    Let G be a reductive algebraic group and let H be a reductive subgroup of G. The modality of a G-variety X is the largest number of the parameters in a continuous family of G-orbits in X. A precise formula for the maximum value of the modality over all affine embeddings of the homogeneous space G/H is obtained.

  1. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  2. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  3. Stabilization of the Motion of Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, E. A.; Martynyuk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient conditions for the stability of a nonlinear affine system subject to interval initial conditions are established. These conditions are based on new estimates of the norms of the solutions of the systems of perturbed equations of motion. This stabilization method is used to analyze an electromechanical system with permanent magnet

  4. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  5. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  6. A regulatory network for coordinated flower maturation.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Paul H; Ellis, Christine M; Ploense, Sara E; Wu, Miin-Feng; Yadav, Vandana; Tholl, Dorothea; Chételat, Aurore; Haupt, Ina; Kennerley, Brian J; Hodgens, Charles; Farmer, Edward E; Nagpal, Punita; Reed, Jason W

    2012-02-01

    For self-pollinating plants to reproduce, male and female organ development must be coordinated as flowers mature. The Arabidopsis transcription factors AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 6 (ARF6) and ARF8 regulate this complex process by promoting petal expansion, stamen filament elongation, anther dehiscence, and gynoecium maturation, thereby ensuring that pollen released from the anthers is deposited on the stigma of a receptive gynoecium. ARF6 and ARF8 induce jasmonate production, which in turn triggers expression of MYB21 and MYB24, encoding R2R3 MYB transcription factors that promote petal and stamen growth. To understand the dynamics of this flower maturation regulatory network, we have characterized morphological, chemical, and global gene expression phenotypes of arf, myb, and jasmonate pathway mutant flowers. We found that MYB21 and MYB24 promoted not only petal and stamen development but also gynoecium growth. As well as regulating reproductive competence, both the ARF and MYB factors promoted nectary development or function and volatile sesquiterpene production, which may attract insect pollinators and/or repel pathogens. Mutants lacking jasmonate synthesis or response had decreased MYB21 expression and stamen and petal growth at the stage when flowers normally open, but had increased MYB21 expression in petals of older flowers, resulting in renewed and persistent petal expansion at later stages. Both auxin response and jasmonate synthesis promoted positive feedbacks that may ensure rapid petal and stamen growth as flowers open. MYB21 also fed back negatively on expression of jasmonate biosynthesis pathway genes to decrease flower jasmonate level, which correlated with termination of growth after flowers have opened. These dynamic feedbacks may promote timely, coordinated, and transient growth of flower organs.

  7. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These orange maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These orange maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  11. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  12. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity requirements are contained in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter...

  13. Career Maturity in High School Age Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Joan Daniels

    1982-01-01

    Examined career maturity in high school females by using a set of general career-maturity and gender-specific, career-related measures, and an alternate career-maturity criterion measure, career-planning involvement. Results indicated significant relationships between achievement orientation and occupational information and knowledge of women's…

  14. 7 CFR 906.11 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity. 906.11 Section 906.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.11 Maturity. Maturity...

  15. Targeted inhibition of oncogenic miR-21 maturation with designed RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Yang, Fan; Zubovic, Lorena; Pavelitz, Tom; Yang, Wen; Godin, Katherine; Walker, Matthew; Zheng, Suxin; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) is the largest family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins. Engineered RRMs with new specificity would provide valuable tools and an exacting test of our understanding of specificity. We have achieved the first successful re-design of the specificity of an RRM using rational methods and demonstrated re-targeting of activity in cells. We engineered the conserved RRM of human Rbfox proteins to specifically bind to the terminal loop of miR-21 precursor with high affinity and inhibit its processing by Drosha and Dicer. We further engineered Giardia Dicer by replacing its PAZ domain with the designed RRM. The reprogrammed enzyme degrades pre-miR-21 specifically in vitro and suppresses mature miR-21 levels in cells, which results in increased expression of PDCD4 and significantly decreased viability for cancer cells. The results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering the sequence-specificity of RRMs and of using this ubiquitous platform for diverse biological applications. PMID:27428511

  16. Insight into the growth dynamics and systematic affinities of the Late Cretaceous Gargantuavis from bone microstructure.

    PubMed

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Buffetaut, Eric; Canoville, Aurore; Angst, Delphine

    2014-05-01

    Enigmatic avialan remains of Gargantuavis philoinos from the Ibero-Armorican island of the Late Cretaceous European archipelago (Southern France) led to a debate concerning its taxonomic affinities. Here, we show that the bone microstructure of Gargantuavis resembles that of Apteryx, the extinct emeids and Megalapteryx from New Zealand, and indicates that like these slow-growing terrestrial birds, it took several years to attain skeletal maturity. Our findings suggest that the protracted cyclical growth in these ornithurines may have been in response to insular evolution.

  17. Immunocytochemical markers of neuronal maturation in human diagnostic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Histological descriptions of morphogenesis in human fetal brain and in malformations and tumours can now be supplemented by the timing and sequence of the maturation of individual neurons. In human neuropathology, this is principally achieved by immunocytochemical reactivities used as maturational markers of neuronal properties denoted by molecules and cell products. Cytological markers can appear early and then regress, often being replaced by more mature molecules, or might not exhibit the onset of immunoreactivity until a certain stage of neuronal differentiation is achieved, some early, others intermediate and some late during the maturational process. Inter-specific differences occur in some structures of the brain. The classification of markers of neuronal maturation can be based, in addition to those mentioned above, on several criteria: cytological localisation, water solubility, biochemical nature of the antigen, specificity and various technical factors. The most useful immunocytochemical markers of neuronal maturation in human neuropathology are NeuN, synaptophysin, calretinin and other calcium-binding molecules, various microtubule-associated proteins and chromogranins. Non-antibody histochemical stains that denote maturational processes include luxol fast blue for myelination, acridine orange fluorochrome for nucleic acids, mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and argentophilic impregnations. Neural crest derivatives of the peripheral nervous system, including chromaffin and neuroendocrine cells, have special features that are shared and others that differ greatly between lineages. Other techniques used in human diagnostic neuropathology, particularly as applied to tumours, include chromosomal and genetic analyses, the mTOR signalling pathway, BRAF V600E and other tumour-suppressor gene products, transcription products of developmental genes and the proliferation index of the tumour cells and of mitotic neuroepithelial cells.

  18. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody-antigen interface.

    PubMed

    Marino, S F; Olal, D; Daumke, O

    2016-03-01

    This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment), J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA). The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: "Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) in a mouse model of multiple myeloma", Mol. Oncol. 9 (7) (2015) pp. 1348-58.

  19. Affinity chromatography approaches to overcome the challenges of purifying plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fani; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Queiroz, João A

    2008-09-01

    The diversity of biomolecules present in plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing extracts and the structural and chemical similarities between pDNA and impurities are some of the main challenges of improving or establishing novel purification procedures. In view of the unequalled specificity of affinity purification, this technique has recently begun to be applied in downstream processing of plasmids. This paper discusses the progress and importance of affinity chromatography (AC) for the purification of pDNA-based therapeutic products. Several affinity approaches have already been successfully developed for a variety of applications, and we will focus here on highlighting their possible contributions to the pDNA purification challenge. Diverse affinity applications and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as the most significant results and improvements in the challenging task of purifying plasmids.

  20. Extension of the selection of protein chromatography and the rate model to affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, G; Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2010-01-01

    The rational selection of optimal protein purification sequences, as well as mathematical models that simulate and allow optimization of chromatographic protein purification processes have been developed for purification procedures such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. This paper investigates the extension of such analysis to affinity chromatography both in the selection of chromatographic processes and in the use of the rate model for mathematical modelling and simulation. Two affinity systems were used: Blue Sepharose and Protein A. The extension of the theory developed previously for ion-exchange and HIC chromatography to affinity separations is analyzed in this paper. For the selection of operations two algorithms are used. In the first, the value of η, which corresponds to the efficiency (resolution) of the actual chromatography and, Σ, which determines the amount of a particular contaminant eliminated after each separation step, which determines the purity, have to be determined. It was found that the value of both these parameters is not generic for affinity separations but will depend on the type of affinity system used and will have to be determined on a case by case basis. With Blue Sepharose a salt gradient was used and with Protein A, a pH gradient. Parameters were determined with individual proteins and simulations of the protein mixtures were done. This approach allows investigation of chromatographic protein purification in a holistic manner that includes ion-exchange, HIC, gel filtration and affinity separations for the first time.

  1. Pitch perception prior to cortical maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Bonnie K.

    Pitch perception plays an important role in many complex auditory tasks including speech perception, music perception, and sound source segregation. Because of the protracted and extensive development of the human auditory cortex, pitch perception might be expected to mature, at least over the first few months of life. This dissertation investigates complex pitch perception in 3-month-olds, 7-month-olds and adults -- time points when the organization of the auditory pathway is distinctly different. Using an observer-based psychophysical procedure, a series of four studies were conducted to determine whether infants (1) discriminate the pitch of harmonic complex tones, (2) discriminate the pitch of unresolved harmonics, (3) discriminate the pitch of missing fundamental melodies, and (4) have comparable sensitivity to pitch and spectral changes as adult listeners. The stimuli used in these studies were harmonic complex tones, with energy missing at the fundamental frequency. Infants at both three and seven months of age discriminated the pitch of missing fundamental complexes composed of resolved and unresolved harmonics as well as missing fundamental melodies, demonstrating perception of complex pitch by three months of age. More surprisingly, infants in both age groups had lower pitch and spectral discrimination thresholds than adult listeners. Furthermore, no differences in performance on any of the tasks presented were observed between infants at three and seven months of age. These results suggest that subcortical processing is not only sufficient to support pitch perception prior to cortical maturation, but provides adult-like sensitivity to pitch by three months.

  2. [Arrest of maturation in spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; Bellocci, M; Martini, M; Bruno, B; Moscardelli, S; Fabbrini, A; Properzi, G

    1982-07-30

    The ultrastructural aspects of the germinal epithelium of 10 infertile men affected by maturative arrest of spermatogenesis were studied. We noted an increased number of malformed germinal cells. Marginal nuclear vescicles were present in spermatogonia of patients affected by spermatogonial arrest. The few spermatid present in the germinal epithelium of the patients affected by a spermatidic arrest presented changes of the nuclear condensation, the acrosome, and the tail. The Sertoli cells presented an immature aspect of the nucleus and changes of the "mantle". A possible correlation between the Sertoli cells changes and the altered spermatogenesis was proposed.

  3. Phenotype of normal hairline maturation.

    PubMed

    Rassman, William R; Pak, Jae P; Kim, Jino

    2013-08-01

    Hairlines change shape with age, starting at birth. A good head of hair is frequently present some time after ages 3 to 5 years. The look of childhood has its corresponding hairline, and, as the child grows and develops into adulthood, facial morphology migrate changes from a childlike look to a more mature look. This article discusses the dynamics of hairline evolution and the phenotypic variations of the front and side hairlines in men and women. A modeling system is introduced that provides a common language to define the various anatomic points of the full range of hairlines.

  4. Academic Achievement of High School Students in Relation to Their Anxiety, Emotional Maturity and Social Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puar, Surjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the non-cognitive variables like anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity and their relationship with academic achievement and also to see the locale-wise differences on the basis of their anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity. The study was conducted over a sample of 400 (200…

  5. The Relationship Between Cognitive Career Maturity and Self-Reported Career Maturity of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated relationship between scores on measures of cognitive career maturity and self-reported career maturity in high school sophomores (N=391) and juniors (N=283). Results suggest that there is no relationship between measured career maturity competencies and self-reported career maturity competencies of high school students. (Author/NB)

  6. Bicarbonate-form anion exchange: affinity, regeneration, and stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Rokicki, Christopher A; Boyer, Treavor H

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) is an effective process for removing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from natural waters, but its implementation has been limited due to production of waste sodium chloride solution (i.e., brine) from the regeneration process. Chloride is of concern because elevated concentrations can have adverse effects on engineered and natural systems. The goal of this research was to explore the efficacy of using anion exchange resin with bicarbonate as the mobile counter ion, which would produce a non-chloride regeneration solution. It was found that bicarbonate-form MIEX resin had a similar affinity as chloride-form MIEX resin for sulfate, nitrate, DOC, and ultraviolet-absorbing substances. Both bicarbonate-form and chloride-form MIEX resins showed the greatest removal efficiencies as fresh resin, and removal efficiency decreased with multiple regeneration cycles. Nevertheless, sodium bicarbonate solution was as effective as sodium chloride solution at regenerating MIEX resin. Regeneration of the bicarbonate-form MIEX resin was illustrated by sparging carbon dioxide gas in a water/resin slurry. This regeneration process would eliminate the need for the addition of salts such as sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. The stoichiometry of the bicarbonate-form resin revealed that the bicarbonate was deprotonating within the resin matrix leading to a mixture of both carbonate and bicarbonate mobile counter ions. This work makes an important contribution to ion exchange applications for water treatment by evaluating the affinity, regeneration, and stoichiometry of bicarbonate-form anion exchange.

  7. Neural networks predict tomato maturity stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Federico

    1999-03-01

    Almost 40% of the total horticultural produce exported from Mexico the USA is tomato, and quality is fundamental for maintaining the market. Many fruits packed at the green-mature stage do not mature towards a red color as they were harvested before achieving its physiological maturity. Tomato gassed for advancing maturation does not respond on those fruits, and repacking is necessary at terminal markets, causing losses to the producer. Tomato spectral signatures are different on each maturity stage and tomato size was poorly correlated against peak wavelengths. A back-propagation neural network was used to predict tomato maturity using reflectance ratios as inputs. Higher success rates were achieved on tomato maturity stage recognition with neural networks than with discriminant analysis.

  8. Physiological thermoregulation of mature alligators.

    PubMed

    Smith, E N; Standora, E A; Robertson, S L

    1984-01-01

    A 67.1 kg alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), tested in air, heated twice as fast as it cooled. The cooling thermal time constant was 425 min while alive. Warming and cooling thermal time constants were 421 min after death. The thermal time constant was not appropriate in describing warming in air of mature alligators. Surface and subdermal heat flow measurements of the 67.1 kg animal indicate greater blood flow in the skin during warming compared to cooling. Two mature alligators, 49.9 and 103 kg, were heated and cooled in water. Warming time constants were 67 and 110 min respectively. Cooling time constants were 180 and 246 min. Data from this study were combined with previously published thermal time constants for alligators providing regression equations for alligators ranging from 37 g to 103 kg. Regression equations for alligators tested in water are: tau w = 8.81 M050 tau c = 12.6 M0.62. Time constants (tau) are in minutes (w = warming, c = cooling) with all measurements in stirred water; mass, M, is in kg. Thermal conductance and metabolism data are combined to provide an estimate of the amount the body temperature of theoretical alligators ranging from 50 g to 1000 kg would be elevated by metabolism. A body temperature of 34.2 degrees C is predicted for a 1000 kg theoretical alligator in 30 degrees C water.

  9. Sexual maturation in kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, S.D.; Scarnecchia, D.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We used observational and experimental approaches to obtain information on factors affecting the timing of maturation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka, a semelparous, landlocked salmon. Gonadal staging criteria were developed and applied to three kokanee populations in Idaho lakes and reservoirs. Testes were classified into three stages: immature (stage one, S1), maturing (S2), and mature (S3). Ovaries were classified into eight stages: immature (S1-S3), transitional (stage S4), maturing (S5-S7), and mature (S8). Males entered the maturing stage (S2) in February through April of the spawning year. Females entered maturing stage (S5) as early as July of the year before the spawning year, and as late as March of the spawning year. Three hatchery experiments demonstrated that attainment of a larger body size 10 to 16 months before spawning increased the likelihood of initiation of maturation in both sexes. No gonads in a state of regression were observed. A gonadosomatic index above 0.1 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing male, and a gonadosomatic index above 1.0 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing female. Instantaneous growth rates were not good predictors of maturation, but attaining a size threshold of 18 to 19 cm in the fall was a good predictor of maturation the following year. This improved knowledge of kokanee maturation will permit more effectively management of the species for age, growth and size at maturity as well as for contributions to fisheries. ?? 2008 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimal Affine-Invariant Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mauro S.; Haralick, Robert M.; Phillips, Tsaiyun I.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    1989-03-01

    The affine-transformation matching scheme proposed by Hummel and Wolfson (1988) is very efficient in a model-based matching system, not only in terms of the computational complexity involved, but also in terms of the simplicity of the method. This paper addresses the implementation of the affine-invariant point matching, applied to the problem of recognizing and determining the pose of sheet metal parts. It points out errors that can occur with this method due to quantization, stability, symmetry, and noise problems. By beginning with an explicit noise model which the Hummel and Wolfson technique lacks, we can derive an optimal approach which overcomes these problems. We show that results obtained with the new algorithm are clearly better than the results from the original method.

  11. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  12. Human Monoclonal Antibody Fragments Binding to Insulin-like Growth Factors 1 and 2 with Picomolar Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Feng, Yang; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) and its ligands (IGF1 and IGF2) have been implicated in a variety of physiological processes and in diseases such as cancer. In addition to IGF1R, IGF2 also activates the insulin receptor (IR) isoform A and therefore antibodies against IGF2 can inhibit cell proliferation mediated by the signaling through both IGF1R and IR triggered by IGF2. We identified a new human monoclonal antibody (mAb), m708.2, which bound to IGF1 and IGF2 but not to insulin. m708.2 potently inhibited signal transduction mediated by the interaction of IGF1 or IGF2 with the IGF1R and IGF2 with the IR. It also inhibited the growth of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. An affinity-matured derivative of m708.2, m708.5, bound to IGF1 with equilibrium dissociation constant, KD = 200 pM and to IGF2 with KD = 60 pM. m708.5 inhibited signal transduction mediated by IGF1 and IGF2 and cancer cell growth more potently than m708.2. These results suggest that m708.5 could have potential as a candidate therapeutic for cancers driven by the IGF1,2 interactions with IGF1R and IR. PMID:21750218

  13. Negative affinity X-ray photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Duckett, S.

    1974-01-01

    A new X-ray image intensifier is described. The device should eventually have a quantum efficiency which is an order of magnitude greater than that of presently available high spatial resolution X-ray detectors, such as microchannel plates. The new intesifier is based upon a GaAs crystal photocathode which is activated to achieve negative electron affinity. Details concerning the detector concept are discussed together with the theoretical relations involved, X-ray data, and optical data.

  14. A designed ankyrin repeat protein evolved to picomolar affinity to Her2.

    PubMed

    Zahnd, Christian; Wyler, Emanuel; Schwenk, Jochen M; Steiner, Daniel; Lawrence, Michael C; McKern, Neil M; Pecorari, Frédéric; Ward, Colin W; Joos, Thomas O; Plückthun, Andreas

    2007-06-15

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) are a novel class of binding molecules, which can be selected to recognize specifically a wide variety of target proteins. DARPins were previously selected against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) with low nanomolar affinities. We describe here their affinity maturation by error-prone PCR and ribosome display yielding clones with zero to seven (average 2.5) amino acid substitutions in framework positions. The DARPin with highest affinity (90 pM) carried four mutations at framework positions, leading to a 3000-fold affinity increase compared to the consensus framework variant, mainly coming from a 500-fold increase of the on-rate. This DARPin was found to be highly sensitive in detecting Her2 in human carcinoma extracts. We have determined the crystal structure of this DARPin at 1.7 A, and found that a His to Tyr mutation at the framework position 52 alters the inter-repeat H-bonding pattern and causes a significant conformational change in the relative disposition of the repeat subdomains. These changes are thought to be the reason for the enhanced on-rate of the mutated DARPin. The DARPin not bearing the residue 52 mutation has an unusually slow on-rate, suggesting that binding occurred via conformational selection of a relatively rare state, which was stabilized by this His52Tyr mutation, increasing the on-rate again to typical values. An analysis of the structural location of the framework mutations suggests that randomization of some framework residues either by error-prone PCR or by design in a future library could increase affinities and the target binding spectrum.

  15. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  16. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture.

  17. Climbing the ladder: capability maturity model integration level 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Bryce; Lutteroth, Christof

    2011-02-01

    This article details the attempt to form a complete workflow model for an information and communication technologies (ICT) company in order to achieve a capability maturity model integration (CMMI) maturity rating of 3. During this project, business processes across the company's core and auxiliary sectors were documented and extended using modern enterprise modelling tools and a The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF) methodology. Different challenges were encountered with regard to process customisation and tool support for enterprise modelling. In particular, there were problems with the reuse of process models, the integration of different project management methodologies and the integration of the Rational Unified Process development process framework that had to be solved. We report on these challenges and the perceived effects of the project on the company. Finally, we point out research directions that could help to improve the situation in the future.

  18. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  19. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  20. Electron attachment and detachment: Electron affinities of isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Van Doren, Jane M.

    2004-11-01

    Rate constants for electron attachment to the three isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile [(CF3)(CN)C6H4, or TFMBN] were measured over the temperature range of 303-463 K in a 133-Pa He buffer gas, using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. At 303 K, the measured attachment rate constants are 9.0×10-8 (o-TFMBN), 5.5×10-8 (m-TFMBN), and 8.9×10-8 cm3 s-1 (p-TFMBN), estimated accurate to ±25%. The attachment process formed only the parent anion in all three cases. Thermal electron detachment was observed for all three anion isomers, and rate constants for this reverse process were also measured. From the attachment and detachment results, the electron affinities of the three isomers of TFMBN were determined to be 0.70(o-TFMBN), 0.67(m-TFMBN), and 0.83 eV (p-TFMBN), all ±0.05 eV. G3(MP2) [Gaussian-3 calculations with reduced Møller-Plesset orders (MP2)] calculations were carried out for the neutrals and anions. Electron affinities derived from these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  1. Electron attachment and detachment: electron affinities of isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Van Doren, Jane M

    2004-11-22

    Rate constants for electron attachment to the three isomers of trifluoromethylbenzonitrile [(CF(3))(CN)C(6)H(4), or TFMBN] were measured over the temperature range of 303-463 K in a 133-Pa He buffer gas, using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. At 303 K, the measured attachment rate constants are 9.0 x 10(-8) (o-TFMBN), 5.5 x 10(-8) (m-TFMBN), and 8.9 x 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) (p-TFMBN), estimated accurate to +/-25%. The attachment process formed only the parent anion in all three cases. Thermal electron detachment was observed for all three anion isomers, and rate constants for this reverse process were also measured. From the attachment and detachment results, the electron affinities of the three isomers of TFMBN were determined to be 0.70(o-TFMBN), 0.67(m-TFMBN), and 0.83 eV (p-TFMBN), all +/-0.05 eV. G3(MP2) [Gaussian-3 calculations with reduced Møller-Plesset orders (MP2)] calculations were carried out for the neutrals and anions. Electron affinities derived from these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  2. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  3. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-07

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  4. Occludin S471 Phosphorylation Contributes to Epithelial Monolayer Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Mark T.; Waldschmidt, Helen V.; Larsen, Scott D.; Bewley, Maria C.; Flanagan, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organ systems require epithelial barriers for normal function, and barrier loss is a hallmark of diseases ranging from inflammation to epithelial cancers. However, the molecular processes regulating epithelial barrier maturation are not fully elucidated. After contact, epithelial cells undergo size-reductive proliferation and differentiate, creating a dense, highly ordered monolayer with high resistance barriers. We provide evidence that the tight junction protein occludin contributes to the regulation of epithelial cell maturation upon phosphorylation of S471 in its coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of a phosphoinhibitory occludin S471A mutant prevents size-reductive proliferation and subsequent tight junction maturation in a dominant manner. Inhibition of cell proliferation in cell-contacted but immature monolayers recapitulated this phenotype. A kinase screen identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) targeting S471, and GRK inhibitors delayed epithelial packing and junction maturation. We conclude that occludin contributes to the regulation of size-reductive proliferation and epithelial cell maturation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:27185880

  5. Software maturity model applied to SDI. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Springsteen, B.

    1991-09-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) is undertaking initiatives to mitigate software risks and to stimulate the DoD contractor community to improve its software practices. To that end, IDA assessed the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) software process maturity model and developed an implementation plan for its use within the SDI program. Under this plan, SDI element programs will use the SEI method to select software contractors with mature practices and to monitor contracts after they have been awarded. This document describes the SEI maturity model and the experience of contractors and government agencies. It also explains SDIO's plans to implement the model program-wide and the benefits and lessons learned from using the model on two contracts.

  6. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  7. Ecological and evolutionary patterns of freshwater maturation in Pacific and Atlantic salmonines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, Matthew R.; Fraser, Dylan J.; Dunham, Jason B.; Falke, Jeffery A.; Jordan, Chris E.; McMillan, John R.; Ohms, Haley A.

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive tactics and migratory strategies in Pacific and Atlantic salmonines are inextricably linked through the effects of migration (or lack thereof) on age and size at maturity. In this review, we focus on the ecological and evolutionary patterns of freshwater maturation in salmonines, a key process resulting in the diversification of their life histories. We demonstrate that the energetics of maturation and reproduction provides a unifying theme for understanding both the proximate and ultimate causes of variation in reproductive schedules among species, populations, and the sexes. We use probabilistic maturation reaction norms to illustrate how variation in individual condition, in terms of body size, growth rate, and lipid storage, influences the timing of maturation. This useful framework integrates both genetic and environmental contributions to conditional strategies for maturation and, in doing so, demonstrates how flexible life histories can be both heritable and subject to strong environmental influences. We review evidence that the propensity for freshwater maturation in partially anadromous species is predictable across environmental gradients at geographic and local spatial scales. We note that growth is commonly associated with the propensity for freshwater maturation, but that life-history responses to changes in growth caused by temperature may be strikingly different than changes caused by differences in food availability. We conclude by exploring how contemporary management actions can constrain or promote the diversity of maturation phenotypes in Pacific and Atlantic salmonines and caution against underestimating the role of freshwater maturing forms in maintaining the resiliency of these iconic species.

  8. Study on CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingping; Deng, Riqiang; Wu, Wenyan

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor of human chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a key target in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection process due to its major involvement in binding to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 and facilitating virus entry into the cells. The identification of naturally occurring CCR5 mutations (especially CCR5 delta-32) has allowed us to address the CCR5 molecule as a promising target to prevent or resist HIV infection in vivo. To obtain high-affinity peptides that can be used to block CCR5, CCR5 analogs with high conformational similarity are required. In this study, two recombinant proteins named CCR5 N-Linker-E2 and CCR5 mN-E1-E2 containing the fragments of the CCR5 N-terminal, the first extracellular loop or the second extracellular loop are cloned from a full-length human CCR5 cDNA. The recombinant human CCR5 analogs with self-cleavage activity of the intein Mxe or Ssp in the vector pTwinI were then produced with a high-yield expression and purification system in Escherichia coli. Experiments of extracellular epitope-activity identification (such as immunoprecipitation and indirective/competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) confirmed the close similarity between the epitope activity of the CCR5 analogs and that of the natural CCR5, suggesting the applicability of the recombinant CCR5 analogs as antagonists of the chemokine ligands. Subsequent screening of high-affinity peptides from the phage random-peptides library acquired nine polypeptides, which could be used as CCR5 peptide antagonists. The CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides elucidated in this paper provide us with a basis for further study of the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  9. Integrin avidity regulation: are changes in affinity and conformation underemphasized?

    PubMed

    Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-10-01

    Integrins play critical roles in development, wound healing, immunity and cancer. Central to their function is their unique ability to modulate dynamically their adhesiveness through both affinity- and valency-based mechanisms. Recent advances have shed light on the structural basis for affinity regulation and on the signaling mechanisms responsible for both affinity and valency modes of regulation.

  10. Effects of inhibitors on 1-methyladenine induced maturation of starfish oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harold H.; Xu, Quanhan

    1986-12-01

    1-methladenine (1-MA) induces starfish oocytes maturation via surface reaction followed by the appearance of a cytoplasmic maturation factor which in turn induces germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) to resume meiosis. Cellular mechanisms involved in GVBD were investigated by microinjection of metabolic inhibitors. Colchicine (Co) inhibited maturation, cytochalasin-B (CB) delayed GVBD and actinomycin-D-(Act-D) and puromycin (Pu) had no effect. It appears that the microtubule and the microfilament systems are associated with the nuclear membrane dissolution during the process of oocyte maturation of starfish.

  11. Highly efficient and low-cost purification of lysozyme: a novel tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane immobilized affinity column.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Cao, Qing; Li, Zhiyu; Li, Na; Li, Kean; Liu, Feng

    2009-03-01

    A highly efficient and low-cost affinity chromatography strategy for lysozyme (LZM) purification is reported. Using tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) as ligand and macroporous silica spheres as matrix, a novel affinity column was prepared. The high specificity, stability and repeatability of this Tris immobilized affinity column were proved by LZM separations from protein mixture solutions for 20 circles and 6 months test. LZM purified from chicken egg white on the Tris affinity column had even higher purity than the commercial standard and well-maintained activity of 8287 U/mg (activity of commercial LZM was 8171 U/mg). The efficient affinity process avoiding expensive or fragile ligand would bring advantages to the routine production of LZM from chicken egg white.

  12. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  13. A Maturity Model for Assessing the Use of ICT in School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Mauricio; Sabattin, Jorge; Parada, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an ICT-based and capability-driven model for assessing ICT in education capabilities and maturity of schools. The proposed model, called ICTE-MM (ICT in School Education Maturity Model), has three elements supporting educational processes: information criteria, ICT resources, and leverage domains. Changing the traditional…

  14. Simultaneous measurements of Cotton fiber maturity, fineness, ribbon width, and micronaire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity (degree of secondary wall development) and fineness (linear density) are important cotton quality and processing properties, but their direct measurement is often difficult and/or expensive to perform. An indirect but critical measurement of maturity and fineness is micronaire, which is on...

  15. Skeletal maturation determined by cervical vertebrae development.

    PubMed

    San Román, Paloma; Palma, Juan Carlos; Oteo, M Dolores; Nevado, Esther

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity of cervical vertebrae radiographic assessment to predict skeletal maturation. Left hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 958 Spanish children from 5 to 18 years of age were measured. On the left hand-wrist radiographs the classification of Grave and Brown was used to assess skeletal maturation. Cervical vertebrae maturation was evaluated with lateral cephalometric radiographs using the stages described by Lamparski and by Hassel and Farman. A new method to evaluate the cervical maturation by studying the changes in the concavity of the lower border, height, and shape of the vertebral body was created. Correlation coefficients were calculated to establish the relationship between skeletal maturation values obtained by the three classifications of vertebral and skeletal maturation measured at the wrist. All correlation values obtained were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The results suggest that this new method to determine skeletal maturation is very reliable. A simple method based on morphological characteristics of the cervical vertebral bodies to evaluate the maturation stage has been designed. In the population investigated, this method is as accurate as the Hassel and Farman classification and superior to the Lamparski classification. The morphological vertebral parameter best able to estimate the maturation is the concavity of the lower border of the body.

  16. WNT signaling in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Silvana B.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulates the structure and function of the adult nervous system. Wnt components are key regulators of a variety of developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. In the nervous system, Wnt signaling also regulates the formation and function of neuronal circuits by controlling neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth and guidance, dendrite development, synaptic function, and neuronal plasticity. Wnt factors can signal through three very well characterized cascades: canonical or β-catenin pathway, planar cell polarity pathway and calcium pathway that control different processes. However, divergent downstream cascades have been identified to control neuronal morphogenesis. In the nervous system, the expression of Wnt proteins is a highly controlled process. In addition, deregulation of Wnt signaling has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we will review different aspects of neuronal and dendrite maturation, including spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Finally, the role of Wnt pathway components on Alzheimer’s disease will be revised. PMID:23847469

  17. Reversible immobilization of proteins with streptavidin affinity tags on a surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Jin; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Xian-En; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Bin; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Ping

    2006-11-01

    Dissociation of biotin from streptavidin is very difficult due to their high binding affinity. The re-use of streptavidin-modified surfaces is therefore almost impossible, making devices containing them (e.g. surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor chips) expensive. This paper describes a new protocol for reversible and site-directed immobilization of proteins with streptavidin affinity tags on the streptavidin-coated SPR biosensor chip (SA chip). Two streptavidin affinity tags, nano-tag and streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP tag), were applied. They both can specifically interact with streptavidin but have weaker binding force compared to the biotin-streptavidin system, thus allowing association and dissociation under controlled conditions. The SA chip surface could be regenerated repeatedly without loss of activity by injection of 50 mM NaOH solution. The fusion construct of a SBP tag and a single-chain antibody to mature bovine prion protein (scFv-Z186-SBP) interacts with the SA chip, resulting in a single-chain-antibody-modified surface. The chip showed kinetic response to the prion antigen with equilibrium dissociation constant K (D) approximately equal to 4.01 x 10(-7). All results indicated that the capture activity of the SA chip has no irreversible loss after repeated immobilization and regeneration cycles. The method should be of great benefit to various biosensors, biochips and immunoassay applications based on the streptavidin capture surface.

  18. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  19. On the electron affinity of Be2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the electron affinity (EA) of Be2 using a large Slater-type orbital basis set and extensive correlation based upon a CASSCF reference are reported. The adiabatic EAs are estimated to be 0.44 eV for the 2Sigma sub g(+) state and 0.56 eV for the 2Pi sub u state. The extra electron attaches into an empty bonding orbital, causing a shortening of the bond length and an increase in omega(e). The D(e) of the 2Pi sub u state of Be2 is six times as large as the D(e) of Be2.

  20. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  1. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  3. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  4. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  5. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-07-18

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process.

  6. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  7. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  8. Probing the binding affinity of plasma proteins adsorbed on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Shaoning

    2017-04-06

    Nanoparticle (NP) surfaces are modified immediately by the adsorption of proteins when exposed to human blood, leading to the formation of a protein corona. The adsorption of serum proteins is the key process for exploring the bioapplication and biosafety of NPs. In this study, NP-protein binding affinity (Ka) was investigated. Some serum proteins, such as human serum albumin (HSA), trypsin (TRP), hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (MB), immunoglobulin G (IgG), carbonic anhydrase (CA), fibrinogen (FIB), chymotrypsin and r-globulin, were used with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to address binding affinity according to isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence quenching. The NP protein binding affinities determined by the two methods were in agreement, and depended on the protein properties and size of the NPs. The two methods are convenient, and the results are highly comparable. These methods can be extended to determine the binding affinity of NP protein interactions. The adsorption of proteins upon the AuNP surface is a complex process and depends on several factors, but the binding affinities are higher for proteins with more cysteine residues located on the surface.

  9. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  10. The developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kathryn L; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Regions of the human brain develop at different rates across the first two decades of life, with some maturing before others. It has been hypothesized that a mismatch in the timing of maturation between subcortical regions (involved in affect and reward processing) and prefrontal regions (involved in cognitive control) underlies the increase in risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors observed during adolescence. Most support for this 'dual systems' hypothesis relies on cross-sectional data, and it is not known whether this pattern is present at an individual level. The current study utilizes longitudinal structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to describe the developmental trajectories of regions associated with risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors, namely, the amygdala, nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Structural trajectories of gray matter volumes were analyzed using FreeSurfer in 33 participants aged 7-30 years, each of whom had at least three high-quality MRI scans spanning three developmental periods: late childhood, adolescence and early adulthood (total 152 scans). The majority of individuals in our sample showed relatively earlier maturation in the amygdala and/or NAcc compared to the PFC, providing evidence for a mismatch in the timing of structural maturation between these structures. We then related individual developmental trajectories to retrospectively assessed self-reported risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence in a subsample of 24 participants. Analysis of this smaller sample failed to find a relationship between the presence of a mismatch in brain maturation and risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence. Taken together, it appears that the developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation is present in neurotypically developing individuals. This pattern of development did not directly relate to self-reported behaviors at an individual level in our sample

  11. TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27

    This Technology Maturation Plan schedules the development process that will bring the Lithium Hydrotalcite waste pretreatment process from its current estimated Technology Readiness Level of 3, to a level of 6. This maturation approach involves chemical and engineering research and development work, from laboratory scale to pilot scale testing, to incrementally make the process progress towards its integration in a fully qualified industrial system.

  12. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Growth and Maturation of Relevance to Physical Activity, Performance, and Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malina, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Growth, maturation, and development dominate the daily lives of children and adolescents for approximately the first 2 decades of life. Growth and maturation are biological processes, while development is largely a behavioral process. The 3 processes occur simultaneously and interact. They can be influenced by physical activity and also can…

  13. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  14. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  15. Affinity-based target deconvolution of safranal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Affinity-based target deconvolution is an emerging method for the identification of interactions between drugs/drug candidates and cellular proteins, and helps to predict potential activities and side effects of a given compound. In the present study, we hypothesized that a part of safranal pharmacological effects, one of the major constituent of Crocus sativus L., relies on its physical interaction with target proteins. Methods Affinity chromatography solid support was prepared by covalent attachment of safranal to agarose beads. After passing tissue lysate through the column, safranal-bound proteins were isolated and separated on SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot software. Results and major conclusion Data showed that safranal physically binds to beta actin, cytochrome b-c1 complex sub-unit 1, trifunctional enzyme sub-unit beta and ATP synthase sub-unit alpha and beta. These interactions may explain part of safranal’s pharmacological effects. However, phenotypic and/or biological relevance of these interactions remains to be elucidated by future pharmacological studies. PMID:23514587

  16. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  17. Common and novel transcriptional routes to behavioral maturation in worker and male honey bees.

    PubMed

    Zayed, A; Naeger, N L; Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Robinson, G E

    2012-04-01

    Worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) undergo a process of behavioral maturation leading to their transition from in-hive tasks to foraging--a process which is associated with profound transcriptional changes in the brain. Changes in brain gene expression observed during worker behavioral maturation could represent either a derived program underlying division of labor or a general program unrelated to sociality. Male bees (drones) undergo a process of behavioral maturation associated with the onset of mating flights, but do not partake in division of labor. Drones thus provide an excellent reference point for polarizing transcriptional changes associated with behavioral maturation in honey bees. We assayed the brain transcriptomes of adult drones and workers to compare and contrast differences associated with behavioral maturation in the two sexes. Both behavioral maturation and sex were associated with changes in expression of thousands of genes in the brain. Many genes involved in neuronal development, behavior, and the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters regulating the perception of reward showed sex-biased gene expression. Furthermore, most of the transcriptional changes associated with behavioral maturation were common to drones and workers, consistent with common genetic and physiological regulation. Our study suggests that there is a common behavioral maturation program that has been co-opted and modified to yield the different behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of worker and drone bees.

  18. The Mature Woman and the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Jeffrey M.; Mantz, Concetta M.

    1976-01-01

    The factors and motivations contributing to the presence of increasing numbers of mature women in college are examined, and seven proposals are offered, representing an attempt to develop a total community college program which will meet the needs of mature women students. (NHM)

  19. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to quantify "semantic linguistic maturity" (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human…

  20. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.)...

  1. Thinned Mature Deciduous Forest Silvopastures for Appalachia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on effective management and utilization of silvopastures developed from the ubiquitous mature woodlots which comprise 40-50% of small Appalachian farm acreage. We thinned a white oak dominated mature second growth forested area establishing two 0.5 ha, eight-paddock,...

  2. Canopy temperature and maturity in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat units are a widely used indicator of maturity in cotton. It is generally assumed that it takes approximately 2200°F (1222°C) heat units for a cotton plant on the South High Plains of Texas to mature. This value is based on a typical planting date of May 15 with ample irrigation. As water for c...

  3. Motivation and Maturity Patterns in Marital Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Married couples rated their marital satisfaction and played interpersonal competitive games which revealed the success with which they interacted. Younger husbands who scored more maturely on the Stewart measure of psychosocial maturity belonged to more successful marriages, as did college-educated wives who showed less immaturity and more phallic…

  4. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement Generally... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity... included under the applicable section of the Act. (2) Thirty-five years for existing projects, except...

  5. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement Generally... Requirements for Existing Projects Mortgage Provisions § 200.82 Maturity. The mortgage shall have a maturity... included under the applicable section of the Act. (2) Thirty-five years for existing projects, except...

  6. Toward the Measurement of Psychosocial Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen; And Others

    The concept of psychosocial maturity is reviewed in preparation for the exploration of the feasibility of constructing a scale that measures maturity. Investigation produced a preliminary 54-item scale with high reliability and moderate validity, which is appended. A factor analysis of the scale supports the a priori structure by the theoretical…

  7. The FMI: Dimensions of Follower Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Loren I.

    1976-01-01

    The Follower Maturity Index (FMI) is an instrument derived from leadership theory and based on observations of verbal and nonverbal behavior of followers in task groups. Dimensions of follower maturity--achievement, responsibility, experience, activity, dependence, variety, interests, perspective, position, and awareness--are discussed. For…

  8. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans § 1421.101 Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than...

  9. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans § 1421.101 Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than...

  10. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans § 1421.101 Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than...

  11. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans § 1421.101 Maturity dates. (a)(1) All marketing assistance loans shall mature on demand by CCC and no later than...

  12. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  13. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  14. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  15. 24 CFR 201.11 - Loan maturities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Loan maturities. 201.11 Section 201... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.11 Loan maturities....

  16. 7 CFR 51.1238 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1238 Mature. Mature means that...

  17. Laboratory and outside the laboratory measurements of ginned and ot ginned cotton for fiber micronaire and maturity by portable Near Infrared (NIR) Instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key cotton quality assessment property, impacting downstream fiber processing and dye consistency. A component of micronaire is fiber maturity (degree of secondary wall development). Historically, micronaire and maturity are measured in a laboratory under tight environmental condit...

  18. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  19. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time.

  20. Deficits in Sialylation Impair Podocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Birgit; Sellmeier, Melanie; Schaper, Wiebke; Blume, Linda; Philippens, Brigitte; Kats, Elina; Bernard, Ulrike; Galuska, Sebastian P.; Geyer, Hildegard; Geyer, Rudolf; Worthmann, Kirstin; Schiffer, Mario; Groos, Stephanie; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The role of sialylation in kidney biology is not fully understood. The synthesis of sialoglycoconjugates, which form the outermost structures of animal cells, requires CMP-sialic acid, which is a product of the nuclear enzyme CMAS. We used a knock-in strategy to create a mouse with point mutations in the canonical nuclear localization signal of CMAS, which relocated the enzyme to the cytoplasm of transfected cells without affecting its activity. Although insufficient to prevent nuclear entry in mice, the mutation led to a drastically reduced concentration of nuclear-expressed enzyme. Mice homozygous for the mutation died from kidney failure within 72 hours after birth. The Cmasnls mouse exhibited podocyte foot process effacement, absence of slit diaphragms, and massive proteinuria, recapitulating features of nephrin-knockout mice and of patients with Finnish-type congenital nephrotic syndrome. Although the Cmasnls mouse displayed normal sialylation in all organs including kidney, a critical shortage of CMP-sialic acid prevented sialylation of nephrin and podocalyxin in the maturing podocyte where it is required during the formation of foot processes. Accordingly, the sialylation defects progressed with time and paralleled the morphologic changes. In summary, sialylation is critical during the development of the glomerular filtration barrier and required for the proper function of nephrin. Whether altered sialylation impairs nephrin function in human disease requires further study. PMID:22745475

  1. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  2. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  3. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  4. Induction of dorsal mesoderm by soluble, mature Vg1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D S; Melton, D A

    1995-07-01

    Mesoderm induction during Xenopus development has been extensively studied, and two members of the transforming growth factor-beta family, activin beta B and Vg1, have emerged as candidates for a natural inducer of dorsal mesoderm. Heretofore, analysis of Vg1 activity has relied on injection of hybrid Vg1 mRNAs, which have not been shown to direct efficient secretion of ligand and, therefore, the mechanism of mesoderm induction by processed Vg1 protein is unclear. This report describes injection of Xenopus oocytes with a chimeric activin-Vg1 mRNA, encoding the pro-region of activin beta B fused to the mature region of Vg1, resulting in the processing and secretion of mature Vg1. Treatment of animal pole explants with mature Vg1 protein resulted in differentiation of dorsal, but not ventral, mesodermal tissues and dose-dependent activation of both dorsal and ventrolateral mesodermal markers. At high doses, mature Vg1 induced formation of 'embryoids' with a rudimentary axial pattern, head structures including eyes and a functional neuromuscular system. Furthermore, truncated forms of the activin and FGF receptors, which block mesoderm induction in the intact embryo, fully inhibited mature Vg1 activity. To examine the mechanism of inhibition, we have performed receptor-binding assays with radiolabeled Vg1. Finally, follistatin, a specific inhibitor of activin beta B which is shown not to block endogenous dorsal mesoderm induction, failed to inhibit Vg1. The results support a role for endogenous Vg1 in dorsal mesoderm induction during Xenopus development.

  5. A novel 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based affinity probe for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yingying; Shi, Yanxia; Li, Xitao; Teng, Yingqi; Pan, Zhengying

    2015-11-01

    As a critical regulator of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has attracted intensive drug discovery efforts for treating B-cell lineage cancers and autoimmune disorders. In particular, covalent inhibitors targeting Cys481 in Btk have demonstrated impressive clinical benefits, and their companion affinity probes have been crucial in the drug development process. Recently, we have discovered a novel series of 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based covalent irreversible inhibitors of Btk. Here, we present the discovery of a novel affinity Btk probe based on the aforementioned scaffold and demonstrate its usage in evaluating the target engagement of Btk inhibitors in live cells.

  6. Genetic affinities of Ukrainians from the maternal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnov, Andrey; Balanovsky, Oleg; Utevska, Olga; Metspalu, Ene; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Agdzhoyan, Anastasia; Churnosov, Mikhail; Atramentova, Lyubov; Balanovska, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The area of what is now the Ukraine has been the arena of large-scale demographic processes that may have left their traces in the contemporary gene pool of Ukrainians. In this study, we present new mitochondrial DNA data for 607 Ukrainians (hypervariable segment I sequences and coding region polymorphisms). To study the maternal affinities of Ukrainians at the level of separate mitochondrial haplotypes, we apply an original technique, the haplotype co-occurrence analysis. About 20% of the Ukrainian maternal gene pool is represented by lineages highly specific to Ukrainians, but is scarcely found in other populations. About 9% of Ukrainian mtDNA lineages are typical for peoples of the Volga region. We also identified minor gene pool strata (1.6-3.3%), each of which is common in Lithuanians, Estonians, Saami, Nenets, Cornish, and the populations of the North Caucasus.

  7. Self-affine crossover length in a layered silicate deposit.

    PubMed

    Fossum, J O; Bergene, H H; Hansen, Alex; O'Rourke, B; Manificat, G

    2004-03-01

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic layered silicate 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM Fourier software and a wavelet method. The deposited surfaces show a persistence to antipersistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is concluded that the crossover length is associated with aggregate size, and further that the persistent roughness at small length scales signals near compact clusters of fractal dimension three, whereas the antipersistent roughness at large length scales signals a sedimentation process.

  8. Self-affine crossover length in a layered silicate deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.; Bergene, H. H.; Hansen, Alex; O'Rourke, B.; Manificat, G.

    2004-03-01

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic layered silicate 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM Fourier software and a wavelet method. The deposited surfaces show a persistence to antipersistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is concluded that the crossover length is associated with aggregate size, and further that the persistent roughness at small length scales signals near compact clusters of fractal dimension three, whereas the antipersistent roughness at large length scales signals a sedimentation process.

  9. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  10. Virus inactivation by protein denaturants used in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Peter L; Lloyd, David

    2007-10-01

    Virus inactivation by a number of protein denaturants commonly used in gel affinity chromatography for protein elution and gel recycling has been investigated. The enveloped viruses Sindbis, herpes simplex-1 and vaccinia, and the non-enveloped virus polio-1 were effectively inactivated by 0.5 M sodium hydroxide, 6 M guanidinium thiocyanate, 8 M urea and 70% ethanol. However, pH 2.6, 3 M sodium thiocyanate, 6 M guanidinium chloride and 20% ethanol, while effectively inactivating the enveloped viruses, did not inactivate polio-1. These studies demonstrate that protein denaturants are generally effective for virus inactivation but with the limitation that only some may inactivate non-enveloped viruses. The use of protein denaturants, together with virus reduction steps in the manufacturing process should ensure that viral cross contamination between manufacturing batches of therapeutic biological products is prevented and the safety of the product ensured.

  11. The affine cohomology spaces and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraj, Nizar Ben; Laraiedh, Ismail

    2016-12-01

    We compute the nth cohomology space of the affine Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) on the (1,1)-dimensional real superspace with coefficient in a large class of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-modules M. We apply our results to the module of weight densities and the module of linear differential operators acting on a superspace of weighted densities. This work is the generalization of a result by Basdouri et al. [The linear 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-invariant differential operators on weighted densities on the superspace ℝ1|n and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-relative cohomology, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 10 (2013), Article ID: 1320004, 9 pp.

  12. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  13. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  14. Non-affine deformations in flexible and semi-flexible polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anindita; Wen, Qi; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, Tom; Janmey, Paul; Yodh, Arjun

    2011-03-01

    We test the validity of affine deformation assumption in flexible and semi-flexible polymer networks by embedding different-sized fluorescent tracer beads within model polymer networks and quantifying their displacements under shear. A conventional rheometer is used with a confocal microscope for this purpose. Non-affinity is quantified as a function of applied strain, polymer chain density, cross-link concentration, network morphology, reaction kinetics and size of probe particles used. ~Non-affinity measurements in flexible polymer gels are in qualitative agreement with current theories in rubber elasticity. ~For semi-flexible bio-polymer gels, measurements indicate that non-affine deformations are small for networks of thinner, relatively flexible filaments and get smaller as strain increases into non-linear elastic regime. These small measures are consistent with the entropic model for non-linear elasticity of semi-flexible gels. However, as filament stiffness and mesh size increase, the deformations become more non-affine, as predicted by the enthalpic bending and stretching models of non-linear elasticity. MRSEC DMR-0520020, DMR-0505048, and DMR- 0079909. Done...processed 7726 records...17:54:11 Beginning APS data extraction...17:54:12

  15. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-09-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression.

  16. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  17. High-affinity interactions of ligands at recombinant Guinea pig 5HT7 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. E.; Ragan, J. E.; Pearlman, R. S.; Brusniak, M. Y.-. K.; Eglen, R. M.; Bonhaus, D. W.; Tenner, T. E., Jr.; Miller, J. D.

    2001-10-01

    The serotonin 5HT7 receptor has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes from circadian rhythms [1] to depression and schizophrenia. Clonal cell lines heterologously expressing recombinant receptors offer good models for understanding drug-receptor interactions and development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) is an important modern QSAR procedure that relates the steric and electrostatic fields of a set of aligned compounds to affinity. Here, we utilized CoMFA to predict affinity for a number of high-affinity ligands at the recombinant guinea pig 5HT7 receptor. Using R-lisuride as the template, a final CoMFA model was derived using procedures similar to those of our recent papers [2, 3, 4] The final cross-validated model accounted for >85% of the variance in the compound affinity data, while the final non-cross validated model accounted for >99% of the variance. Model evaluation was done using cross-validation methods with groups of 5 ligands. Twenty cross-validation runs yielded an average predictive r2(q2) of 0.779 ± 0.015 (range: 0.669-0.867). Furthermore, 3D-chemical database search queries derived from the model yielded hit lists of promising agents with high structural similarity to the template. Together, these results suggest a possible basis for high-affinity drug action at 5HT7 receptors.

  18. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  19. Control of Oocyte Growth and Meiotic Maturation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongseop; Spike, Caroline; Greenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    In sexually reproducing animals, oocytes arrest at diplotene or diakinesis and resume meiosis (meiotic maturation) in response to hormones. Chromosome segregation errors in female meiosis I are the leading cause of human birth defects, and age-related changes in the hormonal environment of the ovary are a suggested cause. C. elegans is emerging as a genetic paradigm for studying hormonal control of meiotic maturation. The meiotic maturation processes in C. elegans and mammals share a number of biological and molecular similarities. Major sperm protein (MSP) and luteinizing hormone (LH), though unrelated in sequence, both trigger meiotic resumption using somatic Gαs-adenylate cyclase pathways and soma-germline gap-junctional communication. At a molecular level, the oocyte responses apparently involve the control of conserved protein kinase pathways and post-transcriptional gene regulation in the oocyte. At a cellular level, the responses include cortical cytoskeletal rearrangement, nuclear envelope breakdown, assembly of the acentriolar meiotic spindle, chromosome segregation, and likely changes important for fertilization and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. This chapter focuses on signaling mechanisms required for oocyte growth and meiotic maturation in C. elegans and discusses how these mechanisms coordinate the completion of meiosis and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. PMID:22872481

  20. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis.

  1. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  2. Thymic exosomes promote the final maturation of thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Skogberg, Gabriel; Lindgren, Susanne; Lundqvist, Christina; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Thörn, Karolina; Telemo, Esbjörn; Ekwall, Olov

    2016-01-01

    Extensive knowledge has been gained the last years concerning mechanisms underlying the selection of single positive thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Less is known regarding other important processes in the thymic medulla such as the regulation of late stage thymocyte maturation. We have previously reported that exosomes are abundant in the thymus with a phenotype that indicates an epithelial cell origin and immunoregulatory properties. In this study we use an in vitro system to investigate the effects of thymic exosomes on the maturation of single positive thymocytes as well as effects on nTreg formation. We show that thymic exosomes promote the maturation of single positive CD4+CD25− cells into mature thymocytes with S1P1+Qa2+ and CCR7+Qa2+ phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that thymic exosomes reduce the formation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ thymocytes and that these exosome effects are independent of dendritic cell co-stimulation but require intact exosomal RNA content and surface proteins. An efficient direct uptake of exosomes by both thymocytes and thymic DC’s is also demonstrated. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exosomes may represent a new route of communication within the thymus. PMID:27824109

  3. Rubicon controls endosome maturation as a Rab7 effector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiming; Westphal, Wiebke; Wong, Kwun Ngok; Tan, Irena; Zhong, Qing

    2010-11-09

    The activation and recruitment of the small GTPase Rab7 to early endosome is a critical step for early to late endosome maturation, a process that requires the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KC3) and GTPase regulators. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Rab7 activation and endosome maturation is still poorly defined. Here we report that Rubicon, a component of the PI3KC3 complex, prevents endosome maturation through differential interactions with Rab7 and UVRAG. UVRAG activates PI3KC3 and C-VPS/HOPS, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that catalyzes the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab7. We demonstrate that Rubicon sequesters UVRAG from C-VPS/HOPS. Active GTP-bound Rab7 competes for Rubicon binding and releases UVRAG to associate with C-VPS/HOPS, which in turn promotes further loading of Rab7 with GTP. This feed-forward loop ensures rapid amplification of GTP-bound Rab7 and consequent stimulation of endosome maturation. Hence, Rubicon serves as a previously unknown Rab7 effector to ensure the proper progression of the endocytic pathway.

  4. Degrees of maturity: the complex structure and biology of flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    Flaviviruses are small enveloped virions that enter target cells in a pH-dependent fashion. Virus attachment, entry, and membrane fusion are orchestrated by the envelope (E) and pre-membrane (prM) proteins, the two structural proteins displayed on the surface of virions. Flaviviruses assemble as an immature non-infectious form onto which prM and E form trimeric spikes. During egress from infected cells, flaviviruses undergo dramatic structural changes characterized by the formation of a herringbone arrangement of E proteins that lie flat against the surface of the virion and cleavage of the prM protein by the cellular protease furin. The result is a relatively smooth, infectious mature virion. This dynamic process is now understood in structural detail at the atomic level. However, recent studies indicate that many of the virions released from cells share structural features of both immature and mature virus particles. These mosaic partially mature virions are infectious and interact uniquely with target cells and the host immune response. Here, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the biology and significance of partially mature flaviviruses.

  5. Proteomic analysis of 'Zaosu' pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and its early-maturing bud sport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueting; Zhai, Rui; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Shiwei; Wang, Zhigang; Qiu, Zonghao; Zhang, Junke; Ma, Fengwang; Xu, Lingfei

    2014-07-01

    Maturation of fruits involves a series of physiological, biochemical, and organoleptic changes that eventually make fleshy fruits attractive, palatable, and nutritional. In order to understand the mature mechanism of the early-maturing bud sport of 'Zaosu' pear, we analyzed the differences of proteome expression between the both pears in different mature stages by the methods of a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Seventy-five differential expressed protein spots (p<0.05) were obtained between 'Zaosu' pear and its early-maturing bud sport, but only sixty-eight were demonstratively identified in the database of NCBI and uniprot. The majority of proteins were linked to metabolism, energy, stress response/defense and cell structure. Additionally, our data confirmed an increase of proteins related to cell-wall modification, oxidative stress and pentose phosphate metabolism and a decrease of proteins related to photosynthesis and glycolysis during the development process of both pears, but all these proteins increased or decreased faster in the early-maturing bud sport. This comparative analysis between both pears showed that these proteins were closely associated with maturation and could provide more detailed characteristics of the maturation process of both pears.

  6. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  7. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas L; Sacha, CR; Pollara, Justin; Himes, Jon; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; McGuire, Erin; Kunz, Erika; Eudailey, Joshua A; Trama, Ashley M; LaBranche, Celia; Fouda, Genevieve G; Wiehe, Kevin; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants due to beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Interestingly, we also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B cell lineage evolution with respect to cross-reactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk IgG repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  8. Simulation of B Cell Affinity Maturation Explains Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE...Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 Sidhartha Chaudhury, Jaques Reifman, and Anders Wallqvist Polyvalent vaccines use a mixture of Ags

  9. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T L; Sacha, C R; Pollara, J; Himes, J; Jaeger, F H; Dennison, S M; McGuire, E; Kunz, E; Eudailey, J A; Trama, A M; LaBranche, C; Fouda, G G; Wiehe, K; Montefiori, D C; Haynes, B F; Liao, H-X; Ferrari, G; Alam, S M; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2016-03-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants because of beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution, and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell-mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B-cell lineage evolution with respect to crossreactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B-cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants.

  10. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  11. Sustained attention and prediction: distinct brain maturation trajectories during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Thillay, Alix; Roux, Sylvie; Gissot, Valérie; Carteau-Martin, Isabelle; Knight, Robert T.; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period for frontal cortex maturation necessary for the development of cognitive ability. Sustained attention and prediction are cognitive functions critical for optimizing sensory processing, and essential to efficiently adapt behaviors in an ever-changing world. The aim of the current study was to investigate the brain developmental trajectories of attentive and predictive processing through adolescence. We recorded EEG in 36 participants from the age of 12–24 years (three age groups: 12–14, 14–17, 18–24 years) to target development during early and late adolescence, and early adulthood. We chose a visual target detection task which loaded upon sustained attention, and we manipulated target predictability. Continued maturation of sustained attention after age 12 was evidenced by improved performance (hits, false alarms (FAs) and sensitivity) in a detection task, associated with a frontal shift in the scalp topographies of the Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) and P3 responses, with increasing age. No effect of age was observed on predictive processing, with all ages showing similar benefits in reaction time, increases in P3 amplitude (indexing predictive value encoding and memorization), increases in CNV amplitude (corresponding to prediction implementation) and reduction in target-P3 latency (reflecting successful prediction building and use), with increased predictive content. This suggests that adolescents extracted and used predictive information to generate predictions as well as adults. The present results show that predictive and attentive processing follow distinct brain developmental trajectories: prediction abilities seem mature by the age of 12 and sustained attention continues to improve after 12-years of age and is associated with maturational changes in the frontal cortices. PMID:26483653

  12. Defining a Maturity Scale for Governing Operational Resilience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Enterprise Focus Overview 2 2.1 Overview of RMM 2 2.2 Overview of the Enterprise Focus Process Area 3 3 Maturity Indicator Levels ( MILs ) 5 4 MIL Scale...Capability Levels to the MIL Scale 5 Table 3: MIL Definitions for Specific Goal 1: Establish Strategic Objectives 8 Table 4: MIL Definitions for Specific...Goal 2: Plan for Operational Resilience 8 Table 5: MIL Definitions for Specific Goal 3: Establish Sponsorship 9 Table 6: MIL Definitions for

  13. Sexual maturity in western Atlantic bluefin tuna

    PubMed Central

    Heinisch, Gilad; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Knapp, Jessica M.; Gordin, Hillel; Lutcavage, Molly E.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel endocrine approach for assessing the unresolved matter of the timing of sexual maturation in western Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT), a highly migratory population whose status remains uncertain. Ratios of follicle stimulating hormone to luteinizing hormone, a sexual maturity indicator, in all ABFT ≥134 cm curved fork length (CFL) were <0.4, similar to Mediterranean spawners, indicating that western ABFT mature at considerably smaller sizes and at a much younger age than currently assumed (≥185 cm CFL). PMID:25431301

  14. Two zinc finger proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, are redundantly required for oocyte maturation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Detwiler, M R; Reuben, M; Li, X; Rogers, E; Lin, R

    2001-08-01

    Oocytes are released from meiotic prophase I arrest through a process termed oocyte maturation. We present here a genetic characterization of oocyte maturation, using C. elegans as a model system. We show that two TIS11 zinc finger-containing proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, express specifically in maturing oocytes and function redundantly in oocyte maturation. Oocytes in oma-1;oma-2 mutants initiate but do not complete maturation and arrest at a defined point in prophase I. Two maturation signal-induced molecular events, including the maintenance of activated MAP kinase, do not occur in Oma oocytes. The Oma prophase arrest is released by inactivation of a MYT-1-like kinase, suggesting that OMA-1 and OMA-2 function upstream of MYT-1 as positive regulators of prophase progression during meiotic maturation.

  15. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  16. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  17. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  18. Towards a Regolith Maturity Index for Howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Cartwright, J. A.; Herrin, J. S.; Johnson, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has just arrived at asteroid 4 Vesta, parent of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites [1], to begin a yearlong surface study from orbit [2]. As Dawn will view a debris-covered surface, understanding the formation and mixing processes for the debris layer will strongly aid surface data interpretations. Howardites are polymict breccias mainly composed of clasts derived from basaltic (eucritic) and orthopy-roxenitic (diogenitic) parent materials [3]. Some howardites are poorly reworked (fragmental howardites) whilst others have been extensively gardened in an active regolith (regolithic howardites) [4]. The latter may represent an ancient, well-mixed regolith, whilst the former may be from more recent ejecta deposits [4]. Due to environmental differences, regolith development on Vesta differs in detail from that on the Moon [4-6]. We have been developing petrological criteria to apply to howardite thin sections to determine their relative regolithic maturity, which we are fine-tuning with comparison to noble gas data [7, 8]. Whilst we previously emphasized the abundance of reworked clasts (fragmental and impact-melt breccia clasts), this is an imperfect criterion: one howardite with abundant re-worked clasts (EET 99408) shows no evidence of solar wind Ne (SW-Ne), yet, two of our alleged fragmental howardites have clear SW-Ne signatures (LEW 85313, MET 00423) [7, 8]. We are now investigating the diversity in minor and trace element contents of low-Ca pyroxene clasts in howardites as a measure of regolith grade, and will begin analyses of such grains within reworked clasts. Our hypothesis is that regolithic howardites (and the breccia clasts they contain) will show greater diversity because they sampled more diverse diogenitic plutons than fragmental howardites, which formed from ejecta from only a few impacts [e.g. 4]. Our initial LA-ICP-MS work showed ranges in trace element diversity in low-Ca pyroxenes (estimated from the standard

  19. Elasticity theory of the maturation of viral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Luigi E.; Aggarwal, Ankush; Rudnick, Joseph; Bruinsma, Robijn; Klug, William S.

    2015-04-01

    Many viral capsids undergo a series of significant structural changes following assembly, a process known as maturation. The driving mechanisms for maturation usually are chemical reactions taking place inside the proteins that constitute the capsid ("subunits") that produce structural changes of the subunits. The resulting alterations of the subunits may be directly visible from the capsid structures, as observed by electron microscopy, in the form of a shear shape change and/or a rotation of groups of subunits. The existing thin shell elasticity theory for viral shells does not take account of the internal structure of the subunits and hence cannot describe displacement patterns of the capsid during maturation. Recently, it was proposed for the case of a particular virus (HK97) that thin shell elasticity theory could in fact be generalized to include transformations of the constituent proteins by including such a transformations as a change of the stress-free reference state for the deformation free energy. In this study, we adopt that approach and illustrate its validity in more generality by describing shape changes occurring during maturation across different T-numbers in terms of subunit shearing. Using phase diagrams, we determine the shear directions of the subunits that are most effective to produce capsid shape changes, such as transitions from spherical to facetted capsid shape. We further propose an equivalent stretching mechanism offering a unifying view under which capsid symmetry can be analyzed. We conclude by showing that hexamer shearing not only drives the shape change of the viral capsid during maturation but also is capable of lowering the capsid elastic energy in particular for chiral capsids (e.g., T = 7) and give rise to pre-shear patterns. These additional mechanisms may provide a driving force and an organizational principle for virus assembly.

  20. Physical and chemical characteristics of pitaya fruits at physiological maturity.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T A; Takahashi, L S A

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of the maturation process of pitaya fruit (Hylocereus undatus) to identify indicators that can be used to determine the point of physiological maturity and establish the optimal timing of physiological maturity for harvesting the fruit. A completely randomized experimental design was employed and four biological repeats were performed. Physiological maturity was assessed using various physical characteristics: longitudinal length (LL), equatorial diameter (ED), pericarp thickness (PeT), pulp thickness (PuT), fruit mass (FM), pulp mass (PuM), pericarp mass (PeM), pericarp percentage (%Pe), pulp percentage (%Pu), pulp/pericarp ratio (Pu/Pe), pericarp color index (CI), hue color angle (h°), lightness index (L*), chroma (C*), blue-yellow variation (b*), and green-red variation (a*). Additionally, chemical characteristics such as soluble solid content (SS), titratable acidity (TA), SS/TA ratio, and pH were screened. The data were statistically analyzed by fitting regression models and computing Pearson's correlation coefficients (P < 0.05). Physiological maturity in pitaya fruits occurred between the 30th and 32nd days after anthesis, and this proved to be the optimal period for harvest. At this time, the fruit was completely red with high SS, and had the recommended values of TA, pH, and SS/TA ratio. During this period, ED, PuT, FM, PuM, %Pu, and Pu/Pe increased while PeT, PeM, and %Pe fell; these changes are considered desirable by producers and/or consumers. PuM was the variable that displayed more strong's association with other variables in the analysis.