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Sample records for affinity purification-mass spectrometry

  1. Predicting direct protein interactions from affinity purification mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry identification (AP-MS) is an increasingly popular approach to observe protein-protein interactions (PPI) in vivo. One drawback of AP-MS, however, is that it is prone to detecting indirect interactions mixed with direct physical interactions. Therefore, the ability to distinguish direct interactions from indirect ones is of much interest. Results We first propose a simple probabilistic model for the interactions captured by AP-MS experiments, under which the problem of separating direct interactions from indirect ones is formulated. Then, given idealized quantitative AP-MS data, we study the problem of identifying the most likely set of direct interactions that produced the observed data. We address this challenging graph theoretical problem by first characterizing signatures that can identify weakly connected nodes as well as dense regions of the network. The rest of the direct PPI network is then inferred using a genetic algorithm. Our algorithm shows good performance on both simulated and biological networks with very high sensitivity and specificity. Then the algorithm is used to predict direct interactions from a set of AP-MS PPI data from yeast, and its performance is measured against a high-quality interaction dataset. Conclusions As the sensitivity of AP-MS pipeline improves, the fraction of indirect interactions detected will also increase, thereby making the ability to distinguish them even more desirable. Despite the simplicity of our model for indirect interactions, our method provides a good performance on the test networks. PMID:21034440

  2. Investigation of PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG interactomes by affinity-purification mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) catalyze the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr), a post-translational modification involved in several important biological processes, namely surveillance of genome integrity, cell cycle progression, initiation of the DNA damage response, apoptosis, and regulation of transcription. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), on the other hand, catabolizes pADPr and thereby accounts for the transient nature of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Our investigation of the interactomes of PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG by affinity-purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) aimed, on the one hand, to confirm current knowledge on these interactomes and, on the other hand, to discover new protein partners which could offer insights into PARPs and PARG functions. Results PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG were immunoprecipitated from human cells, and pulled-down proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis prior to in-gel trypsin digestion. Peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Our AP-MS experiments resulted in the identifications of 179 interactions, 139 of which are novel interactions. Gene Ontology analysis of the identified protein interactors points to five biological processes in which PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG may be involved: RNA metabolism for PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG; DNA repair and apoptosis for PARP-1 and PARP-2; and glycolysis and cell cycle for PARP-1. Conclusions This study reveals several novel protein partners for PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG. It provides a global view of the interactomes of these proteins as well as a roadmap to establish the systems biology of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:20388209

  3. The CRAPome: a Contaminant Repository for Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Wright, Zachary; Couzens, Amber L.; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; St-Denis, Nicole; Li, Tuo; Miteva, Yana V.; Hauri, Simon; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Low, Teck Yew; Halim, Vincentius A.; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Hubner, Nina C.; al-Hakim, Abdallah; Bouchard, Annie; Faubert, Denis; Fermin, Damian; Dunham, Wade H.; Goudreault, Marilyn; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Badillo, Beatriz Gonzalez; Pawson, Tony; Durocher, Daniel; Coulombe, Benoit; Aebersold, Ruedi; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Heck, Albert J. R.; Choi, Hyungwon; Gstaiger, Matthias; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cristea, Ileana M.; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Washburn, Mike P.; Raught, Brian; Ewing, Rob M.; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2013-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is now a widely used approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions. However, for any given protein of interest, determining which of the identified polypeptides represent bona fide interactors versus those that are background contaminants (e.g. proteins that interact with the solid-phase support, affinity reagent or epitope tag) is a challenging task. While the standard approach is to identify nonspecific interactions using one or more negative controls, most small-scale AP-MS studies do not capture a complete, accurate background protein set. Fortunately, negative controls are largely bait-independent. Hence, aggregating negative controls from multiple AP-MS studies can increase coverage and improve the characterization of background associated with a given experimental protocol. Here we present the Contaminant Repository for Affinity Purification (the CRAPome) and describe the use of this resource to score protein-protein interactions. The repository (currently available for Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and computational tools are freely available online at www.crapome.org. PMID:23921808

  4. Analyzing protein-protein interactions from affinity purification-mass spectrometry data with SAINT

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungwon; Liu, Guomin; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Tyers, Mike; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2012-01-01

    Significance Analysis of INTeractome (SAINT) is a software package for scoring protein-protein interactions based on label-free quantitative proteomics data (e.g. spectral count or intensity) in affinity purification – mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. SAINT allows bench scientists to select bona fide interactions and remove non-specific interactions in an unbiased manner. However, there is no `one-size-fits-all' statistical model for every dataset, since the experimental design varies across studies. Key variables include the number of baits, the number of biological replicates per bait, and control purifications. Here we give a detailed account of input data format, control data, selection of high confidence interactions, and visualization of filtered data. We explain additional options for customizing the statistical model for optimal filtering in specific datasets. We also discuss a graphical user interface of SAINT in connection to the LIMS system ProHits which can be installed as a virtual machine on Mac OSX or PC Windows computers. PMID:22948729

  5. SAINTq: Scoring protein-protein interactions in affinity purification - mass spectrometry experiments with fragment or peptide intensity data.

    PubMed

    Teo, Guoci; Koh, Hiromi; Fermin, Damian; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Knight, James D R; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Choi, Hyungwon

    2016-08-01

    SAINT (Significance Analysis of INTeractome) is a probabilistic method for scoring bait-prey interactions against negative controls in affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. Our published SAINT algorithms use spectral counts or protein intensities as the input for calculating the probability of true interaction, which enables objective selection of high-confidence interactions with false discovery control. With the advent of new protein quantification methods such as Data Independent Acquisition (DIA), we redeveloped the scoring method to utilize the reproducibility information embedded in the peptide or fragment intensity data as a key scoring criterion, bypassing protein intensity summarization required in the previous SAINT workflow. The new software package, SAINTq, addresses key issues in the interaction scoring based on intensity data, including treatment of missing values and selection of peptides and fragments for scoring each prey protein. We applied SAINTq to two independent DIA AP-MS data sets profiling the interactome of MEPCE and EIF4A2 and that of 14-3-3β, and benchmarked the performance in terms of recovering previously reported literature interactions in the iRefIndex database. In both data sets, the SAINTq analysis using the fragment-level intensity data led to the most sensitive detection of literature interactions at the same level of specificity. This analysis outperforms the analysis using protein intensity data summed from fragment intensity data that is equivalent to the model in SAINTexpress. PMID:27119218

  6. Using ProHits to store, annotate and analyze affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guomin; Zhang, Jianping; Choi, Hyungwon; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Srikumar, Tharan; Larsen, Brett; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Raught, Brian; Tyers, Mike; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is a robust technique used to identify protein-protein interactions. With recent improvements in sample preparation, and dramatic advances in MS instrumentation speed and sensitivity, this technique is becoming more widely used throughout the scientific community. To meet the needs of research groups both large and small, we have developed software solutions for tracking, scoring and analyzing AP-MS data. Here, we provide details for the installation and utilization of ProHits, a Laboratory Information Management System designed specifically for AP-MS interaction proteomics. This protocol explains: (i) how to install the complete ProHits system, including modules for the management of mass spectrometry files and the analysis of interaction data, and (ii) alternative options for the use of pre-existing search results in simpler versions of ProHits, including a virtual machine implementation of our ProHits Lite software. We also describe how to use the main features of the software to analyze AP-MS data. PMID:22948730

  7. PIPINO: A Software Package to Facilitate the Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions from Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Schildbach, Stefan; Blumert, Conny; Horn, Friedemann; von Bergen, Martin; Labudde, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of most proteins is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Hence, the comprehensive characterization of the interactome is the next milestone on the path to understand the biochemistry of the cell. A powerful method to detect protein-protein interactions is a combination of coimmunoprecipitation or affinity purification with quantitative mass spectrometry. Nevertheless, both methods tend to precipitate a high number of background proteins due to nonspecific interactions. To address this challenge the software Protein-Protein-Interaction-Optimizer (PIPINO) was developed to perform an automated data analysis, to facilitate the selection of bona fide binding partners, and to compare the dynamic of interaction networks. In this study we investigated the STAT1 interaction network and its activation dependent dynamics. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was applied to analyze the STAT1 interactome after streptavidin pull-down of biotagged STAT1 from human embryonic kidney 293T cells with and without activation. Starting from more than 2,000 captured proteins 30 potential STAT1 interaction partners were extracted. Interestingly, more than 50% of these were already reported or predicted to bind STAT1. Furthermore, 16 proteins were found to affect the binding behavior depending on STAT1 phosphorylation such as STAT3 or the importin subunits alpha 1 and alpha 6. PMID:26966684

  8. Affinity purification-mass spectrometry analysis of bcl-2 interactome identified SLIRP as a novel interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Trisciuoglio, D; Desideri, M; Farini, V; De Luca, T; Di Martile, M; Tupone, M G; Urbani, A; D'Aguanno, S; Del Bufalo, D

    2016-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 protein family share regions of sequence similarity, the bcl-2 homology (BH) domains. Bcl-2, the most studied member of this family, has four BH domains, BH1–4, and has a critical role in resistance to antineoplastic drugs by regulating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Moreover, it is also involved in other relevant cellular processes such as tumor progression, angiogenesis and autophagy. Deciphering the network of bcl-2-interacting factors should provide a critical advance in understanding the different functions of bcl-2. Here, we characterized bcl-2 interactome by mass spectrometry in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In silico functional analysis associated most part of the identified proteins to mitochondrial functions. Among them we identified SRA stem–loop interacting RNA-binding protein, SLIRP, a mitochondrial protein with a relevant role in regulating mitochondrial messenger RNA (mRNA) homeostasis. We validated bcl-2/SLIRP interaction by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments in cancer cell lines from different histotypes. We showed that, although SLIRP is not involved in mediating bcl-2 ability to protect from apoptosis and oxidative damage, bcl-2 binds and stabilizes SLIRP protein and regulates mitochondrial mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that the BH4 domain of bcl-2 has a role in maintaining this binding. PMID:26866271

  9. Affinity purification-mass spectrometry analysis of bcl-2 interactome identified SLIRP as a novel interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Trisciuoglio, D; Desideri, M; Farini, V; De Luca, T; Di Martile, M; Tupone, M G; Urbani, A; D'Aguanno, S; Del Bufalo, D

    2016-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 protein family share regions of sequence similarity, the bcl-2 homology (BH) domains. Bcl-2, the most studied member of this family, has four BH domains, BH1-4, and has a critical role in resistance to antineoplastic drugs by regulating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Moreover, it is also involved in other relevant cellular processes such as tumor progression, angiogenesis and autophagy. Deciphering the network of bcl-2-interacting factors should provide a critical advance in understanding the different functions of bcl-2. Here, we characterized bcl-2 interactome by mass spectrometry in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In silico functional analysis associated most part of the identified proteins to mitochondrial functions. Among them we identified SRA stem-loop interacting RNA-binding protein, SLIRP, a mitochondrial protein with a relevant role in regulating mitochondrial messenger RNA (mRNA) homeostasis. We validated bcl-2/SLIRP interaction by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments in cancer cell lines from different histotypes. We showed that, although SLIRP is not involved in mediating bcl-2 ability to protect from apoptosis and oxidative damage, bcl-2 binds and stabilizes SLIRP protein and regulates mitochondrial mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that the BH4 domain of bcl-2 has a role in maintaining this binding. PMID:26866271

  10. An Inducible Retroviral Expression System for Tandem Affinity Purification Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Identifies Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-like Protein (MLKL) as an Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Client.

    PubMed

    Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Fauster, Astrid; Rebsamen, Manuele; Kandasamy, Richard K; Scorzoni, Stefania; Vladimer, Gregory I; Müller, André C; Gstaiger, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is a popular strategy for the identification of protein-protein interactions, characterization of protein complexes, and entire networks. Its employment in cellular settings best fitting the relevant physiology is limited by convenient expression vector systems. We developed an easy-to-handle, inducible, dually selectable retroviral expression vector allowing dose- and time-dependent control of bait proteins bearing the efficient streptavidin-hemagglutinin (SH)-tag at their N- or C termini. Concomitant expression of a reporter fluorophore allows to monitor bait-expressing cells by flow cytometry or microscopy and enables high-throughput phenotypic assays. We used the system to successfully characterize the interactome of the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) Gly12Asp (G12D) mutant and exploited the advantage of reporter fluorophore expression by tracking cytokine-independent cell growth using flow cytometry. Moreover, we tested the feasibility of studying cytotoxicity-mediating proteins with the vector system on the cell death-inducing mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) Ser358Asp (S358D) mutant. Interaction proteomics analysis of MLKL Ser358Asp (S358D) identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a high-confidence interacting protein. Further phenotypic characterization established MLKL as a novel HSP90 client. In summary, this novel inducible expression system enables SH-tag-based interaction studies in the cell line proficient for the respective phenotypic or signaling context and constitutes a valuable tool for experimental approaches requiring inducible or traceable protein expression. PMID:26933192

  11. Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C β 1b (PI-PLCβ1b) Interactome: Affinity Purification-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of PI-PLCβ1b with Nuclear Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Blalock, William L.; Bavelloni, Alberto; Faenza, Irene; D'Angelo, Antonietta; Maraldi, Nadir M.; Cocco, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    Two isoforms of inositide-dependent phospholipase C β1 (PI-PLCβ1) are generated by alternative splicing (PLCβ1a and PLCβ1b). Both isoforms are present within the nucleus, but in contrast to PLCβ1a, the vast majority of PLCβ1b is nuclear. In mouse erythroid leukemia cells, PI-PLCβ1 is involved in the regulation of cell division and the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nuclear localization is crucial for the enzymatic function of PI-PLCβ1, although the mechanism by which this nuclear import occurs has never been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to characterize both the mechanism of nuclear localization and the molecular function of nuclear PI-PLCβ1 by identifying its interactome in Friend's erythroleukemia isolated nuclei, utilizing a procedure that coupled immuno-affinity purification with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Using this procedure, 160 proteins were demonstrated to be in association with PI-PLCβ1b, some of which have been previously characterized, such as the splicing factor SRp20 (Srsf3) and Lamin B (Lmnb1). Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of selected proteins confirmed the data obtained via mass spectrometry. Of particular interest was the identification of the nuclear import proteins Kpna2, Kpna4, Kpnb1, Ran, and Rangap1, as well as factors involved in hematological malignancies and several anti-apoptotic proteins. These data give new insight into possible mechanisms of nuclear trafficking and functioning of this critical signaling molecule. PMID:23665500

  12. Functional Characterization of the Kinase Activation Loop in Nucleophosmin (NPM)-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Using Tandem Affinity Purification and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of ≥1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK. PMID:19887368

  13. Determination of electron affinity of carbonyl radicals by means of negative ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muftakhov; Vasil'ev; Mazunov

    1999-06-01

    Appearance energies of [M-H](-) ions from carbonyl compounds R-CO-R' (R,R' = H, CH(3), NH(2), OH) have been measured by means of negative ion mass spectrometry in resonant electron capture mode. Values of electron affinity of the corresponding radicals, CH(2)&dbond;C(X)O, NH&dbond;C(X)O and O&dbond;C(X)O, have been determined. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10407285

  14. Affinity purification and mass spectrometry: an attractive choice to investigate protein-protein interactions in plant immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Affinity purification of protein complexes from biological tissues, followed by liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (AP-MS/MS), has ballooned in recent years due to sizeable increases in nucleic acid sequence data essential for interpreting mass spectra, improvements in affinity purifica...

  15. Affinity chromatographic selection of carbonylated proteins followed by identification of oxidation sites using tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Regnier, Fred

    2005-04-15

    It has been shown that oxidatively modified forms of proteins accumulate during oxidative stress, aging, and in some age-related diseases. One of the unique features of a wide variety of routes by which proteins are oxidized is the generation of carbonyl groups. This paper reports a method for the isolation of oxidized proteins, which involves (1) biotinylation of oxidized proteins with biotin hydrazide and (2) affinity enrichment using monomeric avidin affinity chromatography columns. The selectivity of the method was validated by adding in vitro oxidized biotinylated BSA to a yeast lysate and showing that the predominant protein recovered was BSA. This method was applied to the question of whether large doses of 2-nitropropane produce oxidized proteins. A study of rat liver homogenates showed that animals dosed with 2-nitropropane produced 17 times more oxidized protein than controls in 6 h. Tryptic digestion of these oxidized proteins followed by reversed-phase chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification of 14 peptides and their parent proteins. Nine of the 14 identified peptides were found to carry 1 or 2 oxidation sites and 5 of the 9 peptides were biotinylated. The significance of this affinity method is that it allows the isolation of oxidized proteins from the rest of the proteome and facilitates their identification. In some cases, it is even possible to identify the site of oxidation. PMID:15828771

  16. Affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS): high-throughput screening for specific small molecule interactions with frozen tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, T; Kawabata, S; Taira, S; Okuno, A; Mikawa, R; Murayama, S; Tanaka, K; Takikawa, O

    2015-11-01

    A novel screening system, using affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS), has been developed to identify protein aggregates or organ structures in unfixed human tissue. Frozen tissue sections are positioned on small (millimetre-scale) stainless steel chips and incubated with an extensive library of small molecules. Candidate molecules showing specific affinity for the tissue section are identified by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). As an example application, we screened over a thousand compounds against Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue and identified several compounds with high affinity for AD brain sections containing tau deposits compared to age-matched controls. It should also be possible to use AIMS to isolate chemical compounds with affinity for tissue structures or components that have been extensively modified by events such as oxidation, phosphorylation, acetylation, aggregation, racemization or truncation, for example, due to aging. It may also be applicable to biomarker screening programs. PMID:26365298

  17. Unravelling plant molecular machineries through affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dedecker, Maarten; Van Leene, Jelle; De Jaeger, Geert

    2015-04-01

    Rather than functioning independently, proteins tend to work in concert with each other and with other macromolecules to form macromolecular complexes. Affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) can lead to a better understanding of the cellular functions of these complexes. With the development of easy purification protocols and ultra-sensitive MS, AP-MS is currently widely used for screening co-complex membership in plants. Studying complexes in their developmental context through the isolation of specific organs and tissues has now become feasible. Besides, the tagged protein can be employed for probing other interactions like protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions. With the tools at hand, protein-centred interaction studies will greatly improve our knowledge of how plant cells wire their functional components in relation to their function. PMID:25603557

  18. Identification of Evening Complex Associated Proteins in Arabidopsis by Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhouxin; Kay, Steve A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species possess an endogenous circadian clock to synchronize internal physiology with an oscillating external environment. In plants, the circadian clock coordinates growth, metabolism and development over daily and seasonal time scales. Many proteins in the circadian network form oscillating complexes that temporally regulate myriad processes, including signal transduction, transcription, protein degradation and post-translational modification. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a tripartite complex composed of EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4), EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3), and LUX ARRHYTHMO (LUX), named the evening complex, modulates daily rhythms in gene expression and growth through transcriptional regulation. However, little is known about the physical interactions that connect the circadian system to other pathways. We used affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) methods to identify proteins that associate with the evening complex in A. thaliana. New connections within the circadian network as well as to light signaling pathways were identified, including linkages between the evening complex, TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1), TIME FOR COFFEE (TIC), all phytochromes and TANDEM ZINC KNUCKLE/PLUS3 (TZP). Coupling genetic mutation with affinity purifications tested the roles of phytochrome B (phyB), EARLY FLOWERING 4, and EARLY FLOWERING 3 as nodes connecting the evening complex to clock and light signaling pathways. These experiments establish a hierarchical association between pathways and indicate direct and indirect interactions. Specifically, the results suggested that EARLY FLOWERING 3 and phytochrome B act as hubs connecting the clock and red light signaling pathways. Finally, we characterized a clade of associated nuclear kinases that regulate circadian rhythms, growth, and flowering in A. thaliana. Coupling mass spectrometry and genetics is a powerful method to rapidly and directly identify novel components and connections within and between complex signaling

  19. Profiling of Protein Interaction Networks of Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for nearly all biological processes, and it is known that aberrant protein-protein interactions can lead to human disease and cancer. Recent evidence has suggested that protein interaction interfaces describe a new class of attractive targets for drug development. Full characterization of protein interaction networks of protein complexes and their dynamics in response to various cellular cues will provide essential information for us to understand how protein complexes work together in cells to maintain cell viability and normal homeostasis. Affinity purification coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry has become the primary method for studying in vivo protein interactions of protein complexes and whole organism proteomes. Recent developments in sample preparation and affinity purification strategies allow the capture, identification, and quantification of protein interactions of protein complexes that are stable, dynamic, transient, and/or weak. Current efforts have mainly focused on generating reliable, reproducible, and high confidence protein interaction data sets for functional characterization. The availability of increasing amounts of information on protein interactions in eukaryotic systems and new bioinformatics tools allow functional analysis of quantitative protein interaction data to unravel the biological significance of the identified protein interactions. Existing studies in this area have laid a solid foundation toward generating a complete map of in vivo protein interaction networks of protein complexes in cells or tissues. PMID:20445003

  20. The detection and determination of aldehydes in aqueous solutions by imine chemistry based affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.; Wong, P.; Cooks, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    A new experiment in membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) is described in which membranes are chemically modified in order to improve selectivity and sensitivity. Selective adsorption of analyte to the membrane allows a method of operation in which the membrane is first loaded with analyte. When sufficient material has been collected it is later released from the membrane and transferred into the gas-phase. The analogy with affinity chromatography lead us to think of this as affinity MIMS. Here, the authors specifically use affinity MIMS to selectively detect and enrich aldehydes in aqueous solutions. The experiments on affinity MIMS were done using a bench-top ion trap mass spectrometer. A new type of MIMS interface which places the membrane external to the mass spectrometer and employs a jet separator for an additional stage of enrichment was used.

  1. Mapping differential interactomes by affinity purification coupled with data independent mass spectrometry acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Ivosev, Gordana; Couzens, Amber L.; Larsen, Brett; Taipale, Mikko; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Zhong, Quan; Lindquist, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Pawson, Tony; Bonner, Ron; Tate, Stephen; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing changes in protein-protein interactions associated with sequence variants (e.g. disease-associated mutations or splice forms) or following exposure to drugs, growth factors or hormones is critical to understanding how protein complexes are built, localized and regulated. Affinity purification (AP) coupled with mass spectrometry permits the analysis of protein interactions under near-physiological conditions, yet monitoring interaction changes requires the development of a robust and sensitive quantitative approach, especially for large-scale studies where cost and time are major considerations. To this end, we have coupled AP to data-independent mass spectrometric acquisition (SWATH), and implemented an automated data extraction and statistical analysis pipeline to score modulated interactions. Here, we use AP-SWATH to characterize changes in protein-protein interactions imparted by the HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 or melanoma-associated mutations in the human kinase CDK4. We show that AP-SWATH is a robust label-free approach to characterize such changes, and propose a scalable pipeline for systems biology studies. PMID:24162924

  2. Analysis of the Glycoproteome of Toxoplasma gondii using Lectin Affinity Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qilie; Upadhya, Rajendra; Zhang, Hong; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Nieves, Edward; Kim, Kami; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Glycoproteins are involved in many important molecular recognition processes including invasion, adhesion, differentiation, and development. To identify the glycoproteins of Toxoplasma gondii, a proteomic analysis was undertaken. T. gondii proteins were prepared and fractioned using lectin affinity chromatography. The proteins in each fraction were then separated using SDS-PAGE and identified by tryptic in gel digestion followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Utilizing these methods 132 proteins were identified. Among the identified proteins were 17 surface proteins, 9 microneme proteins, 15 rhoptry proteins, 11 heat shock proteins (HSP), and 32 hypothetical proteins. Several proteins had 1 to 5 transmembrane domains (TMD) with some being as large as 608.3 kDa. Both lectin-fluorescence labeling and lectin blotting were employed to confirm the presence of carbohydrates on the surface or cytoplasm of T. gondii parasites. PCR demonstrated that selected hypothetical proteins were expressed in T. gondii tachyzoites. This is data provides a large scale analysis of the T. gondii glycoproteome. Studies of the function of glycosylation of these proteins may help elucidate mechanism(s) involved in invasion improving drug therapy as well as identify glycoproteins that may prove to be useful as vaccine candidates. PMID:21920448

  3. Comparative Study of Three Methods for Affinity Measurements: Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled with UV Detection and Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Gleb G.; Logie, Jennifer; Okhonin, Victor; Renaud, Justin B.; Mayer, Paul M.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2012-07-01

    We present affinity capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ACE-MS) as a comprehensive separation technique for label-free solution-based affinity analysis. The application of ACE-MS for measuring affinity constants between eight small molecule drugs [ibuprofen, s-flurbiprofen, diclofenac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, folic acid, resveratrol, and 4,4'-(propane-1,3-diyl) dibenzoic acid] and β-cyclodextrin is described. We couple on-line ACE with MS to combine the separation and kinetic capability of ACE together with the molecular weight and structural elucidation of MS in one system. To understand the full potential of ACE-MS, we compare it with two other methods: Direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and ACE with UV detection (ACE-UV). After the evaluation, DIMS provides less reliable equilibrium dissociation constants than separation-based ACE-UV and ACE-MS, and cannot be used solely for the study of noncovalent interactions. ACE-MS determines apparent dissociation constants for all reacting small molecules in a mixture, even in cases when drugs overlap with each other during separation. The ability of ACE-MS to interact, separate, and rapidly scan through m/z can facilitate the simultaneous affinity analysis of multiple interacting pairs, potentially leading to the high-throughput screening of drug candidates.

  4. Identification of MyoD Interactome Using Tandem Affinity Purification Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boyarchuk, Ekaterina; Robin, Philippe; Fritsch, Lauriane; Joliot, Véronique; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle terminal differentiation starts with the commitment of pluripotent mesodermal precursor cells to myoblasts. These cells have still the ability to proliferate or they can differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myotubes, which maturate further to form myofibers. Skeletal muscle terminal differentiation is orchestrated by the coordinated action of various transcription factors, in particular the members of the Muscle Regulatory Factors or MRFs (MyoD, Myogenin, Myf5, and MRF4), also called the myogenic bHLH transcription factors family. These factors cooperate with chromatin-remodeling complexes within elaborate transcriptional regulatory network to achieve skeletal myogenesis. In this, MyoD is considered the master myogenic transcription factor in triggering muscle terminal differentiation. This notion is strengthened by the ability of MyoD to convert non-muscle cells into skeletal muscle cells. Here we describe an approach used to identify MyoD protein partners in an exhaustive manner in order to elucidate the different factors involved in skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. The long-term aim is to understand the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle genes, i.e., MyoD targets. MyoD partners are identified by using Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP-Tag) from a heterologous system coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) characterization, followed by validation of the role of relevant partners during skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. Aberrant forms of myogenic factors, or their aberrant regulation, are associated with a number of muscle disorders: congenital myasthenia, myotonic dystrophy, rhabdomyosarcoma and defects in muscle regeneration. As such, myogenic factors provide a pool of potential therapeutic targets in muscle disorders, both with regard to mechanisms that cause disease itself and regenerative mechanisms that can improve disease treatment. Thus, the detailed understanding of the intermolecular

  5. When is Mass Spectrometry Combined with Affinity Approaches Essential? A Case Study of Tyrosine Nitration in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Brînduşa-Alina; Ulrich, Martina; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Bernevic, Bogdan; Moise, Adrian; Döring, Gerd; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration in proteins occurs under physiologic conditions and is increased at disease conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease. Identification and quantification of tyrosine-nitrations are crucial for understanding nitration mechanism(s) and their functional consequences. Mass spectrometry (MS) is best suited to identify nitration sites, but is hampered by low stabilities and modification levels and possible structural changes induced by nitration. In this insight, we discuss methods for identifying and quantifying nitration sites by proteolytic affinity extraction using nitrotyrosine (NT)-specific antibodies, in combination with electrospray-MS. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by identification of specific nitration sites in two proteins in eosinophil granules from several biological samples, eosinophil-cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). Affinity extraction combined with Edman sequencing enabled the quantification of nitration levels, which were found to be 8 % and 15 % for ECP and EDN, respectively. Structure modeling utilizing available crystal structures and affinity studies using synthetic NT-peptides suggest a tyrosine nitration sequence motif comprising positively charged residues in the vicinity of the NT- residue, located at specific surface- accessible sites of the protein structure. Affinities of Tyr-nitrated peptides from ECP and EDN to NT-antibodies, determined by online bioaffinity- MS, provided nanomolar KD values. In contrast, false-positive identifications of nitrations were obtained in proteins from cystic fibrosis patients upon using NT-specific antibodies, and were shown to be hydroxy-tyrosine modifications. These results demonstrate affinity- mass spectrometry approaches to be essential for unequivocal identification of biological tyrosine nitrations.

  6. Tandem Affinity Purification Combined with Mass Spectrometry to Identify Components of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Peter; Meierhofer, David; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Most biological processes are governed by multiprotein complexes rather than individual proteins. Identification of protein complexes therefore is becoming increasingly important to gain a molecular understanding of cells and organisms. Mass spectrometry–based proteomics combined with affinity-tag-based protein purification is one of the most effective strategies to isolate and identify protein complexes. The development of tandem-affinity purification approaches has revolutionized proteomics experiments. These two-step affinity purification strategies allow rapid, effective purification of protein complexes and, at the same time, minimize background. Identification of even very low-abundant protein complexes with modern sensitive mass spectrometers has become routine. Here, we describe two general strategies for tandem-affinity purification followed by mass spectrometric identification of protein complexes. PMID:18370112

  7. Determination of binding constants by affinity capillary electrophoresis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and phase-distribution methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Weber, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    Many methods for determining intermolecular interactions have been described in the literature in the past several decades. Chief among them are methods based on spectroscopic changes, particularly those based on absorption or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [especially proton NMR (1H NMR)]. Recently, there have been put forward several new methods that are particularly adaptable, use very small quantities of material, and do not place severe requirements on the spectroscopic properties of the binding partners. This review covers new developments in affinity capillary electrophoresis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and phasetransfer methods. PMID:19802330

  8. Evaluation of Binding Selectivities and Affinities of Platinum-Based Quadruplex Interactive Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Kieltyka, Roxanne; Sleiman, Hanadi F.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    The quadruplex binding affinities and selectivities of two large π-surface PtII phenanthroimidazole complexes, as well as a smaller π-surface platinum bipyridine complex and a larger RuII complex, were evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy was used to determine the structures of various quadruplexes and to study the thermal denaturation of the quadruplexes in the absence and presence of the metal complexes. In addition, chemical probe reactions with glyoxal were used to monitor the changes in the quadruplex conformation because of association with the complexes. The platinum phenanthroimidazole complexes show increased affinity for several of the quadruplexes with elongated loops between guanine repeats. Quadruplexes with shorter loops exhibited insubstantial binding to the transition metal complexes. Similarly binding to duplex and single strand oligonucleotides was low overall. Although the ruthenium-based metal complex showed somewhat enhanced quadruplex binding, the PtII complexes had higher quadruplex affinities and selectivities that are attributed to their square planar geometries. The chemical probe reactions using glyoxal indicated increased reactivity when the platinum phenanthroimidazole complexes were bound to the quadruplexes, thus suggesting a conformational change that alters guanine accessibility. PMID:19117031

  9. Recent Advances in Bacteria Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Nanomaterials as Affinity Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tai-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided. PMID:24786089

  10. Enrichment and Analysis of Nonenzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2007-06-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that ETD fragmentation mode resulted in a significantly higher number of glycated peptide identifications (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing dual glycation enrichment on both the protein and peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS with ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analyses of glycated proteins and can have broad applications in studies of diabetes mellitus.

  11. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  12. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27112153

  13. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  14. From pathways to networks: connecting dots by establishing protein-protein interaction networks in signaling pathways using affinity purification and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Signal transductions are the basis of biological activities in all living organisms. Studying the signaling pathways, especially under physiological conditions, has become one of the most important facets of modern biological research. During the last decade, mass spectrometry has been used extensively in biological research and is proven to be effective in addressing important biological questions. Here, we review the current progress in the understanding of signaling networks using mass spectrometry approaches. We will focus on studies of protein-protein interactions that use affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry approach. We discuss obstacles to affinity purification, data processing, functional validation, and identification of transient interactions and provide potential solutions for pathway-specific proteomics analysis, which we hope one day will lead to a comprehensive understanding of signaling networks in humans. PMID:25137225

  15. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  16. Identification of uranyl binding proteins from human kidney-2 cell extracts by immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, Alain; Bérenguer, Frédéric; Basset, Christian; Prat, Odette; Quéméneur, Eric; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2009-07-10

    To improve our knowledge on protein targets of uranyl ion (UO(2)(2+)), we set up a proteomic strategy based on immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). The successful enrichment of UO(2)(2+)-interacting proteins from human kidney-2 (HK-2) soluble cell extracts was obtained using an ion-exchange chromatography followed by a dedicated IMAC process previously described and designed for the uranyl ion. By mass spectrometry analysis we identified 64 proteins displaying varied functions. The use of a computational screening algorithm along with the particular ligand-based properties of the UO(2)(2+) ion allowed the analysis and categorization of the protein collection. This profitable approach demonstrated that most of these proteins fulfill criteria which could rationalize their binding to the UO(2)(2+)-loaded phase. The obtained results enable us to focus on some targets for more in-depth studies and open new insights on its toxicity mechanisms at molecular level. PMID:19501829

  17. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  18. Monolith immuno-affinity enrichment liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for quantitative protein analysis of recombinant bovine somatotropin in serum.

    PubMed

    Smits, Nathalie G E; Blokland, Marco H; Wubs, Klaas L; Nessen, Merel A; van Ginkel, Leen A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2015-08-01

    The use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) to enhance milk production is approved in several countries, but it is prohibited in the European Union. According to EU legislation, it is necessary to confirm positive screening results prior to enforcement. Although adequate screening assays are available nowadays, development of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) confirmatory methods to detect low levels of rbST is still a challenge. Here, we present a novel approach using immuno-affinity enrichment on monolithic micro-columns in combination with state-of-the-art ultra-high pressure LC-MS/MS (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection. The developed approach enables detection and confirmation of rbST in serum at a decision limit (CCα) concentration of 0.8 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, the method is easy to handle, robust and reproducible. We successfully applied the confirmatory method to serum samples from rbST treated cows that were found suspect after immunoassay-based screening. The use of rbST could be confirmed over 1 week after treatment, and the developed method demonstrated the sensitivity needed for effective control. Graphical Abstract Graphical summary of the workflow, for serum preparation, enrichment with monolith microcolumns and LC-MS/MS measurement of rbST. PMID:26077745

  19. Proteomic analysis of human O {sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Niture, Suryakant K.; Doneanu, Catalin E.; Velu, Chinavenmeni S.; Bailey, Nathan I.; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S. . E-mail: Kalkunte.srivenugopal@ttuhsc.edu

    2005-12-02

    Recent evidence suggests that human O {sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein that protects the genome against mutagens and accords tumor resistance to many anticancer alkylating agents, may have other roles besides repair. Therefore, we isolated MGMT-interacting proteins from extracts of HT29 human colon cancer cells using affinity chromatography on MGMT-Sepharose. Specific proteins bound to this column were identified by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and/or Western blotting. These procedures identified >60 MGMT-interacting proteins with diverse functions including those involved in DNA replication and repair (MCM2, PCNA, ORC1, DNA polymerase {delta}, MSH-2, and DNA-dependent protein kinase), cell cycle progression (CDK1, cyclin B, CDK2, CDC7, CDC10, 14-3-3 protein, and p21{sup waf1/cip1}), RNA processing and translation (poly(A)-binding protein, nucleolin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, A2/B1, and elongation factor-1{alpha}), several histones (H4, H3.4, and H2A.1), and topoisomerase I. The heat shock proteins, HSP-90{alpha} and {beta}, also bound strongly with MGMT. The DNA repair activity of MGMT was greatly enhanced in the presence of interacting proteins or histones. These data, for the first time, suggest that human MGMT is likely to have additional functions, possibly, in sensing and integrating the DNA damage/repair-related signals with replication, cell cycle progression, and genomic stability.

  20. Identification and Affinity-Quantification of ß-Amyloid and α-Synuclein Polypeptides Using On-Line SAW-Biosensor-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamnoiu, Stefan; Vlad, Camelia; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Moise, Adrian; Lindner, Kathrin; Engel, Nicole; Vilanova, Mar; Diaz, Mireia; Karreman, Christiaan; Leist, Marcel; Ciossek, Thomas; Hengerer, Bastian; Vilaseca, Marta; Przybylski, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Bioaffinity analysis using a variety of biosensors has become an established tool for detection and quantification of biomolecular interactions. Biosensors, however, are generally limited by the lack of chemical structure information of affinity-bound ligands. On-line bioaffinity-mass spectrometry using a surface-acoustic wave biosensor (SAW-MS) is a new combination providing the simultaneous affinity detection, quantification, and mass spectrometric structural characterization of ligands. We describe here an on-line SAW-MS combination for direct identification and affinity determination, using a new interface for MS of the affinity-isolated ligand eluate. Key element of the SAW-MS combination is a microfluidic interface that integrates affinity-isolation on a gold chip, in-situ sample concentration, and desalting with a microcolumn for MS of the ligand eluate from the biosensor. Suitable MS- acquisition software has been developed that provides coupling of the SAW-MS interface to a Bruker Daltonics ion trap-MS, FTICR-MS, and Waters Synapt-QTOF- MS systems. Applications are presented for mass spectrometric identifications and affinity (KD) determinations of the neurodegenerative polypeptides, ß-amyloid (Aß), and pathophysiological and physiological synucleins (α- and ß-synucleins), two key polypeptide systems for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Moreover, first in vivo applications of αSyn polypeptides from brain homogenate show the feasibility of on-line affinity-MS to the direct analysis of biological material. These results demonstrate on-line SAW-bioaffinity-MS as a powerful tool for structural and quantitative analysis of biopolymer interactions.

  1. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27067900

  2. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  3. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  4. Data on the identification of protein interactors with the Evening Complex and PCH1 in Arabidopsis using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry (TAP-MS).

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Alvarez, Sophie; Nusinow, Dmitri A

    2016-09-01

    Tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) analysis is a powerful biochemical approach to identify protein-protein associations. Here we describe two datasets generated by a series of TAP-MS analyses to co-purify proteins associated with either ELF3 or ELF4 of the Evening Complex (EC) ("Identification of Evening Complex Associated Proteins in Arabidopsis by Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry" (Huang et al., 2016a) [1]) or proteins associated with PCH1, which is a newly identified output of the circadian clock to regulate photoperiodic growth in Arabidopsis thaliana ("PCH1 integrates circadian and light-signaling pathways to control photoperiod-responsive growth in Arabidopsis" (Huang et al. 2016b) [2]). We used either ELF3, ELF4 or PCH1 fused to a C-terminal tandem affinity tag (6xHis-3xFLAG) as baits and conducted purifications in various genetic mutant backgrounds. These data are discussed in recent publications [1,2], and are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002606 (for EC) and PRIDE: PXD003352 (for PCH1). PMID:27274533

  5. abFASP-MS: Affinity-Based Filter-Aided Sample Preparation Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Labeled Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled to 1-D gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a well-established and widespread approach for the analyses of noncovalently interacting protein complexes. In this study, two proteins conjugated to a streptavidin-binding peptide and hemagglutinin double tag were expressed in the respective Flp-In HEK293 cell lines: green fluorescent protein (SH-GFP) and TANK binding kinase 1 (SH-TBK1_MOUSE). Fluorescent anti-HA immunoblots revealed that the expression level of SH-GFP was ∼50% lower than that of SH-TBK1_MOUSE. Subsequently, the input material was normalized to obtain a similar quantity of purified SH-tagged proteins. Optimization of the release of protein complexes from the anti-HA-agarose with different eluting agents was then assessed. With respect to the total number of protein groups identified in the purified complexes, elution with 2% SDS surpassed both 100 mM glycine and 100 mM formic acid. Relative quantitation of the purified protein complexes using TMT 6-plex reagents confirmed the higher efficiency of the 2% SDS elution followed by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP). The data presented in this study provide a new application of FASP to quantitative MS analysis of affinity-purified protein complexes. We have termed the approach abFASP-MS, or affinity-based filter-aided sample preparation mass spectrometry. PMID:24400740

  6. Multiple ligand detection and affinity measurement by ultrafiltration and mass spectrometry analysis applied to fragment mixture screening.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; Fu, Xu; Shen, Jie; Chen, Xin; Wang, Quan; Bi, Xin; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Lixin; Liang, Guangxin; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-07-30

    Binding affinity of a small molecule drug candidate to a therapeutically relevant biomolecular target is regarded the first determinant of the candidate's efficacy. Although the ultrafiltration-LC/MS (UF-LC/MS) assay enables efficient ligand discovery for a specific target from a mixed pool of compounds, most previous analysis allowed for relative affinity ranking of different ligands. Moreover, the reliability of affinity measurement for multiple ligands with UF-LC/MS has hardly been strictly evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of K(d) determination through UF-LC/MS by comparison with classical ITC measurement. A single-point K(d) calculation method was found to be suitable for affinity measurement of multiple ligands bound to the same target when binding competition is minimized. A second workflow based on analysis of the unbound fraction of compounds was then developed, which simplified sample preparation as well as warranted reliable ligand discovery. The new workflow implemented in a fragment mixture screen afforded rapid and sensitive detection of low-affinity ligands selectively bound to the RNA polymerase NS5B of hepatitis C virus. More importantly, ligand identification and affinity measurement for mixture-based fragment screens by UF-LC/MS were in good accordance with single ligand evaluation by conventional SPR analysis. This new approach is expected to become a valuable addition to the arsenal of high-throughput screening techniques for fragment-based drug discovery. PMID:26320641

  7. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction. PMID:26778144

  8. Identifying an interaction site between MutH and the C-terminal domain of MutL by crosslinking, affinity purification, chemical coding and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahrends, Robert; Kosinski, Jan; Kirsch, Dieter; Manelyte, Laura; Giron-Monzon, Luis; Hummerich, Lars; Schulz, Oliver; Spengler, Bernhard; Friedhoff, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To investigate protein-protein interaction sites in the DNA mismatch repair system we developed a crosslinking/mass spectrometry technique employing a commercially available trifunctional crosslinker with a thiol-specific methanethiosulfonate group, a photoactivatable benzophenone moiety and a biotin affinity tag. The XACM approach combines photocrosslinking (X), in-solution digestion of the crosslinked mixtures, affinity purification via the biotin handle (A), chemical coding of the crosslinked products (C) followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (M). We illustrate the feasibility of the method using a single-cysteine variant of the homodimeric DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Moreover, we successfully applied this method to identify the photocrosslink formed between the single-cysteine MutH variant A223C, labeled with the trifunctional crosslinker in the C-terminal helix and its activator protein MutL. The identified crosslinked MutL-peptide maps to a conserved surface patch of the MutL C-terminal dimerization domain. These observations are substantiated by additional mutational and chemical crosslinking studies. Our results shed light on the potential structures of the MutL holoenzyme and the MutH-MutL-DNA complex. PMID:16772401

  9. Early detection of influenza A(H5) viruses with affinity for the human sialic acid receptor by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry based mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Yea, C; McCorrister, S; Westmacott, G; Petric, M; Tellier, R

    2011-03-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) strains have been causing sporadic cases of disease in South East Asia and Africa for many years. These cases are associated with a high fatality rate, and it is feared that the virus could evolve into a strain capable of causing a pandemic. It is likely that a requirement for a A(H5) pandemic to occur is a switch in the receptor affinity of the virus. Candidate mutations in the hemagglutinin glycoprotein have been identified in the literature, and their emergence in circulating viruses would be an ominous development. This study describes a method to identify the presence of these mutations, even within a quasispecies, using RT-PCR followed by in vitro translation and peptide characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. PMID:21195111

  10. Evaluation of a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry System for the Analysis of Surface Deposited and Affinity Captured Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Ford, Michael J; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Kennel, Steve J

    2006-01-01

    A combined self-aspirating electrospray emitter/surfacing-sampling probe coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used to sample and mass analyze proteins from surfaces. The sampling probe mass spectrometer system was used to sample and detect lysozyme that had been deposited onto a glass slide using a piezoelectric spotter or murine gamma-interferon affinity captured on a glass slide using surface-immobilized anti-gamma-interferon antibody. The detection level for surface-deposited lysozyme (spot size {le}200 {micro}m) was approximately 1.0 fmol ({approx}100 fmol/mm{sup 2}) as determined from the ability to measure accurately the protein molecular mass from the mass spectrum acquired by sampling the deposit. These detection limits may be sufficient for certain applications in which protein fractions from a separation method are collected onto a surface. Radiolabeled proteins were used to quantify the surface density of immobilized antibody and the efficiency of capture of the gamma-interferon on glass and higher surface area ceramic supports. The capture density of gamma-interferon at surface saturation ranged from about 23 to 50 fmol/mm{sup 2} depending on the capture surface. Nonetheless, mass spectrometric detection of affinity capture protein was successful in some cases, but the results were not reproducible. Thus, improvement of the sampling system, ionization efficiency and/or capture density will be necessary for practical sampling of affinity-captured proteins. The means to accomplish improved sampling system detection limits and to increase the absolute amounts of protein captured per unit area are discussed.

  11. Affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, adapted immunodepletion and mass spectrometry used for detection of porcine and piscine heparin-binding human plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadóttir, Stefanía Guðrún; Flengsrud, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    Heparin-binding proteins in human plasma were studied using affinity chromatography columns with porcine (2mL, 10.7mg capacity) and piscine heparin (5mL, 2.7mg capacity). Two-dimensional electrophoresis (Bio-Rad Protean II gel system with 16cm×16cm gels using isoelectric focusing (IEF) and nonequilibrium pH-gradient gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE)), Bruker Ultraflex MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and immunoblotting (NovaBlot semidry discontinuous blotting) were used for unfractionated plasma. This revealed electropherograms with differences between porcine and piscine heparin-binding and totally 17 different fibrinogen variants from all 3 chains. Immunodepletion was used to remove fibrinogen (42.1mg anti-human fibrinogen in 8.4mL resin) and serum albumin (0.42mg binding capacity in 14mL resin) and porcine and piscine heparin-binding proteins were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (Ultimate 3000 NanoLC with Acclaim PepMap 100 column (50cm×75μm)-LTQ Orbitrap Mass XL). In total, the binding of 76 putative or acknowledged biomarkers are shown. Of the identified proteins, 14 are not previously shown to be heparin-binding, such as the low concentration proteins lipocalin-1 and tropomyosin and a hitherto not detected protein in plasma, zinc finger protein 483. The putative heparin-binding sequences were analyzed. The results suggest that the combination of group specific affinity and adapted immunodepletion chromatography could be useful in the study of the plasma proteome. PMID:24316520

  12. A New Protocol of Analyzing Isotope Coded Affinity Tag Data from High Resolution LC-MS Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weichuan; Liu, Junfeng; Colangelo, Chris; Gulcicek, Erol; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Isotope Coded Affinity Tags (ICAT) is a labeling technique that provides insights into quantitative molecular changes. In this paper, we propose a new protocol to identify and analyze ICAT labeled peak pairs in high-resolution LC-MS data. Our major contributions are: 1. We use isotope distance constraint, ICAT distance constraint, and LC-span constraint to identify ICAT labeled peak pairs; and 2. We propose to trigger tandem MS/MS scanning based on the ratio estimation value of identified ICAT peak pairs instead of the peak intensity values. Compared with current approaches that choose peaks with high intensity values for tandem MS/MS scanning, the new protocol can improve the scanning efficiency and accuracy. PMID:17499548

  13. Characterization of the novel broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor CTx-0294885 as an affinity reagent for mass spectrometry-based kinome profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxi; Holmes, Ian P; Hochgräfe, Falko; Walker, Scott R; Ali, Naveid A; Humphrey, Emily S; Wu, Jianmin; de Silva, Melanie; Kersten, Wilhelmus J A; Connor, Theresa; Falk, Hendrik; Allan, Lynda; Street, Ian P; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Monahan, Brendon J; Peat, Thomas S; Daly, Roger J

    2013-07-01

    Kinase enrichment utilizing broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors enables the identification of large proportions of the expressed kinome by mass spectrometry. However, the existing inhibitors are still inadequate in covering the entire kinome. Here, we identified a novel bisanilino pyrimidine, CTx-0294885, exhibiting inhibitory activity against a broad range of kinases in vitro, and further developed it into a Sepharose-supported kinase capture reagent. Use of a quantitative proteomics approach confirmed the selectivity of CTx-0294885-bound beads for kinase enrichment. Large-scale CTx-0294885-based affinity purification followed by LC-MS/MS led to the identification of 235 protein kinases from MDA-MB-231 cells, including all members of the AKT family that had not been previously detected by other broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors. Addition of CTx-0294885 to a mixture of three kinase inhibitors commonly used for kinase-enrichment increased the number of kinase identifications to 261, representing the largest kinome coverage from a single cell line reported to date. Coupling phosphopeptide enrichment with affinity purification using the four inhibitors enabled the identification of 799 high-confidence phosphosites on 183 kinases, ∼10% of which were localized to the activation loop, and included previously unreported phosphosites on BMP2K, MELK, HIPK2, and PRKDC. Therefore, CTx-0294885 represents a powerful new reagent for analysis of kinome signaling networks that may facilitate development of targeted therapeutic strategies. Proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier PXD000239. PMID:23692254

  14. Detection and Identification of Heme c-Modified Peptides by Histidine Affinity Chromatography, High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Park, Jea H.; Belchik, Sara M.; Shi, Liang; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2012-12-07

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (proteins with covalently attached heme c moieties) play important roles in extracellular metal respiration in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-(LC-MS/MS) characterization of c-type cytochromes is hindered by the presence of multiple heme groups, since the heme c modified peptides are typically not observed, or if observed, not identified. Using a recently reported histidine affinity chromatography (HAC) procedure, we enriched heme c tryptic peptides from purified bovine heart cytochrome c, a bacterial decaheme cytochrome, and subjected these samples to LC-MS/MS analysis. Enriched bovine cytochrome c samples yielded three- to six-fold more confident peptide-spectrum matches to heme-c containing peptides than unenriched digests. In unenriched digests of the decaheme cytochrome MtoA from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1, heme c peptides for four of the ten expected sites were observed by LC-MS/MS; following HAC fractionation, peptides covering nine out of ten sites were obtained. Heme c peptide spiked into E. coli lysates at mass ratios as low as 10-4 was detected with good signal-to-noise after HAC and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to HAC, we have developed a proteomics database search strategy that takes into account the unique physicochemical properties of heme c peptides. The results suggest that accounting for the double thioether link between heme c and peptide, and the use of the labile heme fragment as a reporter ion, can improve database searching results. The combination of affinity chromatography and heme-specific informatics yielded increases in the number of peptide-spectrum matches of 20-100-fold for bovine cytochrome c.

  15. Integration of Affinity Selection-Mass Spectrometry and Functional Cell-Based Assays to Rapidly Triage Druggable Target Space within the NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kutilek, Victoria D; Andrews, Christine L; Richards, Matthew P; Xu, Zangwei; Sun, Tianxiao; Chen, Yiping; Hashke, Andrew; Smotrov, Nadya; Fernandez, Rafael; Nickbarg, Elliott B; Chamberlin, Chad; Sauvagnat, Berengere; Curran, Patrick J; Boinay, Ryan; Saradjian, Peter; Allen, Samantha J; Byrne, Noel; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Ford, Rachael E; Hall, Dawn L; Kornienko, Maria; Rickert, Keith W; Sharma, Sujata; Shipman, Jennifer M; Lumb, Kevin J; Coleman, Kevin; Dandliker, Peter J; Kariv, Ilona; Beutel, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The primary objective of early drug discovery is to associate druggable target space with a desired phenotype. The inability to efficiently associate these often leads to failure early in the drug discovery process. In this proof-of-concept study, the most tractable starting points for drug discovery within the NF-κB pathway model system were identified by integrating affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) with functional cellular assays. The AS-MS platform Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) was used to rapidly screen 15 NF-κB proteins in parallel against large-compound libraries. ALIS identified 382 target-selective compounds binding to 14 of the 15 proteins. Without any chemical optimization, 22 of the 382 target-selective compounds exhibited a cellular phenotype consistent with the respective target associated in ALIS. Further studies on structurally related compounds distinguished two chemical series that exhibited a preliminary structure-activity relationship and confirmed target-driven cellular activity to NF-κB1/p105 and TRAF5, respectively. These two series represent new drug discovery opportunities for chemical optimization. The results described herein demonstrate the power of combining ALIS with cell functional assays in a high-throughput, target-based approach to determine the most tractable drug discovery opportunities within a pathway. PMID:26969322

  16. Quantification of activated NF-kappaB/RelA complexes using ssDNA aptamer affinity-stable isotope dilution-selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Widen, Steven G; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Tian, Bing; Wood, Thomas G; Edeh, Chukwudi B; Brasier, Allan R

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) is a family of inducible transcription factors regulated by stimulus-induced protein interactions. In the cytoplasm, the NF-κB member RelA transactivator is inactivated by binding inhibitory IκBs, whereas in its activated state, the serine-phosphorylated protein binds the p300 histone acetyltransferase. Here we describe the isolation of a ssDNA aptamer (termed P028F4) that binds to the activated (IκBα-dissociated) form of RelA with a K(D) of 6.4 × 10(-10), and its application in an enrichment-mass spectrometric quantification assay. ssDNA P028F4 competes with cognate duplex high affinity NF-κB binding sites for RelA binding in vitro, binds activated RelA in eukaryotic nuclei and reduces TNFα-stimulated endogenous NF-κB dependent gene expression. Incorporation of P028F4 as an affinity isolation step enriches for serine 536 phosphorylated and p300 coactivator complexed RelA, simultaneously depleting IκBα·RelA complexes. A stable isotope dilution (SID)-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)- mass spectrometry (MS) assay for RelA was developed that produced a linear response over 1,000 fold dilution range of input protein and had a 200 amol lower limit of quantification. This multiplex SID-SRM-MS RelA assay was used to quantify activated endogenous RelA in cytokine-stimulated eukaryotic cells isolated by single-step P028F4 enrichment. The aptamer-SID-SRM-MS assay quantified the fraction of activated RelA in subcellular extracts, detecting the presence of a cytoplasmic RelA reservoir unresponsive to TNFα stimulation. We conclude that aptamer-SID-SRM-MS is a versatile tool for quantification of activated NF-κB/RelA and its associated complexes in response to pathway activation. PMID:21502374

  17. Quantification of Activated NF-κB/RelA Complexes Using ssDNA Aptamer Affinity – Stable Isotope Dilution—Selected Reaction Monitoring—Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingxin; Widen, Steven G.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Tian, Bing; Wood, Thomas G.; Edeh, Chukwudi B.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) is a family of inducible transcription factors regulated by stimulus-induced protein interactions. In the cytoplasm, the NF-κB member RelA transactivator is inactivated by binding inhibitory IκBs, whereas in its activated state, the serine-phosphorylated protein binds the p300 histone acetyltransferase. Here we describe the isolation of a ssDNA aptamer (termed P028F4) that binds to the activated (IκBα-dissociated) form of RelA with a KD of 6.4 × 10−10, and its application in an enrichment-mass spectrometric quantification assay. ssDNA P028F4 competes with cognate duplex high affinity NF-κB binding sites for RelA binding in vitro, binds activated RelA in eukaryotic nuclei and reduces TNFα-stimulated endogenous NF-κB dependent gene expression. Incorporation of P028F4 as an affinity isolation step enriches for serine 536 phosphorylated and p300 coactivator complexed RelA, simultaneously depleting IκBα·RelA complexes. A stable isotope dilution (SID)-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)- mass spectrometry (MS) assay for RelA was developed that produced a linear response over 1,000 fold dilution range of input protein and had a 200 amol lower limit of quantification. This multiplex SID-SRM-MS RelA assay was used to quantify activated endogenous RelA in cytokine-stimulated eukaryotic cells isolated by single-step P028F4 enrichment. The aptamer-SID-SRM-MS assay quantified the fraction of activated RelA in subcellular extracts, detecting the presence of a cytoplasmic RelA reservoir unresponsive to TNFα stimulation. We conclude that aptamer-SID-SRM-MS is a versatile tool for quantification of activated NF-κB/RelA and its associated complexes in response to pathway activation. PMID:21502374

  18. [Determination of the interaction kinetics between meloxicam and β-cyclodextrin using the quantitative high-performance affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-fen; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Xiao-bo; Li, Hai-yan; Zhang, Ji-wen; Sun, Li-xin

    2015-09-01

    The association rate constant and dissociation rate constant are important parameters of the drug-cyclodextrin supermolecule systems, which determine the dissociation of drugs from the complex and the further in vivo absorption of drugs. However, the current studies of drug-cyclodextrin interactions mostly focus on the thermodynamic parameter of equilibrium constants (K). In this paper, a method based on quantitative high performance affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was developed to determine the apparent dissociation rate constant (k(off,app)) of drug-cyclodextrin supermolecule systems. This method was employed to measure the k(off,app) of meloxicam and acetaminophen. Firstly, chromatographic peaks of drugs and non-retained solute (uracil) on β-cyclodextrin column at different flow rates were acquired, and the retention time and variance values were obtained via the fitting the peaks. Then, the plate heights of drugs (H(R)) and uracil (H(M,C)) were calculated. The plate height of theoretical non-retained solute (H(M,T)) was calculated based on the differences of diffusion coefficient and the stagnant mobile phase mass transfer between drugs and uracil. Finally, the k(off,app) was calculated from the slope of the regression equation between (H(R)-H(M,T)) and uk/(1+k)2, (0.13 ± 0.00) s(-1) and (4.83 ± 0.10) s(-1) for meloxicam and acetaminophen (control drug), respectively. In addition, the apparent association rate constant (k(on,app)) was also calculated through the product of K (12.53 L x mol(-1)) and k(off,app). In summary, it has been proved that the method established in our study was simple, efficiently fast and reproducible for investigation on the kinetics of drug-cyclodextrin interactions. PMID:26757555

  19. Determination of a highly selective mixed-affinity sigma receptor ligand, in rat plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Jamalapuram, Seshulatha; Vuppala, Pradeep K.; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Avery, Bonnie A.

    2014-01-01

    A selective, rapid and sensitive ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) method was developed and validated to quantitate a highly selective mixed-affinity sigma receptor ligand, CM156 (3-(4-(4-cyclohexylpiperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d] thiazole-2(3H)-thione), in rat plasma. CM156 and the internal standard (aripiprazole) were extracted from plasma samples by a single step liquid–liquid extraction using chloroform. The analysis was carried out on an ACQUITY UPLCTM BEH HILIC column (1.7 µm, 2.1 mm × 50 mm) with isocratic elution at flow rate of 0.2 mL/min using 10 mM ammonium formate in 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile (10:90) as the mobile phase. The detection of the analyte was performed on a mass spectrometer operated in selected ion recording (SIR) mode with positive electrospray ionization (ESI). The validated analytical method resulted in a run time of 4 min and the retention times observed were 2.6 ± 0.1 and 2.1 ± 0.1 min for CM156 and the IS, respectively. The calibration curve exhibited excellent linearity over a concentration range of 5–4000 ng/mL with the lower limit of quantification of 5 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision values were below 15% and accuracy ranged from −6.5% to 5.0%. The mean recovery of CM156 from plasma was 96.8%. The validated method was applied to a pilot intravenous pharmacokinetic study in rats. PMID:22406103

  20. Evidence for phosphorylation of serine 753 in CFTR using a novel metal-ion affinity resin and matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, D. C.; Rozanas, C. R.; Price, E. M.; Gruis, D. B.; Verkman, A. S.; Townsend, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encodes an apical membrane Cl- channel regulated by protein phosphorylation. To identify cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-phosphorylated residues in full-length CFTR, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) was used to selectively purify phosphopeptides. The greater specificity of iron-loaded (Fe3+) nitrilotriacetic (NTA). Sepharose compared to iminodiacetic acid (IDA) metal-chelating matrices was demonstrated using a PKA-phosphorylated recombinant NBD1-R protein from CFTR. Fe(3+)-loaded NTA Sepharose preferentially bound phosphopeptides, whereas acidic and poly-His-containing peptides were co-purified using the conventional IDA matrices. IMAC using NTA Sepharose enabled the selective recovery of phosphopeptides and identification of phosphorylated residues from a complex proteolytic digest. Phosphopeptides from PKA-phosphorylated full-length CFTR, generated in Hi5 insect cells using a baculovirus expression system, were purified using NTA Sepharose. Phosphopeptides were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) with post-source decay (PSD) analysis and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Phosphorylated peptides were identified by mass and by the metastable loss of HPO3 and H3PO4 from the parent ions. Peptide sequence and phosphorylation at CFTR residues 660Ser, 737Ser, and 795Ser were confirmed using MALDI/PSD analysis. Peptide sequences and phosphorylation at CFTR residues 700Ser, 712Ser, 768Ser, and 813Ser were deduced from peptide mass, metastable fragment ion formation, and PKA consensus sequences. Peptide sequence and phosphorylation at residue 753Ser was confirmed using MALDI/CID analysis. This is the first report of phosphorylation of 753Ser in full-length CFTR. PMID:9385646

  1. Peptidomic profiles of post myocardial infarction rats affinity depleted plasma using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in drug development, effective cardiovascular therapies and suitable cardiovascular biomarkers remain limited. The aim of this study was to leverage mass spectrometry (MS) based peptide profiling strategies to identify changes that occur in peptidomic profiles of rat plasma following coronary artery ligation generated myocardial infarction (MI). Methods One week after MI, rats were randomized to receive either an ACE inhibitor (ramipril, Ram-1 mg/kg/day), or vehicle (Veh) for 12 weeks. Echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements were made before sacrifice and plasma collection. High abundance proteins were depleted with affinity capture before MS profiling. Differentially expressed peptide ions were identified using proprietary software (ClinProtTools). Results MI increased heart/body weight (18%), lung/body weight (56%), and left ventricular (LV) end diastolic pressure (LVEDP, 247%); and significantly reduced percentage fractional shortening (FS, 75%) and rate of pressure rise in the LV (dP/dtmax, 20%). Ram treatment significantly attenuated the changes in LVEDP (61%) and FS (27%). Analysis of MALDI-ToF generated mass spectra demonstrated that peptide ions 1271, 1878, 1955, 2041 and 2254 m/z were consistently decreased by Ram treatment (p < 0.001) and thus may be associated with the agent’s therapeutic effects. Among peptides that were significantly changed, synapsin-2, adenomatous polyposis coli protein and transcription factor jun-D were identified as significantly reduced by Ram treatment. Conclusions This approach allows us to screen for potential biomarkers in a window of the blood proteome that previously has been difficult to access. The data obtained from such an approach may potentially useful in prognosis, diagnosis, and monitoring of treatment response. PMID:23369288

  2. Simultaneous high-throughput determination of interaction kinetics for drugs and cyclodextrins by high performance affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caifen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiaonan; Liu, Botao; Xu, Xu; Sun, Lixin; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-25

    The individual determination of the apparent dissociation rate constant (kd,app) using high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tedious process requiring numerous separate tests and massive data fitting, unable to provide the apparent association rate constant (ka) and equilibrium binding constant (Ka). In this study, a HPAC with mass spectrometry detection (HPAC-MS/MS) was employed to determine the drug-cyclodextrin (CD) interaction kinetics with low sample loading quantity (<10 ng per injection for single compound) and high-throughput yield as twenty drugs determined in one injection. The kd,app measured by HPAC-MS/MS approach were 0.89 ± 0.07, 4.34 ± 0.01, 1.48 ± 0.01 and 7.77 ± 0.04 s(-1) for ketoprofen, trimethoprim, indapamide and acetaminophen, with kd,app for acetaminophen consistent with that from the HPAC method with UV detector in our previous studies. For twenty drugs with diverse structures and chemical properties, good correlationship was found between kd,app measured by single compound analysis method and high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach, with the correlation coefficient of 0.987 and the significance F less than 0.001. Comprehensive quantification of ka,app, kd,app and Ka values was further performed based on the measurement of kd,app by peak profiling method and Ka by the peak fitting method. And the investigation of the drug-CD interaction kinetics under different conditions indicated that the column temperature and mobile phase composition significantly affected the determination of ka,app, kd,app and Ka while also dependent on the acidity and basicity of drugs. In summary, the high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach has been demonstrated high efficiency in determination of the drug-CD primary interaction kinetic parameter, especially, kd,app, being proven as a novel tool in screening the right CD for the solubilization of the right drug. PMID:26851087

  3. Comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification by affinity zirconium oxide-silica composite monolithic column online solid-phase microextraction - Mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Chu, Jie-Mei; Lan, Meng-Dan; Liu, Ping; Yang, Na; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-01

    More than 140 modified ribonucleosides have been identified in RNA. Determination of endogenous modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive disease diagnostic strategy. However, detection of the modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids is challenging, especially for the low abundant modified ribonucleosides due to the serious matrix interferences of biological fluids. Here, we developed a facile preparation strategy and successfully synthesized zirconium oxide-silica (ZrO2/SiO2) composite capillary monolithic column that exhibited excellent performance for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds. Compared with the boronate-based affinity monolith, the ZrO2/SiO2 monolith showed ∼2 orders of magnitude higher extraction capacity and can be used under physiological pH (pH 6.5-7.5). Using the prepared ZrO2/SiO2 composite monolith as the trapping column and reversed-phase C18 column as the analytical column, we further established an online solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (online SPME-LC-MS/MS) analysis for the comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification in human urine. Our results showed that 68 cis-diol-containing ribosylated compounds were identified in human urine, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest numbers of cis-diol-containing compounds were determined in a single analysis. It is worth noting that four modified ribonucleosides were discovered in the human urine for the first time. In addition, the quantification results from the pooled urine samples showed that compared to healthy controls, the contents of sixteen ribose conjugates in the urine of gastric cancer, eleven in esophagus cancer and seven in lymphoma increased more than two folds. Among these ribose conjugates, four ribose conjugates increased more than two folds in both gastric cancer and esophagus cancer; three ribose conjugates increased more than two

  4. Off-line hyphenation of boronate affinity monolith-based extraction with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for efficient analysis of glycoproteins/glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Bie, Zijun; Chen, Yang; Li, Hengye; Wu, Ronghu; Liu, Zhen

    2014-06-27

    Boronate affinity materials have attracted increasing attentions as sample enrichment platforms for glycoproteomic analysis in recent years. However, most of the boronate affinity materials that have already employed for proteomic analysis are suffering from apparent disadvantages, such as alkaline pH for binding, weak affinity, and relatively poor selectivity. Benzoboroxoles are a unique class of boronic acids which have showed excellent binding properties for the recognition of cis-diol-containing compounds. Recently, a 3-carboxy-benzoboroxole-functionalized monolithic column had been reported and it had exhibited the best selectivity and affinity as well as the lowest binding pH among all reported boronate affinity monolithic columns. In this study, an off-line hyphenation of this boronate affinity monolithic column-based extraction with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was developed and the powerfulness of this hyphenated approach in the analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides in complex samples was investigated. The approach was first applied to the analysis of glycopeptides in the tryptic digest of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Totally 22 glycopeptides were identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the best performance among all the boronic acid-functionalized materials. We further employed this approach to the analysis of intact proteins in human saliva. Totally 6 intact glycoproteins were successfully identified. As comparison, when the samples were analyzed without extraction, only a few glycopeptides were identified from the tryptic digest of HRP while no glycoproteins were found from the saliva samples. PMID:24928239

  5. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  6. Short communication: Identification of iron-binding peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and reversed phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Martínez Maqueda, Daniel; de la Hoz, Lucia; da Silva, Vera S Nunes; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with iron-binding capacity obtained by hydrolysis of whey protein with Alcalase (Novozymes, Araucaria, PR, Brazil), pancreatin, and Flavourzyme (Novozymes) were identified. Hydrolysates were subjected to iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and the bound peptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Regardless of the enzyme used, the domains f(42-59) and f(125-137) from β-lactoglobulin enclosed most of identified peptides. This trend was less pronounced in the case of peptides derived from α-lactalbumin, with sequences deriving from diverse regions. Iron-bound peptides exhibited common structural characteristics, such as an abundance of Asp, Glu, and Pro, as revealed by mass spectrometry and AA analysis. In conclusion, this characterization of iron-binding peptides helps clarify the relationship between peptide structure and iron-chelating activity and supports the promising role of whey protein hydrolysates as functional ingredients in iron supplementation treatments. PMID:26601589

  7. From pathways to networks: connecting dots by establishing protein-protein interaction networks in signaling pathways using affinity purification and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Signal transductions are the basis of biological activities in all living organisms. Studying the signaling pathways, especially under physiological conditions, has become one of the most important facets of modern biological research. During the last decade, MS has been used extensively in biological research and is proven to be effective in addressing important biological questions. Here, we review the current progress in the understanding of signaling networks using MS approaches. We will focus on studies of protein-protein interactions that use affinity purification followed by MS approach. We discuss obstacles to affinity purification, data processing, functional validation, and identification of transient interactions and provide potential solutions for pathway-specific proteomics analysis, which we hope one day will lead to a comprehensive understanding of signaling networks in humans. PMID:25137225

  8. Identification of Cell Cycle Dependent Interaction Partners of the Septins by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renz, Christian; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Grinhagens, Sören; Warscheid, Bettina; Johnsson, Nils; Gronemeyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that, in the baker's yeast, assemble into a highly ordered array of filaments at the mother bud neck. These filaments undergo significant structural rearrangements during the cell cycle. We aimed at identifying key components that are involved in or regulate the transitions of the septins. By combining cell synchronization and quantitative affinity-purification mass-spectrometry, we performed a screen for specific interaction partners of the septins at three distinct stages of the cell cycle. A total of 83 interaction partners of the septins were assigned. Surprisingly, we detected DNA-interacting/nuclear proteins and proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis predominantly present in alpha-factor arrested that do not display an assembled septin structure. Furthermore, two distinct sets of regulatory proteins that are specific for cells at S-phase with a stable septin collar or at mitosis with split septin rings were identified. Complementary methods like SPLIFF and immunoprecipitation allowed us to more exactly define the spatial and temporal characteristics of selected hits of the AP-MS screen. PMID:26871441

  9. Data for the identification of proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins associated to histones H3 and H4 in S. cerevisiae, using tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification method (TAP) allows the efficient purification of native protein complexes which incorporate a target protein fused with the TAP tag. Purified multiprotein complexes can then be subjected to diverse types of proteomic analyses. Here we describe the data acquired after applying the TAP strategy on histones H3 and H4 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify associated proteins and protein post-translational modifications in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mass spectrometry dataset described here consists of 14 files generated from four different analyses in a 5600 Triple TOF (Sciex) by information-dependent acquisition (IDA) LC-MS/MS. The above files contain information about protein identification, protein relative abundance, and PTMs identification. The instrumental raw data from these files has been also uploaded to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository, with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002671 and http://dx.doi.org/10.6019/PXD002671. These data are discussed and interpreted in http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.004. Valero et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:26949727

  10. An affinity selection-mass spectrometry method for the identification of small molecule ligands from self-encoded combinatorial libraries: Discovery of a novel antagonist of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annis, D. Allen; Athanasopoulos, John; Curran, Patrick J.; Felsch, Jason S.; Kalghatgi, Krishna; Lee, William H.; Nash, Huw M.; Orminati, Jean-Paul A.; Rosner, Kristin E.; Shipps, Gerald W., Jr.; Thaddupathy, G. R. A.; Tyler, Andrew N.; Vilenchik, Lev; Wagner, Carston R.; Wintner, Edward A.

    2004-11-01

    The NeoGenesis Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS), an affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) process consisting of a rapid size-exclusion chromatography stage integrated with reverse-phase chromatography, electrospray mass spectrometry, and novel data searching algorithms, was used to screen mass-encoded, 2500-member combinatorial libraries, leading to the discovery of a novel, bioactive ligand for the anti-infective target Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Synthesis of the mass-encoded, ligand-containing library, discussion of the deconvolution process for verifying the structure of the ligand through independent synthesis and screening in a small mixture (sub-library) format, and ALIS-MS/MS techniques to assign its regioisomeric connectivity are presented. ALIS-based competition experiments between the newly discovered ligand and other, known DHFR ligands, and biological activity assessments with stereo- and regioisomers of the hit compound confirm its DHFR-specific biological activity. The method described requires no foreknowledge of the structure or biochemistry of the protein target, consumes less than 1 [mu]g protein to screen >2500 compounds in a single experiment, and enables screening of >250,000 compounds per system per day. These advantages highlight the potential of the ALIS method for drug discovery against genomic targets with unknown biological function, as well as validated targets for which traditional discovery efforts have failed.

  11. Leukotriene-E4 in human urine: Comparison of on-line purification and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to affinity purification followed by enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Michael; Liu, Andrew H.; Harbeck, Ronald; Reisdorph, Rick; Rabinovitch, Nathan; Reisdorph, Nichole

    2009-01-01

    A new analytical method suitable for high throughput measurements of LTE4 in human urine is described. The methodology utilizes on-line enrichment and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The novel LC/MS/MS method is rapid, linear from 5 to 500 pg/mL in spiked urine samples of both healthy and asthmatic subjects and more accurate and precise than enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and previous LC/MS/MS methods. Results from sample integrity experiments and preliminary values of urinary LTE4 from healthy adults and children are reported. PMID:19726242

  12. Immobilized magnetic beads based multi-target affinity selection coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for screening anti-diabetic compounds from a Chinese medicine "Tang-Zhi-Qing".

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Chen, Zhui; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2013-05-01

    We developed an approach for screening bioactive compounds from botanical drug using multiple target-immobilized magnetic beads coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This novel approach was called magnetic beads based multi-target affinity selection-mass spectrometry (MT-ASMS). It can enrich and identify different types of ligands from mixture extracts. Multiple targets (maltase, invertase, lipase) were immobilized on the magnetic beads by covalent linkage using 1-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-3-ethyl-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as reaction reagents, respectively. The properties of enzyme conjugated magnetic beads were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometer and vibration sample magnetometer. Several factors including pH, ion strength, incubation time and temperature were optimized using three known ligands (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and hesperidin). The established MT-ASMS approach was applied to screening for ligands from a Chinese medicine "Tang-Zhi-Qing", which was used to treat type II diabetes in China. Seven bound compounds were identified via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Five active compounds including 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-D-glucose, 1,2,3,4-tetra-O-galloyl-D-glucose, 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-d-glucose, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide and quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside were identified and their activities were validated by conventional inhibitory assay. Our findings suggested that the proposed approach is efficient in screening compounds with multiple activities from extracts of botanical drugs. PMID:23501439

  13. Study of immobilized metal affinity chromatography sorbents for the analysis of peptides by on-line solid-phase extraction capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martin, Lorena; Benavente, Fernando; Medina-Casanellas, Silvia; Giménez, Estela; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2015-03-01

    Several commercial immobilized metal affinity chromatography sorbents were evaluated in this study for the analysis of two small peptide fragments of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) (Aβ(1-15) and Aβ(10-20) peptides) by on-line immobilized metal affinity SPE-CE (IMA-SPE-CE). The performance of a nickel metal ion (Ni(II)) sorbent based on nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelating agent was significantly better than two copper metal ion (Cu(II)) sorbents based on iminodiacetic acid. A BGE of 25 mM phosphate (pH 7.4) and an eluent of 50 mM imidazole (in BGE) yielded a 25-fold and 5-fold decrease in the LODs by IMA-SPE-CE-UV for Aβ(1-15) and Aβ(10-20) peptides (0.1 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively) with regard to CE-UV (2.5 μg/mL for both peptides). The phosphate BGE was also used in IMA-SPE-CE-MS, but the eluent needed to be substituted by a 0.5% HAc v/v solution. Under optimum preconcentration and detection conditions, reproducibility of peak areas and migration times was acceptable (23.2 and 12.0%RSD, respectively). The method was more sensitive for Aβ(10-20) peptide, which could be detected until 0.25 μg/mL. Linearity for Aβ(10-20) peptide was good in a narrow concentration range (0.25-2.5 μg/mL, R(2) = 0.93). Lastly, the potential of the optimized Ni(II)-IMA-SPE-CE-MS method for the analysis of amyloid peptides in biological fluids was evaluated by analyzing spiked plasma and serum samples. PMID:25640944

  14. Quantifying Protein-Ligand Binding Constants using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: A Systematic Binding Affinity Study of a Series of Hydrophobically Modified Trypsin Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubrilovic, Dragana; Biela, Adam; Sielaff, Frank; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Klebe, Gerhard; Zenobi, Renato

    2012-10-01

    NanoESI-MS is used for determining binding strengths of trypsin in complex with two different series of five congeneric inhibitors, whose binding affinity in solution depends on the size of the P3 substituent. The ligands of the first series contain a 4-amidinobenzylamide as P1 residue, and form a tight complex with trypsin. The inhibitors of the second series have a 2-aminomethyl-5-chloro-benzylamide as P1 group, and represent a model system for weak binders. The five different inhibitors of each group are based on the same scaffold and differ only in the length of the hydrophobic side chain of their P3 residue, which modulates the interactions in the S3/4 binding pocket of trypsin. The dissociation constants (KD) for high affinity ligands investigated by nanoESI-MS ranges from 15 nM to 450 nM and decreases with larger hydrophobic P3 side chains. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments of five trypsin and benzamidine-based complexes show a correlation between trends in KD and gas-phase stability. For the second inhibitor series we could show that the effect of imidazole, a small stabilizing additive, can avoid the dissociation of the complex ions and as a result increases the relative abundance of weakly bound complexes. Here the KD values ranging from 2.9 to 17.6 μM, some 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than the first series. For both ligand series, the dissociation constants (KD) measured via nanoESI-MS were compared with kinetic inhibition constants (Ki) in solution.

  15. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  16. Identification of phosphoproteins in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using polyethylene glycol fractionation, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Uma K; Krochko, Joan E; Ross, Andrew R S

    2012-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism in cells. Identification and characterization of phosphoproteins requires specialized enrichment methods, due to the relatively low abundance of these proteins, and is further complicated in plants by the high abundance of Rubisco in green tissues. We present a novel method for plant phosphoproteome analysis that depletes Rubisco using polyethylene glycol fractionation and utilizes immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography to enrich phosphoproteins. Subsequent protein separation by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is further improved by extracting the PEG-fractionated protein samples with SDS/phenol and methanol/chloroform to remove interfering compounds. Using this approach, we identified 132 phosphorylated proteins in a partial Arabidopsis leaf extract. These proteins are involved in a range of biological processes, including CO(2) fixation, protein assembly and folding, stress response, redox regulation, and cellular metabolism. Both large and small subunits of Rubisco were phosphorylated at multiple sites, and depletion of Rubisco enhanced detection of less abundant phosphoproteins, including those associated with state transitions between photosystems I and II. The discovery of a phosphorylated form of AtGRP7, a self-regulating RNA-binding protein that affects floral transition, as well as several previously uncharacterized ribosomal proteins confirm the utility of this approach for phosphoproteome analysis and its potential to increase our understanding of growth and development in plants. PMID:22092075

  17. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  18. Motif affinity and mass spectrometry proteomic approach for the discovery of cellular AMPK targets: identification of mitochondrial fission factor as a new AMPK substrate.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Serge; Deak, Maria; Sumpton, David; Ford, Rebecca J; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Kussmann, Martin; Viollet, Benoit; Steinberg, Gregory R; Foretz, Marc; Dayon, Loïc; Morrice, Nicholas A; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key cellular energy sensor and regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Although it is best known for its effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, AMPK is implicated in diverse cellular processes, including mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, and cell growth and proliferation. To further our understanding of energy homeostasis through AMPK-dependent processes, the design and application of approaches to identify and characterise novel AMPK substrates are invaluable. Here, we report an affinity proteomicstrategy for the discovery and validation of AMPK targets using an antibody to isolate proteins containing the phospho-AMPK substrate recognition motif from hepatocytes that had been treated with pharmacological AMPK activators. We identified 57 proteins that were uniquely enriched in the activator-treated hepatocytes, but were absent in hepatocytes lacking AMPK. We focused on two candidates, cingulin and mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), and further characterised/validated them as AMPK-dependent targets by immunoblotting with phosphorylation site-specific antibodies. A small-molecule AMPK activator caused transient phosphorylation of endogenous cingulin at S137 in intestinal Caco2 cells. Multiple splice-variants of MFF appear to express in hepatocytes and we identified a common AMPK-dependent phospho-site (S129) in all the 3 predominant variants spanning the mass range and a short variant-specific site (S146). Collectively, our proteomic-based approach using a phospho-AMPK substrate antibody in combination with genetic models and selective AMPK activators will provide a powerful and reliable platform for identifying novel AMPK-dependent cellular targets. PMID:25683918

  19. Profiling of cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites by boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid monolithic capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chu, Jie-Mei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-01-01

    RNA contains a large number of modified nucleosides. In the metabolic re-exchange of RNA, modified nucleosides cannot be recycled and are thus excreted from cells into biological fluids. Determination of endogenous modified nucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive cancers diagnostic methods. Here we prepared boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid capillary monolithic column (BOHCMC) that exhibited excellent selectivity toward the cis-diol-containing compounds. We then used the prepared BOHCMC as the on-line solid-phase microextraction (SPME) column and developed an on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method to comprehensively profile cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites in human urine. Forty-five cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites were successfully identified in human urine. And five ribose conjugates, for the first time, were identified existence in human urine in the current study. Furthermore, the relative quantification suggested 4 cis-diol-containing compounds (5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadensine, N(4)-acetylcytidine, 1-ribosyl-N-propionylhistamine and N(2),N(2),7-trimethylguanosine) increased more than 1.5 folds in all the 3 types of examined cancers (lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer) compared to healthy controls. The on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method demonstrates a promising method for the comprehensive profiling of cis-diol-containing ribose conjugates in human urines, which provides an efficient strategy for the identification and discovery of biomarkers and may be used for the screening of cancers. PMID:25585609

  20. Profiling of cis-Diol-containing Nucleosides and Ribosylated Metabolites by Boronate-affinity Organic-silica Hybrid Monolithic Capillary Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chu, Jie-Mei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-01-01

    RNA contains a large number of modified nucleosides. In the metabolic re-exchange of RNA, modified nucleosides cannot be recycled and are thus excreted from cells into biological fluids. Determination of endogenous modified nucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive cancers diagnostic methods. Here we prepared boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid capillary monolithic column (BOHCMC) that exhibited excellent selectivity toward the cis-diol-containing compounds. We then used the prepared BOHCMC as the on-line solid-phase microextraction (SPME) column and developed an on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method to comprehensively profile cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites in human urine. Forty-five cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites were successfully identified in human urine. And five ribose conjugates, for the first time, were identified existence in human urine in the current study. Furthermore, the relative quantification suggested 4 cis-diol-containing compounds (5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadensine, N4-acetylcytidine, 1-ribosyl-N-propionylhistamine and N2,N2,7-trimethylguanosine) increased more than 1.5 folds in all the 3 types of examined cancers (lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer) compared to healthy controls. The on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method demonstrates a promising method for the comprehensive profiling of cis-diol-containing ribose conjugates in human urines, which provides an efficient strategy for the identification and discovery of biomarkers and may be used for the screening of cancers. PMID:25585609

  1. [Analysis of rice leaves proteomes by liquid chromatography-tandem, mass spectrometry based on the purification using a novel affinity detergent removal spin column].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolin; Gong, Jiadi; Chen, Mingxue; Yu, Shasha; Bian, Yingfang; Cao, Zhaoyun

    2014-11-01

    A purification method was established for the analysis of proteomes in rice leaves based on a novel detergent removal spin column (DRSC). The proteins were extracted by phenol protein extraction method followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) lysis. The lysate was purified by the detergent removal spin column and the enzymolytic peptides were detected by the nanoflow liquid chromatography-hybrid linear trap quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ/Orbitrap). In terms of SDS removal efficiencies and protein identification, the method of DRSC was compared with those of filter aided sample preparation (FASP) and acetone precipitation. As a result, there were good efficiencies ( > 95%) of SDS removal for the three methods. With the DRSC purification strategy, 563 proteins were identified from rice leaves, while only 196 and 306 proteins were identified by FASP and acetone precipitation procedures respectively, in spite of certain complementarities among these identified proteins by the three methods. DRSC is suitable for proteins with various relative molecular masses and pI values. However, there were similar losses of proteins with different relative molecular masses and pI values with the other two methods. Using the established method, 588 proteins were identified by once injection analysis. According to the molecular functions, 296 proteins with at least two identified peptides can be classified into eight categories with binding activity, enzyme activity, transporter activity, inhibitor activity, structural constitute, catalytic activity, other and unknown functions. The method provides technical reference for conducting rice proteomes. PMID:25764651

  2. Use of affinity-directed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to map the epitopes of a factor VIII inhibitor antibody fraction

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Amy E.; Wang, Wensheng; Hagen, Fred K.; Fay, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Neutralizing factor (F) VIII antibodies develop in ~30% of individuals with hemophilia A and show specificity to multiple sites in the FVIII protein. Methods Reactive epitopes to an immobilized IgG fraction prepared from a high-titer, FVIII inhibitor plasma were determined following immuno-precipitation (IP) of tryptic and chymotryptic peptides derived from digests of the A1 and A2 subunits of FVIIIa and FVIII light chain. Peptides were detected and identified using highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Results Coverage maps of the A1 subunit, A2 subunit and light chain represented 79%, 69% and 90%, respectively, of the protein sequences. Dot blots indicated that the inhibitor IgG reacted with epitopes contained within each subunit of FVIIIa. IP coupled with LC-MS identified 19 peptides representing epitopes from all FVIII A and C domains. The majority of peptides (10) were derived from the A2 domain. Three peptides mapped to the C2 domain, while two mapped to the A1 and A3 domains, and single peptides mapped to the a1 segment and C1 domain. Epitopes were typically defined by peptide sequences of <12 residues. Conclusions IP coupled with LC-MS identified extensive antibody reactivity at high resolution over the entire functional FVIII molecule and yielded sequence lengths of less than 15 residues. A number of the peptides identified mapped to known sequences involved in functionally important protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. PMID:21668738

  3. Synthesis and physicochemical characterization of Gd-C4-thyroxin-DTPA, a potential MRI contrast agent. Evaluation of its affinity for human serum albumin by proton relaxometry, NMR diffusometry, and electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Henoumont, C; Vander Elst, L; Laurent, S; Muller, R N

    2010-03-18

    Gd-C(4)-thyroxin-DTPA, a potential MRI contrast agent, was synthesized from Gd-DTPA and thyroxine, which interacts strongly with human serum albumin (HSA). It was characterized in water by its relaxometric properties and its stability versus zinc transmetalation. The affinity of the complex for HSA was studied by using three different methods: proton relaxometry, NMR diffusometry, and electrospray mass spectrometry. From the results, it appears that Gd-C(4)-thyroxin-DTPA exhibits a relatively high relaxivity (r(1) = 9.01 s(-1) mM(-1) at 1.5 T and 310 K), a good stability versus zinc transmetalation, and a strong interaction with HSA (K(a) approximately 10,000 M(-1) with two binding sites). The kinetics of the exchange between the bound and the free form of the complex was evaluated by the NMR diffusometry technique. Competition experiments have allowed the assignment of the chelate's binding site on HSA. PMID:20175550

  4. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  5. Continuous affinity-gradient nano-stationary phase served as a column for reversed-phase electrochromatography and matrix carrier in time-of-flight mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jen-Kuei; Yang, Chung-Shi; Wu, Yi-Shiuan; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2015-08-19

    This study developed an affinity-gradient nano-stationary phase (AG-NSP) for protein analysis using nanofluidic capillary electrochromatography (nano-CEC) conjugated with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The AG-NSP can be used for protein pre-separation in nano-CEC and as a matrix carrier for protein analysis in MALDI-TOF-MS. A hydrophobicity gradient in AG-NSP was photochemically formed by grafting 4-azidoaniline hydrochloride on vertically arrayed multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through gray-level exposure to UV light. The reversed-phase gradient stationary phase in AG-NSP was tailored according to the properties of the mobile phase gradient in capillary electrochromatography. As a result, the operation of the system is easily automated using a single buffer solution without the need for multiple solvents for elution. The use of nano-CEC with AG-NSP demonstrated excellent separation efficiency and high resolution for various types of DNA/protein/peptide. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis was then performed directly on the separated proteins and peptides on the chip. The proposed system was then used for the detection of three types of proteins with different molecular weights and PI values, including Cytochrome c (12,360, pI = 10), Lysozyme (14,300, pI = 11), and BSA (86,000, pI = 5)), and digested IgG fragments. The proposed system provided resolution of 1000 Da for the proteins in this study and the separation of digested IgG fragments at a low concentration of 1.2 pmol μL(-1). PMID:26343439

  6. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  7. Screening and confirmation of thyreostatics in urine by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after sample clean-up with a mercurated affinity column.

    PubMed

    Schilt, R; Weseman, J M; Hooijerink, H; Korbee, H J; Traag, W A; van Steenbergen, M J; Haasnoot, W

    1989-04-01

    Methods are described for the screening and confirmation of residues of the thyreostatics thiouracil, methylthiouracil and propylthiouracil in urine samples of cattle at levels down to 25 micrograms/l. After a selective preconcentration of the thiol-containing thyreostatics on a mercurated affinity column, the analytes are derivatized by extractive alkylation and analysed by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus or mass spectrometric detection. PMID:2745644

  8. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  9. A Method to Site-Specifically Identify and Quantitate Carbonyl End Products of Protein Oxidation Using Oxidation-Dependent Element Coded Affinity Tags (O-ECAT) and NanoLiquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Young, N L; Whetstone, P A; Cheal, S M; Benner, W H; Lebrilla, C B; Meares, C F

    2005-08-25

    Protein oxidation is linked to cellular stress, aging, and disease. Protein oxidations that result in reactive species are of particular interest, since these reactive oxidation products may react with other proteins or biomolecules in an unmediated and irreversible fashion, providing a potential marker for a variety of disease mechanisms. We have developed a novel system to identify and quantitate, relative to other states, the sites of oxidation on a given protein. A specially designed Oxidation-dependent carbonyl-specific Element-Coded Affinity Mass Tag (O-ECAT), AOD, ((S)-2-(4-(2-aminooxy)-acetamido)-benzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid, is used to covalently tag the residues of a protein oxidized to aldehyde or keto end products. After proteolysis, the resulting AOD-tagged peptides are affinity purified, and analyzed by nanoLC-FTICR-MS, which provides high specificity in extracting co-eluting AOD mass pairs with a unique mass difference and affords relative quantitation based on isotopic ratios. Using this methodology, we have mapped the surface oxidation sites on a model protein, recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in its native form (as purchased) and after FeEDTA oxidation. A variety of modified amino acid residues including lysine, arginine, proline, histidine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, were found to be oxidized to aldehyde and keto end products. The sensitivity of this methodology is shown by the number of peptides identified, twenty peptides on the native protein and twenty-nine after surface oxidation using FeEDTA and ascorbate. All identified peptides map to the surface of the HSA crystal structure validating this method for identifying oxidized amino acids on protein surfaces. In relative quantitation experiments between FeEDTA oxidation and native protein oxidation, identified sites showed different relative propensities towards oxidation independent of amino acid residue. We expect to extend

  10. Characterization of a benzyladenine binding-site peptide isolated from a wheat cytokinin-binding protein: Sequence analysis and identification of a single affinity-labeled histidine residue by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brinegar, A.C.; Cooper, G.; Stevens, A.; Hauer, C.R.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D.F.; Fox, J.E. )

    1988-08-01

    A wheat embryo cytokinin-binding protein was covalently modified with the radiolabeled photoaffinity ligand 2-azido-N{sup 6}-({sup 14}C)benzyladenine. A single labeled peptide was obtained after proteolytic digestion and isolation by reversed-phase and anion-exchange HPLC. Sequencing by classical Edman degradation identified 11 of the 12 residues but failed to identify the labeled amino acid. Analysis by laser photodissociation Fourier-transform mass spectrometry of 10 pmol of the peptide independently confirmed the Edman data and also demonstrated that the histidine residue nearest the C terminus (underlined) was modified by the reagent in the sequence Ala-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-His{und His}-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu.

  11. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  12. Morphometric affinities of gigantopithecus.

    PubMed

    Gelvin, B R

    1980-11-01

    Multivariate analyses, supplemented by univariate statistical methods, of measurements from mandibular tooth crown dimensions and the mandible of Gigantopithecus blacki, G. bilaspurensis, Plio-Plelstocene hominids, Homo erectus, and seven Neogene ape species from the genera Proconsul, Sivapithecus, Ouranopithecus, and Dryopithecus were used to assess the morphometric affinities of Gigantopithecus. The results show that Gigantopithecus displays affinities to Ouranopithecus and to the hominids, particularly the Plio-Plelstocene hominids, rather than to the apes. Ouranopithecus demonstrated dental resemblances to G. bilaspurensis and the Plio-Pleistocene hominids but mandibular similarities to the apes. Results of analyses of tooth and mandibular shape indices, combined with multivariate distance and temporal relationships, suggest that Ouranopithecus is a more likely candidate for Gigantopithecus ancestry than is Silvapithecus indicus. Shape and allometric differences between G. bilaspurensis and the robust australopithecines weaken the argument for an ancestral-descendant relationship between these groups. The results support the hypothesis that Gigantopithecus is an extinct side branch of the Hominidae. PMID:7468790

  13. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  14. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  15. Ultrasensitive characterization of site-specific glycosylation of affinity-purified haptoglobin from lung cancer patient plasma using 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular liquid chromatography-linear ion trap collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L

    2011-03-15

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography-collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of the glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization, 200-500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrixes. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultranarrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap (LTQ) collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometer to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low picomole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patient plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol of Hpt digest (13 ng of protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS system allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ∼100 amol level. The PLOT LC-MS system is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace

  16. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  17. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  18. Boronate affinity materials for separation and molecular recognition: structure, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojin; Chen, Yang; Liu, Zhen

    2015-11-21

    Boronate affinity materials, as unique sorbents, have emerged as important media for the selective separation and molecular recognition of cis-diol-containing compounds. With the introduction of boronic acid functionality, boronate affinity materials exhibit several significant advantages, including broad-spectrum selectivity, reversible covalent binding, pH-controlled capture/release, fast association/desorption kinetics, and good compatibility with mass spectrometry. Because cis-diol-containing biomolecules, including nucleosides, saccharides, glycans, glycoproteins and so on, are the important targets in current research frontiers such as metabolomics, glycomics and proteomics, boronate affinity materials have gained rapid development and found increasing applications in the last decade. In this review, we critically survey recent advances in boronate affinity materials. We focus on fundamental considerations as well as important progress and new boronate affinity materials reported in the last decade. We particularly discuss on the effects of the structure of boronate ligands and supporting materials on the properties of boronate affinity materials, such as binding pH, affinity, selectivity, binding capacity, tolerance for interference and so on. A variety of promising applications, including affinity separation, proteomics, metabolomics, disease diagnostics and aptamer selection, are introduced with main emphasis on how boronate affinity materials can solve the issues in the applications and what merits boronate affinity materials can provide. PMID:26377373

  19. Use of The Yeast Two-Hybrid System to Identify Targets of Fungal Effectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) system is a binary method widely used to determine direct interactions between paired proteins. Although having certain limitations, this method has become one of the two main systemic tools (along with affinity purification/mass spectrometry) for interactome mapping in mo...

  20. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  1. Development of the affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment in phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Nan; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2015-04-29

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key event in numerous biological processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most powerful analysis tool in modern phosphoproteomics. However, the direct MS analysis of phosphorylated proteins/peptides is still a big challenge because of the low abundance and insufficient ionization of phosphorylated proteins/peptides as well as the suppression effects of nontargets. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins/peptides by affinity materials from complex biosamples is the most widely used strategy to enhance the MS detection. The demand of efficiently enriching phosphorylated proteins/peptides has spawned diverse affinity materials based on different enrichment principles (e.g., electronic attraction, chelating). In this review, we summarize the recent development of various affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment. We will highlight the design and fabrication of these affinity materials, discuss the enrichment mechanisms involved in different affinity materials, and suggest the future challenges and research directions in this field. PMID:25845677

  2. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  3. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  4. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  5. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  6. Enrichment of Phosphopeptides via Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Swaney, Danielle L; Villén, Judit

    2016-03-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is a frequently used method for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from complex, cellular lysate-derived peptide mixtures. Here we outline an IMAC protocol that uses iron-chelated magnetic beads to selectively isolate phosphorylated peptides for mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. Under acidic conditions, negatively charged phosphoryl modifications preferentially bind to positively charged metal ions (e.g., Fe(3+), Ga(3+)) on the beads. After washing away nonphosphorylated peptides, a pH shift to basic conditions causes the elution of bound phosphopeptides from the metal ion. Under optimal conditions, very high specificity for phosphopeptides can be achieved. PMID:26933247

  7. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems. PMID:21117653

  8. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  9. Dual-tagging system for the affinity purification of mammalian protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Huang, Ying; Wu, Jun; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Although affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful tool to study protein-protein interactions, this strategy has encountered numerous difficulties when adapted to mammalian cells. Here we describe a Gateway{reg_sign}-compatible dual-tag affinity purification system that integrates regulatable expression, tetracysteine motifs, and various combinations of affinity tags to facilitate the cloning, detection, and purification of bait proteins and their interacting partners. Utilizing the human telomere binding protein TRF2 as a benchmark, we demonstrate bait protein recoveries upwards of approximately 16% from as little as 1-7 x 10{sup 7} cells and successfully identify known TRF2 interacting proteins, suggesting that our dual-tag affinity purification approach is a capable new tool for expanding the capacity to explore mammalian proteomic networks.

  10. Supramolecular Affinity Chromatography for Methylation-Targeted Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Graham A E; Starke, Melissa J; Shaurya, Alok; Li, Janessa; Hof, Fraser

    2016-04-01

    Proteome-wide studies of post-translationally methylated species using mass spectrometry are complicated by high sample diversity, competition for ionization among peptides, and mass redundancies. Antibody-based enrichment has powered methylation proteomics until now, but the reliability, pan-specificity, polyclonal nature, and stability of the available pan-specific antibodies are problematic and do not provide a standard, reliable platform for investigators. We have invented an anionic supramolecular host that can form host-guest complexes selectively with methyllysine-containing peptides and used it to create a methylysine-affinity column. The column resolves peptides on the basis of methylation-a feat impossible with a comparable commercial cation-exchange column. A proteolyzed nuclear extract was separated on the methyl-affinity column prior to standard proteomics analysis. This experiment demonstrates that such chemical methyl-affinity columns are capable of enriching and improving the analysis of methyllysine residues from complex protein mixtures. We discuss the importance of this advance in the context of biomolecule-driven enrichment methods. PMID:26973166

  11. N-Alkyl Ammonium Resorcinarene Salts as High-Affinity Tetravalent Chloride Receptors.

    PubMed

    Beyeh, N Kodiah; Pan, Fangfang; Bhowmik, Sandip; Mäkelä, Toni; Ras, Robin H A; Rissanen, Kari

    2016-01-22

    N-Alkyl ammonium resorcinarene salts (NARYs, Y=triflate, picrate, nitrate, trifluoroacetates and NARBr) as tetravalent receptors, are shown to have a strong affinity for chlorides. The high affinity for chlorides was confirmed from a multitude of exchange experiments in solution (NMR and UV/Vis), gas phase (mass spectrometry), and solid-state (X-ray crystallography). A new tetra-iodide resorcinarene salt (NARI) was isolated and fully characterized from exchange experiments in the solid-state. Competition experiments with a known monovalent bis-urea receptor (5) with strong affinity for chloride, reveals these receptors to have a much higher affinity for the first two chlorides, a similar affinity as 5 for the third chloride, and lower affinity for the fourth chloride. The receptors affinity toward chloride follows the trend K1 ≫K2 ≫K3 ≈5>K4, with Ka =5011 m(-1) for 5 in 9:1 CDCl3/[D6]DMSO. PMID:26671730

  12. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  13. Dissecting SUMO Dynamics by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drabikowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Protein modification by SUMO proteins is one of the key posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes. Here, we describe a workflow to analyze SUMO dynamics in response to different stimuli, purify SUMO conjugates, and analyze the changes in SUMOylation level in organisms, tissues, or cell culture. We present a protocol for lysis in denaturing conditions that is compatible with downstream IMAC and antibody affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and data analysis. PMID:27613044

  14. Indian craniometric variability and affinities.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with "Caucasoid" populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  15. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  16. Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burlingame, A.L.; Baillie, T.A.; Derrick, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It is the intention of the review to bring together in one source the direction of major developments in mass spectrometry and to illustrate these by citing key contributions from both fundamental and applied research. The Review is intended to provide the reader with a sense of the main currents, their breadth and depth, and probable future directions. It is also intended to provide the reader with a glimpse of the diverse discoveries and results that underpin the eventual development of new methods and instruments - the keys to obtaining new insights in all the physical, chemical, and biological sciences which depend on mass spectrometry at various levels of sophistication. Focal points for future interdisciplinary synergism might be selective quantitative derivatization of large peptides, which would convey properties that direct fragmentation providing specific sequence information, or optimization of LCMS for biooligomer sequencing and mixture analysis, or the perfect way to control or enhance the internal energy of ions of any size, or many others. 1669 references.

  17. Affinity chromatography based on a combinatorial strategy for rerythropoietin purification.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ceron, María C; Marani, Mariela M; Taulés, Marta; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Albericio, Fernando; Cascone, Osvaldo; Camperi, Silvia A

    2011-05-01

    Small peptides containing fewer than 10 amino acids are promising ligand candidates with which to build affinity chromatographic systems for industrial protein purification. The application of combinatorial peptide synthesis strategies greatly facilitates the discovery of suitable ligands for any given protein of interest. Here we sought to identify peptide ligands with affinity for recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), which is used for the treatment of anemia. A combinatorial library containing the octapeptides X-X-X-Phe-X-X-Ala-Gly, where X = Ala, Asp, Glu, Phe, His, Leu, Asn, Pro, Ser, or Thr, was synthesized on HMBA-ChemMatrix resin by the divide-couple-recombine method. For the library screening, rhEPO was coupled to either Texas Red or biotin. Fluorescent beads or beads showing a positive reaction with streptavidin-peroxidase were isolated. After cleavage, peptides were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Fifty-seven beads showed a positive reaction. Peptides showing more consensuses were synthesized, and their affinity to rhEPO was assessed using a plasma resonance biosensor. Dissociation constant values in the range of 1-18 μM were obtained. The best two peptides were immobilized on Sepharose, and the resultant chromatographic matrixes showed affinity for rhEPO with dissociation constant values between 1.8 and 2.7 μM. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was spiked with rhEPO, and the artificial mixture was loaded on Peptide-Sepharose columns. The rhEPO was recovered in the elution fraction with a yield of 90% and a purity of 95% and 97% for P1-Sepharose and P2-Sepharose, respectively. PMID:21495625

  18. Affine hypersurfaces with parallel difference tensor relative to affine α-connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cece

    2014-12-01

    Li and Zhang (2014) studied affine hypersurfaces of R n + 1 with parallel difference tensor relative to the affine α-connection ∇ (α), and characterized the generalized Cayley hypersurfaces by K n - 1 ≠ 0 and ∇ (α) K = 0 for some nonzero constant α, where the affine α-connection ∇ (α) of information geometry was introduced on affine hypersurface. In this paper, by a slightly different method we continue to study affine hypersurfaces with ∇ (α) K = 0, if α = 0 we further assume that the Pick invariant vanishes and affine metric is of constant sectional curvature. It is proved that they are either hyperquadrics or improper affine hypersphere with flat indefinite affine metric, the latter can be locally given as a graph of a polynomial of at most degree n + 1 with constant Hessian determinant. In particular, if the affine metric is definite, Lorentzian, or its negative index is 2, we complete the classification of such hypersurfaces.

  19. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  20. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  1. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  2. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  3. Compact noncontraction semigroups of affine operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynov, A. S.; Protasov, V. Yu

    2015-07-01

    We analyze compact multiplicative semigroups of affine operators acting in a finite-dimensional space. The main result states that every such semigroup is either contracting, that is, contains elements of arbitrarily small operator norm, or all its operators share a common invariant affine subspace on which this semigroup is contracting. The proof uses functional difference equations with contraction of the argument. We look at applications to self-affine partitions of convex sets, the investigation of finite affine semigroups and the proof of a criterion of primitivity for nonnegative matrix families. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  4. Affinity Enhancement by Ligand Clustering Effect Inspired by Peptide Dendrimers−Shank PDZ Proteins Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity binders are desirable tools to probe the function that specific protein−protein interactions play in cell. In the process of seeking a general strategy to design high-affinity binders, we found a clue from the βPIX (p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor)−Shank PDZ interaction in synaptic assembly: three PDZ-binding sites are clustered by a parallel coiled-coil trimer but bind to Shank PDZ protein with 1:1 stoichiometry (1 trimer/1 PDZ). Inspired by this architecture, we proposed that peptide dendrimer, mimicking the ligand clustering in βPIX, will also show enhanced binding affinity, yet with 1:1 stoichiometry. This postulation has been proven here, as we synthesized a set of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric peptides and measured their binding affinity and stoichiometry with Shank PDZ domains by isothermal titration calorimetry, native mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance. This affinity enhancement, best explained by proximity effect, will be useful to guide the design of high-affinity blockers for protein−protein interactions. PMID:26918521

  5. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  6. Characterization of Extracellular Proteins in Tomato Fruit using Lectin Affinity Chromatography and LC-MALDI-MS/MS analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large-scale isolation and analysis of glycoproteins by lectin affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool to monitor changes in the “glycoproteome” of mammalian cells. Thus far, however, this approach has not been used extensively for the analysis of plant g...

  7. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set. PMID:20866473

  8. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed. PMID:24630982

  9. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  10. Affine root systems and dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyakov, I. V.; Gromov, N. A.; Kuratov, V. V.

    The root systems in Carroll spaces with degenerate metric are defined. It is shown that their Cartan matrices and reflection groups are affine. Due to the geometric consideration the root system structure of affine algebras is determined by a sufficiently simple algorithm.

  11. Loop realizations of quantum affine algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Cautis, Sabin; Licata, Anthony

    2012-12-15

    We give a simplified description of quantum affine algebras in their loop presentation. This description is related to Drinfeld's new realization via halves of vertex operators. We also define an idempotent version of the quantum affine algebra which is suitable for categorification.

  12. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  13. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  14. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses. PMID:22752448

  15. The eyes of Tullimonstrum reveal a vertebrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Clements, Thomas; Dolocan, Andrei; Martin, Peter; Purnell, Mark A; Vinther, Jakob; Gabbott, Sarah E

    2016-04-28

    Tullimonstrum gregarium is an iconic soft-bodied fossil from the Carboniferous Mazon Creek Lagerstätte (Illinois, USA). Despite a large number of specimens and distinct anatomy, various analyses over the past five decades have failed to determine the phylogenetic affinities of the 'Tully monster', and although it has been allied to such disparate phyla as the Mollusca, Annelida or Chordata, it remains enigmatic. The nature and phylogenetic affinities of Tullimonstrum have defied confident systematic placement because none of its preserved anatomy provides unequivocal evidence of homology, without which comparative analysis fails. Here we show that the eyes of Tullimonstrum possess ultrastructural details indicating homology with vertebrate eyes. Anatomical analysis using scanning electron microscopy reveals that the eyes of Tullimonstrum preserve a retina defined by a thick sheet comprising distinct layers of spheroidal and cylindrical melanosomes. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics provide further evidence that these microbodies are melanosomes. A range of animals have melanin in their eyes, but the possession of melanosomes of two distinct morphologies arranged in layers, forming retinal pigment epithelium, is a synapomorphy of vertebrates. Our analysis indicates that in addition to evidence of colour patterning, ecology and thermoregulation, fossil melanosomes can also carry a phylogenetic signal. Identification in Tullimonstrum of spheroidal and cylindrical melanosomes forming the remains of retinal pigment epithelium indicates that it is a vertebrate; considering its body parts in this new light suggests it was an anatomically unusual member of total group Vertebrata. PMID:27074512

  16. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  17. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  18. Affinity purification of heme-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2014-01-01

    Protein affinity purification techniques are widely used for isolating pure target proteins for biochemical and structural characterization. Herein, we describe the protocol for affinity-based purification of proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a peptide tag covalently modified with heme c, known as a heme-tag, to an L-histidine immobilized Sepharose resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. In addition, we describe methods for specifically detecting heme-tagged proteins in SDS-PAGE gels using a heme-staining procedure and for quantifying the proteins using a pyridine hemochrome assay. PMID:24943311

  19. Biomarker Candidates of Chlamydophila pneumoniae Proteins and Protein Fragments Identified by Affinity-Proteomics Using FTICR-MS and LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susnea, Iuliana; Bunk, Sebastian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hermann, Corinna; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We report here an affinity-proteomics approach that combines 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with high performance mass spectrometry to the identification of both full length protein antigens and antigenic fragments of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae). The present affinity-mass spectrometry approach effectively utilized high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and LC-tandem-MS for protein identification, and enabled the identification of several new highly antigenic C. pneumoniae proteins that were not hitherto reported or previously detected only in other Chlamydia species, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Moreover, high resolution affinity-MS provided the identification of several neo-antigenic protein fragments containing N- and C-terminal, and central domains such as fragments of the membrane protein Pmp21 and the secreted chlamydial proteasome-like factor (Cpaf), representing specific biomarker candidates.

  20. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  1. Minimal information to determine affine shape equivalence.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, J; Van Gool, L; Lamote, C; Foster, D H

    2000-04-01

    Participants judged the affine equivalence of 2 simultaneously presented 4-point patterns. Performance level (d') varied between 1.5 and 2.7, depending on the information available for solving the correspondence problem (insufficient in Experiment 1a, superfluous in Experiment 1b, and minimal in Experiments 1c, 2a, 2b) and on the exposure time (unlimited in Experiments 1 and 2a and 500 ms in Experiment 2b), but it did not vary much with the complexity of the affine transformation (rotation and slant in Experiment 1 and same plus tilt in Experiment 2). Performance in Experiment 3 was lower with 3-point patterns than with 4-point patterns, whereas blocking the trials according to the affine transformation parameters had little effect. Determining affine shape equivalence with minimal-information displays is based on a fast assessment of qualitatively or quasi-invariant properties such as convexity/ concavity, parallelism, and collinearity. PMID:10811156

  2. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  3. Visualizing antibody affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Tas, Jeroen M J; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Mano, Yasuko M; Chen, Casie S; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with nonimmunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  4. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores.

    PubMed

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are iron (Fe)-binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium-binding properties. Previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl (UO2)-binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of UO2, yet they have not been widely studied. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore that is not commercially available and so was obtained from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe-depleted conditions. The relative affinity for UO2 binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between UO2 acetate and different concentrations of Fe(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A), were studied to understand their relative affinities for the UO2(2+) ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxamate siderophores to UO2(2+) ions were observed to decrease with increasing Fe(III)Cl3 concentration at the lower pH. On the other hand, decreasing the pH has a smaller impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and the UO2(2+) ion. Desmalonichrome in particular was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for UO2 at all pH and Fe(III) concentrations examined. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are important for strong chelation with UO2 at lower pH. PMID:27232848

  5. Affinities of human histo-blood group antigens for norovirus capsid protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Boraston, Alisdair B; Klassen, John S

    2015-01-01

    The binding profiles of many human noroviruses (huNoVs) for human histo-blood group antigens have been characterized. However, quantitative-binding data for these important virus–host interactions are lacking. Here, we report on the intrinsic (per binding site) affinities of HBGA oligosaccharides for the huNoV VA387 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the associated subviral P particles measured using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The affinities of 13 HBGA oligosaccharides, containing A, B and H epitopes, with variable sizes (disaccharide to tetrasaccharide) and different precursor chain types (types 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6), were measured for the P particle, while the affinities of the A and B trisaccharides and A and B type 6 tetrasaccharides for the VLP were determined. The intrinsic affinities of the HBGA oligosaccharides for the P particle range from 500 to 2300 M−1, while those of the A and B trisaccharides and the A and B type 6 tetrasaccharides for the VLP range from 1000 to 4000 M−1. Comparison of these binding data with those measured previously for the corresponding P dimer reveals that the HBGA oligosaccharides tested exhibit similar intrinsic affinities for the P dimer and P particle. The intrinsic affinities for the VLP are consistently higher than those measured for the P particle, but within a factor of three. While the cause of the subtle differences in HBGA oligosaccharide affinities for the P dimer and P particle and those for the VLP remains unknown, the present data support the use of P dimers or P particles as surrogates to the VLP for huNoV-receptor-binding studies. PMID:25395406

  6. Affinity engineering of maltoporin: variants with enhanced affinity for particular ligands.

    PubMed

    Clune, A; Lee, K S; Ferenci, T

    1984-05-31

    Affinity-chromatographic selection on immobilized starch was used to selectively enhance the affinity of the maltodextrin-specific pore protein ( maltoporin , LamB protein, or lambda receptor protein) in the outer membrane of E. coli. Selection strategies were established for rare bacteria in large populations producing maltoporin variants with enhanced affinities for both starch and maltose, for starch but not maltose and for maltose but not starch. Three classes of lamB mutants with up to eight-fold increase in affinity for particular ligands were isolated. These mutants provide a unique range of modifications in the specificity of a transport protein. PMID:6375667

  7. Identification of proteins interacting with ammodytoxins in Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom by immuno-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brgles, Marija; Kurtović, Tihana; Kovačič, Lidija; Križaj, Igor; Barut, Miloš; Lang Balija, Maja; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their function, proteins frequently interact with other proteins. Various methods are used to reveal protein interacting partners, and affinity chromatography is one of them. Snake venom is composed mostly of proteins, and various protein complexes in the venom have been found to exhibit higher toxicity levels than respective components separately. Complexes can modulate envenomation activity of a venom and/or potentiate its effect. Our previous data indicate that the most toxic components of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes (Vaa) venom isolated so far-ammodytoxins (Atxs)-are contributing to the venom's toxicity only moderately; therefore, we aimed to explore whether they have some interacting partner(s) potentiating toxicity. For screening of possible interactions, immuno-affinity chromatography combined with identification by mass spectrometry was used. Various chemistries (epoxy, carbonyldiimidazole, ethylenediamine) as well as protein G functionality were used to immobilize antibodies on monolith support, a Convective Interaction Media disk. Monoliths have been demonstrated to better suit the separation of large biomolecules. Using such approach, several proteins were indicated as potential Atx-binding proteins. Among these, the interaction of Atxs with a Kunitz-type inhibitor was confirmed by far-Western dot-blot and surface plasmon resonance measurement. It can be concluded that affinity chromatography on monolithic columns combined with mass spectrometry identification is a successful approach for screening of protein interactions and it resulted with detection of the interaction of Atx with Kunitz-type inhibitor in Vaa venom for the first time. PMID:24217948

  8. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  9. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  10. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  11. Identification of protein interacting partners using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dalan; Urena, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A critical and often limiting step in understanding the function of host and viral proteins is the identification of interacting cellular or viral protein partners. There are many approaches that allow the identification of interacting partners, including the yeast two hybrid system, as well as pull down assays using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins followed by mass spectrometry identification(1). Recent studies have highlighted the utility of double-affinity tag mediated purification, coupled with two specific elution steps in the identification of interacting proteins. This approach, termed Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP), was initially used in yeast(2,3) but more recently has been adapted to use in mammalian cells(4-8). As proof-of-concept we have established a tandem affinity purification (TAP) method using the well-characterized eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E(9,10).The cellular translation factor eIF4E is a critical component of the cellular eIF4F complex involved in cap-dependent translation initiation(10). The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence. The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence(8). To forgo the need for the generation of clonal cell lines, we developed a rapid system that relies on the expression of the TAP-tagged bait protein from an episomally maintained plasmid based on pMEP4 (Invitrogen). Expression of tagged murine eIF4E from this plasmid was controlled using the cadmium chloride inducible metallothionein promoter. Lysis of the expressing cells and subsequent affinity purification via binding to rabbit IgG agarose, TEV protease cleavage, binding to streptavidin linked agarose and subsequent biotin elution identified numerous

  12. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same time,…

  13. On Affine Fusion and the Phase Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Mark A.

    2012-11-01

    A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the su(n) Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The Yang-Baxter equation leads to the construction of commuting operators as Schur polynomials, with noncommuting hopping operators as arguments. The algebraic Bethe ansatz diagonalizes them, revealing a connection to the modular S matrix and fusion of the su(n) WZNW model. The noncommutative Schur polynomials play roles similar to those of the primary field operators in the corresponding WZNW model. In particular, their 3-point functions are the su(n) fusion multiplicities. We show here how the new phase model realization of affine fusion makes obvious the existence of threshold levels, and how it accommodates higher-genus fusion.

  14. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. > The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. > Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. > f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy theories to

  15. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  16. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  17. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  18. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  19. Preparation and affinity identification of glutamic acid-urea small molecule analogs in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zheng; Yang, Deyong; Fan, Weiwei; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Xiancheng; Chen, Xiaochi; Wang, Qifeng; Song, Xishuang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, study concerning activity inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been concentrated on the glutamic urea (Glu-urea-R) small molecule and its analogs. The present study aimed to synthesize 4 analogs of Glu-urea-R and identify the affinities of these compounds to PSMA. The compounds were synthesized from raw materials, and the experimental procedures of the present study were in accordance with standard techniques under anhydrous and anaerobic conditions. Glu-urea-Lysine (Glu-urea-Lys), Glu-urea-Ornithine (Glu-urea-Orn), Glu-urea-Glutamine (Glu-urea-Gln) and Glu-urea-Asparagine (Glu-urea-Asn) were successfully synthesized, and their structures were confirmed to be as desired using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. An affinity assay was performed to detect the affinity between the various compounds and PSMA expressed from the prostate cancer LNCap cell line. Glu-urea-Gln had the highest affinity to PSMA, followed by Glu-urea-Asn, Glu-urea-Orn and Glu-urea-Lys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Glu-urea-R specifically binds PSMA expressed in the LNCap cell line and inhibits its activity. PMID:27446384

  20. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual-Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter we describe a comprehensive methodology that utilizes our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we have demonstrated the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  1. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannone, Richard J.; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we describe a comprehensive methodology that uses our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we demonstrate the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  2. Proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi developmental stages using isotope-coded affinity tag reagents.

    PubMed

    Paba, Jaime; Ricart, Carlos A O; Fontes, Wagner; Santana, Jaime M; Teixeira, Antonio R L; Marchese, Jason; Williamson, Brian; Hunt, Tony; Karger, Barry L; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis of developmental stages of the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi was carried out by isotope-coded affinity tag technology (ICAT) associated with liquid cromatography-mass spectrometry peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Protein extracts of the protozoan trypomastigote and amastigote stages were labeled with heavy (D8) and light (D0) ICAT reagents and subjected to cation exchange and avidin affinity chromatographies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. High confidence sequence information and expression levels for 41 T. cruzi polypeptides, including metabolic enzymes, paraflagellar rod components, tubulins, and heat-shock proteins were reported. Twenty-nine proteins displayed similar levels of expression in both forms of the parasite, nine proteins presented higher levels in trypomastigotes, whereas three were more expressed in amastigotes. PMID:15253433

  3. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T; Vinci, Chris R; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the "affinity maturation" step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  4. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T.; Vinci, Chris R.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the “affinity maturation” step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  5. High affinity of lead for fetal haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, C N; Lee, W R

    1980-01-01

    In-vitro experiments using 203Pb were performed to identify lead-binding components in human haemoglobin. Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography of haemolysate showed that different types of haemoglobin had different affinities for lead. For the haemolysate from adults, lead was present in both Hb A (alpha 2 beta 2) and Hb A2 (alpha 2 delta 2), whereas, in the haemolysate from new-born infants, the haemoglobin of fetal origin, Hb F (alpha 2 gamma 2) showed a much greater affinity for 203Pb than the adult haemoglobin Hb A (alpha 2 beta 2), obtained from maternal blood. Analysis of the 203 Pb-labelled haemoglobin suggested that about 82% of 203Pb was in the globin polypeptide. Further analysis with carboxylmethyl (CM) cellulose chromatography indicated that the gamma globin of fetal origin had a higher affinity for 203Pb than the beta globin, whereas alpha globin appeared to be unimportant in lead binding. The results of the different affinities for lead of different Hb types are discussed with regard to the effect of lead upon haemoglobin synthesis. PMID:6158989

  6. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  7. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  8. Determination of antiplasmodial activity and binding affinity of selected natural products towards PfTrxR and PfGR.

    PubMed

    Munigunti, Ranjith; Becker, Katja; Brun, Reto; Calderón, Angela I

    2013-08-01

    In our study, the binding affinities of selected natural products towards PfTrxR, PfGR, human TrxR and human GR were determined using a mass spectrometry based ligand binding assay. The in vitro antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of these ligands were also determined. Catharanthine, 11-(OH)-coronaridine, hernagine, vobasine and hispolone displayed antiplasmodial activity against PfK1 (IC50 = 0.996-3.63 microg/mL). PMID:24079187

  9. Evidence of land plant affinity for the Devonian fossil Protosalvinia (Foerstia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romankiw, L.A.; Hatcher, P.G.; Roen, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The Devonian plant fossil Protosalvinia (Foerstia) has been examined by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PY-GC-MS). Results of these studies reveal that the chemical structure of Protosalvinia is remarkably similar to that of coalified wood. A well-defined phenolic carbon peak in the NMR spectra and the appearance of phenol and alkylated phenols in pyrolysis products are clearly indicative of lignin-like compounds. These data represent significant new information on the chemical nature of Protosalvinia and provide the first substantial organic geochemical evidence for land plant affinity. -Authors

  10. Evaluation of SDS depletion using an affinity spin column and IMS-MS detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hengel, Shawna M.; Floyd, Erica A.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Zhao, Rui; Wu, Si; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2012-11-01

    While the use of detergents is necessary for a variety of protein isolation preparation protocols, often prior to mass spectral (MS) analysis, they are not compatible with MS analysis due to ion suppression and adduct formation. This manuscript describes optimization of detergent removal, using commercially available SDS depletion spin columns containing an affinity resin, providing for both increased protein recovery and thorough SDS removal. Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) allowed for a concurrent analysis of both analyte and detergent. In the case of both proteins and peptides, higher detergent concentrations than previously reported provided an increase of sample recovery; however there was a limit as SDS was detected by IMS-MS at higher levels of SDS indicating incomplete detergent depletion. The results also suggest optimal conditions for SDS removal are dependent on the sample concentration. Overall, this study provides a useful guide for proteomic studies where SDS is required for efficient sample preparation.

  11. Affinity Purification Strategies for Proteomic Analysis of Transcription Factor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Affinity purification (AP) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in elucidating protein molecular networks of mammalian cells. These approaches have dramatically increased the knowledge of the interconnectivity present among proteins and highlighted biological functions within different protein complexes. Despite significant technical improvements reached in the past years, it is still challenging to identify the interaction networks and the subsequent associated functions of nuclear proteins such as transcription factors (TFs). A straightforward and robust methodology is therefore required to obtain unbiased and reproducible interaction data. Here we present a new approach for TF AP-MS, exemplified with the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha). Utilizing the advantages of a double tag and three different MS strategies, we conducted a total of six independent AP-MS strategies to analyze the protein–protein interactions of C/EBPalpha. The resultant data were combined to produce a cohesive C/EBPalpha interactome. Our study describes a new methodology that robustly identifies specific molecular complexes associated with transcription factors. Moreover, it emphasizes the existence of TFs as protein complexes essential for cellular biological functions and not as single, static entities. PMID:23937658

  12. Affinity entrapment of oligosaccharides and glycopeptides using free lectin solution.

    PubMed

    Yodoshi, Masahiro; Oyama, Takehiro; Masaki, Ken; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Hayakawa, Takao; Suzuki, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Two procedures were proposed for the specific recovery of fluorescent derivatives of glycoprotein-derived oligosaccharides and tryptic glycopeptides using certain plant lectins. The first was based on the salting out of oligosaccharide-lectin conjugates with ammonium sulfate. Oligosaccharides specifically bound to lectins were recovered free from lectins using ethanol precipitation after dissolution in water. This method enabled group separation of 2-aminopyridine-labeled oligosaccharides derived from ovalbumin to galacto-oligosaccharides and agalacto-oligosaccharides by Ricinus communis agglutinin, and to high mannose- and hybrid-type oligosaccharides by wheat-germ agglutinin. Fractional precipitation based on differences in affinity for concanavalin A was accomplished by adding an appropriate concentration of methyl α-mannoside as an inhibitor. In the second method, tryptic digests of glycoproteins were mixed with a lectin solution, and the glycopeptide-lectin conjugates were specifically trapped on a centrifugal ultrafiltration membrane with cut-off of 10 kD. Trapped glycopeptides, as retentates, were passed through membranes by resuspension in diluted acid. This method is particularly useful for the enrichment of glycopeptides in protease digestion mixtures for glycosylation analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:21478615

  13. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  14. Generation of acetyllysine antibodies and affinity enrichment of acetylated peptides

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Kun-Liang; Yu, Wei; Lin, Yan; Xiong, Yue; Zhao, Shimin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has emerged as one of the major post-translational modifications, as indicated by its roles in chromatin remodeling, activation of transcription factors and, most recently, regulation of metabolic enzymes. Identification of acetylation sites in a protein is the first essential step for functional characterization of acetylation in physiological regulation. However, the study of the acetylome is hindered by the lack of suitable physical and biochemical properties of the acetyl group and existence of high-abundance acetylated histones in the cell, and needs a robust method to overcome these problems. Here we present protocols for (i) using chemically acetylated ovalbumin and synthetic acetylated peptide to generate a pan-acetyllysine antibody and a site-specific antibody to Lys288-acetylated argininosuccinate lyase, respectively; (ii) using subcellular fractionation to reduce highly abundant acetylated histones; and (iii) using acetyllysine antibody affinity purification and mass spectrometry to characterize acetylome of human liver tissue. The entire characterization procedure takes ~2–3 d to complete. PMID:21085124

  15. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasson, John R.; Salinas, Jorge E.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews current research in NMR spectrometry, in the areas of apparatus and techniques, spectral analysis, computer applications, analytical applications, and selected organic and inorganic systems. Various aspects of NMR spectrometry are presented in tabular form, with 133 references. Listed also are 124 references from the discussions in the…

  17. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  18. Smooth big bounce from affine quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Hervé; Dapor, Andrea; Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Małkiewicz, Przemysław

    2014-04-01

    We examine the possibility of dealing with gravitational singularities on a quantum level through the use of coherent state or wavelet quantization instead of canonical quantization. We consider the Robertson-Walker metric coupled to a perfect fluid. It is the simplest model of a gravitational collapse, and the results obtained here may serve as a useful starting point for more complex investigations in the future. We follow a quantization procedure based on affine coherent states or wavelets built from the unitary irreducible representation of the affine group of the real line with positive dilation. The main issue of our approach is the appearance of a quantum centrifugal potential allowing for regularization of the singularity, essential self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian, and unambiguous quantum dynamical evolution.

  19. Improved native affinity purification of RNA.

    PubMed

    Batey, Robert T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2007-08-01

    RNA biochemical or structural studies often require an RNA sample that is chemically pure, and most protocols for its in vitro production use denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to achieve this. Unfortunately, many RNAs do not quantitatively refold into an active conformation after denaturation, creating significant problems for downstream characterization or use. In addition, this traditional purification method is not amenable to studies demanding high-throughput RNA production. Recently, we presented the first general method for producing almost any RNA sequence that employs an affinity tag that is removed during the purification process. Because technical difficulties prevented application of this method to many RNAs, we have developed an improved version that utilizes a different activatable ribozyme and affinity tag that are considerably more robust, rapid, and broadly applicable. PMID:17548432

  20. Protein affinity map of chemical space.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, L M; Villar, H O; Sportsman, J R; Higgins, D L; Schmidt, D E

    1998-09-11

    Affinity fingerprinting is a quantitative method for mapping chemical space based on binding preferences of compounds for a reference panel of proteins. An effective reference panel of <20 proteins can be empirically selected which shows differential interaction with nearly all compounds. By using this map to iteratively sample the chemical space, identification of active ligands from a library of 30,000 candidate compounds has been accomplished for a wide spectrum of specific protein targets. In each case, <200 compounds were directly assayed against the target. Further, analysis of the fingerprint database suggests a strategy for effective selection of affinity chromatography ligands and scaffolds for combinatorial chemistry. With such a system, the large numbers of potential therapeutic targets emerging from genome research can be categorized according to ligand binding properties, complementing sequence based classification. PMID:9792501

  1. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  2. Integrating Mass Spectrometry of Intact Protein Complexes into Structural Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes has emerged as an established technology for assessing the composition and connectivity within dynamic, heterogeneous multiprotein complexes at low concentrations and in the context of mixtures. As this technology continues to move forward, one of the main challenges is to integrate the information content of such intact protein complex measurements with other mass spectrometry approaches in structural biology. Methods such as H/D exchange, oxidative foot-printing, chemical cross-linking, affinity purification, and ion mobility separation add complementary information that allows access to every level of protein structure and organization. Here, we survey the structural information that can be retrieved by such experiments, demonstrate the applicability of integrative mass spectrometry approaches in structural proteomics, and look to the future to explore upcoming innovations in this rapidly-advancing area. PMID:22611037

  3. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-06-20

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  4. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  5. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  6. Localization of Free Field Realizations of Affine Lie Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futorny, Vyacheslav; Grantcharov, Dimitar; Martins, Renato A.

    2015-04-01

    We use localization technique to construct new families of irreducible modules of affine Kac-Moody algebras. In particular, localization is applied to the first free field realization of the affine Lie algebra or, equivalently, to imaginary Verma modules.

  7. High-Affinity Recombinant Antibody Fragments (Fabs) Can Be Applied in Peptide Enrichment Immuno-MRM Assays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-affinity antibodies binding to linear peptides in solution are a prerequisite for performing immuno-MRM, an emerging technology for protein quantitation with high precision and specificity using peptide immunoaffinity enrichment coupled to stable isotope dilution and targeted mass spectrometry. Recombinant antibodies can be generated from appropriate libraries in high-throughput in an automated laboratory and thus may offer advantages over conventional monoclonal antibodies. However, recombinant antibodies are typically obtained as fragments (Fab or scFv) expressed from E. coli, and it is not known whether these antibody formats are compatible with the established protocols and whether the affinities necessary for immunocapture of small linear peptides can be achieved with this technology. Hence, we performed a feasibility study to ask: (a) whether it is feasible to isolate high-affinity Fabs to small linear antigens and (b) whether it is feasible to incorporate antibody fragments into robust, quantitative immuno-MRM assays. We describe successful isolation of high-affinity Fab fragments against short (tryptic) peptides from a human combinatorial Fab library. We analytically characterize three immuno-MRM assays using recombinant Fabs, full-length IgGs constructed from these Fabs, or traditional monoclonals. We show that the antibody fragments show similar performance compared with traditional mouse- or rabbit-derived monoclonal antibodies. The data establish feasibility of isolating and incorporating high-affinity Fabs into peptide immuno-MRM assays. PMID:24568200

  8. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Determination of the Proton Affinity of (CF3CH2)2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Ball, David W.

    1998-01-01

    We report the experimental determination of the proton affinity of the molecule (CF3CH2)2O using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and we compare it to the theoretical value obtained for protonation at the oxygen atom using the calculational methodology (MP2/6-31G**//MP2/3-21G). The proton affinity for this molecule as measured by bracketing experiments was between 724 kJ/mole and 741 kJ/mole. Ab initio (MP2/6-31G**//MP2/3-21G) calculations yield a value of about 729 kJ/mole, in agreement with the chemical ionization experiments. The results of these and related calculations suggest that the (MP2/6-31G**//MP2/3-21G) methodology is acceptable for estimating the proton affinities of partially-and fully-fluorinated methyl and ethyl ethers. We submit that any conclusions about the chemistry of fluoroether polymer lubricants based on their basicity can also be predicted reliably with such calculations.

  10. Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Reproducible Quantification of Phospho-signaling.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jacob J; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G; Voytovich, Uliana J; Moore, Heather D; Lin, Chenwei; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L; Stirewalt, Derek L; Reding, Kerryn W; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-02-01

    A major goal in cell signaling research is the quantification of phosphorylation pharmacodynamics following perturbations. Traditional methods of studying cellular phospho-signaling measure one analyte at a time with poor standardization, rendering them inadequate for interrogating network biology and contributing to the irreproducibility of preclinical research. In this study, we test the feasibility of circumventing these issues by coupling immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based enrichment of phosphopeptides with targeted, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to achieve precise, specific, standardized, multiplex quantification of phospho-signaling responses. A multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay targeting phospho-analytes responsive to DNA damage was configured, analytically characterized, and deployed to generate phospho-pharmacodynamic curves from primary and immortalized human cells experiencing genotoxic stress. The multiplexed assays demonstrated linear ranges of ≥3 orders of magnitude, median lower limit of quantification of 0.64 fmol on column, median intra-assay variability of 9.3%, median inter-assay variability of 12.7%, and median total CV of 16.0%. The multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay enabled robust quantification of 107 DNA damage-responsive phosphosites from human cells following DNA damage. The assays have been made publicly available as a resource to the community. The approach is generally applicable, enabling wide interrogation of signaling networks. PMID:26621847

  11. Early Detection of Cancer by Affinity Mass Spectrometry-Set Aside funds — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A.   RATIONALE The recent introduction of multiple reaction monitoring capabilities offers unprecedented capability to the research arsenal available to protein based biomarker discovery. Specific to the discovery process this technology offers an ability to monitor specific protein changes in concentration and/or post-translational modification. The ability to accurately confirm specific biomarkers in a sensitive and reproducible manner is critical to the confirmation and pre-validation process. We are proposing two collaborative studies that promise to develop Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) work flows for the biomarker scientific community and specifically for EDRN. B.   GOALS The overall goal for this proposal is the identification of protein biomarkers that can be associated with prostate cancer detection. The underlying goal is the application of a novel technological approach aided by MRM toward biomarker discovery. An additional goal will be the dissemination of knowledge gained from these studies EDRN wide.

  12. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  13. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  14. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  15. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  16. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kwon; Jung, Kyung-Sik; Son, Cagdas D; Kim, Heejung; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  17. Aluminum monocation basicity and affinity scales.

    PubMed

    Gal, Jean-François; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2015-01-01

    The experimental aspects of the determination of thermochemical data for the attachment of the aluminum monocation Al(+) to neutral atoms and molecules are reviewed. Literature aluminum cation affinities (enthalpy scale) and basicities (Gibbs energy scale) are tabulated and discussed. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level on 43 adducts provide a consistent picture of the energetics of the adducts and their structures. The Al(+)-ligand bonding is analyzed in terms of natural bond orbital and atom-in molecule analyses. A brief comparison of the Al(+) basicity scales and other gas- phase cation basicities is presented. PMID:26307732

  18. Contractions of affine Kac-Moody algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daboul, J.; Daboul, C.; de Montigny, M.

    2008-08-01

    I review our recent work on contractions of affine Kac-Moody algebras (KMA) and present new results. We study generalized contractions of KMA with respect to their twisted and untwisted KM subalgebras. As a concrete example, we discuss contraction of D(1)4 and D(3)4, based on Z3-grading. We also describe examples of 'level-dependent' contractions, which are based on Z-gradings of KMA. Our work generalizes the Inönü-Wigner contraction of P. Majumdar in several directions. We also give an algorithm for constructing Kac-Moody-like algebras hat g for any Lie algebra g.

  19. Aptamer Affinity Maturation by Resampling and Microarray Selection.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Liang, Shaolin; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Fraser, Lewis A; Shiu, Simon Chi-Chin; Tang, Marco S L; Tanner, Julian A

    2016-07-19

    Aptamers have significant potential as affinity reagents, but better approaches are critically needed to discover higher affinity nucleic acids to widen the scope for their diagnostic, therapeutic, and proteomic application. Here, we report aptamer affinity maturation, a novel aptamer enhancement technique, which combines bioinformatic resampling of aptamer sequence data and microarray selection to navigate the combinatorial chemistry binding landscape. Aptamer affinity maturation is shown to improve aptamer affinity by an order of magnitude in a single round. The novel aptamers exhibited significant adaptation, the complexity of which precludes discovery by other microarray based methods. Honing aptamer sequences using aptamer affinity maturation could help optimize a next generation of nucleic acid affinity reagents. PMID:27346322

  20. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  1. Heparin affinity purification of extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Balaj, Leonora; Atai, Nadia A.; Chen, Weilin; Mu, Dakai; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan; Maguire, Casey A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid membrane vesicles released by cells. They carry active biomolecules including DNA, RNA, and protein which can be transferred to recipient cells. Isolation and purification of EVs from culture cell media and biofluids is still a major challenge. The most widely used isolation method is ultracentrifugation (UC) which requires expensive equipment and only partially purifies EVs. Previously we have shown that heparin blocks EV uptake in cells, supporting a direct EV-heparin interaction. Here we show that EVs can be purified from cell culture media and human plasma using ultrafiltration (UF) followed by heparin-affinity beads. UF/heparin-purified EVs from cell culture displayed the EV marker Alix, contained a diverse RNA profile, had lower levels of protein contamination, and were functional at binding to and uptake into cells. RNA yield was similar for EVs isolated by UC. We were able to detect mRNAs in plasma samples with comparable levels to UC samples. In conclusion, we have discovered a simple, scalable, and effective method to purify EVs taking advantage of their heparin affinity. PMID:25988257

  2. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  3. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  4. Exploring Fluorous Affinity by Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Catani, Martina; Guzzinati, Roberta; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Terms such as "fluorous affinity" and "fluorophilicity" have been used to describe the unique partition and sorption properties often exhibited by highly fluorinated organic compounds, that is molecules rich in sp(3) carbon-fluorine bonds. In this work, we made use of a highly fluorinated stationary phase and a series of benzene derivatives to study the effect of one single perfluorinated carbon on the chromatographic behavior and adsorption properties of molecules. For this purpose, the adsorption equilibria of α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, toluene, and other alkylbenzenes have been studied by means of nonlinear chromatography in a variety of acetonitrile/water eluents. Our results reveal that one single perfluorinated carbon is already enough to induce a drastic change in the adsorption properties of molecules on the perfluorinated stationary phase. In particular, it has been found that adsorption is monolayer if the perfluoroalkyl carbon is present but that, when this unit is missing, molecules arrange as multilayer stack structures. These findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of fluorous affinity. PMID:26047527

  5. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  6. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  7. Affinities of recombinant norovirus P dimers for human blood group antigens

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ling; Kitov, Pavel I; Kitova, Elena N; Tan, Ming; Wang, Leyi; Xia, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis, recognize histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as receptors or attachment factors. To gain a deeper understanding of the interplay between NoVs and their hosts, the affinities of recombinant P dimers (P2's) of a GII.4 NoV (VA387) to a library of 41 soluble analogs of HBGAs were measured using the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay. The HBGAs contained the A, B, H and Lewis epitopes, with variable sizes (2–6 residues) and different types (1–6). The results reveal that the P2's exhibit a broad specificity for the HBGAs and bind to all of the oligosaccharides tested. Overall, the affinities are relatively low, ranging from 400 to 3000 M−1 and are influenced by the chain type: 3 > 1 ≈ 2 ≈ 4 ≈ 5 ≈ 6 for H antigens; 6 > 1 ≈ 3 ≈ 4 ≈ 5 > 2 for A antigens; 3 > 1 ≈ 4 ≈ 5 ≈ 6 > 2 for B antigens, but not by chain length. The highest-affinity ligands are B type 3 (3000 ± 300 M−1) and A type 6 (2350 ± 60 M−1). While the higher affinity to the type 3 H antigen was previously observed, preferential binding to the types 6 and 3 antigens with A and B epitopes, respectively, has not been previously reported. A truncated P domain dimer (lacking the C-terminal arginine cluster) exhibits similar binding. The central-binding motifs in the HBGAs were identified by molecular-docking simulations. PMID:23118206

  8. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  9. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques. PMID:26070716

  10. Modulating uranium binding affinity in engineered calmodulin EF-hand peptides: effect of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T(9)TKE(12) sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from K(d) = 25±6 nM to K(d) = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (K(d) = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the ν(as)(P-O) and ν(s)(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in ν(as)(UO(2))(2+) vibration (from 923 cm(-1) to 908 cm(-1)) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  11. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  12. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  13. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  14. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  15. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  16. Affinities of the Swartkrans early Homo mandibles.

    PubMed

    Curnoe, Darren

    2008-01-01

    The southern African early Homo assemblage continues to make important contributions to understanding the systematics, adaptations and evolutionary history of the human genus. However, the taxonomy of this sample is in a state of flux. This study examines the size and shape of the mandibular bodies of Swartkrans SK 15 and SK 45 comparing them with variation in two early Homo taxa (H. habilis sensu lato and H. sapiens erectus). The research aims to clarify their phenetic affinities and systematics through univariate statistics, inferential testing and multivariate analysis employing size (Log-transformed) and shape (Mosimann variables). Neither of them strongly resembles H. habilis sensu lato or H. sapiens erectus, rather, they probably sample a novel species of Homo not seen in East Africa. Moreover, there is considerable morphological variability within the Swartkrans sample and the possibility of more than one novel species being sampled at this site cannot be excluded. PMID:18402959

  17. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  18. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  19. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  20. In vitro affinity maturation of a natural human antibody overcomes a barrier to in vivo affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Fouts, Ashley E; Stengel, Katharina; Luan, Peng; Dillon, Michael; Liang, Wei-Ching; Feierbach, Becket; Kelley, Robert F; Hötzel, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies isolated from human donors are increasingly being developed for anti-infective therapeutics. These antibodies undergo affinity maturation in vivo, minimizing the need for engineering of therapeutic leads for affinity. However, the affinities required for some therapeutic applications may be higher than the affinities of the leads obtained, requiring further affinity maturation in vitro. To improve the neutralization potency of natural human antibody MSL-109 targeting human cytomegalovirus (CMV), we affinity matured the antibody against the gH/gL glycoprotein complex. A phage display library where most of the six complementary-determining regions (CDRs) were allowed to vary in only one amino acid residue at a time was used to scan for mutations that improve binding affinity. A T55R mutation and multiple mutations in position 53 of the heavy chain were identified that, when present individually or in combination, resulted in higher apparent affinities to gH/gL and improved CMV neutralization potency of Fab fragments expressed in bacterial cells. Three of these mutations in position 53 introduced glycosylation sites in heavy chain CDR 2 (CDR H2) that impaired binding of antibodies expressed in mammalian cells. One high affinity (KD < 10 pM) variant was identified that combined the D53N and T55R mutations while avoiding glycosylation of CDR H2. However, all the amino acid substitutions identified by phage display that improved binding affinity without introducing glycosylation sites required between two and four simultaneous nucleotide mutations to avoid glycosylation. These results indicate that the natural human antibody MSL-109 is close to a local affinity optimum. We show that affinity maturation by phage display can be used to identify and bypass barriers to in vivo affinity maturation of antibodies imposed by glycosylation and codon usage. These constraints may be relatively prevalent in human antibodies due to the codon usage and the amino acid

  1. Prediction of Neutral Salt Elution Profiles for Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1981-04-01

    Neutral salts exhibit very marked differences as eluants of proteins from affinity columns. We observe: (i) that the relative potencies of neutral salts as eluants are independent of the protein or the affinity ligand in the systems studied, (ii) that the absolute salt concentration necessary to elute any given protein bound to the affinity matrix is proportional to the algebraic sum of a set of elution coefficients defined herein for the separate ions present in the solution, and (iii) that the proportionality between elution potency and elution coefficient is a function of the affinity of the protein for the immobilized ligand. Given the concentration of one neutral salt required for elution of a protein of interest from an affinity column, the elution capability of any neutral salt at any temperature can be quantitatively predicted for that protein. Accordingly, application and elution protocols for affinity chromatography can be designed to optimize the yield and fold purification of proteins.

  2. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  3. Affine Vertex Operator Algebras and Modular Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arike, Yusuke; Kaneko, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we list all affine vertex operator algebras of positive integral levels whose dimensions of spaces of characters are at most 5 and show that a basis of the space of characters of each affine vertex operator algebra in the list gives a fundamental system of solutions of a modular linear differential equation. Further, we determine the dimensions of the spaces of characters of affine vertex operator algebras whose numbers of inequivalent simple modules are not exceeding 20.

  4. A Genome-Inspired DNA Ligand for Affinity Capture of Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junfeng; Carter, Jennifer A.; Frederick, Kimberley A.; McGown, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-linked polymorphic region (ILPR) of the human insulin gene contains tandem repeats of similar G-rich sequences, some of which form intramolecular G-quadruplex structures in vitro. Previous work showed affinity binding of insulin to an intramolecular G-quadruplex formed by ILPR variant a. Here we report on interactions of insulin and the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) with ILPR variants a, h and i. Circular dichroism indicated intramolecular G-quadruplex formation for variants a and h. Affinity MALDI mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance were used to compare protein capture and binding strengths. Insulin and IGF-2 exhibited high binding affinity for variants a and h but not i, indicating the involvement of intramolecular G-quadruplexes. Interaction between insulin and variant a was unique in the appearance of two binding interactions with KD~10−13 M and KD~10−7 M, which was not observed for insulin with variant h (KD~10−8 M) or IGF-2 with either variant (KD’s~10−9 D M). The results provide a basis for design of DNA binding ligands for insulin and IGF-2 and support a new approach to discovery of DNA affinity binding ligands based on genome-inspired sequences rather than the traditional combinatorial selection route to aptamer discovery. PMID:19391177

  5. Isolation of ubiquitinated substrates by tandem affinity purification of E3 ligase-polyubiquitin-binding domain fusions (ligase traps).

    PubMed

    Mark, Kevin G; Loveless, Theresa B; Toczyski, David P

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential protein modification that influences eukaryotic processes ranging from substrate degradation to nonproteolytic pathway alterations, including DNA repair and endocytosis. Previous attempts to analyze substrates via physical association with their respective ubiquitin ligases have had some success. However, because of the transient nature of enzyme-substrate interactions and rapid protein degradation, detection of substrates remains a challenge. Ligase trapping is an affinity purification approach in which ubiquitin ligases are fused to a polyubiquitin-binding domain, which allows the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates. Immunoprecipitation is first used to enrich for proteins that are bound to the ligase trap. Subsequently, affinity purification is used under denaturing conditions to capture proteins conjugated with hexahistidine-tagged ubiquitin. By using this protocol, ubiquitinated substrates that are specific for a given ligase can be isolated for mass spectrometry or western blot analysis. After cells have been collected, the described protocol can be completed in 2-3 d. PMID:26766115

  6. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  7. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  8. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  9. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  10. Differential Mobility Spectrometry: Preliminary Findings on Determination of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti; Boyd, John

    2007-01-01

    The electron capture detector (ECD) has been used for 40+ years (1) to derive fundamental constants such as a compound's electron affinity. Given this historical perspective, it is not surprising that differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) might be used in a like manner. This paper will present data from a gas chromatography (GC)-DMS instrument that illustrates the potential capability of this device to derive fundamental constants for electron-capturing compounds. Potential energy curves will be used to provide possible explanation of the data.

  11. Native Mass Spectrometry in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of native mass spectrometry (MS) in 1990 led to the development of new mass spectrometry instrumentation and methodologies for the analysis of noncovalent protein-ligand complexes. Native MS has matured to become a fast, simple, highly sensitive and automatable technique with well-established utility for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). Native MS has the capability to directly detect weak ligand binding to proteins, to determine stoichiometry, relative or absolute binding affinities and specificities. Native MS can be used to delineate ligand-binding sites, to elucidate mechanisms of cooperativity and to study the thermodynamics of binding. This review highlights key attributes of native MS for FBDD campaigns. PMID:27483215

  12. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  13. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation. PMID:25086199

  14. A Differential Dielectric Affinity Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Song, Bing; Li, Dachao; Xu, Kexin; Accili, Domenico; Wang, Qian; Leibel, Rudolph; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous glucose monitor with a differential dielectric sensor implanted within the subcutaneous tissue that determines the glucose in the interstitial fluid is presented. The device, created using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, consists of sensing and reference modules that are identical in design and placed in close proximity. Each module contains a microchamber housing a pair of capacitive electrodes residing on the device substrate and embedded in a suspended, perforated polymer diaphragm. The microchambers, enclosed in semi-permeable membranes, are filled with either a polymer solution that has specific affinity to glucose or a glucose-insensitive reference solution. To accurately determine the glucose concentration, changes in the permittivity of the sensing and the reference solutions induced by changes in glucose concentration are measured differentially. In vitro characterization demonstrated the sensor capable of measuring glucose concentrations from 0 to 500 mg/dL with resolution and accuracy of ∼1.7 μg/dL and ∼1.74 mg/dL, respectively. In addition, device drift was reduced to 1.4% (uncontrolled environment) and 11% (5 °C of temperature variation) of that from non-differential measurements, indicating significant stability improvements. Preliminary animal testing demonstrated that the differential sensor accurately tracks glucose concentration in blood. This sensor can potentially be used clinically as a subcutaneously implanted continuous monitoring device in diabetic patients. PMID:24220675

  15. Affine gravity, Palatini formalism and charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Livshits, Gideon I.

    2011-12-01

    Affine gravity and the Palatini formalism contribute both to produce a simple and unique formula for calculating charges at spatial and null infinity for Lovelock type Lagrangians whose variational derivatives do not depend on second-order derivatives of the field components. The method is based on the covariant generalization due to Julia and Silva of the Regge-Teitelboim procedure that was used to define properly the mass in the classical formulation of Einstein's theory of gravity. Numerous applications reproduce standard results obtained by other secure but mostly specialized method like in ADM energy for asymptotically flat spacetimes and in Abbot and Deser for asymptotically de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spacetimes, both at spatial infinity. As a novel application we calculate the Bondi energy loss in five dimensional gravity, based on the asymptotic solution given by Tanabe et al. and obtain, as expected, the same result. We also give the for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and find the superpotential for Lovelock theories of gravity when the number of dimensions tends to infinity with maximally symmetrical boundaries. The paper is written in standard component formalism.

  16. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  17. Divalent cation affinity sites in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G; Kaneshiro, E S; Peters, P D

    1976-05-01

    Sites with high calcium affinity in Paramecium aurelia were identified by high calcium (5 mM) fixation and electron microscope methods. Electron-opaque deposits were observed on the cytoplasmic side of surface membranes, particularly at the basal regions of cilia and trichocyst-pellicle fusion sites. Deposits were also observed on some smooth cytomembranes, within the axoneme of cilia, and on basal bodies. The divalent cations, Mg2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, Ni2+, Ba2+, and Zn2+, could be substituted for Ca2+ in the procedure. Deposits were larger with 5 mM Sr2+. Ba2+, and Mn2+ at ciliary transverse plates and the terminal plate of basal bodies. Microprobe analysis showed that Ca and C1 were concentrated within deposits. In some analyses, S and P were detected in deposits. Also, microprobe analysis of 5 mM Mn2+-fixed P. aurelia showed that those deposits were enriched in Mn and C1 and sometimes enriched in P. Deposits were seen only when the ciliates were actively swimming at the time of fixation. Locomotory mutants having defective membrane Ca-gating mechanisms and ciliates fixed while exhibiting ciliary reversal showed no obvious differences in deposition pattern and intensity. Possible correlations between electron-opaque deposits and the locations of intramembranous particles seen by freeze-fracture studied, as well as sites where fibrillar material associate with membranes are considered. The possibility that the action sites of calcium and other divalent cations were identified is discussed. PMID:1262398

  18. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-04-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  19. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  20. Banach frames in the affine synthesis problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, Pavel A.

    2009-10-01

    We consider the problem of representing functions f\\in L^p(\\mathbb R^d) by a series in elements of the affine system \\displaystyle \\psi_{j,k}(x)=\\lvert\\det a_j\\rvert^{1/2}\\psi(a_jx-bk), \\qquad j\\in\\mathbb N, \\quad k\\in\\mathbb Z^d. The corresponding representation theorems are established on the basis of the frame inequalities \\displaystyle A\\Vert g\\Vert _q\\le\\Vert\\{(g,\\psi_{j,k})\\}\\Vert _Y\\le B\\Vert g\\Vert _q for the Fourier coefficients \\displaystyle(g,\\psi_{j,k})=\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}g(x)\\psi_{j,k}(x)\\,dx of functions g\\in L^q(\\mathbb R^d), 1/p+1/q=1, where {\\Vert\\cdot\\Vert}_Y is the norm in some Banach space of number families \\{y_{j,k}\\} and 0 are constants. In particular, it is proved that if the integral of a function \\psi\\in L^1\\cap L^p(\\mathbb R^d), 1, is nonzero, so \\displaystyle\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}\\psi(x)\\,dx\

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Affine constellations without mutually unbiased counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Stefan; Durt, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely.

  2. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  3. The Study of Affinity-Seeking in an Organizational Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flath, Dominic B.

    This study investigated the relationship between supervisors' use of Bell and Daly's affinity-seeking strategies and their impact on employee satisfaction. Results indicated that 16 of the 25 affinity-seeking strategies were positively correlated with a subordinate's perception of supervisor credibility. Results also indicated that a supervisor's…

  4. A minimax approach to spatial estimation using affinity matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. N.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates made in the plane to improve on noisy unbiased estimates were combined. Only a small fraction of points in a giant grid were used to do this, those that are most like a given point. A component of this process defining an affinity matrix of values, indicating which points are relevant to others. Minimax rules are shown to be based on affinity matrices.

  5. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  6. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  7. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  8. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)- d-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α- d-Gal-(1→2)-[α- d-Abe-(1→3)]-α- d-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GalNAc-(1→4)[α- d-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α- l-Fuc-(1→2)-β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  9. May the Best Molecule Win: Competition ESI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Sarah; Wilson, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has become invaluable in the characterization of macromolecular biological systems such as nucleic acids and proteins. Recent advances in the field of mass spectrometry and the soft conditions characteristic of electrospray ionization allow for the investigation of non-covalent interactions among large biomolecules and ligands. Modulation of genetic processes through the use of small molecule inhibitors with the DNA minor groove is gaining attention as a potential therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the development of a competition method using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to probe the interactions of multiple DNA sequences with libraries of minor groove binding molecules. Such an approach acts as a high-throughput screening method to determine important information including the stoichiometry, binding mode, cooperativity, and relative binding affinity. In addition to small molecule-DNA complexes, we highlight other applications in which competition mass spectrometry has been used. A competitive approach to simultaneously investigate complex interactions promises to be a powerful tool in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors with high specificity and for specific, important DNA sequences. PMID:26501262

  10. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-12-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  11. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture. PMID:27473483

  12. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  13. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  14. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sulatskaya, Anna I.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Belousov, Mikhail V.; Bondarev, Stanislav A.; Zhouravleva, Galina A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  15. Supramolecular Affinity Labeling of Histone Peptides Containing Trimethyllysine and Its Application to Histone Deacetylase Assays.

    PubMed

    Gober, Isaiah N; Waters, Marcey L

    2016-08-01

    Lysine methylation is an important histone post-translational modification (PTM) for manipulating chromatin structure and regulating gene expression, and its dysregulation is associated with various diseases including many cancers. While characterization of Lys methylation has seen improvements over the past decade due to advances in proteomic mass spectrometry and methods involving antibodies, chemical methods for selective detection of proteins containing PTMs are still lacking. Here, we detail the development of a unique labeling method wherein a synthetic receptor probe for trimethyl lysine (Kme3), CX4-ONBD, is used to direct selective fluorescent labeling of Kme3 histone peptides. This supramolecular approach reverses the paradigm of ligand-directed affinity labeling by making the receptor the synthetic component and the ligand the component to be labeled. We show that the probe mediates a strong turn-on fluorescence response in the presence of a Kme3 histone peptide and shows >5-fold selectivity in covalent labeling over an unmethylated lysine peptide. We also demonstrate the utility of the probe through the design of a turn-on fluorescence assay for histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and for inhibitor screening and IC50 determination. Our synthetic receptor-mediated affinity labeling approach broadens the scope of PTM detection by chemical means and may facilitate the development of more versatile in vitro enzymatic assays. PMID:27387477

  16. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  17. Fragment screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meiby, Elinor; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M; Ohlson, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a new strategy for drug discovery where lead compounds are evolved from small molecules. These fragments form low affinity interactions (dissociation constant (K(D)) = mM - μM) with protein targets, which require fragment screening methods of sufficient sensitivity. Weak affinity chromatography (WAC) is a promising new technology for fragment screening based on selective retention of fragments by a drug target. Kinases are a major pharmaceutical target, and FBDD has been successfully applied to several of these targets. In this work, we have demonstrated the potential to use WAC in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for fragment screening of a kinase target-cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK). One hundred seventy fragments were selected for WAC screening by virtual screening of a commercial fragment library against the ATP-binding site of five different proteins. GAK protein was immobilized on a capillary HPLC column, and compound binding was characterized by frontal affinity chromatography. Compounds were screened in sets of 13 or 14, in combination with MS detection for enhanced throughput. Seventy-eight fragments (46 %) with K(D) < 200 μM were detected, including a few highly efficient GAK binders (K(D) of 2 μM; ligand efficiency = 0.51). Of special interest is that chiral screening by WAC may be possible, as two stereoisomeric fragments, which both contained one chiral center, demonstrated twin peaks. This ability, in combination with the robustness, sensitivity, and simplicity of WAC makes it a new method for fragment screening of considerable potential. PMID:22918538

  18. Genetic affinities of central China populations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H Y; Wang, H W; Tan, S N; Chen, Y; Wang, W L; Tao, H X; Yin, Z C; Zou, Y H; Ouyang, S M; Ni, B

    2014-01-01

    Hunan locates in the south-central part of China, to the south of the middle reaches of the Yangtze River and south of Lake Dongting. According to the historical records, the peopling of Hunan by modern human ancestors can ascend to 40 thousand years ago. Thus, to trace the ancient maternal components can offer further insight into the origin of south-central China. In this study, we investigated the mitochondrial DNA of 114 individuals from Hunan Province (including 34 Han, 40 Tujia and 40 Miao). Hypervariable regions I and II of the mtDNA control region were sequenced, and the relative diagnostic variations in coding region according to the updated worldwide phylogeny tree were selected and typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or direct sequencing. All individuals were classified into specific (sub)haplogroups. By comparison with the surrounding populations, southern China-prevalent haplogroups were detected with relative higher frequency in the Tujia and Miao ethnic populations, such as haplogroup B, with more than 20%, lacking in the Han population, which illustrated its southern origin characters. In addition, we also detected northern of East Asia prevalent haplogroups with a relative higher frequency in Tujia populations than in the Miao and Yao ethnic groups, implying a gene flow from Han populations. However, the language-clustering tendency was supported by our principal component analysis and further genetic estimation results. Han and ethnic groups in central China exhibited specific ancestors related to their closer language affinity, although there was extensively genetic admixture between Han and ethnic groups. PMID:24615027

  19. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  20. Tetrahydroprotoberberine alkaloids with dopamine and σ receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Gadhiya, Satishkumar; Madapa, Sudharshan; Kurtzman, Thomas; Alberts, Ian L; Ramsey, Steven; Pillarsetty, Nagavara-Kishore; Kalidindi, Teja; Harding, Wayne W

    2016-05-01

    Two series of analogues of the tetrahydroprotoberberine (THPB) alkaloid (±)-stepholidine that (a) contain various alkoxy substituents at the C10 position and, (b) were de-rigidified with respect to (±)-stepholidine, were synthesized and evaluated for affinity at dopamine and σ receptors in order to evaluate effects on D3 and σ2 receptor affinity and selectivity. Small n-alkoxy groups are best tolerated by D3 and σ2 receptors. Among all compounds tested, C10 methoxy and ethoxy analogues (10 and 11 respectively) displayed the highest affinity for σ2 receptors as well as σ2 versus σ1 selectivity and also showed the highest D3 receptor affinity. De-rigidification of stepholidine resulted in decreased affinity at all receptors evaluated; thus the tetracyclic THPB framework is advantageous for affinity at dopamine and σ receptors. Docking of the C10 analogues at the D3 receptor, suggest that an ionic interaction between the protonated nitrogen atom and Asp110, a H-bond interaction between the C2 phenol and Ser192, a H-bond interaction between the C10 phenol and Cys181 as well as hydrophobic interactions of the aryl rings to Phe106 and Phe345, are critical for high affinity of the compounds. PMID:27032890

  1. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  2. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L; White, Christopher J; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S

    2014-10-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  3. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  4. ODE/IM correspondence and modified affine Toda field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Katsushi; Locke, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    We study the two-dimensional affine Toda field equations for affine Lie algebra gˆ modified by a conformal transformation and the associated linear equations. In the conformal limit, the associated linear problem reduces to a (pseudo-)differential equation. For classical affine Lie algebra gˆ, we obtain a (pseudo-)differential equation corresponding to the Bethe equations for the Langlands dual of the Lie algebra g, which were found by Dorey et al. in study of the ODE/IM correspondence.

  5. Strategies to guide the antibody affinity maturation process.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Joyce, M Gordon

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies with protective activity are critical for vaccine efficacy. Affinity maturation increases antibody activity through multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection in the germinal center. Identification of HIV-1 specific and influenza-specific antibody developmental pathways, as well as characterization of B cell and virus co-evolution in patients, has informed our understanding of antibody development. In order to counteract HIV-1 and influenza viral diversity, broadly neutralizing antibodies precisely target specific sites of vulnerability and require high levels of affinity maturation. We present immunization strategies that attempt to recapitulate these natural processes and guide the affinity maturation process. PMID:25913818

  6. Strategies to guide the antibody affinity maturation process

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Joyce, M. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies with protective activity are critical for vaccine efficacy. Affinity maturation increases antibody activity through multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection in the germinal center. Identification of HIV-1 specific and influenza-specific antibody developmental pathways, as well as characterization of B cell and virus co-evolution in patients, has informed our understanding of antibody development. In order to counteract HIV-1 and Influenza viral diversity, broadly neutralizing antibodies precisely target specific sites of vulnerability and require high levels of affinity maturation. We present immunization strategies that attempt to recapitulate these natural processes and guide the affinity maturation process. PMID:25913818

  7. Affinity- and topology-dependent bound on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-08-01

    We provide a proof of a recently conjectured universal bound on current fluctuations in Markovian processes. This bound establishes a link between the fluctuations of an individual observable current, the cycle affinities driving the system into a non-equilibrium steady state, and the topology of the network. The proof is based on a decomposition of the network into independent cycles with both positive affinity and positive stationary cycle current. This formalism allows for a refinement of the bound for systems in equilibrium or with locally vanishing affinities.

  8. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  9. Combustion diagnostics by laser spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Morita, Shigeaki; Kodama, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kozo

    2009-03-01

    We have developed three different types of visualization methods for energy conversion systems by means of laser spectrometry. (1) Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and (2) laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS) have been applied to visualization of chemical species in combustion fields of flames. (3) Near-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy has been used for visualization of water in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Complex physicochemical processes in the energy conversion systems have been revealed by laser spectrometry.

  10. Characterization of the human submandibular/sublingual saliva glycoproteome using lectin affinity chromatography coupled to Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Lu, Bingwen; Liao, Lujian; Xu, Tao; Bedi, Gurrinder; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth analysis of the salivary proteome is fundamental to understanding the functions of salivary proteins in the oral cavity and to reveal disease biomarkers involved in different pathophysiological conditions, with the ultimate goal of improving patient diagnosis and prognosis. Submandibular and sublingual glands contribute saliva rich in glycoproteins to the total saliva output, making them valuable sources for glycoproteomic analysis. Lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics was used to explore the submandibular/sublingual (SM/SL) saliva glycoproteome. A total of 262 N- and O-linked glycoproteins were identified by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Only 38 were previously described in SM and SL salivas from the human salivary N-linked glycoproteome, while 224 were unique. Further comparison analysis with SM/SL saliva of the human saliva proteome, revealed 125 glycoproteins not formerly reported in this secretion. KEGG pathway analyses demonstrated that many of these glycoproteins are involved in processes such as complement and coagulation cascades, cell communication, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis neo-lactoseries, O-glycan biosynthesis, glycan structures-biosynthesis 2, starch and sucrose metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis or others pathways. In summary, lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to MudPIT mass spectrometry identified many novel glycoproteins in SM/SL saliva. These new additions to the salivary proteome may prove to be a critical step for providing reliable biomarkers in the diagnosis of a myriad of oral and systemic diseases. PMID:21936497

  11. Characterization of methyl methacrylate oligomers using secondary ion mass spectrometry, APCI mass spectrometry and molecular orbital theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Iwai, K.; Momoji, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Saiki, K.; Hashimoto, K.

    2003-01-01

    The ionization efficiency and fragmentation mechanism of methyl methacrylate (MMA) oligomers (3-mer˜8-mer) were investigated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and APCI mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). Protonation and fragmentation mechanisms of MMA oligomers were clarified by using molecular orbital (MO) methods. MMA oligomers were synthesized in anionic polymerization, and the oligomers were fractionated into 3-mer˜8-mer using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). In SIMS of MMA oligomers (3-mer˜8-mer), [MH] +, [MH-CH 3OH] +, [MH-methyl formate] + and [MH-2CH 3OH-methyl formate] + appeared. The peak intensities of adduct ions [M+Li] +, [M+Na] + and [M+K] + increased with the increase of the polymerization degree. The optimized geometries and H +, Li +, Na + and K + affinities of MMA monomer (1-mer), dimer (2-mer), and trimer (3-mer) were calculated using the PM3 and ab initio MO methods. The calculated H +, Li +, Na + and K + affinities increased in order of 1-mer, 2-mer and 3-mer of MMA.

  12. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  13. Bioaffinity Mass Spectrometry Screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ben; Feng, Yun Jiang; Vu, Hoan; McCormick, Brendan; Rowley, Jessica; Pedro, Liliana; Crowther, Gregory J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Forster, Paul I; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS or ESI-FTMS) was used to screen 192 natural product extracts and a 659-member natural product-based fragment library for bindings to a potential malaria drug target, Plasmodium falciparum Rab11a (PfRab11a, PF13_0119). One natural product extract and 11 fragments showed binding activity. A new natural product, arborside E, was identified from the active extract of Psydrax montigena as a weak binder. Its binding activity and inhibitory activity against PfRab11a were confirmed by ESI-FTMS titration experiments and an orthogonal enzyme assay. PMID:26773071

  14. Extremely high negative electron affinity of diamond via magnesium adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, K. M.; Edmonds, M. T.; Tadich, A.; Thomsen, L.; Stacey, A.; Schenk, A.; Pakes, C. I.; Ley, L.

    2015-07-01

    We report large negative electron affinity (NEA) on diamond (100) using magnesium adsorption on a previously oxygen-terminated surface. The measured NEA is up to (-2.01 ±0.05 ) eV, the largest reported negative electron affinity to date. Despite the expected close relationship between the surface chemistry of Mg and Li species on oxygen-terminated diamond, we observe differences in the adsorption properties between the two. Most importantly, a high-temperature annealing step is not required to activate the Mg-adsorbed surface to a state of negative electron affinity. Diamond surfaces prepared by this procedure continue to possess negative electron affinity after exposure to high temperatures, air, and even immersion in water.

  15. COMPARATIVE OXYGEN AFFINITY OF FISH AND MAMMALIAN MYOGLOBINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Myoglobins from rat, coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), buffalo sculpin (Enophrys bison) hearts, and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) red skeletal muscle were partially purified and their O2 binding affinities determined. Commercially prepared sperm whale myoglobin was employe...

  16. Proton affinity of several basic non-standard amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rožman, Marko

    2012-08-01

    The structures and absolute proton affinities of several arginine (2-amino-3-guanidinopropionic acid, 2-amino-4-guanidinobutyric acid, homoarginine, citrulline and canavanine), histidine (1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine) and lysine (2,3-diaminopropanoic acid, 2,4-diaminobutanoic acid, ornithine, 5-hydroxylysine, canaline and thialysine) homologues and analogues have been estimated using composite G3MP2B3 computational protocol. For a majority of here studied non-standard amino acids the gas-phase proton affinities were established for the first time, while for the others obtained values are used to improve the accuracy of the computational and experimental proton affinities reported previously. In addition, structures and proton affinities are discussed in order to rationalize their biological activity.

  17. Bidirectional Elastic Image Registration Using B-Spline Affine Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Wang, Chen; Kaminski, Naftali; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-01-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-Spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bi-directional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective / cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy. PMID:24530210

  18. Bidirectional elastic image registration using B-spline affine transformation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C; Ma, Hongxia; Leader, Joseph; Kaminski, Naftali; Gur, David; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-06-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bidirectional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective/cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy. PMID:24530210

  19. Frontal affinity chromatography (FAC): theory and basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is a versatile analytical tool for determining specific interactions between biomolecules and is particularly useful in the field of glycobiology. This article presents its basic aspects, merits, and theory. PMID:25117240

  20. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  1. Aptamer-modified magnetic beads in affinity separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guohong; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are valuable alternative ligands for affinity separations. Here, we describe the aptamer-based affinity separation of His-tagged proteins using an aptamer directed against the His-tag. The immobilization of the aptamer to magnetic beads is described as well as the aptamer-based purification and proper methods for the characterization of the process. Moreover, indications for the transfer of the process to other aptamers are given. PMID:25749947

  2. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  3. Enhancing IHE XDS for federated clinical affinity domain support.

    PubMed

    Dogac, Asuman; Laleci, Gokce B; Aden, Thomas; Eichelberg, Marco

    2007-03-01

    One of the key problems in healthcare informatics is the inability to share patient records across enterprises. To address this problem, an important industry initiative called "integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE)" specified the "cross enterprise document sharing (XDS)" profile. In the IHE XDS, healthcare enterprises that agree to work together form a "clinical affinity domain" and store healthcare documents in an ebXML registry/repository architecture to facilitate their sharing. The affinity domains also agree on a common set of policies such as coding lists to be used to annotate clinical documents in the registry/repository and the common schemes for patient identification. However, since patients expect their records to follow them as they move from one clinical affinity domain to another, there is a need for affinity domains to be federated to enable information exchange. In this paper, we describe how IHE XDS can be enhanced to support federated clinical affinity domains. We demonstrate that federation of affinity domains are facilitated when ontologies, rather than coding term lists, are used to annotate clinical documents. Furthermore, we describe a patient identification protocol that eliminates the need to keep a master patient index file for the federation. PMID:17390991

  4. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  5. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3′ end of dengue virus (DENV) 5′–3′ UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions. PMID:26389898

  6. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3' end of dengue virus (DENV) 5'-3' UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions. PMID:26389898

  7. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  8. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  9. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  10. Increased hemoglobin O2 affinity protects during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Ozlem; Cabrales, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxia requires time to complete the adaptation mechanisms that influence oxygen (O(2)) transport and O(2) utilization. Although decreasing hemoglobin (Hb) O(2) affinity would favor the release of O(2) to the tissues, increasing Hb O(2) affinity would augment arterial O(2) saturation during hypoxia. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pharmacologically increasing the Hb O(2) affinity will augment O(2) transport during severe hypoxia (10 and 5% inspired O(2)) compared with normal Hb O(2) affinity. RBC Hb O(2) affinity was increased by infusion of 20 mg/kg of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF). Control animals received only the vehicle. The effects of increasing Hb O(2) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model, in terms of systemic and microvascular hemodynamics and partial pressures of O(2) (Po(2)). Pimonidazole binding to hypoxic areas of mice heart and brain was also studied. 5HMF decreased the Po(2) at which the Hb is 50% saturated with O(2) by 12.6 mmHg. During 10 and 5% O(2) hypoxia, 5HMF increased arterial blood O(2) saturation by 35 and 48% from the vehicle group, respectively. During 5% O(2) hypoxia, blood pressure and heart rate were 58 and 30% higher for 5HMF compared with the vehicle. In addition, 5HMF preserved microvascular blood flow, whereas blood flow decreased to 40% of baseline in the vehicle group. Consequently, perivascular Po(2) was three times higher in the 5HMF group compared with the control group at 5% O(2) hypoxia. 5HMF also reduced heart and brain hypoxic areas in mice. Therefore, increased Hb O(2) affinity resulted in hemodynamics and oxygenation benefits during severe hypoxia. This acute acclimatization process may have implications in survival during severe environmental hypoxia when logistic constraints prevent chronic acclimatization. PMID:22636677

  11. Affinities of methylphenidate derivatives for dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Gatley, S J; Pan, D; Chen, R; Chaturvedi, G; Ding, Y S

    1996-01-01

    We have synthesized several derivative of dl-threo-methylphenidate (Ritalin) bearing substituents on the phenyl ring. IC50 values for binding these compounds to rat brain monoamine transporters were assessed using [3H]WIN 35,428 (striatal membranes, dopamine transporters, DAT), [3H]nisoxetine (frontal cortex membranes, norepinephrine transporters, NET) and [3H]paroxetine (brain stem membranes, 5HT transporters, 5HTT). Affinities (1/Ki) decreased in the order: DAT > NET > 5HTT. Substitution at the para position of dl-threo-methylphenidate generally led to retained or increased affinity for the dopamine transporter (bromo > iodo > methoxy > hydroxy). Substitution at the meta position also increased affinity for the DAT (m-bromo > methylphenidate; m-iodo-p-hydroxy > p-hydroxy). Substitution at the ortho position with bromine considerably decreased affinity. Similar IC50 values for binding of o-bromomethylphenidate to the dopamine transporter were measured at 0, 22 and 37 degrees. N-Methylation of the piperidine ring of methylphenidate also considerably reduced affinity. The dl-erythro isomer of o-bromomethylphenidate did not bind to the DAT (IC50 > 50,000 nM). Affinities at the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters for substituted methylphenidate derivatives were well correlated (r2=0.90). Abilities of several methylphenidate derivatives to inhibit [3H]dopamine uptake in striatal synaptosomes corresponded well with inhibition of [3H]WIN 35, 428 binding. None of the compounds examined exhibited significant affinity to dopamine D1 or D2 receptors (IC50 > 500 or 5,000 nM, respectively), as assessed by inhibition of binding of [3H]SCH 23390 or [123I]epidepride, respectively, to striatal membranes. PMID:8786705

  12. Increased hemoglobin O2 affinity protects during acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxia requires time to complete the adaptation mechanisms that influence oxygen (O2) transport and O2 utilization. Although decreasing hemoglobin (Hb) O2 affinity would favor the release of O2 to the tissues, increasing Hb O2 affinity would augment arterial O2 saturation during hypoxia. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pharmacologically increasing the Hb O2 affinity will augment O2 transport during severe hypoxia (10 and 5% inspired O2) compared with normal Hb O2 affinity. RBC Hb O2 affinity was increased by infusion of 20 mg/kg of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF). Control animals received only the vehicle. The effects of increasing Hb O2 affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model, in terms of systemic and microvascular hemodynamics and partial pressures of O2 (Po2). Pimonidazole binding to hypoxic areas of mice heart and brain was also studied. 5HMF decreased the Po2 at which the Hb is 50% saturated with O2 by 12.6 mmHg. During 10 and 5% O2 hypoxia, 5HMF increased arterial blood O2 saturation by 35 and 48% from the vehicle group, respectively. During 5% O2 hypoxia, blood pressure and heart rate were 58 and 30% higher for 5HMF compared with the vehicle. In addition, 5HMF preserved microvascular blood flow, whereas blood flow decreased to 40% of baseline in the vehicle group. Consequently, perivascular Po2 was three times higher in the 5HMF group compared with the control group at 5% O2 hypoxia. 5HMF also reduced heart and brain hypoxic areas in mice. Therefore, increased Hb O2 affinity resulted in hemodynamics and oxygenation benefits during severe hypoxia. This acute acclimatization process may have implications in survival during severe environmental hypoxia when logistic constraints prevent chronic acclimatization. PMID:22636677

  13. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  14. Developments in ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Collins, D C; Lee, M L

    2002-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used for over 30 years as a sensitive detector of organic compounds. The following is a brief review of IMS and its principles with an emphasis on its usage when coupled to mass spectrometry. Since its inception, IMS has been interfaced with quadrupole, time-of-flight, and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These hybrid instruments have been employed for the analysis of a variety of target analytes, including biomolecules, explosives, chemical warfare degradation products, and illicit drugs. PMID:11939214

  15. Development of simple and rapid elution methods for proteins from various affinity beads for their direct MALDI-TOF downstream application.

    PubMed

    Mlynarcik, Patrik; Bencurova, Elena; Madar, Marian; Mucha, Rastislav; Pulzova, Lucia; Hresko, Stanislav; Bhide, Mangesh

    2012-07-19

    Commercially available desalting techniques, necessary for downstream MALDI-TOF analysis of proteins, are often costly or time consuming for large-scale analysis. Here, we present techniques to elute proteins from various affinity resins, free from salt and ready for MALDI mass spectrometry. We showed that 0.1% TFA in 50% acetonitrile or 40% ethanol can be used as salt-free eluents for His-tagged proteins from variety of polyhistidine-affinity resins, while washing of resin beads twice with double-distilled water prior to the elution effectively desalted and recovered wide-range-molecular size proteins than commercially available desalting devices. Modified desalting and elution techniques were also applied for Flag- and Myc-tag affinity resins. The technique was further applied in co-precipitation assay, where the maximum recovery of wide-range molecular size proteins is crucial. Further, results showed that simple washing of the beads with double distilled water followed by elution with acetonitrile effectively desalted and recovered 150 kDa factor H protein of the sheep and its binding partner ~30 kDa BbCRASP-1 in co-precipitation assay. In summary, simple modifications in the desalting and elution strategy save time, labor and cost of the protein preparation for MALDI mass spectrometry; and large-scale protein purifications or co-precipitations can be performed with ease. PMID:22433248

  16. Robust Affinity Standards for Cu(I) Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Pritha; Morgan, M. Thomas; Bacsa, John; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of reliable Cu(I) protein binding affinities requires competing reference ligands with similar binding strengths; however, the literature on such reference ligands is not only sparse but often conflicting. To address this deficiency, we have created and characterized a series of water-soluble monovalent copper ligands, MCL-1, MCL-2, and MCL-3, that form well-defined, air-stable, and colorless complexes with Cu(I) in aqueous solution. Concluding from X-ray structural data, electrochemical measurements, and an extensive network of equilibrium titrations, all three ligands form discrete Cu(I) complexes with 1:1 stoichiometry and are capable of buffering Cu(I) concentrations between 10−10 and 10−17 M. As most Cu(I) protein affinities have been obtained from competition experiments with bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) or 2,2′-bicinchoninic acid (BCA), we further calibrated their Cu(I) stability constants against the MCL-series. To demonstrate the application of these reagents, we determined the Cu(I) binding affinity of CusF (logK = 14.3±0.1), a periplasmic metalloprotein required for the detoxification of elevated copper levels in E. coli. Altogether, this interconnected set of affinity standards establishes a reliable foundation that will facilitate the precise determination of Cu(I) binding affinities of proteins and small molecule ligands. PMID:24298878

  17. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  18. Fluorescent measurement of affinity binding between thrombin and its aptamers using on-chip affinity monoliths.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Woolley, Adam T

    2013-05-24

    A microfluidic chip with integrated 2mm long monoliths incorporated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups was developed for thrombin-aptamer interaction study. The non-G quartet forming oligonucleotide coated monoliths was compared to a 15 mer thrombin-binding aptamer, in which affinity binding and elution processes were real-time monitored fluorescently. The results showed that the fluorescence intensity of aptamer stationary phase is approximately 10 times higher than that of the control column, which is probably due to the successful suppression of nonspecific adsorption between thrombin and aptamers/monoliths by using PEG-monolith. The experiment was repeated using human serum albumin (HSA) and green fluorescence protein (GFP) as interferences, it was double confirmed that thrombin was selectively retained by PEG-monolith. An elution efficiency of 75% was achieved with an elute of 200mM acetic acid and 2M NaCI, and the eluted thrombin was successfully separated in an ionic buffer system of 20mM NaHCO3 (pH 9.5) with 3% PEG. The hydrophilic and antifouling properties of PEG-monolith greatly decrease nonspecific adsorption and enhance detection sensitivity, which provided an alternative method to perform on-chip fluorescent measurement of bioaffinity binding. PMID:23587316

  19. Craniodental affinities of Southeast Asia's "negritos" and the concordance with their genetic affinities.

    PubMed

    Bulbeck, David

    2013-01-01

    Genetic research into Southeast Asia's "negritos" has revealed their deep-rooted ancestry, with time depth comparable to that of Southwest Pacific populations. This finding is often interpreted as evidence that negritos, in contrast to other Southeast Asians, can trace much of their ancestry directly back to the early dispersal of Homo sapiens in the order of 70 kya from Africa to Pleistocene New Guinea and Australia. One view on negritos is to lump them and Southwest Pacific peoples into an "Australoid" race whose geographic distribution had included Southeast Asia prior to the Neolithic incursion of "Mongoloid" farmers. Studies into Semang osteology have revealed some hints of Southwest Pacific affinities in cranial shape, dental morphology, and dental metrical "shape." On the other hand, the Andamanese have been shown to resemble Africans in their craniometrics and South Asians in their dental morphology, while Philippine negritos resemble Mongoloid Southeast Asians in these respects and also in their dental metrics. This study expands the scope of negrito cranial comparisons by including Melayu Malays and additional coverage of South Asians. It highlights the distinction between the Mongoloid-like Philippine negritos and the Andamanese and Semang (and Senoi of Malaya) with their non-Mongoloid associations. It proposes that the early/mid-Holocene dispersal of the B4a1a mitochondrial DNA clade across Borneo, the Philippines, and Taiwan may be important for understanding the distinction between Philippine and other negritos. PMID:24297222

  20. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  1. Imaging spectrometry for ecological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Paul J.

    Imaging spectrometry from aircraft or satellite borne sensors has many potential ecological applications. This paper reviews its use for the remote sensing of foliar biochemical concentration, as this is an ecological application of remote sensing that is unique to imaging spectrometry. Attention is focussed on the development of methodologies, drawing where relevant on theory and techniques from both outside and inside remote sensing. Examples from the fields of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and geological remote sensing, along with an extensive reference list, provide an introduction to some of the ecological opportunities offered by imaging spectrometry.

  2. Enhancing Community Detection By Affinity-based Edge Weighting Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    Community detection refers to an important graph analytics problem of finding a set of densely-connected subgraphs in a graph and has gained a great deal of interest recently. The performance of current community detection algorithms is limited by an inherent constraint of unweighted graphs that offer very little information on their internal community structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to address this issue that weights the edges in a given graph based on recently proposed vertex affinity. The vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength, and therefore, it is ideal for graph analytics applications such as community detection. We also demonstrate that the affinity-based edge weighting scheme can improve the performance of community detection algorithms significantly.

  3. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Dedieu, Alain; Guérin, Philippe; Quéméneur, Eric; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude

    2008-03-28

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO2(2+)) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of aminophosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:18308325

  4. Recent advances in affinity capillary electrophoresis for binding studies.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; El Deeb, Sami; AlGarabli, Noura; AlAstal, Raghda; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The present review covers recent advances and important applications of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). It provides an overview about various ACE types, including ACE-MS, the multiple injection mode, the use of microchips and field-amplified sample injection-ACE. The most common scenarios of the studied affinity interactions are protein-drug, protein-metal ion, protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-carbohydrate, carbohydrate-drug, peptide-peptide, DNA-drug and antigen-antibody. Approaches for the improvements of ACE in term of precision, rinsing protocols and sensitivity are discussed. The combined use of computer simulation programs to support data evaluation is presented. In conclusion, the performance of ACE is compared with other techniques such as equilibrium dialysis, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, high-performance affinity chromatography as well as surface plasmon resonance, ultraviolet, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, MS and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:25534793

  5. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity (EA) of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, using 2p electron full configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions expanded in a 6s5p3d2f Slater-type orbital basis. The best complete active space self-consistent field - multireference CI (CASSCF-MRCI) result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell correlation increases the computed EA to 1.290 at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. This study clearly establishes the synergistic effect between the higher excitations and basis set completeness on the electron affinity when the 2s electrons are correlated.

  6. SwellGel: a sample preparation affinity chromatography technology for high throughput proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Haney, Paul J; Draveling, Connie; Durski, Wendy; Romanowich, Kathryn; Qoronfleh, M Walid

    2003-04-01

    Development of high throughput systems for purification and analysis of proteins is essential for the success of today's proteomic research. We have developed an affinity chromatography technology that allows the customization of high capacity/high throughput chromatographic separation of proteins. This technology utilizes selected chromatography media that are dehydrated to form uniform SwellGel discs. Unlike wet resin slurries, these discs are easily adaptable to a variety of custom formats, eliminating problems associated with resin dispensing, equilibration, or leakage. Discs can be made in assorted sizes (resin volume 15 microl-3 ml) dispensed in various formats (384-, 96-, 48-, and 24-well microplates or columns) and different ligands can be attached to the matrix. SwellGel discs rapidly hydrate upon addition of either water or the protein sample, providing dramatically increased capacity compared to coated plates. At the same time, the discs offer greater stability, reproducibility, and ease of handling than standard wet chromatography resins. We previously reported the development of SwellGel for the purification of 6x His- and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion proteins [Prot. Exp. Purif. 22 (2001) 359-366]. In this paper, we discuss an expanded list of SwellGel stabilized chromatographic methods that have been adapted to high throughput formats for processing protein samples ranging from 10 microl to 10 ml (1 microg to 50 mg protein). Data are presented applying SwellGel discs to high throughput proteomic applications such as affinity tag purification, protein desalting, the removal of abundant proteins from serum including albumin and immunoglobulin, and the isolation of phosphorylated peptides for mass spectrometry. PMID:12699691

  7. Development of Substrate-Selective Probes for Affinity Pulldown of Histone Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases (JHDMs) play critical roles in many key cellular processes and have been implicated in multiple disease conditions. Each enzyme within this family is known to have a strict substrate scope, specifically the position of the lysine within the histone and its degree of methylation. While much progress has been made in determining the substrates of each enzyme, new methods with which to systematically profile each histone mark are greatly needed. Novel chemical tools have the potential to fill this role and, furthermore, can be used as probes to answer fundamental questions about these enzymes and serve as potential therapeutic leads. In this work, we first investigated three small-molecule probes differing in the degree of “methylation state” and their differential bindings to JHDM1A (an H3K36me1/2 demethylase) using a fluorescence polarization-based competition assay. We then applied this specificity toward the “methylation state” and combined it with specificity toward lysine position in the design and synthesis of a peptidic probe targeting H3K36me2 JHDMs. The probe is further functionalized with a benzophenone cross-linking moiety and a biotin for affinity purification. Results showed binding of the peptidic probe to JHDM1A and specific enrichment of this protein in the presence of its native histone substrates. Affinity purification pulldown experiments from nuclear lysate coupled with mass spectrometry revealed the capability of the probe to pull out and enrich JHDMs along with other epigenetic proteins and transcriptional regulators. PMID:25335116

  8. Comparing multistep immobilized metal affinity chromatography and multistep TiO2 methods for phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Schunter, Alissa; Hummon, Amanda B

    2015-09-01

    Phosphopeptide enrichment from complicated peptide mixtures is an essential step for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic studies to reduce sample complexity and ionization suppression effects. Typical methods for enriching phosphopeptides include immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) beads, which have selective affinity and can interact with phosphopeptides. In this study, the IMAC enrichment method was compared with the TiO2 enrichment method, using a multistep enrichment strategy from whole cell lysate, to evaluate their abilities to enrich for different types of phosphopeptides. The peptide-to-beads ratios were optimized for both IMAC and TiO2 beads. Both IMAC and TiO2 enrichments were performed for three rounds to enable the maximum extraction of phosphopeptides from the whole cell lysates. The phosphopeptides that are unique to IMAC enrichment, unique to TiO2 enrichment, and identified with both IMAC and TiO2 enrichment were analyzed for their characteristics. Both IMAC and TiO2 enriched similar amounts of phosphopeptides with comparable enrichment efficiency. However, phosphopeptides that are unique to IMAC enrichment showed a higher percentage of multiphosphopeptides as well as a higher percentage of longer, basic, and hydrophilic phosphopeptides. Also, the IMAC and TiO2 procedures clearly enriched phosphopeptides with different motifs. Finally, further enriching with two rounds of TiO2 from the supernatant after IMAC enrichment or further enriching with two rounds of IMAC from the supernatant TiO2 enrichment does not fully recover the phosphopeptides that are not identified with the corresponding multistep enrichment. PMID:26237447

  9. Neuroprotective effects of high affinity sigma 1 receptor selective compounds

    PubMed Central

    Luedtke, Robert R.; Perez, Evelyn; Yang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Tu, Zhude; Mach, Robert H.; Simpkins, James W.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the antipsychotic drug haloperidol, a multifunctional D2-like dopamine and sigma receptor subtype antagonist, has neuroprotective properties. In this study we further examined the association between neuroprotection and receptor antagonism by evaluating a panel of novel compounds with varying affinity at sigma and D2-like dopamine receptors. These compounds were evaluated using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay that utilizes a hippocampal-derived cell line, HT-22, in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (5 to 20 mM) of glutamate. While haloperidol was found to be a potent neuroprotective agent in this in vitro cell assay, the prototypic sigma 1 receptor agonist (+)-pentazocine was found not to be neuroprotective. Subsequently, the potency for the neuroprotection of HT-22 cells was evaluated for a) three SV series indoles which have nMolar affinity at D2-like receptors but varying affinity at sigma 1 receptor and b) two benzyl phenylacetamides sigma 1 receptor selective compounds which bind with low affinity at D2-like receptors but have nMolar affinity for the sigma 1 receptor. We observed that cytoprotection correlated with the affinity of the compounds for sigma 1 receptors. Based upon results from the HT-22 cell-based in vitro assay, two phenylacetamides, LS-127 and LS-137, were further evaluated in vivo using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (t-MCAO) model of stroke. At a dose of 100 µg/kg, both LS-127 and LS-137 attenuated infarct volume by approximately 50%. These studies provide further evidence that sigma 1 receptor selective compounds can provide neuroprotection in cytotoxic situations. These results also demonstrate that sigma 1 receptor selective benzyl phenylacetamides are candidate pharmacotherapeutic agents that could be used to minimize neuronal death after a stroke or head trauma. PMID:22285434

  10. Ferromagnetic levan composite: an affinity matrix to purify lectin.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Renata; da Paz, Nathalia V N; Maciel, Jackeline C; Araújo, Flávia F B; Paiva, Patrícia M G; Calazans, Glícia M T; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C L; Coelho, Luana C B B; Carvalho, Luiz B; Silva, Maria da Paz C; dos Santos Correia, Maria Tereza

    2009-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A) and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1, 4) did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column. PMID:19547713

  11. Ferromagnetic Levan Composite: An Affinity Matrix to Purify Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Renata; da Paz, Nathalia V. N.; Maciel, Jackeline C.; Araújo, Flávia F. B.; Paiva, Patrícia M. G.; Calazans, Glícia M. T.; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Carvalho, Luiz B.; Silva, Maria da Paz C.; dos Santos Correia, Maria Tereza

    2009-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A) and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1, 4) did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column. PMID:19547713

  12. Affine and deformable registration based on polynomial expansion.

    PubMed

    Farnebäck, Gunnar; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a registration framework based on the polynomial expansion transform. The idea of polynomial expansion is that the image is locally approximated by polynomials at each pixel. Starting with observations of how the coefficients of ideal linear and quadratic polynomials change under translation and affine transformation, algorithms are developed to estimate translation and compute affine and deformable registration between a fixed and a moving image, from the polynomial expansion coefficients. All algorithms can be used for signals of any dimensionality. The algorithms are evaluated on medical data. PMID:17354971

  13. Affine generalization of the Komar complex of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2001-02-01

    On the basis of the ``on shell'' Noether identities of the metric-affine gauge approach of gravity, an affine superpotential is derived which comprises the energy- and angular-momentum content of exact solutions. In the special case of general relativity (GR) or its teleparallel equivalent, the Komar or Freud complex, respectively, are recovered. Applying this to the spontaneously broken anti-de Sitter gauge model of McDowell and Mansouri with an induced Euler term automatically yields the correct mass and spin of the Kerr-AdS solution of GR with a (induced) cosmological constant without the factor two discrepancy of the Komar formula.

  14. Affinity based and molecularly imprinted cryogels: Applications in biomacromolecule purification.

    PubMed

    Andaç, Müge; Galaev, Igor Yu; Denizli, Adil

    2016-05-15

    The publications in macro-molecularly imprinted polymers have increased drastically in recent years with the development of water-based polymer systems. The macroporous structure of cryogels has allowed the use of these materials within different applications, particularly in affinity purification and molecular imprinting based methods. Due to their high selectivity, specificity, efficient mass transfer and good reproducibility, molecularly imprinted cryogels (MICs) have become attractive for researchers in the separation and purification of proteins. In this review, the recent developments in affinity based cryogels and molecularly imprinted cryogels in protein purification are reviewed comprehensively. PMID:26454622

  15. Statistical theory of chromatography: new outlooks for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Denizot, F C; Delaage, M A

    1975-01-01

    We have developed further the statistical approach to chromatography initiated by Giddings and Eyring, and applied it to affinity chromatography. By means of a convenient expression of moments the convergence towards the Laplace-Gauss distribution has been established. The Gaussian character is not preserved if other causes of dispersion are taken into account, but expressions of moments can be obtained in a generalized form. A simple procedure is deduced for expressing the fundamental constants of the model in terms of purely experimental quantities. Thus, affinity chromatography can be used to determine rate constants of association and dissociation in a range considered as the domain of the stopped-flow methods. PMID:1061072

  16. and as Vertex Operator Extensionsof Dual Affine Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowcock, P.; Feigin, B. L.; Semikhatov, A. M.; Taormina, A.

    We discover a realisation of the affine Lie superalgebra and of the exceptional affine superalgebra as vertex operator extensions of two algebras with ``dual'' levels (and an auxiliary level-1 algebra). The duality relation between the levels is . We construct the representation of on a sum of tensor products of , , and modules and decompose it into a direct sum over the spectral flow orbit. This decomposition gives rise to character identities, which we also derive. The extension of the construction to is traced to the properties of embeddings into and their relation with the dual pairs. Conversely, we show how the representations are constructed from representations.

  17. Dynamic output feedback H ∞ control for affine fuzzy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the problem of designing H ∞ dynamic output feedback controllers for nonlinear systems, which are described by affine fuzzy models. The system outputs have been chosen as premise variables, which can guarantee that the plant and the controller always switch to the same region. By using a piecewise Lyapunov function and adding slack matrix variables, a piecewise-affine dynamic output feedback controller design method is obtained in the formulation of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be efficiently solved numerically. In contrast to the existing work, the proposed approach needs less LMI constraints and leads to less conservatism. Finally, numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the new result.

  18. Synthesis of biotinylated probes of artemisinin for affinity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Konziase, Benetode

    2015-01-01

    In this data article, we described the synthetic routes to four biotinylated probes (2, 3, 4, and 5) of artemisinin and the associated experimental procedures. We also provided the physical data for the synthesized compounds. These synthesized biotinylated probes of artemisinin are useful molecular tools for the affinity-labeling study of target receptor proteins of artemisinin in tropical pathogens such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, and Schistosoma. The data provided herein are related to “Biotinylated probes of artemisinin with labeling affinity toward Trypanosoma brucei brucei target proteins”, by Konziase (Anal. Biochem. (2015)). PMID:26217765

  19. Kinetic controlled affinity labeling of target enzyme with thioester chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tomohiro, Takenori; Nakabayashi, Masahiro; Sugita, Yuka; Morimoto, Shota

    2016-08-01

    High specificity has been an important feature in affinity labeling for target profiling. Especially, to label targets via rapidly progressing reactions with consumption of ligand (probe), high specificity of reaction with common functional groups of target protein should be achieved without reactions with similar groups of non-target proteins. Herein, we demonstrate the kinetic controlled affinity labeling of acyl CoA synthetase using a fatty acid analogue containing a phenylthioester linkage. High specificity was attained by accelerating the labeling rate in the binding pocket. This approach could be useful for profiling a series of target enzymes and transporters in signal transduction pathways. PMID:27298000

  20. Affinity Chromatography Purification of Cytochrome c Binding Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Angelo; Bill, Kurt; Broger, Clemens

    1982-04-01

    An efficient affinity chromatography procedure for the isolation of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and reductase is described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c was used as a ligand, bound to a thiol-Sepharose 4B gel through cysteine-107. In this way, the site of interaction of cytochrome c with cytochrome oxidase and reductase remained unmodified and available for binding to a number of partner enzymes. The procedure is adequate for the purification of all those proteins having in common the property of binding with high affinity to cytochrome c--e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, reductase, and peroxidase, sulfite oxidase, and reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria.

  1. Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashchitskii, B. A.; Kuznetsov, P. V.

    1984-10-01

    The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

  2. Quality management in clinical application of mass spectrometry measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Vogeser, Michael; Seger, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to highly specific analyte detection and potentially complete compensation for matrix variables based on the principle of stable isotope derivative internal standardisation, mass spectrometry methods allow the development of diagnostic tests of outstanding analytical quality. However, these features per se do not guarantee reliability of tests. A wide range of factors can introduce analytical errors and inaccuracy due to the extreme complexity of the methods involved. Furthermore, it can be expected that the application patterns of MS methods in diagnostic laboratories will change substantially during the coming years - with presumably less specialised laboratories implementing mass spectrometry. Introduction of highly automated test solutions by manufacturers will require some trade-off between operation convenience, sample throughput and analytical performance. Structured and careful quality and risk management is therefore crucial to translate the analytical power of mass spectrometry into actionable and reliable results for individual patients' care and to maintain the degree of reliability that is expected from MS methods in clinical pathology. This reflection review discusses whether particular quality assurance tools have to be applied for MS-based diagnostic tests and whether these tools are different from those applied for optical- and affinity-based standard tests. Both pre-implementation strategies and surveillance of assays with assessment of metadata in routine testing are addressed. The release of the CLSI guideline C62-A in 2014 was a substantial achievement in this context because it addresses a wide spectrum of relevant issues in quality assurance of mass spectrometry-based clinical tests. However, the translation of this best practice document into individual laboratory settings is likely to be heterogeneous. PMID:27400682

  3. Affinity chromatography and affinity labeling of rat liver succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ball, D J; Nishimura, J S

    1980-11-25

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from rat liver. The key step in the purification procedure involved adsorption on a GDP dialdehyde (dial-GDP)-adipic dihydrazide-Sepharose 4B column and elution by GDP-Mg2+. Like the pig heart enzyme (Brownie, E. R., and Bridger, W. A. (1972) Can. J. Biochem. 50, 719--724), the rat liver enzyme was an alpha beta heterodimer and only the alpha subunit was phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]GTP. The A 280(0.1%) of the enzyme was determined to be 0.5. Amino acid analyses revealed significant similarities in 50% of the amino acid residues of rat liver and Escherichia coli succinyl-CoA synthetases. However, immunodiffusion analysis failed to reveal any antigenic identity between the two enzymes. Incubation with the affinity label, dial-GDP, in the presence of Mg2+ resulted in a biphasic inactivation of the enzyme. The extent of the rapid phase of inactivation appeared to be related to the extent of dephosphorylation of the enzyme and was prevented by preincubation of the enzyme with GTP-Mg2+. The presence of GDP-Mg2+ in the incubation medium prevented the slow phase of the inactivation and retarded the rapid phase. Dephosphorylated enzyme was approximately 2 orders of magnitude more susceptible to inactivation by dial-GDP than phosphorylated enzyme. Labeling of succinyl-CoA synthetase with [3H]dial-GDP gave a linear relationship between inactivation and incorporation of radioactivity with an extrapolated value of less than 1.2 mol of analog/mol of enzyme at 100% inactivation. The distribution of the label in enzyme that was inactivated 40% was approximately 60% in the alpha subunit and 40% in the beta subunit. Thus, while phosphorylation of the enzyme occurs exclusively in the alpha subunit, the nucleotide binding site appears to include components from both alpha and beta subunits. PMID:7430155

  4. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Frenchette, Layne; Moon, Wooyoung; Pruitt, Cole; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter; Stein, Derek

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterization of a nanopore-based ion source for mass spectrometry. Our goal is to field-extract ions directly from solution into the high vacuum to enable unit collection efficiency and temporal resolution of sequential ion emissions for DNA sequencing. The ion source features a capillary whose tip, measuring tens to hundreds of nanometers in inner diameter, is situated in the vacuum ~ 1.5 cm away from an extractor electrode. The capillary was filled with conductive solution and voltage-biased relative to the extractor. Applied voltages of hundreds of volts extracted tens to hundreds of nA of current from the tip. A mass analysis of the extracted ions showed primarily singly charged clusters comprising the cation or anion solvated by several solvent molecules. Our interpretation of these results, based on the works of Taylor and of de la Mora, is that the applied electric stresses distort the fluid meniscus into a Taylor cone, where electric fields reach ~ 1V/nm and induce significant ion evaporation. Accordingly, the abundances of extracted ionic clusters resemble a Boltzmann distribution. This work was supported by NIH grant NHGRI 1R21HG005100-01.

  5. Methods for Neutron Spectrometry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1961-01-09

    The appropriate theories and the general philosophy of methods of measurement and treatment of data neutron spectrometry are discussed. Methods of analysis of results for liquids using the Van Hove formulation, and for crystals using the Born-von Karman theory, are reviewed. The most useful of the available methods of measurement are considered to be the crystal spectrometer methods and the pulsed monoenergetic beam/time-of-flight method. Pulsed-beam spectrometers have the advantage of higher counting rates than crystal spectrometers, especially in view of the fact that simultaneous measurements in several counters at different angles of scattering are possible in pulsed-beam spectrometers. The crystal spectrometer permits several valuable new types of specialized experiments to be performed, especially energy distribution measurements at constant momentum transfer. The Chalk River triple-axis crystal-spectrometer is discussed, with reference to its use in making the specialized experiments. The Chalk River rotating crystal (pulsed-beam) spectrometer is described, and a comparison of this type instrument with other pulsed-beam spectrometers is made. A partial outline of the theory of operation of rotating-crystal spectrometers is presented. The use of quartz-crystal filters for fast neutron elimination and for order elimination is discussed. (auth)

  6. Gridless overtone mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Steven M; Ewing, Michael A; Clemmer, David E

    2013-11-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions toward the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  7. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  8. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  9. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Foote, Linda J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  10. Quantitative demonstration of intrathecal synthesis of high affinity immunoglobulin G in herpes simplex encephalitis using affinity-mediated immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Miles D; Thompson, Edward J; Candler, Paul M; Dale, Russell C; Church, Andrew J; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2007-04-01

    Three paired serial samples of CSF and serum (from days 8, 13 and 22) were taken from a patient referred to the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery with what was duly confirmed as having herpes simplex encephalitis using PCR. The samples were investigated using affinity-mediated immunoblotting followed by incubation with sodium thiocyanate. Digitisation of the blots enabled further analysis. We showed that the clones of antigen-specific IgG, which were produced intrathecally, were of higher relative affinity than polyclonal antigen-specific IgG. PMID:17303253

  11. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago. PMID:23743326

  12. Affinities and beyond! Developing Ways of Seeing in Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Julia

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an insider view of an online community of adults involved in sharing digital photography through a host website, Flickr. It describes how reciprocal teaching and learning partnerships in a dynamic multimodal environment are achieved through the creation of a "Third Space" or "Affinity Space", where "Funds of Knowledge" are…

  13. Native Elution of Yeast Protein Complexes Obtained by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes two options for the native (nondenaturing) elution of protein complexes obtained by affinity capture. The first approach involves the elution of complexes purified through a tag that includes a human rhinovirus 3C protease (PreScission protease) cleavage site sequence between the protein of interest and the tag. Incubation with the protease cleaves immobilized complexes from the affinity medium. The second approach involves the release of protein A-tagged protein complexes using a competitive elution reagent called PEGylOx. The degree of purity of the native assemblies eluted is sample dependent and strongly influenced by the affinity capture. It should be noted that the efficiency of native elution is commonly lower than that of elution by a denaturing agent (e.g., SDS) and the release of the complex will be limited by the activity of the protease or the inhibition constant (Ki) of the competitive release agent. However, an advantage of native release is that some nonspecifically bound materials tend to stay adsorbed to the affinity medium, providing an eluted fraction of higher purity. Finally, keep in mind that the presence of the protease or elution peptide could potentially affect downstream applications; thus, their removal should be considered. PMID:27371597

  14. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  15. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  16. Chemokines and the Signaling Modules Regulating Integrin Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Montresor, Alessio; Toffali, Lara; Constantin, Gabriela; Laudanna, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion is a general concept referring to a series of adhesive phenomena including tethering–rolling, affinity, valency, and binding stabilization altogether controlling cell avidity (adhesiveness) for the substrate. Arrest chemokines modulate each aspect of integrin activation, although integrin affinity regulation has been recognized as the prominent event in rapid leukocyte arrest induced by chemokines. A variety of inside-out and outside-in signaling mechanisms have been related to the process of integrin-mediated adhesion in different cellular models, but only few of them have been clearly contextualized to rapid integrin affinity modulation by arrest chemokines in primary leukocytes. Complex signaling processes triggered by arrest chemokines and controlling leukocyte integrin activation have been described for ras-related rap and for rho-related small GTPases. We summarize the role of rap and rho small GTPases in the regulation of rapid integrin affinity in primary leukocytes and provide a modular view of these pro-adhesive signaling events. A potential, albeit still speculative, mechanism of rho-mediated regulation of cytoskeletal proteins controlling the last step of integrin activation is also discussed. We also discuss data suggesting a functional integration between the rho- and rap-modules of integrin activation. Finally we examine the universality of signaling mechanisms regulating integrin triggering by arrest chemokines. PMID:22654882

  17. Development of gadolinium based nanoparticles having an affinity towards melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Roux, Amandine; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Cohen, Richard; Tarrit, Sébastien; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Hachani, Roxanne; Kryza, David; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip.Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33457g

  18. Background correction using dinucleotide affinities improves the performance of GCRMA

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Fodor, Anthony A; Gibas, Cynthia J

    2008-01-01

    Background High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data, which can have serious implications for the interpretation of the generated data if not estimated correctly. Results We introduce an approach to calculate probe affinity based on sequence composition, incorporating nearest-neighbor (NN) information. Our model uses position-specific dinucleotide information, instead of the original single nucleotide approach, and adds up to 10% to the total variance explained (R2) when compared to the previously published model. We demonstrate that correcting for background noise using this approach enhances the performance of the GCRMA preprocessing algorithm when applied to control datasets, especially for detecting low intensity targets. Conclusion Modifying the previously published position-dependent affinity model to incorporate dinucleotide information significantly improves the performance of the model. The dinucleotide affinity model enhances the detection of differentially expressed genes when implemented as a background correction procedure in GeneChip preprocessing algorithms. This is conceptually consistent with physical models of binding affinity, which depend on the nearest-neighbor stacking interactions in addition to base-pairing. PMID:18947404

  19. Affinity and Avidity in Antibody-Based Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, Stephen I.

    2009-01-01

    Summation Many factors contribute to successful tumor targeting by antibodies. Besides properties of the tumor tissue and general antibody pharmacology, a relationship exists between an antibody and its antigen that can shape penetration, catabolism, specificity, and efficacy. The affinity and avidity of the binding interactions play critical roles in these dynamics. In this work, we review the principles that guide models predicting tumor penetration and cellular internalization while providing a critical overview of studies aimed at experimentally determining the specific role of affinity and avidity in these processes. One should gain the perspective that binding affinity can, in part, dictate the localization of antibodies in tumors, leading to high concentrations in the perivascular space or low concentrations diffused throughout the tumor. These patterns can be simply due to the diminution of available dose by binding antigen and are complicated by internalization and degradation stemming from slow rates of dissociation. As opposed to the trend of simply increasing affinity to increase efficacy, novel strategies that increase avidity and broaden specificity have made significant progress in tumor targeting. PMID:19409036

  20. Affinity through Mathematical Activity: Cultivating Democratic Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta-Irving, Tesha

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author demonstrates how a broader view of what shapes affinity is ideologically and practically linked to creating democratic learning communities. Specifically, the author explores how a teacher employed complex instruction (an equity pedagogy) with her ethnically and racially diverse students in the "lowest track"…

  1. Toward an Affinity Space Methodology: Considerations for Literacy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammers, Jayne C.; Curwood, Jen Scott; Magnifico, Alecia Marie

    2012-01-01

    As researchers seek to make sense of young people's online literacy practices and participation, questions of methodology are important to consider. In our work to understand the culture of physical, virtual and blended spheres that adolescents inhabit, we find it necessary to expand Gee's (2004) notion of affinity spaces. In this article, we draw…

  2. Peptides@mica: from affinity to adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, A; John, T; Gladytz, T; Hassert, R; Pagel, M; Risselada, H J; Naumov, S; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Abel, B

    2016-09-14

    Investigating the adsorption of peptides on inorganic surfaces, on the molecular level, is fundamental for medicinal and analytical applications. Peptides can be potent as linkers between surfaces and living cells in biochips or in implantation medicine. Here, we studied the adsorption process of the positively charged pentapeptide RTHRK, a recently identified binding sequence for surface oxidized silicon, and novel analogues thereof to negatively charged mica surfaces. Homogeneous formation of monolayers in the nano- and low micromolar peptide concentration range was observed. We propose an alternative and efficient method to both quantify binding affinity and follow adhesion behavior. This method makes use of the thermodynamic relationship between surface coverage, measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the concomitant free energy of adhesion. A knowledge-based fit to the autocorrelation of the AFM images was used to correct for a biased surface coverage introduced by the finite lateral resolution of the AFM. Binding affinities and mechanisms were further explored by large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The combination of well validated MD simulations with topological data from AFM revealed a better understanding of peptide adsorption processes on the atomistic scale. We demonstrate that binding affinity is strongly determined by a peptide's ability to form salt bridges and hydrogen bonds with the surface lattice. Consequently, differences in hydrogen bond formation lead to substantial differences in binding affinity despite conservation of the peptide's overall charge. Further, MD simulations give access to relative changes in binding energy of peptide variations in comparison to a lead compound. PMID:27491508

  3. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  4. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels.

    PubMed

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca(2+)-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  5. Student Engagement and Neoliberalism: Mapping an Elective Affinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to argue that student engagement, an important area for research about learning and teaching in formal higher education, has an elective affinity with neoliberalism, a hegemonic ideology in many countries of the developed world. The paper first surveys an extensive research literature examining student engagement and…

  6. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  7. Bimolecular affinity purification: a variation of TAP with multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Burstein, Ezra

    2014-01-01

    The identification of true interacting partners of any given bait can be plagued by the nonspecific purification of irrelevant proteins. To avoid this problem, Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) is a widely used procedure in molecular biology as this reduces the chance of nonspecific proteins being present in the final preparation. In this approach, two different affinity tags are fused to the protein bait. Herein, we review in detail a variation on the TAP procedure that we have previously developed, where the affinity moieties are placed on two different proteins that form a complex in vivo. This variation, which we refer to as Bimolecular Affinity Purification (BAP), is suited for the identification of specific molecular complexes marked by the presence of two known proteins. We have utilized BAP for characterization of molecular complexes and evaluation of proteins interaction. Another application of BAP is the isolation of ubiquitin-like proteins (UBL)-modified fractions of a given protein and characterization of the lysine-acceptor site and structure of UBL-chains. PMID:24943324

  8. ESTIMATION OF ELECTRON AFFINITY BASED ON STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron affinity for a wide range of organic molecules was calculated from molecular structure using the chemical reactivity models developed in SPARC. hese models are based on fundamental chemical structure theory applied to the prediction of chemical reactivities for organic m...

  9. Harmonic fusion and pitch affinity: Is there a direct link?

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Damien; Dauman, René; Semal, Catherine; Demany, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Simultaneous pure tones approximately one octave apart tend to be fused perceptually and to evoke a single pitch sensation. Besides, sequentially presented pure tones show a subjective "affinity" or similarity in pitch when their frequency ratio is close to one octave. The aim of the study reported here was to determine if these two perceptual phenomena are directly related. Each stimulus was a triplet of simultaneous or successive pure tones forming frequency ratios varying across stimuli between 0.96 and 1.04 octaves. The tones were presented at a low sensation level (15 dB) within broadband threshold-equalizing noise, in order to prevent them from interacting in the cochlea when they were simultaneous. A large set of stimulus comparisons made by 18 listeners indicated that: (1) when the tones were simultaneous, maximal fusion was obtained for a mean frequency ratio deviating by less than 0.2% from one octave, and fusion decreased less rapidly above this frequency ratio than below it; (2) when the tones were presented successively, maximal pitch affinity was obtained for a mean frequency ratio significantly larger than one octave, and pitch affinity decreased more rapidly above this frequency ratio than below it. The differences between the results obtained for simultaneous and successive tones suggest that harmonic fusion and pitch affinity are unrelated phenomena. PMID:26341475

  10. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. T R Henry1, J S Denny2 and P K Schmieder2. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, 1Experimental Toxicology Division and 2Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN, USA.
    The USEPA has been mandated to screen industria...

  11. Ampicillin/penicillin-binding protein interactions as a model drug-target system to optimize affinity pull-down and mass spectrometric strategies for target and pathway identification.

    PubMed

    von Rechenberg, Moritz; Blake, Brian Kelly; Ho, Yew-Seng J; Zhen, Yuejun; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Richardson, Bonnie E; Xu, Nafei; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of active compounds identified in cell-based assays is an important step in preclinical drug development. New analytical approaches that combine drug affinity pull-down assays with mass spectrometry (MS) could lead to the identification of new targets and druggable pathways. In this work, we investigate a drug-target system consisting of ampicillin- and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) to evaluate and compare different amino-reactive resins for the immobilization of the affinity compound and mass spectrometric methods to identify proteins from drug affinity pull-down assays. First, ampicillin was immobilized onto various amino-reactive resins, which were compared in the ampicillin-PBP model with respect to their nonspecific binding of proteins from an Escherichia coli membrane extract. Dynal M-270 magnetic beads were chosen to further study the system as a model for capturing and identifying the targets of ampicillin, PBPs that were specifically and covalently bound to the immobilized ampicillin. The PBPs were identified, after in situ digestion of proteins bound to ampicillin directly on the beads, by using either one-dimensional (1-D) or two-dimensional (2-D) liquid chromatography (LC) separation techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. Alternatively, an elution with N-lauroylsarcosine (sarcosyl) from the ampicillin beads followed by in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis identified proteins potentially interacting noncovalently with the PBPs or the ampicillin. The in situ approach required only little time, resources, and sample for the analysis. The combination of drug affinity pull-down assays with in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis is a useful tool in obtaining complex information about a primary drug target as well as its protein interactors. PMID:15761956

  12. Myoglobin oxygen affinity in aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Traver J; Davis, Randall W

    2015-07-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is an oxygen binding protein found in vertebrate skeletal muscle, where it facilitates intracellular transport and storage of oxygen. This protein has evolved to suit unique physiological needs in the muscle of diving vertebrates that express Mb at much greater concentrations than their terrestrial counterparts. In this study, we characterized Mb oxygen affinity (P50) from 25 species of aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals. Among diving species, we tested for correlations between Mb P50 and routine dive duration. Across all species examined, Mb P50 ranged from 2.40 to 4.85 mmHg. The mean P50 of Mb from terrestrial ungulates was 3.72±0.15 mmHg (range 3.70-3.74 mmHg). The P50 of cetaceans was similar to terrestrial ungulates ranging from 3.54 to 3.82 mmHg, with the exception of the melon-headed whale, which had a significantly higher P50 of 4.85 mmHg. Among pinnipeds, the P50 ranged from 3.23 to 3.81 mmHg and showed a trend for higher oxygen affinity in species with longer dive durations. Among diving birds, the P50 ranged from 2.40 to 3.36 mmHg and also showed a trend of higher affinities in species with longer dive durations. In pinnipeds and birds, low Mb P50 was associated with species whose muscles are metabolically active under hypoxic conditions associated with aerobic dives. Given the broad range of potential globin oxygen affinities, Mb P50 from diverse vertebrate species appears constrained within a relatively narrow range. High Mb oxygen affinity within this range may be adaptive for some vertebrates that make prolonged dives. PMID:25987728

  13. A new method of synthesizing biopolymeric affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Guzman, R; Porath, J O

    1997-08-01

    (1) A new concept for producing soluble polymeric affinity ligands is proposed and exemplified. By solid-phase synthesis, an insoluble hydrophilic polymer is converted into an affinity gel. The gel is hydrolytically degraded to water-soluble affinity polymeric ligands which are recovered and purified. (2) A water-soluble biopolymeric metal-affinity carrier based on an iminodiacetic acid (IDA) derivative of dextran has been synthesized through the modification of Sephadex G-200 by IDA, followed by hydrolysis with dextranase and size-exclusion-chromatographic purification of the high-molecular-mass fragments. (3) The molecular size of the soluble products as a function of hydrolysis time with dextranase from Penicillium sp. was determined. The range of molecular size of the biopolymeric chelating ligand varies from around 200 Da to greater than 580 kDa. (4) The influence of three metal ions chelated with the Sephadex derivative on the hydrolysis rate and the molecular-size distribution of end products was studied. Eu3+ was found to improve the rate of solubilization. Ni2+ and Cu2+ decreased the hydrolysis rate, as compared with that of the metal-free IDA-Sephadex. (5) The method introduced here has the potential of being developed and applied as a general technology for synthesis of soluble multifunctional affinity ligands. Such ligands should be useful for liquid-phase extraction as well as for the synthesis of adsorbents with localized multiple binding sites. Other possible fields of applications are to be found in medicine, where they could be used for slow drug delivery or detoxification, and in analytical chemistry, where they could be used in various assays. PMID:9261997

  14. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  15. Tuning Hydrophobicity in Abiotic Affinity Reagents: Polymer Hydrogel Affinity Reagents for Molecules with Lipid-like Domains.

    PubMed

    Chou, Beverly; Mirau, Peter; Jiang, Tian; Wang, Szu-Wen; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions often dominate the associative forces between biomacromolecules. A synthetic affinity reagent must be able to exploit and optimize these interactions. We describe synthesis of abiotic affinity reagents that sequester biomacromolecules with lipid-like domains. NIPAm-based copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) containing C4-C8 hydrophobic groups were evaluated for their affinity for lipopolysaccharides (LPS), the lipophilic component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Optimal affinity was found for NPs incorporating a linear C4 hydrocarbon group. 1D and 2D (1)H NMR studies revealed that in water, the longer chain (C6 and C8) alkyl groups in the hydrogel NPs were engaged in intrachain association, rendering them less available to interact with LPS. Optimal LPS-NP interaction requires maximizing hydrophobicity, while avoiding side chain aggregation. Polymer compositions with high LPS binding were grafted onto agarose beads and evaluated for LPS clearance from solution; samples containing linear C4 groups also showed the highest LPS clearance capacity. PMID:27064286

  16. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  17. PHOS-Select Iron Affinity beads enrich peptides for detection of organophosphorus adducts on albumin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Dubrovskii, Yaroslav A; Podolskaya, Ekaterina P; Murashko, Ekaterina A; Babakov, Vladimir; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Albumin is covalently modified by organophosphorus toxicants (OP) on tyrosine 411, but less than 1% of albumin is modified in humans by lethal OP doses that inhibit 95% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase. A method that enriches OP-modified albumin peptides could aid analysis of low dose exposures. Soman or chlorpyrifos oxon treated human plasma was digested with pepsin. Albumin peptides were enriched by binding to Fe3+ beads at pH 11 and eluted with pH 2.6 buffer. Similarly, mouse and guinea pig albumin modified by chlorpyrifos oxon were digested with pepsin and enriched by binding to Fe3+ beads. Peptides were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. PHOS-select Iron Affinity beads specifically enriched albumin peptides VRY411TKKVPQVST and LVRY411TKKVPQVST in a pepsin digest of human plasma. The unmodified as well as OP-modified peptides bound to the beads. The binding capacity of 500 μl beads was the pepsin digest of 2.1 μL human plasma. The limit of detection was 0.2% of OP-modified albumin peptide in 0.43 μL plasma. Enrichment of OP-modified albumin peptides by binding to Fe3+ beads is a method with potential application to diagnosis of OP pesticide and nerve agent exposure in humans, mice, and guinea pigs. PMID:24187955

  18. Proteomic profiling of tandem affinity purified 14-3-3 protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng; Curran, Amy; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David; Cushman, John; Mittler, Ron; Harmon, Alice; Harper, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 14-3-3 dimers regulate hundreds of functionally diverse proteins (clients), typically in phosphorylation-dependent interactions. To uncover new clients, a 14-3-3 omega (At1g78300) from Arabidopsis was engineered with a “tandem affinity purification” (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic plants. Purified complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicate that 14-3-3 omega can dimerize with at least 10 of the 12 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in Arabidopsis. The identification here of 121 putative clients provides support for in vivo 14-3-3 interactions with a diverse array of proteins, including those involved in: (1) Ion transport, such as a K+ channel (GORK), a Cl− channel (CLCg), Ca2+ channels belonging to the glutamate receptor family (GLRs 1.2, 2.1, 2.9, 3.4, 3.7); (2) hormone signaling, such as ACC synthase (isoforms ACS-6, 7 and 8 involved in ethylene synthesis) and the brassinolide receptors BRI1 and BAK1; (3) transcription, such as 7 WRKY family transcription factors; (4) metabolism, such as phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) carboxylase; and (5) lipid signaling, such as phospholipase D (β, and γ). More than 80% (101) of these putative clients represent previously unidentified 14-3-3 interactors. These results raise the number of putative 14-3-3 clients identified in plants to over 300. PMID:19452453

  19. High Confidence Fission Yeast SUMO Conjugates Identified by Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Minghua; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Boddy, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Covalent attachment of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to key targets in the proteome critically regulates the evolutionarily conserved processes of cell cycle control, transcription, DNA replication and maintenance of genome stability. The proteome-wide identification of SUMO conjugates in budding yeast has been invaluable in helping to define roles of SUMO in these processes. Like budding yeast, fission yeast is an important and popular model organism; however, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe community currently lacks proteome-wide knowledge of SUMO pathway targets. To begin to address this deficiency, we adapted and used a highly stringent Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification (TDAP) method, coupled with mass spectrometry, to identify fission yeast SUMO conjugates. Comparison of our data with that compiled in budding yeast reveals conservation of SUMO target enrichment in nuclear and chromatin-associated processes. Moreover, the SUMO "cloud" phenomenon, whereby multiple components of a single protein complex are SUMOylated, is also conserved. Overall, SUMO TDAP provides both a key resource of high confidence SUMO-modified target proteins in fission yeast, and a robust method for future analyses of SUMO function. PMID:26404184

  20. PHOS-select iron affinity beads enrich peptides for the detection of organophosphorus adducts on albumin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Dubrovskii, Yaroslav A; Podolskaya, Ekaterina P; Murashko, Ekaterina A; Babakov, Vladimir; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-12-16

    Albumin is covalently modified by organophosphorus toxicants (OP) on tyrosine 411, but less than 1% of albumin is modified in humans by lethal OP doses that inhibit 95% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase. A method that enriches OP-modified albumin peptides could aid analysis of low dose exposures. Soman or chlorpyrifos oxon treated human plasma was digested with pepsin. Albumin peptides were enriched by binding to Fe(3+) beads at pH 11 and eluted with pH 2.6 buffer. Similarly, mouse and guinea pig albumin modified by chlorpyrifos oxon were digested with pepsin and enriched by binding to Fe(3+) beads. Peptides were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. PHOS-select iron affinity beads specifically enriched albumin peptides VRY411TKKVPQVST and LVRY411TKKVPQVST in a pepsin digest of human plasma. The unmodified as well as OP-modified peptides bound to the beads. The binding capacity of 500 μL of beads was the pepsin digest of 2.1 μL of human plasma. The limit of detection was 0.2% of OP-modified albumin peptide in 0.43 μL of plasma. Enrichment of OP-modified albumin peptides by binding to Fe(3+) beads is a method with potential application to diagnosis of OP pesticide and nerve agent exposure in humans, mice, and guinea pigs. PMID:24187955

  1. A tandem affinity purification tag of TGA2 for isolation of interacting proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Henrik U; Findling, Simone; Nukarinen, Ella; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging provides a powerful tool for isolating interacting proteins in vivo. TAP-tag purification offers particular advantages for the identification of stimulus-induced protein interactions. Type II bZIP transcription factors (TGA2, TGA5 and TGA6) play key roles in pathways that control salicylic acid, ethylene, xenobiotic and reactive oxylipin signaling. Although proteins interacting with these transcription factors have been identified through genetic and yeast 2-hybrid screening, others are still elusive. We have therefore generated a C-terminal TAP-tag of TGA2 to isolate additional proteins that interact with this transcription factor. Three lines most highly expressing TAP-tagged TGA2 were functional in that they partially complemented reactive oxylipin-responsive gene expression in a tga2 tga5 tga6 triple mutant. TAP-tagged TGA2 in the most strongly overexpressing line was proteolytically less stable than in the other 2 lines. Only this overexpressing line could be used in a 2-step purification process, resulting in isolation of co-purifying bands of larger molecular weight than TGA2. TAP-tagged TGA2 was used to pull down NPR1, a protein known to interact with this transcription factor. Mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides that co-purified with TAP-tagged TGA2. Having generated this TGA2 TAP-tag line will therefore be an asset to researchers interested in stimulus-induced signal transduction processes. PMID:25482810

  2. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-28

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples. PMID:27087258

  3. High Confidence Fission Yeast SUMO Conjugates Identified by Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Minghua; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Boddy, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent attachment of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to key targets in the proteome critically regulates the evolutionarily conserved processes of cell cycle control, transcription, DNA replication and maintenance of genome stability. The proteome-wide identification of SUMO conjugates in budding yeast has been invaluable in helping to define roles of SUMO in these processes. Like budding yeast, fission yeast is an important and popular model organism; however, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe community currently lacks proteome-wide knowledge of SUMO pathway targets. To begin to address this deficiency, we adapted and used a highly stringent Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification (TDAP) method, coupled with mass spectrometry, to identify fission yeast SUMO conjugates. Comparison of our data with that compiled in budding yeast reveals conservation of SUMO target enrichment in nuclear and chromatin-associated processes. Moreover, the SUMO “cloud” phenomenon, whereby multiple components of a single protein complex are SUMOylated, is also conserved. Overall, SUMO TDAP provides both a key resource of high confidence SUMO-modified target proteins in fission yeast, and a robust method for future analyses of SUMO function. PMID:26404184

  4. Membrane introduction mass spectrometry: trends and applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R C; Cooks, R G; Allen, T M; Cisper, M E; Hemberger, P H

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) are reviewed. On-line monitoring is treated by focusing on critical variables, including the nature and dimensions of the membrane, and the analyte vapor pressure, diffusivity, and solubility in the membrane barrier. Sample introduction by MIMS is applied in (i) on-line monitoring of chemical and biological reactors, (ii) analysis of volatile organic compounds in environmental matrices, including air, water and soil, and (iii) in more fundamental studies, such as measurements of thermochemical properties, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. New semipermeable membranes are discussed, including those consisting of thin polymers, low vapor pressure liquids, and zeolites. These membranes have been used to monitor polar compounds, selectively differentiate compounds through affinity-binding, and provide isomer differentiation based on molecular size. Measurements at high spatial resolution, for example, using silicone-capped hypodermic needle inlets, are also covered, as is electrically driven sampling through microporous membranes. Other variations on the basic MIMS experiment include analyte preconcentration through cryotrapping (CT-MIMS) or trapping in the membrane (trap-and-release), as well as differential thermal release methods and reverse phase (i.e., organic solvent) MIMS. Method limitations center on semivolatile compounds and complex mixture analysis, and novel solutions are discussed. Semivolatile compounds have been monitored with thermally assisted desorption, ultrathin membranes and derivatization techniques. Taking advantage of the differences in time of membrane permeation, mixtures of structurally similar compounds have been differentiated by using sample modulation techniques and by temperature-programmed desorption from a membrane interface. Selective ionization techniques that increase instrument sensitivity towards polar compounds are also described, and comparisons are made with

  5. Analysis of biogenic amines using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Z; Mardihallaj, A; Khayamian, T

    2010-05-15

    A new method based on corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was developed for the analysis of biogenic amines including spermidine, spermine, putrescine, and cadaverine. The ion mobility spectra of the compounds were obtained with and without n-Nonylamine used as the reagent gas. The high proton affinity of n-Nonylamine prevented ion formation from compounds with a proton affinity lower than that of n-Nonylamine and, therefore, enhanced its selectivity. It was also realized that the ion mobility spectrum of n-Nonylamine varied with its concentration. A sample injection port of a gas chromatograph was modified and used as the sample introduction system into the CD-IMS. The detection limits, dynamic ranges, and analytical parameters of the compounds with and without using the reagent gas were obtained. The detection limits and dynamic ranges of the compounds were about 2ng and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively. The wide dynamic range of CD-IMS originates from the high current of the corona discharge. The results revealed the high capability of the CD-IMS for the analysis of biogenic amines. PMID:20298897

  6. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  7. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion. PMID:22528201

  8. Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data

  9. Phosphoprotein Isotope-coded Affinity Tags: Application to the Enrichment and Identification of Low-Abundance Phosphoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael; Veenstra, Timothy D. ); Panisko, Ellen A.; Conrads, Thomas P. ); Angell, Nicolas H.; Smith, Richard D. )

    2002-02-01

    A novel approach using different isotopic labeling and biotinylation has been developed for the enrichment and quantitation of phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl-peptides. The phosphoprotein isotope-coded affinity tag (PhIAT) exploits the high affinity biotin-avidin interaction to isolate modified phosphopeptides from a complex mixture of peptides. The PhIAT strategy for quantifying and enriching mixtures for phosphopeptides was demonstrated using a commercially available sample of the phosphoprotein B-casein. A denatured solution of B-casein was labeled using the PhIAT method and after proteolytic digestion, the labeled peptides were isolated using immobilize avidin. The recovered peptides were separated by capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. PhIAT-labeled peptides corresponding to known O-phosphorylated peptides from B-casein were identified as were phosphorylated peptides from as1-casein and ase-casein, known low-level (< 5%) contaminants of commercially available B-casein. All of the identified phosphopeptides from these caseins have been previously documented to be phosphorylated at the sites elucidated by the PhIAT approach. The results illustrate the efficancy of the PhIAT-labeling strategy to enrich mixtures for phosphopeptides and permit the detection and identification of low abundance phosphopeptides. In addition, experiments using light and heavy isotopic version of the PhIAT reagents demonstrated that a 10% difference in phosphorylation state could be determined between phosphopeptides in comparative samples.

  10. An in vivo imaging-based assay for detecting protein interactions over a wide range of binding affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Owens, Elizabeth T; Standaert, Robert F; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Billings, Amanda N

    2009-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing protein interactions are fundamental steps towards understanding and modeling biological networks. Methods that detect protein interactions in intact cells rather than buffered solutions are likely more relevant to natural systems since molecular crowding events in the cytosol can influence the diffusion and reactivity of individual proteins. One in vivo, imaging-based method relies on the co-localization of two proteins of interest fused to DivIVA, a cell division protein from Bacillus subtilis, and green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have modified this imaging-based assay to facilitate rapid cloning by constructing new vectors encoding N- and C-terminal DivIVA or GFP molecular tag fusions based on site-specific recombination technology. The sensitivity of the assay was defined using a well-characterized protein interaction system involving the eukaryotic nuclear import receptor subunit, Importin (Imp ) and variant nuclear localization signals (NLS) representing a range of binding affinities. These data demonstrate that the modified co-localization assay is sensitive enough to detect protein interactions with Kd values that span over four orders of magnitude (1nM to 15 M). Lastly, this assay was used to confirm numerous protein interactions identified from mass spectrometry-based analyses of affinity isolates as part of an interactome mapping project in Rhodopseudomonas palustris

  11. Relationships between Membrane Binding, Affinity and Cell Internalization Efficacy of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide: Penetratin as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Isabel D.; Bechara, Cherine; Walrant, Astrid; Zaltsman, Yefim; Jiao, Chen-Yu; Sagan, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    Background Penetratin is a positively charged cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that has the ability to bind negatively charged membrane components, such as glycosaminoglycans and anionic lipids. Whether this primary interaction of penetratin with these cell surface components implies that the peptide will be further internalized is not clear. Methodology Using mass spectrometry, the amount of internalized and membrane bound penetratin remaining after washings, were quantified in three different cell lines: wild type (WT), glycosaminoglycans- (GAGneg) and sialic acid-deficient (SAneg) cells. Additionally, the affinity and kinetics of the interaction of penetratin to membrane models composed of pure lipids and membrane fragments from the referred cell lines was investigated, as well as the thermodynamics of such interactions using plasmon resonance and calorimetry. Principal Findings Penetratin internalized with the same efficacy in the three cell lines at 1 µM, but was better internalized at 10 µM in SAneg>WT>GAGneg. The heat released by the interaction of penetratin with these cells followed the ranking order of internalization efficiency. Penetratin had an affinity of 10 nM for WT cells and µM for SAneg and GAGneg cells and model membrane of phospholipids. The remaining membrane-bound penetratin after cells washings was similar in WT and GAGneg cells, which suggested that these binding sites relied on membrane phospholipids. The interaction of penetratin with carbohydrates was more superficial and reversible while it was stronger with phospholipids, likely because the peptide can intercalate between the fatty acid chains. Conclusion/Significance These results show that accumulation and high-affinity binding of penetratin at the cell-surface do not reflect the internalization efficacy of the peptide. Altogether, these data further support translocation (membrane phospholipids interaction) as being the internalization pathway used by penetratin at low

  12. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  13. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  14. Comparative oxygen affinity of fish and mammalian myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J W; Weber, L J

    1989-01-01

    Myoglobins from rat, coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), buffalo sculpin (Enophrys bison) hearts, and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) red skeletal muscle were partially purified and their O2 binding affinities determined. Commercially prepared sperm whale myoglobin was employed as an internal standard. Tested at 20 degrees C, myoglobins from salmon and sculpin bound O2 with lower affinity than myoglobins from the rat or sperm whale. Oxygen binding studies at 12 degrees C and 37 degrees C suggest that this difference is adaptive, permitting myoglobins from cold-adapted fish to function at physiologically relevant temperatures. Taken together, purification and O2 binding data obtained in this study reveal a previously unrecognized diversity of myoglobin structure and function. PMID:2760286

  15. Isotope shift in the electron affinity of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-12-21

    Very accurate electron affinity (EA) calculations of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li (and {sup {infinity}L}i) have been performed using explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and a variational approach that explicitly includes the nuclear motion in the calculations (i.e., the approach that does not assume the Born-Oppenheimer approximation). The leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the electron affinities were also calculated. The results are the most accurate theoretical values obtained for the studied systems to date. Our best estimates of the {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li EAs are 4984.9842(30) and 4984.9015(30) cm{sup -1}, respectively, and of the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li EA isotope shift is 0.0827 cm{sup -1}.

  16. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  17. Affinity Propagation Clustering of Measurements for Multiple Extended Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Renbiao

    2015-01-01

    More measurements are generated by the target per observation interval, when the target is detected by a high resolution sensor, or there are more measurement sources on the target surface. Such a target is referred to as an extended target. The probability hypothesis density filter is considered an efficient method for tracking multiple extended targets. However, the crucial problem of how to accurately and effectively partition the measurements of multiple extended targets remains unsolved. In this paper, affinity propagation clustering is introduced into measurement partitioning for extended target tracking, and the elliptical gating technique is used to remove the clutter measurements, which makes the affinity propagation clustering capable of partitioning the measurement in a densely cluttered environment with high accuracy. The Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density filter is implemented for multiple extended target tracking. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, which provides improved performance, while obviously reducing the computational complexity. PMID:26370998

  18. Affinity Propagation Clustering of Measurements for Multiple Extended Target Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Renbiao

    2015-01-01

    More measurements are generated by the target per observation interval, when the target is detected by a high resolution sensor, or there are more measurement sources on the target surface. Such a target is referred to as an extended target. The probability hypothesis density filter is considered an efficient method for tracking multiple extended targets. However, the crucial problem of how to accurately and effectively partition the measurements of multiple extended targets remains unsolved. In this paper, affinity propagation clustering is introduced into measurement partitioning for extended target tracking, and the elliptical gating technique is used to remove the clutter measurements, which makes the affinity propagation clustering capable of partitioning the measurement in a densely cluttered environment with high accuracy. The Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density filter is implemented for multiple extended target tracking. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, which provides improved performance, while obviously reducing the computational complexity. PMID:26370998

  19. The Weyl-Cartan Space Problem in Purely Affine Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Borzeszkowski, Horst-Heino; Treder, Hans-Jürgen

    1997-04-01

    According to Poincaré, only the ``epistemological sum of geometry and physics is measurable". Of course, there are requirements of measurement to be imposed on geometry because otherwise the theory resting on this geometry cannot be physically interpreted. In particular, the Weyl--Cartan space problem must be solved, i.e., it must be guaranteed that the comparison of distances is compatible with the Levi-Civita transport. In the present paper, we discuss these requirements of measurement and show that in the (purely affine) Einstein-Schrödinger unified field theory the solution of the Weyl-Cartan space problem simultaneously determines the matter via Einstein's equations. Here the affine field $\\Gamma^ikl$ represents Poincaré's sum, and the solution of the space problem means its splitting in a metrical space and in matter fields, where the latter are given by the torsion tensor $\\Gamma^i_{[kl]}$.

  20. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:27429157

  1. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  2. Evolution based on chromosome affinity from a network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, R. L. S.; Fontoura, J. R. A.; Carneiro, T. K. G.; Moret, M. A.; Pereira, H. B. B.

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have focused on models to simulate the complex phenomenon of evolution of species. Several studies have been performed with theoretical models based on Darwin's theories to associate them with the actual evolution of species. However, none of the existing models include the affinity between individuals using network properties. In this paper, we present a new model based on the concept of affinity. The model is used to simulate the evolution of species in an ecosystem composed of individuals and their relationships. We propose an evolutive algorithm that incorporates the degree centrality and efficiency network properties to perform the crossover process and to obtain the network topology objective, respectively. Using a real network as a starting point, we simulate its evolution and compare its results with the results of 5788 computer-generated networks.

  3. Robust Spectral Clustering Using Statistical Sub-Graph Affinity Model

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, Justin A.; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods. PMID:24386111

  4. Molecular modeling of the affinity chromatography of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paloni, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a methodology that offers the possibility of studying complex systems such as protein-ligand complexes from an atomistic point of view, making available information that can be difficultly obtained from experimental studies. Here, a protocol for the construction of molecular models of the interaction between antibodies and ligands that can be used for an affinity chromatography process is presented. The outlined methodology focuses mostly on the description of a procedure that may be adopted to determine the structure and free energy of interaction between the antibody and the affinity ligand. A procedure to extend the proposed methodology to include the effect of the environment (buffer solution, spacer, support matrix) is also briefly outlined. PMID:25749965

  5. Stable high capacity, F-actin affinity column

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, E.J.; Wang, Y.L.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Branton, D.; Taylor, D.L.

    1982-11-10

    A high capacity F-actin affinity matrix is constructed by binding fluorescyl-actin to rabbit anti-fluorescein IgG that is covalently bound to Sepharose 4B. When stabilized with phalloidin, the actin remains associated with the Sepharose beads during repeated washes, activates the ATPase activity of myosin subfragment 1, and specifically binds /sup 125/I-heavy meromyosin and /sup 125/I-tropomyosin. The associations between the F-actin-binding proteins are monitored both by affinity chromatography and by a rapid, low speed sedimentation assay. Anti-fluorescein IgG-Sepharose should be generally useful as a matrix for the immobilization of proteins containing accessible, covalently bound fluorescein groups.

  6. Rapid D-Affine Biventricular Cardiac Function with Polar Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen; Cowan, Brett; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Occleshaw, Christopher; Young, Alistair

    2014-01-01

    Although many solutions have been proposed for left ventricular functional analysis of the heart, right and left (bi-) ventricular function has been problematic due to the complex geometry and large motions. Biventricular function is particularly important in congenital heart disease, the most common type of birth defects. We describe a rapid interactive analysis tool for biventricular function which incorporates 1) a 3D+ time finite element model of biventricular geometry, 2) a fast prediction step which estimates an initial geometry in a polar coordinate system, and 3) a Cartesian update which penalizes deviations from affine transformations (D-Affine) from a prior. Solution times were very rapid, enabling interaction in real time using guide point modeling. The method was applied to 13 patients with congenital heart disease and compared with the clinical gold standard of manual tracing. Results between the methods showed good correlation (R2 > 0.9) and good precision (volume<17ml; mass<11g) for both chambers. PMID:25485422

  7. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  8. Cohomology of Various Completions of Quasicoherent Sheaves on Affines

    PubMed Central

    Laudal, Olav Arnfinn

    1972-01-01

    Let O be a complete discrete valuation ring and let A be a commutative O-algebra. Let M be any A-module. In this paper, a class of completions M̃ on the affine X corresponding to A, which includes, e.g., the Washnitzer-Monsky completion [1], and the full completion is studied. We then prove that for all of these completions we have, Hi(X,M̃+) = O for i ≥ 1, H°(X,M̃+) = M+. PMID:16592014

  9. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  10. Purification of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; De Backer, J P; Guillet, J C; Vanderheyden, P; Vauquelin, G; Strosberg, A D

    1983-01-01

    Calf forebrain homogenates contain 2.8 pM muscarinic acetylcholine receptors per mg of protein. [3H]Antagonist saturation binding experiments under equilibrium conditions revealed a single class of sites with equilibrium dissociation constants of 0.82 nM for [3H]dexetimide and 0.095 nM for [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. Displacement binding studies with agonists revealed the presence of low and high affinity sites. Here we describe the solubilization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with digitonin and their purification by affinity chromatography using an affinity gel which consisted of dexetimide coupled to Affi-Gel 10 (i.e., carboxy N-hydroxysuccinimide esters linked via a 1 nm spacer arm to agarose beads). Purified proteins were obtained by specific elution with muscarinic drugs, i.e., the antagonist atropine and the irreversible ligand propylbenzilylcholine mustard. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the radioiodinated purified preparations revealed a major 70-K protein. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6605245

  11. Nanoparticle Surface Affinity as a Predictor of Trophic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Geitner, Nicholas K; Marinakos, Stella M; Guo, Charles; O'Brien, Niall; Wiesner, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Nanoscale materials, whether natural, engineered, or incidental, are increasingly acknowledged as important components in large, environmental systems with potential implications for environmental impact and human health. Mathematical models are a useful tool for handling the rapidly increasing complexity and diversity of these materials and their exposure routes. Presented here is a mathematical model of trophic transfer driven by nanomaterial surface affinity for environmental and biological surfaces, developed in tandem with an experimental functional assay for determining these surface affinities. We found that nanoparticle surface affinity is a strong predictor of uptake through predation in a simple food web consisting of the algae Chlorella vulgaris and daphnid Daphnia magna. The mass of nanoparticles internalized by D. magna through consuming nanomaterial-contaminated algae varied linearly with surface-attachment efficiency. Internalized quantities of gold nanoparticles in D. magna ranged from 8.3 to 23.6 ng/mg for nanoparticle preparations with surface-attachment efficiencies ranging from 0.07 to 1. This model, coupled with the functional-assay approach, may provide a useful screening tool for existing materials as well as a predictive model for their development. PMID:27249534

  12. Crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Douglas R; Mrozkiewicz, Marek K; McGrath, William J; Listwan, Pawel; Kobe, Bostjan

    2003-07-01

    The fusion of a protein of interest to a large-affinity tag, such as the maltose-binding protein (MBP), thioredoxin (TRX), or glutathione-S-transferase (GST), can be advantageous in terms of increased expression, enhanced solubility, protection from proteolysis, improved folding, and protein purification via affinity chromatography. Unfortunately, crystal growth is hindered by the conformational heterogeneity induced by the fusion tag, requiring that the tag is removed by a potentially problematic cleavage step. The first three crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags have been reported recently. All three structures used a novel strategy to rigidly fuse the protein of interest to MBP via a short three- to five-amino acid spacer. This strategy has the potential to aid structure determination of proteins that present particular experimental challenges and are not conducive to more conventional crystallization strategies (e.g., membrane proteins). Structural genomics initiatives may also benefit from this approach as a way to crystallize problematic proteins of significant interest. PMID:12824478

  13. Structure of Greyhound hemoglobin: origin of high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Veer S; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Harris, David R; Couto, C Guillermo; Wang, Peng G; Palmer, Andre F

    2011-05-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of Greyhound hemoglobin (GrHb) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. GrHb was found to crystallize with an α₁β₁ dimer in the asymmetric unit and belongs to the R2 state. Oxygen-affinity measurements combined with the fact that GrHb crystallizes in the R2 state despite the high-salt conditions used for crystallization strongly indicate that GrHb can serve as a model high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin (Hb) for higher mammals, especially humans. Structural analysis of GrHb and its comparison with the R2-state of human Hb revealed several regions that can potentially contribute to the high oxygen affinity of GrHb and serve to rationalize the additional stability of the R2-state of GrHb. A previously well studied hydrophobic cluster of bar-headed goose Hb near α119 was also incorporated in the comparison between GrHb and human Hb. Finally, a structural comparison with generic dog Hb and maned wolf Hb was conducted, revealing that in contrast to GrHb these structures belong to the R state of Hb and raising the intriguing possibility of an additional allosteric factor co-purifying with GrHb that can modulate its quaternary structure. PMID:21543841

  14. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  15. An Early Cambrian problematic fossil: Vetustovermis and its possible affinities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-yuan; Huang, Di-ying; Bottjer, David J

    2005-01-01

    The Early Cambrian problematic fossil Vetustovermis (Glaessner 1979 Alcheringa 3, 21–31) was described as an annelid or arthropod. Anatomical analysis of 17 new specimens from the Lower Cambrian Maotianshan Shale at Anning, Kunming (South China) does not support its affinities with annelids or arthropods. Anatomical features instead resemble other animal groups including modern flatworms, nemertines and molluscs. The presence of a pelagic slug-like form and ventral foot, as well as a head with eyes and tentacles indicates a possible affinity with molluscs, but these characters are not present only in molluscs; some of them are shared with other animal groups, including flatworms and nemertines. For example, a ventral foot-like structure is found in nemertines, ‘turbellarians’, and some polychaete groups. The well differentiated head is seen in separate bilaterian groups, but among molluscs it did not occur before the evolutionary level of the Conchifera. Unlike the ctenia-gills in molluscs, the gills in Vetustovermis are bar-like. All the characters displayed in this 525 million-year old soft-bodied animal fail to demonstrate clear affinity with molluscs or any other known extant or extinct animal groups, but argue for representing an independently evolved animal group, which flourished in Early Cambrian and possibly in Middle Cambrian time. PMID:16191609

  16. Virtual-real spatial information visualization registration using affine representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xueling; Ren, Fu; Du, Qingyun

    2009-10-01

    Virtual-real registration in Outdoor Augmented Reality is committed to enhance user's spatial cognition by overlaying virtual geographical objects on real scene. According to analyze fiducial detection registration method in indoor AR, for the purpose of avoiding complex and tedious process of position tracking and camera calibration in traditional registration methods, it puts forward and practices a virtual-real spatial information visualization registration method using affine representations. Based on the observation from Koenderink and van Doorn, Ullman and Basri in 1991 which is given a set of four or more non-coplanar 3D points, the projection of all points in the set can be computed as a linear combination of the projection of just four of the points, it sets up global affine coordinate system in light of world coordinates, camera coordinates and virtual coordinates and extracts four feature points from scene image and calculates the global affine coordinates of key points of virtual objects. Then according to a linear homogeneous coordinates of the four feature point's projection, it calculates projection pixel coordinates of key points of virtual objects. In addition, it proposes an approach to obtain pixel relative depth for hidden surface removal. Finally, by a case study, it verifies the feasibility and efficiency of the registration methods. The method would not only explore a new research direction for Geographical Information Science, but also would provide location-based information and services for outdoor AR.

  17. Affitins for protein purification by affinity magnetic fishing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Dos Santos, Raquel; Ottengy, Stella; Viecinski, Aline Canani; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-07-29

    Currently most economical and technological bottlenecks in protein production are placed in the downstream processes. With the aim of increasing the efficiency and reducing the associated costs, various affinity ligands have been developed. Affitins are small, yet robust and easy to produce, proteins derived from the archaeal extremophilic "7kDa DNA-binding" protein family. By means of combinatorial protein engineering and ribosome display selection techniques, Affitins have shown to bind a diversity of targets. In this work, two previously developed Affitins (anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG) were immobilized onto magnetic particles to assess their potential for protein purification by magnetic fishing. The optimal lysozyme and human IgG binding conditions yielded 58mg lysozyme/g support and 165mgIgG/g support, respectively. The recovery of proteins was possible in high yield (≥95%) and with high purity, namely ≥95% and 81%, when recovering lysozyme from Escherichia coli supernatant and IgG from human plasma, respectively. Static binding studies indicated affinity constants of 5.0×10(4)M(-1) and 9.3×10(5)M(-1) for the anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG magnetic supports. This work demonstrated that Affitins, which can be virtually evolved for any protein of interest, can be coupled onto magnetic particles creating novel affinity adsorbents for purification by magnetic fishing. PMID:27342136

  18. Relative Binding Affinities of Monolignols to Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-08-11

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic -OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic -OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate. PMID:27447548

  19. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  20. Affinity labeling of the ribosomal P site in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    North, D.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent studies have probed the peptidyl transferase region of the Drosophila ribosome via the use of reactive site specific analogues (affinity labels). P site proteins adjacent to the 3' end of the amino acid bearing tRNA strand were labeled with modified tRNA fragments. Drugs affecting the binding of these agents were used to further clarify the nature of the region. The nascent peptide region of the P site was not labeled in previous experiments. To label that region radioactive Bromoacetylphenylalanyl-tRNA (BrAcphe-tRNA) was synthesized. The alpha-bromoacetyl group of this analogue is potentially reactive with nucleophiles present in either proteins or RNAs. Charged tRNAs and tRNA analogues bearing a peptide bond on the N-terminus of their amino acid are recognized as having affinity for the ribosomal P site. Specific labeling of the P site by BrAcphe-tRNA was confirmed by its ability to radioactively label proteins indirectly. As many as 8 ribosomal proteins may be labeled under these conditions, however, the majority of the bound label is associated with 3 large subunit proteins and 2 small subunit proteins. Overlaps between the proteins labeled by BrAcphe-tRNA and those labeled by other affinity labels are examined and a model of the peptidyl transferase region of Drosophila ribosomes is presented.

  1. Pepsin-modified chiral monolithic column for affinity capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tingting; Chi, Cuijie; Ji, Yibing

    2014-11-01

    Pepsin-modified affinity monolithic capillary electrochromatography, a novel microanalysis system, was developed by the covalent bonding of pepsin on silica monolith. The column was successfully applied in the chiral separation of (±)-nefopam. Furthermore, the electrochromatographic performance of the pepsin-functionalized monolith for enantiomeric analysis was evaluated in terms of protein content, pH of running buffer, sample volume, buffer concentration, applied voltage, and capillary temperature. The relative standard deviation (%RSD) values of retention time (intraday <0.53, n = 10; interday <0.53, n = 10; column-to-column <0.70, n = 20; and batch-to-batch <0.80, n = 20) indicated satisfactory stability of these columns. No appreciable change was observed in retention and resolution for chiral recognition of (±)-nefopam in 50 days with 100 injections. The proteolytic activity of this stationary phase was further characterized with bovine serum albumin as substrate for online protein digestion. As for monolithic immobilized enzyme reactor, successive protein injections confirmed both the operational stability and ability to reuse the bioreactor for at least 20 digestions. It implied that the affinity monolith used in this research opens a new path of exploring particularly versatile class of enzymes to develop enzyme-modified affinity capillary monolith for enantioseparation. PMID:25146884

  2. Comparison of Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Cell Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Tian, Yu; Pappas, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Cell separation based on microfluidic affinity chromatography is a widely used methodology in cell analysis research when rapid separations with high purity are needed. Several successful examples have been reported with high separation efficiency and purity; however, cell capture at the inlet area and inlet design has not been extensively described or studied. The most common inlets—used to connect the microfluidic chip to pumps, tubing, etc—are vertical (top-loading) inlets and parallel (in-line) inlets. In this work, we investigated the cell capture behavior near the affinity chip inlet area and compared the different performance of vertical inlet devices and parallel inlet devices. Vertical inlet devices showed significant cell capture capability near the inlet area, which led to the formation of cell blockages as the separation progressed. Cell density near the inlet area was much higher than the remaining channel, while for parallel inlet chips cell density at the inlet area was similar to the rest of the channel. In this paper, we discuss the effects of inlet type on chip fabrication, nonspecific binding, cell capture efficiency, and separation purity. We also discuss the possibility of using vertical inlets in negative selection separations. Our findings show that inlet design is critical and must be considered when fabricating cell affinity microfluidic devices. PMID:21207967

  3. Negative Enrichment of Target Cells by Microfluidic Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Gao, Yan; Pappas, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional microfluidic channel was developed for high purity cell separations. This system featured high capture affinity using multiple vertical inlets to an affinity surface. In cell separations, positive selection (capture of the target cell) is usually employed. Negative enrichment, the capture of non-target cells and elution of target cells, has distinct advantages over positive selection. In negative enrichment, target cells are not labeled, and are not subjected to strenuous elution conditions or dilution. As a result, negative enrichment systems are amenable to multi-step processes in microfluidic systems. In previous work, we reported cell capture enhancement effects at vertical inlets to the affinity surface. In this study, we designed a chip that has multiple vertical and horizontal channels, forming a three-dimensional separation system. Enrichment of target cells showed separation purities of 92-96%, compared with straight-channel systems (77% purity). A parallelized chip was also developed for increased sample throughput. A two-channel showed similar separation purity with twice the sample flow rate. This microfluidic system, featuring high separation purity, ease of fabrication and use, is suitable for cell separations when subsequent analysis of target cells is required. PMID:21939198

  4. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Graça, Vânia C; Sousa, Fani; Santos, Paulo F; Almeida, Paulo S

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography (AC) is one of the most important techniques for the separation and purification of biomolecules, being probably the most selective technique for protein purification. It is based on unique specific reversible interactions between the target molecule and a ligand. In this affinity interaction, the choice of the ligand is extremely important for the success of the purification protocol. The growing interest in AC has motivated an intense research effort toward the development of materials able to overcome the disadvantages of conventional natural ligands, namely their high cost and chemical and biological lability. In this context, synthetic dyes have emerged, in recent decades, as a promising alternative to biological ligands. Herein, detailed protocols for the assembling of a new chromatographic dye-ligand affinity support bearing an immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dye on an agarose-based matrix (Sepharose CL-6B) and for the separation of a mixture o f three standard proteins: lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin are provided. PMID:25749942

  5. Affinity approaches in RNAi-based therapeutics purification.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Figueiras, Ana; Sousa, Fani

    2016-05-15

    The recent investigation on RNA interference (RNAi) related mechanisms and applications led to an increased awareness of the importance of RNA in biology. Nowadays, RNAi-based technology has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for silencing gene expression, being exploited to develop new therapeutics for treating a vast number of human disease conditions, as it is expected that this technology can be translated onto clinical applications in a near future. This approach makes use of a large number of small (namely short interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are likely to have a crucial role as the next generation therapeutics. The commercial and biomedical interest in these RNAi-based therapy applications have fostered the need to develop innovative procedures to easily and efficiently purify RNA, aiming to obtain the final product with high purity degree, good quality and biological activity. Recently, affinity chromatography has been applied to ncRNAs purification, in view of the high specificity. Therefore, this article intends to review the biogenesis pathways of regulatory ncRNAs and also to discuss the most significant and recent developments as well as applications of affinity chromatography in the challenging task of purifying ncRNAs. In addition, the importance of affinity chromatography in ncRNAs purification is addressed and prospects for what is forthcoming are presented. PMID:26830537

  6. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  7. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  8. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N; Tuszynski, Jack A; Klassen, John S

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26944280

  9. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides.

  10. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Clemmer, David E

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides. PMID:25840811

  11. Structural Elucidation of Enzymatically Synthesized Galacto-oligosaccharides Using Ion-Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carević, Milica; Bezbradica, Dejan; Banjanac, Katarina; Milivojević, Ana; Fanuel, Mathieu; Rogniaux, Hélène; Ropartz, David; Veličković, Dušan

    2016-05-11

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) represent a diverse group of well-characterized prebiotic ingredients derived from lactose in a reaction catalyzed with β-galactosidases. Enzymatic transgalactosylation results in a mixture of compounds of various degrees of polymerization and types of linkages. Because structure plays an important role in terms of prebiotic activity, it is of crucial importance to provide an insight into the mechanism of transgalactosylation reaction and occurrence of different types of β-linkages during GOS synthesis. Our study proved that a novel one-step method, based on ion-mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (IMS-MS/MS), enables complete elucidation of GOS structure. It has been shown that β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae has the highest affinity toward formation of β-(1→3) or β-(1→6) linkages. Additionally, it was observed that the occurrence of different linkages varies during the reaction course, indicating that tailoring favorable GOS structures with improved prebiotic activity can be achieved by adequate control of enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27109424

  12. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  13. Robust adaptive control for a class of uncertain non-affine nonlinear systems using affine-type neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shitie; Gao, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    A robust adaptive control is proposed for a class of single-input single-output non-affine nonlinear systems. In order to approximate the unknown nonlinear function, a novel affine-type neural network is used, and then to compensate the approximation error and external disturbance a robust control term is employed. By Lyapunov stability analysis for the closed-loop system, it is proved that tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero. Moreover, an observer is designed to estimate the system states because all the states may not be available for measurements. Furthermore, the adaptation laws of neural networks and the robust controller are given out based on the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  14. Thiochrome enhances acetylcholine affinity at muscarinic M4 receptors: receptor subtype selectivity via cooperativity rather than affinity.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Dolezal, V; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2004-01-01

    Thiochrome (2,7-dimethyl-5H-thiachromine-8-ethanol), an oxidation product and metabolite of thiamine, has little effect on the equilibrium binding of l-[3H]N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]NMS) to the five human muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1-M5) at concentrations up to 0.3 mM. In contrast, it inhibits [3H]NMS dissociation from M1 to M4 receptors at submillimolar concentrations and from M5 receptors at 1 mM. These results suggest that thiochrome binds allosterically to muscarinic receptors and has approximately neutral cooperativity with [3H]NMS at M1 to M4 and possibly M5 receptors. Thiochrome increases the affinity of acetylcholine (ACh) 3- to 5-fold for inhibiting [3H]NMS binding to M4 receptors but has no effect on ACh affinity at M1 to M3 or M5 receptors. Thiochrome (0.1 mM) also increases the direct binding of [3H]ACh to M4 receptors but decreases it slightly at M2 receptors. In agreement with the binding data, thiochrome does not affect the potency of ACh for stimulating the binding of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) to membranes containing M1 to M3 receptors, but it increases ACh potency 3.5-fold at M4 receptors. It also selectively reduces the release of [3H]ACh from potassium-stimulated slices of rat striatum, which contain autoinhibitory presynaptic M4 receptors, but not from hippocampal slices, which contain presynaptic M2 receptors. We conclude that thiochrome is a selective M4 muscarinic receptor enhancer of ACh affinity and has neutral cooperativity with ACh at M1 to M3 receptors; it therefore demonstrates a powerful new form of selectivity, "absolute subtype selectivity", which is derived from cooperativity rather than from affinity. PMID:14722259

  15. Analysis of free drug fractions in human serum by ultrafast affinity extraction and two-dimensional affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast affinity extraction and a two-dimensional high performance affinity chromatographic system were used to measure the free fractions for various drugs in serum and at typical therapeutic concentrations. Pooled samples of normal serum or serum from diabetic patients were utilized in this work. Several drug models (i.e., quinidine, diazepam, gliclazide, tolbutamide, and acetohexamide) were examined that represented a relatively wide range of therapeutic concentrations and affinities for human serum albumin (HSA). The two-dimensional system consisted of an HSA microcolumn for the extraction of a free drug fraction, followed by a larger HSA analytical column for the further separation and measurement of this fraction. Factors that were optimized in this method included the flow rates, column sizes, and column switching times that were employed. The final extraction times used for isolating the free drug fractions were 333-665 ms or less. The dissociation rate constants for several of the drugs with soluble HSA were measured during system optimization, giving results that agreed with reference values. In the final system, free drug fractions in the range of 0.7-9.5% were measured and gave good agreement with values that were determined by ultrafiltration. Association equilibrium constants or global affinities were also estimated by this approach for the drugs with soluble HSA. The results for the two-dimensional system were obtained in 5-10 min or less and required only 1-5 μL of serum per injection. The same approach could be adapted for work with other drugs and proteins in clinical samples or for biomedical research. PMID:26462924

  16. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  17. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  18. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  19. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  20. Mass spectrometry of large complexes.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is becoming a more and more powerful tool for investigating protein complexes. Recent developments, based on different ionization techniques, electrospray, desorption/ionization and others are contributing to the usefulness of MS to describe the organization and structure of large non-covalent assemblies. PMID:19782560

  1. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold. PMID:24862193

  2. PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: RECENT TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe A.; Bi, Cong; Li, Rong; Matsuda, Ryan; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Vargas, John; Zheng, Xiwei

    2012-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a separation technique that has become increasingly important in work with biological samples and pharmaceutical agents. This method is based on the use of a biologically-related agent as a stationary phase to selectively retain analytes or to study biological interactions. This review discusses the basic principles behind affinity chromatography and examines recent developments that have occurred in the use of this method for biomedical and pharmaceutical analysis. Techniques based on traditional affinity supports are discussed, but an emphasis is placed on methods in which affinity columns are used as part of HPLC systems or in combination with other analytical methods. General formats for affinity chromatography that are considered include step elution schemes, weak affinity chromatography, affinity extraction and affinity depletion. Specific separation techniques that are examined include lectin affinity chromatography, boronate affinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography, and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Approaches for the study of biological interactions by affinity chromatography are also presented, such as the measurement of equilibrium constants, rate constants, or competition and displacement effects. In addition, related developments in the use of immobilized enzyme reactors, molecularly imprinted polymers, dye ligands and aptamers are briefly considered. PMID:22305083

  3. Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reactionmore » monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than

  4. Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; Zhao, Rui; Camp II, David G.; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. Steven; Qian, Weijun

    2014-12-17

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than

  5. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  6. Engineered affinity proteins for tumour-targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Targeting of tumour-associated antigens is an expanding treatment modality in clinical oncology as an alternative to, or in combination with, conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy, external-radiation therapy and surgery. Targeting of antigens that are unique or more highly expressed in tumours than in normal tissues can be used to increase the specificity and reduce the cytotoxic effect on normal tissues. Several targeting agents have been studied for clinical use, where monoclonal antibodies have been the ones most widely used. More than 20 monoclonal antibodies are approved for therapy today and the largest field is oncology. Advances in genetic engineering and in vitro selection technology has enabled the feasible high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies, antibody derivatives [e.g. scFvs, Fab molecules, dAbs (single-domain antibodies), diabodies and minibodies] and more recently also non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins. Several of these affinity proteins have been investigated for both in vivo diagnostics and therapy. Affinity proteins in tumour-targeted therapy can affect tumour progression by altering signal transduction or by delivering a payload of toxin, drug or radionuclide. The ErbB receptor family has been extensively studied as biomarkers in tumour targeting, primarily for therapy using monoclonal antibodies. Two receptors in the ErbB family, EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and HER2 (epidermal growth factor receptor 2), are overexpressed in various malignancies and associated with poor patient prognosis and are therefore interesting targets for solid tumours. In the present review, strategies are described for tumour targeting of solid tumours using affinity proteins to deliver radionuclides, either for molecular imaging or radiotherapy. Antibodies, antibody derivatives and non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins are discussed with a certain focus on the affibody (Affibody) molecule. PMID:19341363

  7. Improving affinity chromatography resin efficiency using semi-continuous chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ekta; George, Anupa; Wolk, Bradley

    2012-03-01

    Protein A affinity chromatography is widely used for purification of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF). At the manufacturing scale, the HCCF is typically loaded on a single Protein A affinity chromatography column in cycles until all of the HCCF is processed. Protein A resin costs are significant, comprising a substantial portion of the raw material costs in MAb manufacturing. Cost can be reduced by operating the process continuously using multiple smaller columns to a higher binding capacity in lieu of one industrial scale column. In this study, a series of experiments were performed using three 1-ml Hi-Trap™ MabSelect SuRe™ columns on a modified ÄKTA™ system operated according to the three Column Periodic Counter Current Chromatography (3C PCC) principle. The columns were loaded individually at different times until the 70% breakthrough point was achieved. The HCCF with unbound protein from the column was then loaded onto the next column to capture the MAb, preventing any protein loss. At any given point, all three columns were in operation, either loading or washing, enabling a reduction in processing time. The product yield and quality were evaluated and compared with a batch process to determine the effect of using the three column continuous process. The continuous operation shows the potential to reduce both resin volume and buffer consumption by ∼40%, however the system hardware and the process is more complex than the batch process. Alternative methods using a single standard affinity column, such as recycling load effluent back to the tank or increasing residence time, were also evaluated to improve Protein A resin efficiency. These alternative methods showed similar cost benefits but required longer processing time. PMID:22265178

  8. Surface affinity role in graphoepitaxy of lamellar block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claveau, G.; Quemere, P.; Argoud, M.; Hazart, J.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Sarrazin, A.; Posseme, N.; Tiron, R.; Chevalier, X.; Nicolet, C.; Navarro, C.

    2016-03-01

    Overcoming the optical limitations of 193nm immersion lithography can be achieved using Directed Self Assembly (DSA) of block-copolymers (BCPs) as a low-cost and versatile complementary technique. The goal of this paper is to investigate the potential of DSA to address line and space (L/S) high resolution patterning by performing the density multiplication of lines with the graphoepitaxy approach. As surface affinity is a key parameter in self-assembly, three variations, or "flavors", of DSA template affinity are investigated regarding several success criteria such as morphology control or defectivity. More precisely, both the methodology to register DSA defects and the impact of process parameters on defectivity are detailed. Using the 300mm pilot line available in LETI and Arkema's advanced materials, we investigate process optimization of DSA line/space patterning of a 38nm period lamellar PS-b-PMMA BCP (L38). For this study, our integration scheme, depicted in figure 2-1, is based on BCP self-assembly inside organic hard mask guiding patterns obtained using 193i nm lithography. Defect analysis coupled with the fine tuning of process parameters (annealing, brush material) provided the optimum conditions for the L38 self-assembly. Using such conditions, DSA using the three affinity flavors is investigated by means of SEM top-view and cross-section review. Lithographic performances of one selected flavor are then evaluated with the comparison of Process Windows (PWs) function of either commensurability, morphology or LWR. This work is a first step in finding the best process for an industrial graphoepitaxy approach.

  9. The affinity of magnetic microspheres for Schistosoma eggs.

    PubMed

    Candido, Renata R F; Favero, Vivian; Duke, Mary; Karl, Stephan; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Woodward, Robert C; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Jones, Malcolm K; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease of humans, with two species primarily causing the intestinal infection: Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Traditionally, diagnosis of schistosomiasis is achieved through direct visualisation of eggs in faeces using techniques that lack the sensitivity required to detect all infections, especially in areas of low endemicity. A recently developed method termed Helmintex™ is a very sensitive technique for detection of Schistosoma eggs and exhibits 100% sensitivity at 1.3 eggs per gram of faeces, enough to detect even low-level infections. The Helminthex™ method is based on the interaction of magnetic microspheres and schistosome eggs. Further understanding the underlying egg-microsphere interactions would enable a targeted optimisation of egg-particle binding and may thus enable a significant improvement of the Helmintex™ method and diagnostic sensitivity in areas with low infection rates. We investigated the magnetic properties of S. mansoni and S. japonicum eggs and their interactions with microspheres with different magnetic properties and surface functionalization. Eggs of both species exhibited higher binding affinity to the magnetic microspheres than the non-magnetic microspheres. Binding efficiency was further enhanced if the particles were coated with streptavidin. Schistosoma japonicum eggs bound more microspheres compared with S. mansoni. However, distinct differences within eggs of each species were also observed when the distribution of the number of microspheres bound per egg was modelled with double Poisson distributions. Using this approach, both S. japonicum and S. mansoni eggs fell into two groups, one having greater affinity for magnetic microspheres than the other, indicating that not all eggs of a species exhibit the same binding affinity. Our observations suggest that interaction between the microspheres and eggs is more likely to be related to surface charge-based electrostatic

  10. [Progresses in screening active compounds from herbal medicine by affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying-shu; Tong, Shan-shan; Xu, Xi-ming; Yu, Jiang-nan

    2015-03-01

    Affinity chromatography is a chromatographic method for separating molecules using the binding characteristics of the stationary phase with potential drug molecules. This method can be performed as a high throughput screening method and a chromatographic separation method to screen a variety of active drugs. This paper summarizes the history of affinity chromatography, screening technology of affinity chromatography, and application of affinity chromatography in screening bio-active compounds in herbal medicines, and then discusses its application prospects, in order to broaden applications of the affinity chromatography in drug screening. PMID:26226740

  11. Calcium affinity of human α-actinin 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Due to alternative splicing, the human ACTN1 gene codes for three different transcripts of α-actinin; one isoform that is expressed only in the brain and two with a more general expression pattern. The sequence difference is located to the C-terminal domains and the EF-hand motifs. Therefore, any functional or structural distinction should involve this part of the protein. To investigate this further, the calcium affinities of these three isoforms of α-actinin 1 have been determined by isothermal calorimetry. PMID:26020004

  12. Membrane affinity chromatography used for the separation of trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Shang, Z; Yu, Y; Guan, Y; Zhou, L

    1992-01-01

    Polysulphone (PS) was chemically modified by acrylation-amination and by chloromethylation-amination, respectively. An ultrafiltration membrane of chemically modified polysulphone (CMPS) was prepared by the phase inversion method. Trypsin was then covalently bonded onto the CMPS membrane by diazotization. The activity of immobilized trypsin reaches up to 10200 U/g; 15 mg trypsin was immobilized on 1 g CMPS membrane. Separation of soybean trypsin inhibitor was carried out on the affinity membrane, yielding 6.5 mg pure trypsin inhibitor in one run. The enzyme membrane has good activity and stability. PMID:1638098

  13. Lateral Casimir force between self-affine rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Fatemeh; Masoudi, Amir Ali; Khorrami, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The effect of self-affine roughness on the lateral Casimir force between two plates is studied using a perturbative expansion method. The PWS (pairwise summation) method is applicable only at lateral correlation lengths much larger than the separation between two plates. The effect of the roughness parameters on the lateral Casimir force is investigated, and it is seen that this effect is significant, enabling one to tailor roughness parameters so that to obtain the desirable Casimir force and increase the yield of micro- or nano-electromechanical devices based on the vacuum fluctuations.

  14. Self-affine surface morphology of plastically deformed metals.

    PubMed

    Zaiser, Michael; Grasset, Frederic Madani; Koutsos, Vasileios; Aifantis, Elias C

    2004-11-01

    We analyze the surface morphology of metals after plastic deformation over a range of scales from 10 nm to 2 mm using atomic force microscopy and scanning white-light interferometry. We demonstrate that an initially smooth surface during deformation develops self-affine roughness over almost 4 orders of magnitude in scale. The Hurst exponent H of one-dimensional surface profiles initially decreases with increasing strain and then stabilizes at H approximately 0.75. We show that the profiles can be mathematically modeled as graphs of a fractional Brownian motion. Our findings can be understood in terms of a fractal distribution of plastic strain within the deformed samples. PMID:15600851

  15. Surface States and Negative Electron Affinity in Polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Righi, M. C.; Scandolo, S.; Serra, S.; Iarlori, S.; Tosatti, E.; Santoro, G.

    2001-08-13

    First-principles calculations are used to investigate the electronic properties of the surfaces of polyethylene. The calculations support the experimental evidence of a negative electron affinity, with calculated values of -0.17 eV and -0.10 eV for surfaces with chains perpendicular and parallel to the surface normal, respectively. Both surfaces exhibit a surface state with binding energy -1.2{+-}0.5 eV with respect to the bulk polyethylene conduction band minimum. Implications of these findings on spectroscopy, as well as on the transport and aging properties of polyethylene for high-voltage applications, are discussed.

  16. Modified gravity in three dimensional metric-affine scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Ghasemi-Nodehi, M.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2015-08-01

    We consider metric-affine scenarios where a modified gravitational action is sourced by electrovacuum fields in a three dimensional space-time. We first study the case of f (R ) theories, finding deviations near the center as compared to the solutions of general relativity. We then consider Born-Infeld gravity, which has raised a lot of interest in the last few years regarding its applications in astrophysics and cosmology, and show that new features always arise at a finite distance from the center. Several properties of the resulting space-times, in particular in presence of a cosmological constant term, are discussed.

  17. Affinity enhancement by dendritic side chains in synthetic carbohydrate receptors.

    PubMed

    Destecroix, Harry; Renney, Charles M; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Carter, Tom S; Stewart, Patrick F N; Crump, Matthew P; Davis, Anthony P

    2015-02-01

    Dendritic side chains have been used to modify the binding environment in anthracene-based synthetic carbohydrate receptors. Control of length, charge, and branching enabled the positioning of side-chain carboxylate groups in such a way that they assisted in binding substrates rather than blocking the cavity. Conformational degeneracy in the dendrimers resulted in effective preorganization despite the flexibility of the system. Strong binding was observed to glucosammonium ions in water, with Ka values up to 7000 M(-1) . Affinities for uncharged substrates (glucose and N-acetylglucosamine) were also enhanced, despite competition from solvent and the absence of electrostatic interactions. PMID:25645064

  18. Control of an affinity purification procedure using a thermal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Flygare, L; Larsson, P O; Danielsson, B

    1990-10-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was recovered from a solution by affinity binding to an N(6)-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP-Sepharose gel. An enzyme thermistor unit was employed to continously measure the activity of the unbound LDH. The enzyme activity signal from the enzyme thermistor was used in a PID controller to regulate the addition of AMP-Sepharose gel to the LDH solution. In another type of experiment, a desktop computer was utilized to control the addition of the adsorbent. Both systems worked satisfactorily, and enabled a rapid and accurate assessment of correct addition of adsorbent. PMID:18597264

  19. Development of a novel affinity membrane purification system for deoxyribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Levin, Robert E

    2014-02-01

    A membrane based affinity purification system was developed for the purification of the DNA specific nuclease, DNase I. Single stranded DNA was bound to unmodified polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes which were used to purify DNase I from a solution of bovine serum albumin. Using coated membranes, a 6-fold increase in specific activity was achieved with 80 % enzyme recovery. This method provides a simple yet effective way to purify DNase I and can be very useful for the purification of other DNA specific enzymes. PMID:24318589

  20. Nine switch-affine neurons suffice for Turing universality.

    PubMed

    Siegelmann, H T.; Margenstern, M

    1999-06-01

    In a previous work Pollack showed that a particular type of heterogeneous processor network is Turing universal. Siegelmann and Sontag (1991) showed the universality of homogeneous networks of first-order neurons having piecewise-linear activation functions. Their result was generalized by Kilian and Siegelmann (1996) to include various sigmoidal activation functions. Here we focus on a type of high-order neurons called switch-affine neurons, with piecewise-linear activation functions, and prove that nine such neurons suffice for simulating universal Turing machines. PMID:12662670

  1. Kinetic analysis of drug-protein interactions by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-10-01

    Information on the kinetics of drug-protein interactions is of crucial importance in drug discovery and development. Several methods based on affinity chromatography have been developed in recent years to examine the association and dissociation rates of these processes. These techniques include band-broadening measurements, the peak decay method, peak fitting methods, the split-peak method, and free fraction analysis. This review will examine the general principles and applications of these approaches and discuss their use in the characterization, screening and analysis of drug-protein interactions in the body. PMID:26724332

  2. Cohomology of various completions of quasicoherent sheaves on affines.

    PubMed

    Laudal, O A

    1972-09-01

    Let O be a complete discrete valuation ring and let A be a commutative O-algebra. Let M be any A-module. In this paper, a class of completions M on the affine X corresponding to A, which includes, e.g., the Washnitzer-Monsky completion [1], and the full completion is studied. We then prove that for all of these completions we have, H(i)(X,M(+)) = O for i >/= 1, H degrees (X,M(+)) = M(+). PMID:16592014

  3. An affine projection algorithm using grouping selection of input vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, JaeWook; Kong, NamWoong; Park, PooGyeon

    2011-10-01

    This paper present an affine projection algorithm (APA) using grouping selection of input vectors. To improve the performance of conventional APA, the proposed algorithm adjusts the number of the input vectors using two procedures: grouping procedure and selection procedure. In grouping procedure, the some input vectors that have overlapping information for update is grouped using normalized inner product. Then, few input vectors that have enough information for for coefficient update is selected using steady-state mean square error (MSE) in selection procedure. Finally, the filter coefficients update using selected input vectors. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has small steady-state estimation errors comparing with the existing algorithms.

  4. Isolation of human lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, A H; van Kuyk, L; Boettcher, B

    1978-01-01

    Human isoenzyme LDH-X (lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X) was isolated from seminal fluid of frozen semen samples by affinity chromatography by using oxamate-Sepharose and AMP-Sepharose. In the presence of 1.6 mM-NAD+, isoenzyme LDH-X does not bind to AMP-Sepharose, whereas the other lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes do. This is the crucial point in the isolation of isoenzyme LDH-X from the other isoenzymes. The purified human isoenzyme LDH-X had a specific activity of 146 units/mg of protein. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:213050

  5. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples.Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the

  6. Experimental and theoretical binding affinity between polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and selected phenolic compounds from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; López-Cortés, Xaviera A; Castro, Ricardo I; Avila-Salas, Fabián; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Laurie, V Felipe; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-02-01

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent, widely used in winemaking and brewing, whose mode of action in removing phenolic compounds has not been fully characterised. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental and theoretical binding affinity of PVPP towards six phenolic compounds representing different types of phenolic species. The interaction between PVPP and phenolics was evaluated in model solutions, where hydroxyl groups, hydrophobic bonding and steric hindrance were characterised. The results of the study indicated that PVPP exhibits high affinity for quercetin and catechin, moderate affinity for epicatechin, gallic acid and lower affinity for 4-methylcatechol and caffeic acid. The affinity has a direct correlation with the hydroxylation degree of each compound. The results show that the affinity of PVPP towards phenols is related with frontier orbitals. This work demonstrates a direct correlation between the experimental affinity and the interaction energy calculations obtained through computational chemistry methods. PMID:25172736

  7. Challenges and recent advances in affinity purification of tag-free proteins.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongli; Chen, Zhilei

    2014-07-01

    There is currently no generic, simple, lowcost method for affinity chromatographic purification of proteins in which the purified product is free of appended tags. Existing approaches for the purification of tagless proteins fall into two broad categories: (1) direct affinity-based capture of tag-free proteins that utilize affinity ligands specific to the target protein or class of target protein, and (2) removal of an appended affinity tag following tag-mediated protein capture. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art approaches for tagless protein purification in both categories, including specific examples of affinity ligands used for the capture of different classes of proteins and cleavage systems for affinity tag removal following chromatographic capture. A particular focus of this review is on recent developments in affinity tag removal systems utilizing split inteins. PMID:24658742

  8. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  9. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  10. Sub 2-μm macroporous silica particles derivatized for enhanced lectin affinity enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Benjamin F; Mann, Amanda K P; Skrabalak, Sara E; Novotny, Milos V

    2013-02-01

    A new, mechanically stable silica microparticle with macrosized internal pores (1.6 μm particles with 100 nm pores) has been developed for chromatography. The particles are characterized by an extensive network of interconnected macropores with a high intraparticle void volume, as observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They are synthesized by an aerosol assembly technique called ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP). The particles have a high surface area for a macroporous material, ∼200 m(2)/g, making them suitable for large biomolecular separations. To demonstrate their potential for bioseparations, they have been functionalized with lectins for affinity enrichment of glycoproteins. The material was derivatized with two lectins, Concanavalin A (Con A) and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), and binding properties were tested with standard glycoproteins. The columns exhibited excellent binding capacities for microaffinity enrichment: Con A was able to bind 75 μg of a standard glycoprotein in a 50 × 1 mm column. Following initial tests, the lectin microcolumns were utilized for enrichment of glycoproteins from 1 μL volumes of blood serum samples, performed in triplicate for each lectin. The enriched serum fractions were subjected to side-by-side glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling analyses with mass spectrometry to show that the new particles offer excellent sensitivity for microscale analyses of precious biological sample materials. The unique combination of the macroporous architecture and small particle diameter suggests the material may have advantages for conventional modes of chromatographic separation of macromolecules in an ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) format. PMID:23278114

  11. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore » new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for

  12. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a

  13. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica.

    PubMed

    Barden, Holly E; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J; Manning, Phillip L; Withers, Philip J; Wogelius, Roy A; van Dongen, Bart E

    2015-01-01

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for fossil

  14. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2015-01-01

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for fossil

  15. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 (Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 Å cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the “off-target” effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism. PMID:20194791

  16. Comprehensive and Reproducible Phosphopeptide Enrichment Using Iron Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography (Fe-IMAC) Columns

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Benjamin; Koch, Heiner; Medard, Guillaume; Mundt, Max; Kuster, Bernhard; Lemeer, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Advances in phosphopeptide enrichment methods enable the identification of thousands of phosphopeptides from complex samples. Current offline enrichment approaches using TiO2, Ti, and Fe immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) material in batch or microtip format are widely used, but they suffer from irreproducibility and compromised selectivity. To address these shortcomings, we revisited the merits of performing phosphopeptide enrichment in an HPLC column format. We found that Fe-IMAC columns enabled the selective, comprehensive, and reproducible enrichment of phosphopeptides out of complex lysates. Column enrichment did not suffer from bead-to-sample ratio issues and scaled linearly from 100 μg to 5 mg of digest. Direct measurements on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer identified >7500 unique phosphopeptides with 90% selectivity and good quantitative reproducibility (median cv of 15%). The number of unique phosphopeptides could be increased to more than 14,000 when the IMAC eluate was subjected to a subsequent hydrophilic strong anion exchange separation. Fe-IMAC columns outperformed Ti-IMAC and TiO2 in batch or tip mode in terms of phosphopeptide identification and intensity. Permutation enrichments of flow-throughs showed that all materials largely bound the same phosphopeptide species, independent of physicochemical characteristics. However, binding capacity and elution efficiency did profoundly differ among the enrichment materials and formats. As a result, the often quoted orthogonality of the materials has to be called into question. Our results strongly suggest that insufficient capacity, inefficient elution, and the stochastic nature of data-dependent acquisition in mass spectrometry are the causes of the experimentally observed complementarity. The Fe-IMAC enrichment workflow using an HPLC format developed here enables rapid and comprehensive phosphoproteome analysis that can be applied to a wide range of biological systems. PMID

  17. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  18. Low-Affinity Memory CD8+ T Cells Mediate Robust Heterologous Immunity.

    PubMed

    Krummey, Scott M; Martinez, Ryan J; Andargachew, Rakieb; Liu, Danya; Wagener, Maylene; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Evavold, Brian D; Larsen, Christian P; Ford, Mandy L

    2016-03-15

    Heterologous immunity is recognized as a significant barrier to transplant tolerance. Whereas it has been established that pathogen-elicited memory T cells can have high or low affinity for cross-reactive allogeneic peptide-MHC, the role of TCR affinity during heterologous immunity has not been explored. We established a model with which to investigate the impact of TCR-priming affinity on memory T cell populations following a graft rechallenge. In contrast to high-affinity priming, low-affinity priming elicited fully differentiated memory T cells with a CD45RB(hi) status. High CD45RB status enabled robust secondary responses in vivo, as demonstrated by faster graft rejection kinetics and greater proliferative responses. CD45RB blockade prolonged graft survival in low affinity-primed mice, but not in high affinity-primed mice. Mechanistically, low affinity-primed memory CD8(+) T cells produced more IL-2 and significantly upregulated IL-2Rα expression during rechallenge. We found that CD45RB(hi) status was also a stable marker of priming affinity within polyclonal CD8(+) T cell populations. Following high-affinity rechallenge, low affinity-primed CD45RB(hi) cells became CD45RB(lo), demonstrating that CD45RB status acts as an affinity-based differentiation switch on CD8(+) T cells. Thus, these data establish a novel mechanism by which CD45 isoforms tune low affinity-primed memory CD8(+) T cells to become potent secondary effectors following heterologous rechallenge. These findings have direct implications for allogeneic heterologous immunity by demonstrating that despite a lower precursor frequency, low-affinity priming is sufficient to generate memory cells that mediate potent secondary responses against a cross-reactive graft challenge. PMID:26864034

  19. Use of quantitative affinity chromatography for characterizing high-affinity interactions: binding of heparin to antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Jackson, C M; Winzor, D J

    1991-02-01

    The versatility of quantitative affinity chromatography (QAC) for evaluating the binding of macromolecular ligands to macromolecular acceptors has been increased substantially as a result of the derivation of the equations which describe the partitioning of acceptor between matrix-bound and soluble forms in terms of total, rather than free, ligand concentrations. In addition to simplifying the performance of the binding experiments, this development makes possible the application of the technique to systems characterized by affinities higher than those previously amenable to investigation by QAC. Addition of an on-line data acquisition system to monitor the concentration of partitioning solute in the liquid phase as a function of time has permitted the adoption of an empirical approach for determining the liquid-phase concentration of acceptor in the system at partition equilibrium, a development which decreases significantly the time required to obtain a complete binding curve by QAC. The application of these new QAC developments is illustrated by the determination of binding constants for the interactions of high-affinity heparin (Mr 20,300) with antithrombin III at three temperatures. Association constants of 8.0 +/- 2.2 x 10(7), 3.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(7), and 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(7) M-1 were observed at 15, 25, and 35 degrees C, respectively. The standard enthalpy change of -4.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol that is calculated from these data is in good agreement with a reported value obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements. PMID:2035830

  20. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  1. Influence of affinity on antibody determination in microtiter ELISA systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, J.H.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Butler, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Theoretically, all immunoassays are affinity (Ka) dependent when the product of the antibody (Ab) Ka and the free epitope concentration is less than 10. Thus, the degree of dependence on Ka depends on the concentration of available antigen in the system. The authors examined the binding of /sup 125/I-anti-fluorescein (a-FLU) monoclonal antibodies of different affinities to FLU-gelatin adsorbed on Immunlon 2 microtiter plates. Data obtained were in general agreement with our theoretical predictions; the percent of /sup 125/I-a-FLU which bound correlated with Ka, as did the shape of the titration curves. Measurement of 5 a-FLU monoclonals by the ELISA showed that the determination of Ab concentrations depends on the FLU-gelatin concentration, epitope density, and on the relationship between the Kas of test samples and the reference standard Ab preparation. Thus the ELISA is Ka dependent and should not be used routinely to estimate the absolute amount to Ab in unknown samples. However, the Ka dependency of the ELISA might provide a convenient assay for the estimation of the relative functional Ka (rfKa) of antibody preparations.

  2. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  3. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion. PMID:2888155

  4. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  5. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  6. Detection of Waterborne Viruses Using High Affinity Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Zeynep; Gittens, Micah; Guerreiro, Antonio; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Walker, Jimmy; Piletsky, Sergey; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptor ligands which can recognize and specifically bind to a target molecule. They are more resistant to chemical and biological damage and inactivation than antibodies. Therefore, target specific-MIP nanoparticles are aimed to develop and implemented to biosensors for the detection of biological toxic agents such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi toxins that cause many diseases and death due to the environmental contamination. For the first time, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) targeting the bacteriophage MS2 as the template was investigated using a novel solid-phase synthesis method to obtain the artificial affinity ligand for the detection and removal of waterborne viruses through optical-based sensors. A high affinity between the artificial ligand and the target was found, and a regenerative MIP-based virus detection assay was successfully developed using a new surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-biosensor which provides an alternative technology for the specific detection and removal of waterborne viruses that lead to high disease and death rates all over the world. PMID:26008649

  7. Telonemia, a new protist phylum with affinity to chromist lineages.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, K; Eikrem, W; Klaveness, D; Vaulot, D; Minge, M A; Le Gall, F; Romari, K; Throndsen, J; Botnen, A; Massana, R; Thomsen, H A; Jakobsen, K S

    2006-07-22

    Recent molecular investigations of marine samples taken from different environments, including tropical, temperate and polar areas, as well as deep thermal vents, have revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of protists, some of them forming deep-branching clades within important lineages, such as the alveolates and heterokonts. Using the same approach on coastal samples, we have identified a novel group of protist small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences that do not correspond to any phylogenetic group previously identified. Comparison with other sequences obtained from cultures of heterotrophic protists showed that the environmental sequences grouped together with Telonema, a genus known since 1913 but of uncertain taxonomic affinity. Phylogenetic analyses using four genes (SSU, Hsp90, alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin), and accounting for gamma- and covarion-distributed substitution rates, revealed Telonema as a distinct group of species branching off close to chromist lineages. Consistent with these gene trees, Telonema possesses ultrastructures revealing both the distinctness of the group and the evolutionary affinity to chromist groups. Altogether, the data suggest that Telonema constitutes a new eukaryotic phylum, here defined as Telonemia, possibly representing a key clade for the understanding of the early evolution of bikont protist groups, such as the proposed chromalveolate supergroup. PMID:16790418

  8. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  9. Fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Bandodkar, Amay Jairaj; Gupta, Vinay; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2012-02-01

    Organization of biomolecules in two/three dimensional assemblies has recently aroused much interest in nanobiotechnology. In this context, the development of techniques for controlling spatial arrangement and orientation of the desired molecules to generate highly-ordered nanostructures in the form of a mono/multi layer is considered highly significant. The studies of monolayer films to date have focused on three distinct methods of preparation: (i) the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, involving the transfer of a monolayer assembled at the gas-liquid interface; (ii) self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, based on spontaneous adsorption of desired molecules from a solution directly onto a solid surface; and (iii) Layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly at a liquid-solid interface, based on inter-layer electrostatic attractions for fabrication of multilayers. A variety of monolayers have been utilized to fabricate biomolecular electronic devices including biosensors. The composition of a monolayer based matrix has been found to influence the activity(ies) of biomolecule(s). We present comprehensive and critical analysis of ordered molecular assemblies formed by LB and self-assembly with potential applications to affinity biosensing. This critical review on fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing is likely to benefit researchers working in this as well as related fields of research (401 references). PMID:22105315

  10. A heme fusion tag for protein affinity purification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel affinity-based purification method for proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a heme tag to an l-histidine-immobilized sepharose (HIS) resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. We show that azurin and maltose binding protein are readily purified from cell lysate using the heme tag and HIS resin. Mild conditions are used; heme-tagged proteins are bound to the HIS resin in phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, and eluted by adding 200–500 mM imidazole or binding buffer at pH 5 or 8. The HIS resin exhibits a low level of nonspecific binding of untagged cellular proteins for the systems studied here. An additional advantage of the heme tag-HIS method for purification is that the heme tag can be used for protein quantification by using the pyridine hemochrome absorbance method for heme concentration determination. PMID:20665691

  11. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method. PMID:25608306

  12. An Ultrahigh Affinity D-Peptide Antagonist Of MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Changyou; Zhao, Le; Wei, Xiaoli; Wu, Xueji; Chen, Xishan; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wei-Yue; Pazgier, Marzena; Lu, Wuyuan

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein MDM2 negatively regulates the activity and stability of the p53 tumor suppressor, and is an important molecular target for anticancer therapy. Aided by mirror image phage display and native chemical ligation, we have previously discovered several proteolysis-resistant duodecimal D-peptide antagonists of MDM2, termed DPMI-α, β, γ. The prototypic D-peptide inhibitor DPMI-α binds (25-109)MDM2 at an affinity of 220 nM, and kills tumor cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo by reactivating the p53 pathway. Herein, we report the design of a super-active D-peptide antagonist of MDM2, termed DPMI-δ, of which the binding affinity for (25-109)MDM2 has been improved over DPMI-α by three orders of magnitude (Kd = 220 pM). X-ray crystallographic studies validate DPMI-δ as an exceedingly potent inhibitor of the p53-MDM2 interaction, promising to be a highly attractive lead drug candidate for anticancer therapeutic development. PMID:22694121

  13. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  14. Electron affinity of cubic boron nitride terminated with vanadium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Sun, Tianyin; Shammas, Joseph; Kaur, Manpuneet; Hao, Mei; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    A thermally stable negative electron affinity (NEA) for a cubic boron nitride (c-BN) surface with vanadium-oxide-termination is achieved, and its electronic structure was analyzed with in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The c-BN films were prepared by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing BF3 and N2 as precursors. Vanadium layers of ˜0.1 and 0.5 nm thickness were deposited on the c-BN surface in an electron beam deposition system. Oxidation of the metal layer was achieved by an oxygen plasma treatment. After 650 °C thermal annealing, the vanadium oxide on the c-BN surface was determined to be VO2, and the surfaces were found to be thermally stable, exhibiting an NEA. In comparison, the oxygen-terminated c-BN surface, where B2O3 was detected, showed a positive electron affinity of ˜1.2 eV. The B2O3 evidently acts as a negatively charged layer introducing a surface dipole directed into the c-BN. Through the interaction of VO2 with the B2O3 layer, a B-O-V layer structure would contribute a dipole between the O and V layers with the positive side facing vacuum. The lower enthalpy of formation for B2O3 is favorable for the formation of the B-O-V layer structure, which provides a thermally stable surface dipole and an NEA surface.

  15. Membrane Affinity of Platensimycin and Its Dialkylamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Ian; Guo, Min; Yasmann, Anthony; Cember, Abigail; Sintim, Herman O.; Sukharev, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Membrane permeability is a desired property in drug design, but there have been difficulties in quantifying the direct drug partitioning into native membranes. Platensimycin (PL) is a new promising antibiotic whose biosynthetic production is costly. Six dialkylamine analogs of PL were synthesized with identical pharmacophores but different side chains; five of them were found inactive. To address the possibility that their activity is limited by the permeation step, we calculated polarity, measured surface activity and the ability to insert into the phospholipid monolayers. The partitioning of PL and the analogs into the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli was assessed by activation curve shifts of a re-engineered mechanosensitive channel, MscS, in patch-clamp experiments. Despite predicted differences in polarity, the affinities to lipid monolayers and native membranes were comparable for most of the analogs. For PL and the di-myrtenyl analog QD-11, both carrying bulky sidechains, the affinity for the native membrane was lower than for monolayers (half-membranes), signifying that intercalation must overcome the lateral pressure of the bilayer. We conclude that the biological activity among the studied PL analogs is unlikely to be limited by their membrane permeability. We also discuss the capacity of endogenous tension-activated channels to detect asymmetric partitioning of exogenous substances into the native bacterial membrane and the different contributions to the thermodynamic force which drives permeation. PMID:26247942

  16. Therapeutic Strategies to Alter Oxygen Affinity of Sickle Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Safo, Martin K.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental pathophysiology of sickle cell disease involves the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin in its T-state which develops under low oxygen saturation. One therapeutic strategy is to develop pharmacologic agents to stabilize the R-state of hemoglobin, which has higher oxygen affinity and would be expected to have slower kinetics of polymerization, potentially delaying the sickling of red cells during circulation. This therapeutic strategy has stimulated the laboratory investigation of aromatic aldehydes, aspirin derivatives, thiols and isothiocyanates that can stabilize the R-state of hemoglobin in vitro. One representative aromatic aldehyde agent, 5-hydoxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF, also known as Aes-103) increases oxygen affinity of sickle hemoglobin and reduces hypoxia-induced sickling in vitro and protects sickle cell mice from effects of hypoxia. It has completed pre-clinical testing and has entered clinical trials. The development of Hb allosteric modifiers as direct anti-sickling agents is an attractive investigational goal for the treatment of sickle cell disease. PMID:24589263

  17. Affinity sensor using 3-aminophenylboronic acid for bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Wannapob, Rodtichoti; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Limbut, Warakorn; Numnuam, Apon; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote

    2010-10-15

    Boronic acid that can reversibly bind to diols was used to detect bacteria through its affinity binding reaction with diol-groups on bacterial cell walls. 3-aminophenylboronic acid (3-APBA) was immobilized on a gold electrode via a self-assembled monolayer. The change in capacitance of the sensing surface caused by the binding between 3-APBA and bacteria in a flow system was detected by a potentiostatic step method. Under optimal conditions the linear range of 1.5×10(2)-1.5×10(6) CFU ml(-1) and the detection limit of 1.0×10(2) CFU ml(-1) was obtained. The sensing surface can be regenerated and reused up to 58 times. The method was used for the analysis of bacteria in several types of water, i.e., bottled, well, tap, reservoir and wastewater. Compared with the standard plate count method, the results were within one standard deviation of each other. The proposed method can save both time and cost of analysis. The electrode modified with 3-APBA would also be applicable to the detection of other cis-diol-containing analytes. The concept could be extended to other chemoselective ligands, offering less expensive and more robust affinity sensors for a wide range of compounds. PMID:20801635

  18. Telonemia, a new protist phylum with affinity to chromist lineages

    PubMed Central

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, K; Eikrem, W; Klaveness, D; Vaulot, D; Minge, M.A; Le Gall, F; Romari, K; Throndsen, J; Botnen, A; Massana, R; Thomsen, H.A; Jakobsen, K.S

    2006-01-01

    Recent molecular investigations of marine samples taken from different environments, including tropical, temperate and polar areas, as well as deep thermal vents, have revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of protists, some of them forming deep-branching clades within important lineages, such as the alveolates and heterokonts. Using the same approach on coastal samples, we have identified a novel group of protist small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences that do not correspond to any phylogenetic group previously identified. Comparison with other sequences obtained from cultures of heterotrophic protists showed that the environmental sequences grouped together with Telonema, a genus known since 1913 but of uncertain taxonomic affinity. Phylogenetic analyses using four genes (SSU, Hsp90, alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin), and accounting for gamma- and covarion-distributed substitution rates, revealed Telonema as a distinct group of species branching off close to chromist lineages. Consistent with these gene trees, Telonema possesses ultrastructures revealing both the distinctness of the group and the evolutionary affinity to chromist groups. Altogether, the data suggest that Telonema constitutes a new eukaryotic phylum, here defined as Telonemia, possibly representing a key clade for the understanding of the early evolution of bikont protist groups, such as the proposed chromalveolate supergroup. PMID:16790418

  19. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  20. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  1. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  2. Impact of crystalline quality on neuronal affinity of pristine graphene.

    PubMed

    Veliev, Farida; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Bouchiat, Vincent; Delacour, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Due to its outstanding mechanical and electrical properties as well as chemical inertness, graphene has attracted a growing interest in the field of bioelectric interfacing. Herein, we investigate the suitability of pristine, i.e. without a cell adhesive coating, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer graphene to act as a platform for neuronal growth. We study the development of primary hippocampal neurons grown on bare graphene (transferred on glass coverslip) for up to 5 days and show that pristine graphene significantly improves the neurons adhesion and outgrowth at the early stage of culture (1-2 days in vitro). At the later development stage, neurons grown on coating free graphene (untreated with poly-L-lysine) show remarkably well developed neuritic architecture similar to those cultured on conventional poly-L-lysine coated glass coverslips. This exceptional possibility to bypass the adhesive coating allows a direct electrical contact of graphene to the cells and reveals its great potential for chronic medical implants and tissue engineering. Moreover, regarding the controversial results obtained on the neuronal affinity of pristine graphene and its ability to support neuronal growth without the need of polymer or protein coating, we found that the crystallinity of CVD grown graphene plays an important role in neuronal attachment, outgrowth and axonal specification. In particular, we show that the decreasing crystalline quality of graphene tunes the neuronal affinity from highly adhesive to fully repellent. PMID:26878439

  3. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  4. Certain photooxidized derivatives of tryptophan bind with very high affinity to the Ah receptor and are likely to be endogenous signal substances

    SciTech Connect

    Rannug, A.; Rannug, U.; Rosenkranz, H.S.; Winqvist, L.; Westerholm, R.; Agurell, E.; Grafstroem, A.K.

    1987-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation of amino acids produces compounds with affinity for the Ah receptor. Aqueous solutions of L-tryptophan were exposed to radiation from an unfiltered high-pressure mercury lamp. The photoproducts formed were solvent-extracted or concentrated on Sep-Pak C18 cartridges. The concentrated extracts or eluants were treated for their ability to compete with /sup 3/H-labeled 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Binding was assayed in liver cytosolic preparations from Sprague-Dawley rats using a technique based on hydroxylapatite separation. Photoproducts with receptor affinity were formed in a time-dependent manner. Histidine and tryptamine also gave products upon UV irradiation that competed with TCDD. Commercial tryptophan, at least aged, contained trace amounts of impurities with receptor affinity. Analysis by TLC and high-pressure liquid chromatography of the photo-products of tryptophan showed a minimum of three different binding compounds. Two of the products were studied in greater detail. One of them, showing UV absorbance and yellow fluorescence, gave a molecular ion (M+) of 284 and the other gave M+ 312 but showed little UV absorption and fluorescence. The concentration, based on mass spectrometry quantifications, of the two compounds that displaced more than 50% of TCDD was found to be extremely low, giving Kd values of 0.44 nM (M+ 312) and 0.07 nM (M+ 284). The existence of high affinity receptors for oxidized amino acids is postulated and their possible role in the proliferative cellular responses to TCDD and tryptophan is discussed briefly.

  5. The crystal structure of oxy hemoglobin from high oxygen affinity bird emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Mohamed Abubakkar, Mohamed H; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ponnuswamy, Mon Nanjappa G

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin is an honorary enzyme, a two-way respiratory carrier, transporting oxygen from the lungs to the tissues and facilitating the return transport of carbon dioxide. Hemoglobin has high affinity for oxygen and low affinity for carbon dioxide and other substances in the arterial circulation, whereas in the venous circulation these relative affinities are upturned. The oxygen affinity of hemoglobin increases with the fall in temperature and decreases with the increase in pH and 2, 3-bisphosphoglycerate; point mutations also affect the tetrameric arrangement and alter the oxygen affinity. Though several studies have revealed the specific reasons for the adaptation of increased oxygen affinity of avian hemoglobins at high-altitudes, further structural insights on hemoglobins from high oxygen affinity species are required to understand the detailed oxygen adaptation at the molecular level. Herein, we describe the structural investigation of hemoglobin from emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a high oxygen affinity bird. Hemoglobin from emu was purified using anion-exchange chromatography, crystallized and determined the structure in the oxy form at a resolution of 2.3 Å; the R-factor of the model was 19.2%. The structure was compared with other oxy hemoglobins of high oxygen affinity avian species; significant changes are noted at intra-subunit contacts which provide the clues for increased oxygen affinity of emu hemoglobin. PMID:25146185

  6. Deformation of supersymmetric and conformal quantum mechanics through affine transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav

    1993-01-01

    Affine transformations (dilatations and translations) are used to define a deformation of one-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Resulting physical systems do not have conserved charges and degeneracies in the spectra. Instead, superpartner Hamiltonians are q-isospectral, i.e. the spectrum of one can be obtained from another (with possible exception of the lowest level) by q(sup 2)-factor scaling. This construction allows easily to rederive a special self-similar potential found by Shabat and to show that for the latter a q-deformed harmonic oscillator algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane serves as the spectrum generating algebra. A general class of potentials related to the quantum conformal algebra su(sub q)(1,1) is described. Further possibilities for q-deformation of known solvable potentials are outlined.

  7. Robust template matching for affine resistant image watermarks.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S; Pun, T

    2000-01-01

    Digital watermarks have been proposed as a method for discouraging illicit copying and distribution of copyrighted material. This paper describes a method for the secure and robust copyright protection of digital images. We present an approach for embedding a digital watermark into an image using the Fourier transform. To this watermark is added a template in the Fourier transform domain to render the method robust against general linear transformations. We detail a new algorithm based on polar maps for the accurate and efficient recovery of the template in an image which has undergone a general affine transformation. We also present results which demonstrate the robustness of the method against some common image processing operations such as compression, rotation, scaling, and aspect ratio changes. PMID:18255481

  8. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  9. Hausdorff Dimension for Randomly Perturbed Self Affine Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Thomas; Pollicott, Mark; Simon, Károly

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we shall consider a self-affine iterated function system in mathbb{R}^d, d ≥ 2, where we allow a small random translation at each application of the contractions. We compute the dimension of a typical attractor of the resulting random iterated function system, complementing a famous deterministic result of Falconer, which necessarily requires restrictions on the norms of the contraction. However, our result has the advantage that we do not need to impose any additional assumptions on the norms. This is of benefit in practical applications, where such perturbations would correspond to the effect of random noise. We also give analogous results for the dimension of ergodic measures (in terms of their Lyapunov dimension). Finally, we apply our method to a problem originating in the theory of fractal image compression.

  10. The anatomy, affinity, and phylogenetic significance of Markuelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xi-Ping; Donoghue, Philip C J; Cunningham, John A; Liu, Jian-Bo; Cheng, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The fossil record provides a paucity of data on the development of extinct organisms, particularly for their embryology. The recovery of fossilized embryos heralds new insight into the evolution of development but advances are limited by an almost complete absence of phylogenetic constraint. Markuelia is an exception to this, known from cleavage and pre-hatchling stages as a vermiform and profusely annulated direct-developing bilaterian with terminal circumoral and posterior radial arrays of spines. Phylogenetic analyses have hitherto suggested assignment to stem-Scalidophora (phyla Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Priapulida). We test this assumption with additional data and through the inclusion of additional taxa. The available evidence supports stem-Scalidophora affinity, leading to the conclusion that scalidophorans, cyclonerualians, and ecdysozoans are primitive direct developers, and the likelihood that scalidophorans are primitively metameric. PMID:16174039

  11. 3D affine registration using teaching-learning based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Ashish; Savsani, Vimal; Pandya, Abhijit

    2013-09-01

    3D image registration is an emerging research field in the study of computer vision. In this paper, two effective global optimization methods are considered for the 3D registration of point clouds. Experiments were conducted by applying each algorithm and their performance was evaluated with respect to rigidity, similarity and affine transformations. Comparison of algorithms and its effectiveness was tested for the average performance to find the global solution for minimizing the error in the terms of distance between the model cloud and the data cloud. The parameters for the transformation matrix were considered as the design variables. Further comparisons of the considered methods were done for the computational effort, computational time and the convergence of the algorithm. The results reveal that the use of TLBO was outstanding for image processing application involving 3D registration. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  13. Chelators whose affinity for calcium is decreased by illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Roger Y. (Inventor); Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz (Inventor); Minta, Akwasi (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention discloses a group of calcium chelating compounds which have a descreased affinity for calcium following illumination. These new compounds contain a photolabile nitrobenzyl derivative coupled to a tetracarboxylate Ca.sup.2+ chelating parent compound having the octacoordinate chelating groups characteristic of EGTA or BAPTA. In a first form, the new compounds are comprised of a BAPTA-like chelator coupled to a single 2-nitrobenzyl derivative, which in turn is a photochemical precursor of a 2-nitrosobenzophenone. In a second form, the new compounds are comprised of a BAPTA-like chelator coupled to two 2-nitrobenzyl derivatives, themselves photochemical prcursors of the related 2-nitrosobenzophenones. The present invention also discloses a novel method for preparing 1-hydroxy- or 1-alkoxy-1-(2-nitroaryl)-1-aryl methanes. Methanes of this type are critical to the preparation of, or actually constitute, the photolabile Ca.sup.2+ chelating compounds disclosed and claimed herein.

  14. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  15. Search for Amyloid-Binding Proteins by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    ‘Amyloid binging proteins’ is a generic term used to designate proteins that interact with different forms of amyloidogenic peptides or proteins and that, as a result, may modulate their physiological and pathological functions by altering solubility, transport, clearance, degradation, and fibril formation. We describe a simple affinity chromatography protocol to isolate and characterize amyloid-binding proteins based on the use of sequential elution steps that may provide further information on the type of binding interaction. As an example, we depict the application of this protocol to the study of Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) peptide-binding proteins derived from human plasma. Biochemical analysis of the proteins eluted under different conditions identified serum amyloid P component (SAP) and apolipoprotein J (clusterin) as the main plasma Aβ-binding proteins while various apolipoproteins (apoA-IV, apoE, and apoA-I), as well as albumin (HSA) and fibulin were identified as minor contributors. PMID:22528093

  16. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  17. Political ideology: its structure, functions, and elective affinities.

    PubMed

    Jost, John T; Federico, Christopher M; Napier, Jaime L

    2009-01-01

    Ideology has re-emerged as an important topic of inquiry among social, personality, and political psychologists. In this review, we examine recent theory and research concerning the structure, contents, and functions of ideological belief systems. We begin by defining the construct and placing it in historical and philosophical context. We then examine different perspectives on how many (and what types of) dimensions individuals use to organize their political opinions. We investigate (a) how and to what extent individuals acquire the discursive contents associated with various ideologies, and (b) the social-psychological functions that these ideologies serve for those who adopt them. Our review highlights "elective affinities" between situational and dispositional needs of individuals and groups and the structure and contents of specific ideologies. Finally, we consider the consequences of ideology, especially with respect to attitudes, evaluations, and processes of system justification. PMID:19035826

  18. Affinity sensor based on immobilized molecular imprinted synthetic recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Pieterjan; De Saeger, Sarah; Mattiasson, Bo; Hedström, Martin

    2015-07-15

    An affinity sensor based on capacitive transduction was developed to detect a model compound, metergoline, in a continuous flow system. This system simulates the monitoring of low-molecular weight organic compounds in natural flowing waters, i.e. rivers and streams. During operation in such scenarios, control of the experimental parameters is not possible, which poses a true analytical challenge. A two-step approach was used to produce a sensor for metergoline. Submicron spherical molecularly imprinted polymers, used as recognition elements, were obtained through emulsion polymerization and subsequently coupled to the sensor surface by electropolymerization. This way, a robust and reusable sensor was obtained that regenerated spontaneously under the natural conditions in a river. Small organic compounds could be analyzed in water without manipulating the binding or regeneration conditions, thereby offering a viable tool for on-site application. PMID:25703726

  19. A Mechanism for Actin Filament Severing by Malaria Parasite Actin Depolymerizing Factor 1 via a Low Affinity Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Webb, Andrew I.; Olshina, Maya A.; Infusini, Giuseppe; Tan, Yan Hong; Hanssen, Eric; Catimel, Bruno; Suarez, Cristian; Condron, Melanie; Angrisano, Fiona; NebI, Thomas; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2014-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilins are essential regulators of actin turnover in eukaryotic cells. These multifunctional proteins facilitate both stabilization and severing of filamentous (F)-actin in a concentration-dependent manner. At high concentrations ADF/cofilins bind stably to F-actin longitudinally between two adjacent actin protomers forming what is called a decorative interaction. Low densities of ADF/cofilins, in contrast, result in the optimal severing of the filament. To date, how these two contrasting modalities are achieved by the same protein remains uncertain. Here, we define the proximate amino acids between the actin filament and the malaria parasite ADF/cofilin, PfADF1 from Plasmodium falciparum. PfADF1 is unique among ADF/cofilins in being able to sever F-actin but do so without stable filament binding. Using chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) combined with structure reconstruction we describe a previously overlooked binding interface on the actin filament targeted by PfADF1. This site is distinct from the known binding site that defines decoration. Furthermore, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of single actin filaments confirms that this novel low affinity site is required for F-actin severing. Exploring beyond malaria parasites, selective blocking of the decoration site with human cofilin (HsCOF1) using cytochalasin D increases its severing rate. HsCOF1 may therefore also use a decoration-independent site for filament severing. Thus our data suggest that a second, low affinity actin-binding site may be universally used by ADF/cofilins for actin filament severing. PMID:24371134

  20. Application of a New Dual Localization-Affinity Purification Tag Reveals Novel Aspects of Protein Kinase Biology in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi occupy critical environmental niches and have numerous beneficial industrial applications but devastating effects as pathogens and agents of food spoilage. As regulators of essentially all biological processes protein kinases have been intensively studied but how they regulate the often unique biology of filamentous fungi is not completely understood. Significant understanding of filamentous fungal biology has come from the study of the model organism Aspergillus nidulans using a combination of molecular genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and genomic approaches. Here we describe dual localization-affinity purification (DLAP) tags enabling endogenous N or C-terminal protein tagging for localization and biochemical studies in A. nidulans. To establish DLAP tag utility we endogenously tagged 17 protein kinases for analysis by live cell imaging and affinity purification. Proteomic analysis of purifications by mass spectrometry confirmed association of the CotA and NimXCdk1 kinases with known binding partners and verified a predicted interaction of the SldABub1/R1 spindle assembly checkpoint kinase with SldBBub3. We demonstrate that the single TOR kinase of A. nidulans locates to vacuoles and vesicles, suggesting that the function of endomembranes as major TOR cellular hubs is conserved in filamentous fungi. Comparative analysis revealed 7 kinases with mitotic specific locations including An-Cdc7 which unexpectedly located to mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs), the first such localization described for this family of DNA replication kinases. We show that the SepH septation kinase locates to SPBs specifically in the basal region of apical cells in a biphasic manner during mitosis and again during septation. This results in gradients of SepH between G1 SPBs which shift along hyphae as each septum forms. We propose that SepH regulates the septation initiation network (SIN) specifically at SPBs in the basal region of G1 cells and that localized gradients