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Sample records for affinity purification-mass spectrometry

  1. Solid support resins and affinity purification mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Havis, Spencer; Moree, Wilna J; Mali, Sujina; Bark, Steven J

    2017-02-28

    Co-affinity purification-mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a primary technology for elucidating the protein-protein interactions that form the basis of all biological processes. A critical component of CoAP-MS is the affinity purification (AP) of the bait protein, usually by immobilization of an antibody to a solid-phase resin. This Minireview discusses common resins, reagents, tagging methods, and their consideration for successful AP of tagged proteins. We discuss our experiences with different solid supports, their impact in AP experiments, and propose areas where chemistry can advance this important technology.

  2. Scoring Large Scale Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Datasets with MIST

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, Erik; Von Dollen, John; Cimermancic, Peter; Gulbahce, Natali; Sali, Andrej; Krogan, Nevan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments can identify a large number of protein interactions but only a fraction of these interactions are biologically relevant. Here, we describe a comprehensive computational strategy to process raw AP-MS data, perform quality controls and prioritize biologically relevant bait-prey pairs in a set of replicated AP-MS experiments with Mass spectrometry interaction STatistics (MiST). The MiST score is a linear combination of prey quantity (abundance), abundance invariability across repeated experiments (reproducibility), and prey uniqueness relative to other baits (specificity); We describe how to run the full MiST analysis pipeline in an R environment and discuss a number of configurable options that allow the lay user to convert any large-scale AP-MS data into an interpretable, biologically relevant protein-protein interaction network. PMID:25754993

  3. Observations on different resin strategies for affinity purification mass spectrometry of a tagged protein.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sujina; Moree, Wilna J; Mitchell, Morgan; Widger, William; Bark, Steven J

    2016-12-15

    Co-affinity purification mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a highly effective method for identifying protein complexes from a biological sample and inferring important interactions, but the impact of the solid support is usually not considered in design of such experiments. Affinity purification (AP) experiments typically utilize a bait protein expressing a peptide tag such as FLAG, c-Myc, HA or V5 and high affinity antibodies to these peptide sequences to facilitate isolation of a bait protein to co-purify interacting proteins. We observed significant variability for isolation of tagged bait proteins between Protein A/G Agarose, Protein G Dynabeads, and AminoLink resins. While previous research identified the importance of tag sequence and their location, crosslinking procedures, reagents, dilution, and detergent concentrations, the effect of the resin itself has not been considered. Our data suggest the type of solid support is important and, under the conditions of our experiments, AminoLink resin provided a more robust solid-support platform for AP-MS.

  4. Affinity purification-mass spectrometry and network analysis to understand protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Morris, John H; Knudsen, Giselle M; Verschueren, Erik; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Cimermancic, Peter; Greninger, Alexander L; Pico, Alexander R

    2014-11-01

    By determining protein-protein interactions in normal, diseased and infected cells, we can improve our understanding of cellular systems and their reaction to various perturbations. In this protocol, we discuss how to use data obtained in affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments to generate meaningful interaction networks and effective figures. We begin with an overview of common epitope tagging, expression and AP practices, followed by liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS) data collection. We then provide a detailed procedure covering a pipeline approach to (i) pre-processing the data by filtering against contaminant lists such as the Contaminant Repository for Affinity Purification (CRAPome) and normalization using the spectral index (SIN) or normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF); (ii) scoring via methods such as MiST, SAInt and CompPASS; and (iii) testing the resulting scores. Data formats familiar to MS practitioners are then transformed to those most useful for network-based analyses. The protocol also explores methods available in Cytoscape to visualize and analyze these types of interaction data. The scoring pipeline can take anywhere from 1 d to 1 week, depending on one's familiarity with the tools and data peculiarities. Similarly, the network analysis and visualization protocol in Cytoscape takes 2-4 h to complete with the provided sample data, but we recommend taking days or even weeks to explore one's data and find the right questions.

  5. Using ProHits to store, annotate, and analyze affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guomin; Zhang, Jianping; Choi, Hyungwon; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Srikumar, Tharan; Larsen, Brett; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Raught, Brian; Tyers, Mike; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2012-09-01

    Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is a robust technique used to identify protein-protein interactions. With recent improvements in sample preparation, and dramatic advances in MS instrumentation speed and sensitivity, this technique is becoming more widely used throughout the scientific community. To meet the needs of research groups both large and small, we have developed software solutions for tracking, scoring and analyzing AP-MS data. Here, we provide details for the installation and utilization of ProHits, a Laboratory Information Management System designed specifically for AP-MS interaction proteomics. This protocol explains: (i) how to install the complete ProHits system, including modules for the management of mass spectrometry files and the analysis of interaction data, and (ii) alternative options for the use of pre-existing search results in simpler versions of ProHits, including a virtual machine implementation of our ProHits Lite software. We also describe how to use the main features of the software to analyze AP-MS data.

  6. Using ProHits to store, annotate and analyze affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guomin; Zhang, Jianping; Choi, Hyungwon; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Srikumar, Tharan; Larsen, Brett; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Raught, Brian; Tyers, Mike; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is a robust technique used to identify protein-protein interactions. With recent improvements in sample preparation, and dramatic advances in MS instrumentation speed and sensitivity, this technique is becoming more widely used throughout the scientific community. To meet the needs of research groups both large and small, we have developed software solutions for tracking, scoring and analyzing AP-MS data. Here, we provide details for the installation and utilization of ProHits, a Laboratory Information Management System designed specifically for AP-MS interaction proteomics. This protocol explains: (i) how to install the complete ProHits system, including modules for the management of mass spectrometry files and the analysis of interaction data, and (ii) alternative options for the use of pre-existing search results in simpler versions of ProHits, including a virtual machine implementation of our ProHits Lite software. We also describe how to use the main features of the software to analyze AP-MS data. PMID:22948730

  7. PIPINO: A Software Package to Facilitate the Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions from Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Schildbach, Stefan; Blumert, Conny; Horn, Friedemann; von Bergen, Martin; Labudde, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of most proteins is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Hence, the comprehensive characterization of the interactome is the next milestone on the path to understand the biochemistry of the cell. A powerful method to detect protein-protein interactions is a combination of coimmunoprecipitation or affinity purification with quantitative mass spectrometry. Nevertheless, both methods tend to precipitate a high number of background proteins due to nonspecific interactions. To address this challenge the software Protein-Protein-Interaction-Optimizer (PIPINO) was developed to perform an automated data analysis, to facilitate the selection of bona fide binding partners, and to compare the dynamic of interaction networks. In this study we investigated the STAT1 interaction network and its activation dependent dynamics. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was applied to analyze the STAT1 interactome after streptavidin pull-down of biotagged STAT1 from human embryonic kidney 293T cells with and without activation. Starting from more than 2,000 captured proteins 30 potential STAT1 interaction partners were extracted. Interestingly, more than 50% of these were already reported or predicted to bind STAT1. Furthermore, 16 proteins were found to affect the binding behavior depending on STAT1 phosphorylation such as STAT3 or the importin subunits alpha 1 and alpha 6. PMID:26966684

  8. Interactome analysis of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α1 and -β1 in INS-1 pancreatic beta-cells by affinity purification-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sungyoon; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Jin, Jonghwa; Ho, Won-Kyung; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-03-14

    The heterotrimeric enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major metabolic factor that regulates the homeostasis of cellular energy. In particular, AMPK mediates the insulin resistance that is associated with type 2 diabetes. Generally, cellular processes require tight regulation of protein kinases, which is effected through their formation of complex with other proteins and substrates. Despite their critical function in regulation and pathogenesis, there are limited data on the interaction of protein kinases. To identify proteins that interact with AMPK, we performed large-scale affinity purification (AP)-mass spectrometry (MS) of the AMPK-α1 and -β1 subunits. Through a comprehensive analysis, using a combination of immunoprecipitaion and ion trap mass spectrometry, we identified 381 unique proteins in the AMPKα/β interactomes: 325 partners of AMPK-α1 and 243 for AMPK-β1. Further, we identified 196 novel protein-protein interactions with AMPK-α1 and AMPK-β1. Notably, in our bioinformatics analysis, the novel interaction partners mediated functions that are related to the regulation of actin organization. Specifically, several such proteins were linked to pancreatic beta-cell functions, including glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, beta-cell development, beta-cell differentiation, and cell-cell communication.

  9. Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-coupled Affinity Purification/Mass Spectrometry Analysis Revealed a Novel Role of Neurofibromin in mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Gao, Min; Choi, Jong Min; Kim, Beom-Jun; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Zhen; Jain, Antrix N; Jung, Sung Yun; Yuan, Jingsong; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Yi; Chen, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Neurofibromin (NF1) is a well known tumor suppressor that is commonly mutated in cancer patients. It physically interacts with RAS and negatively regulates RAS GTPase activity. Despite the importance of NF1 in cancer, a high quality endogenous NF1 interactome has yet to be established. In this study, we combined clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated gene knock-out technology with affinity purification using antibodies against endogenous proteins, followed by mass spectrometry analysis, to sensitively and accurately detect NF1 protein-protein interactions in unaltered in vivo settings. Using this system, we analyzed endogenous NF1-associated protein complexes and identified 49 high-confidence candidate interaction proteins, including RAS and other functionally relevant proteins. Through functional validation, we found that NF1 negatively regulates mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling (mTOR) in a LAMTOR1-dependent manner. In addition, the cell growth and survival of NF1-deficient cells have become dependent on hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway, and the tumorigenic properties of these cells have become dependent on LAMTOR1. Taken together, our findings may provide novel insights into therapeutic approaches targeting NF1-deficient tumors. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. An Inducible Retroviral Expression System for Tandem Affinity Purification Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Identifies Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-like Protein (MLKL) as an Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Client*

    PubMed Central

    Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Fauster, Astrid; Rebsamen, Manuele; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Scorzoni, Stefania; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Müller, André C.; Gstaiger, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification–mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is a popular strategy for the identification of protein–protein interactions, characterization of protein complexes, and entire networks. Its employment in cellular settings best fitting the relevant physiology is limited by convenient expression vector systems. We developed an easy-to-handle, inducible, dually selectable retroviral expression vector allowing dose- and time-dependent control of bait proteins bearing the efficient streptavidin-hemagglutinin (SH)-tag at their N- or C termini. Concomitant expression of a reporter fluorophore allows to monitor bait-expressing cells by flow cytometry or microscopy and enables high-throughput phenotypic assays. We used the system to successfully characterize the interactome of the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) Gly12Asp (G12D) mutant and exploited the advantage of reporter fluorophore expression by tracking cytokine-independent cell growth using flow cytometry. Moreover, we tested the feasibility of studying cytotoxicity-mediating proteins with the vector system on the cell death-inducing mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) Ser358Asp (S358D) mutant. Interaction proteomics analysis of MLKL Ser358Asp (S358D) identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a high-confidence interacting protein. Further phenotypic characterization established MLKL as a novel HSP90 client. In summary, this novel inducible expression system enables SH-tag-based interaction studies in the cell line proficient for the respective phenotypic or signaling context and constitutes a valuable tool for experimental approaches requiring inducible or traceable protein expression. PMID:26933192

  11. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Targeting Synaptic Pathology with a Novel Affinity Mass Spectrometry Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmalm, Ann; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Honer, William G.; Moreno, Julie A.; Jakobsson, Joel; Mallucci, Giovanna R.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Öhrfelt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel strategy for studying synaptic pathology by concurrently measuring levels of four SNARE complex proteins from individual brain tissue samples. This method combines affinity purification and mass spectrometry and can be applied directly for studies of SNARE complex proteins in multiple species or modified to target other key elements in neuronal function. We use the technique to demonstrate altered levels of presynaptic proteins in Alzheimer disease patients and prion-infected mice. PMID:24973420

  13. Parallel Exploration of Interaction Space by BioID and Affinity Purification Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Youn, Ji-Young; Samavarchi-Tehrani, Payman; Raught, Brian; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Complete understanding of cellular function requires knowledge of the composition and dynamics of protein interaction networks, the importance of which spans all molecular cell biology fields. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches are instrumental in this process, with affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) now widely used for defining interaction landscapes. Traditional AP-MS methods are well suited to providing information regarding the temporal aspects of soluble protein-protein interactions, but the requirement to maintain protein-protein interactions during cell lysis and AP means that both weak-affinity interactions and spatial information is lost. A more recently developed method called BioID employs the expression of bait proteins fused to a nonspecific biotin ligase, BirA*, that induces in vivo biotinylation of proximal proteins. Coupling this method to biotin affinity enrichment and mass spectrometry negates many of the solubility and interaction strength issues inherent in traditional AP-MS methods, and provides unparalleled spatial context for protein interactions. Here we describe the parallel implementation of both BioID and FLAG AP-MS allowing simultaneous exploration of both spatial and temporal aspects of protein interaction networks.

  14. Identification of Evening Complex Associated Proteins in Arabidopsis by Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhouxin; Kay, Steve A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species possess an endogenous circadian clock to synchronize internal physiology with an oscillating external environment. In plants, the circadian clock coordinates growth, metabolism and development over daily and seasonal time scales. Many proteins in the circadian network form oscillating complexes that temporally regulate myriad processes, including signal transduction, transcription, protein degradation and post-translational modification. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a tripartite complex composed of EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4), EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3), and LUX ARRHYTHMO (LUX), named the evening complex, modulates daily rhythms in gene expression and growth through transcriptional regulation. However, little is known about the physical interactions that connect the circadian system to other pathways. We used affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) methods to identify proteins that associate with the evening complex in A. thaliana. New connections within the circadian network as well as to light signaling pathways were identified, including linkages between the evening complex, TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1), TIME FOR COFFEE (TIC), all phytochromes and TANDEM ZINC KNUCKLE/PLUS3 (TZP). Coupling genetic mutation with affinity purifications tested the roles of phytochrome B (phyB), EARLY FLOWERING 4, and EARLY FLOWERING 3 as nodes connecting the evening complex to clock and light signaling pathways. These experiments establish a hierarchical association between pathways and indicate direct and indirect interactions. Specifically, the results suggested that EARLY FLOWERING 3 and phytochrome B act as hubs connecting the clock and red light signaling pathways. Finally, we characterized a clade of associated nuclear kinases that regulate circadian rhythms, growth, and flowering in A. thaliana. Coupling mass spectrometry and genetics is a powerful method to rapidly and directly identify novel components and connections within and between complex signaling

  15. Sodium Cation Affinities of Commonly Used MALDI Matrices Determined by Guided Ion Beam Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinthaka, S. D. M.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2012-04-01

    The sodium cation affinities of six commonly used MALDI matrices are determined here using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The collision-induced dissociation behavior of six sodium cationized MALDI matrices, Na+(MALDI), with Xe is studied as a function of kinetic energy. The MALDI matrices examined here include: nicotinic acid, quinoline, 3-aminoquinoline, 4-nitroaniline, picolinic acid, and 3-hydroxypicolinic acid. In all cases, the primary dissociation pathway corresponds to endothermic loss of the intact MALDI matrix. The cross section thresholds are interpreted to yield zero and 298 K Na+-MALDI bond dissociation energies (BDEs), or sodium cation affinities, after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-neutral collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and dissociation lifetimes. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G* and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G* levels of theory are used to characterized the structures and energetics for these systems. The calculated BDEs exhibit very good agreement with the measured values for most systems. The experimental and theoretical Na+-MALDI BDEs determined here are compared with those previously measured by cation transfer equilibrium methods.

  16. Ultrafiltration Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Estrogens for Characterization of Structure and Affinity for Human Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongkai; Gu, Chungang; Liu, Xuemei; Liang, Wenzhong; Yao, Ping; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    Although hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is used by post-menopausal women for the relief of menopausal symptoms and the potential reduction of osteoporosis, HRT also increases their risk of Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer. Since the majority of these effects are associated primarily with estrogen binding to only one of the estrogen receptors (ER), new assays are needed that can more efficiently evaluate ER-binding and identify ligands selective for ER-α and ER-β. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was combined with ultrafiltration as a new method to investigate the relative binding of compounds to the ERs and to evaluate the structures of these estrogens. Mixtures of estradiol and six equine estrogens including equilin, equilenin, 8,9-dehydroestrone, and their 17β-hydroxyl derivatives were assayed simultaneously to determine their relative binding to human ER-α and ER-β. Estrogens containing a 17β-OH group were found to have higher relative affinities for the estrogen receptors than their ketone analogs. In addition, 17β-EN showed selectivity for binding to ER-β over ER-α. The results were compared to the IC50 values obtained by using a conventional radiolabled estradiol competitive binding assay. Finally, the utility of negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for the unambiguous identification these estrogen isomers was investigated. Several characteristic recyclization pathways during tandem mass spectrometry were identified, which might be useful for distinguishing related estrogens. PMID:15694777

  17. Binding constant determination of high-affinity protein-ligand complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ligand competition.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Arno; Jecklin, Matthias C; Touboul, David; Badertscher, Martin; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-05-01

    We describe an approach for the determination of binding constants for protein-ligand complexes with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, based on the observation of unbound ligands competing for binding to a protein target. For the first time, dissociation constants lower than picomolar could be determined with good accuracy by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The presented methodology relies only on the determination of signal intensity ratios for free ligands in the low mass region. Therefore, all the advantages of measuring low masses with mass spectrometry, such as high resolution are preserved. By using a reference ligand with known binding affinity, the affinity of a second ligand can be determined. Since no noncovalently bound species are observed, assumptions about response factors are not necessary. The method is validated with ligands binding to avidin and applied to ligands binding to p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  18. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial ribosomes: affinity purification and component identification by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zíková, Alena; Panigrahi, Aswini K; Dalley, Rachel A; Acestor, Nathalie; Anupama, Atashi; Ogata, Yuko; Myler, Peter J; Stuart, Kenneth

    2008-07-01

    Although eukaryotic mitochondrial (mt) ribosomes evolved from a putative prokaryotic ancestor their compositions vary considerably among organisms. We determined the protein composition of tandem affinity-purified Trypanosoma brucei mt ribosomes by mass spectrometry and identified 133 proteins of which 77 were associated with the large subunit and 56 were associated with the small subunit. Comparisons with bacterial and mammalian mt ribosomal proteins identified T. brucei mt homologs of L2-4, L7/12, L9, L11, L13-17, L20-24, L27-30, L33, L38, L43, L46, L47, L49, L52, S5, S6, S8, S9, S11, S15-18, S29, and S34, although the degree of conservation varied widely. Sequence characteristics of some of the component proteins indicated apparent functions in rRNA modification and processing, protein assembly, and mitochondrial metabolism implying possible additional roles for these proteins. Nevertheless most of the identified proteins have no homology outside Kinetoplastida implying very low conservation and/or a divergent function in kinetoplastid mitochondria.

  19. Mapping differential interactomes by affinity purification coupled with data independent mass spectrometry acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Ivosev, Gordana; Couzens, Amber L.; Larsen, Brett; Taipale, Mikko; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Zhong, Quan; Lindquist, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Pawson, Tony; Bonner, Ron; Tate, Stephen; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing changes in protein-protein interactions associated with sequence variants (e.g. disease-associated mutations or splice forms) or following exposure to drugs, growth factors or hormones is critical to understanding how protein complexes are built, localized and regulated. Affinity purification (AP) coupled with mass spectrometry permits the analysis of protein interactions under near-physiological conditions, yet monitoring interaction changes requires the development of a robust and sensitive quantitative approach, especially for large-scale studies where cost and time are major considerations. To this end, we have coupled AP to data-independent mass spectrometric acquisition (SWATH), and implemented an automated data extraction and statistical analysis pipeline to score modulated interactions. Here, we use AP-SWATH to characterize changes in protein-protein interactions imparted by the HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 or melanoma-associated mutations in the human kinase CDK4. We show that AP-SWATH is a robust label-free approach to characterize such changes, and propose a scalable pipeline for systems biology studies. PMID:24162924

  20. Affinity Selection-Mass Spectrometry Identifies a Novel Antibacterial RNA Polymerase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Walker, Scott S; Degen, David; Nickbarg, Elliott; Carr, Donna; Soriano, Aileen; Mandal, Mihir; Painter, Ronald E; Sheth, Payal; Xiao, Li; Sher, Xinwei; Murgolo, Nicholas; Su, Jing; Olsen, David B; Ebright, Richard H; Young, Katherine

    2017-03-31

    The growing prevalence of drug resistant bacteria is a significant global threat to human health. The antibacterial drug rifampin, which functions by inhibiting bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), is an important part of the antibacterial armamentarium. Here, in order to identify novel inhibitors of bacterial RNAP, we used affinity-selection mass spectrometry to screen a chemical library for compounds that bind to Escherichia coli RNAP. We identified a novel small molecule, MRL-436, that binds to RNAP, inhibits RNAP, and exhibits antibacterial activity. MRL-436 binds to RNAP through a binding site that differs from the rifampin binding site, inhibits rifampin-resistant RNAP derivatives, and exhibits antibacterial activity against rifampin-resistant strains. Isolation of mutants resistant to the antibacterial activity of MRL-436 yields a missense mutation in codon 622 of the rpoC gene encoding the RNAP β' subunit or a null mutation in the rpoZ gene encoding the RNAP ω subunit, confirming that RNAP is the functional cellular target for the antibacterial activity of MRL-436, and indicating that RNAP β' subunit residue 622 and the RNAP ω subunit are required for the antibacterial activity of MRL-436. Similarity between the resistance determinant for MRL-436 and the resistance determinant for the cellular alarmone ppGpp suggests a possible similarity in binding site and/or induced conformational state for MRL-436 and ppGpp.

  1. Epitope structure and binding affinity of single chain llama anti-β-amyloid antibodies revealed by proteolytic excision affinity-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paraschiv, Gabriela; Vincke, Cécile; Czaplewska, Paulina; Manea, Marilena; Muyldermans, Serge; Przybylski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ß-Amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for reducing the level of Aß in brain. New immunological approaches have been recently proposed for rapid, early diagnosis, and molecular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases related to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The combination of proteolytic epitope excision and extraction and mass spectrometry using digestion with various proteases has been shown to be an efficient tool for the identification and molecular characterization of antigenic determinants. Here, we report the identification of the Aβ epitope recognized by the variable domain of single chain llama anti-Aβ-antibodies, termed Aβ-nanobodies, that have been discovered in the blood of camelids and found to be promising candidates for immunotherapy of AD. The epitope recognized by two Aβ-specific nanobodies was identified by proteolytic epitope extraction- and excision-mass spectrometry using a series of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, GluC-protease, and LysC-protease). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--mass spectrometric analysis of the affinity--elution fraction provided the epitope, Aβ(17-28), in the mid- to carboxy-terminal domain of Aβ, which has been shown to exert an Aß-fibril inhibiting effect. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope confirmed that the Aβ(17-28) peptide is the minimal fragment that binds to the nanobodies. The interactions between the nanobodies and full length Aβ(1-40) or Aβ-peptides containing or lacking the epitope sequence were further characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and bioaffinity analysis. Determinations of binding affinities between the Aβ-nanobodies and Aβ(1-40) and the Aβ(17-28) epitope provided K(D) values of approximately 150 and 700 nmol, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of the epitope may be highly useful for future studies of Aβ-aggregation (oligomerization and fibril formation) and for designing new aggregation inhibitors.

  2. Comparative Study of Three Methods for Affinity Measurements: Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled with UV Detection and Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Gleb G.; Logie, Jennifer; Okhonin, Victor; Renaud, Justin B.; Mayer, Paul M.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2012-07-01

    We present affinity capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ACE-MS) as a comprehensive separation technique for label-free solution-based affinity analysis. The application of ACE-MS for measuring affinity constants between eight small molecule drugs [ibuprofen, s-flurbiprofen, diclofenac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, folic acid, resveratrol, and 4,4'-(propane-1,3-diyl) dibenzoic acid] and β-cyclodextrin is described. We couple on-line ACE with MS to combine the separation and kinetic capability of ACE together with the molecular weight and structural elucidation of MS in one system. To understand the full potential of ACE-MS, we compare it with two other methods: Direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and ACE with UV detection (ACE-UV). After the evaluation, DIMS provides less reliable equilibrium dissociation constants than separation-based ACE-UV and ACE-MS, and cannot be used solely for the study of noncovalent interactions. ACE-MS determines apparent dissociation constants for all reacting small molecules in a mixture, even in cases when drugs overlap with each other during separation. The ability of ACE-MS to interact, separate, and rapidly scan through m/z can facilitate the simultaneous affinity analysis of multiple interacting pairs, potentially leading to the high-throughput screening of drug candidates.

  3. When is Mass Spectrometry Combined with Affinity Approaches Essential? A Case Study of Tyrosine Nitration in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Brînduşa-Alina; Ulrich, Martina; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Bernevic, Bogdan; Moise, Adrian; Döring, Gerd; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration in proteins occurs under physiologic conditions and is increased at disease conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease. Identification and quantification of tyrosine-nitrations are crucial for understanding nitration mechanism(s) and their functional consequences. Mass spectrometry (MS) is best suited to identify nitration sites, but is hampered by low stabilities and modification levels and possible structural changes induced by nitration. In this insight, we discuss methods for identifying and quantifying nitration sites by proteolytic affinity extraction using nitrotyrosine (NT)-specific antibodies, in combination with electrospray-MS. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by identification of specific nitration sites in two proteins in eosinophil granules from several biological samples, eosinophil-cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). Affinity extraction combined with Edman sequencing enabled the quantification of nitration levels, which were found to be 8 % and 15 % for ECP and EDN, respectively. Structure modeling utilizing available crystal structures and affinity studies using synthetic NT-peptides suggest a tyrosine nitration sequence motif comprising positively charged residues in the vicinity of the NT- residue, located at specific surface- accessible sites of the protein structure. Affinities of Tyr-nitrated peptides from ECP and EDN to NT-antibodies, determined by online bioaffinity- MS, provided nanomolar KD values. In contrast, false-positive identifications of nitrations were obtained in proteins from cystic fibrosis patients upon using NT-specific antibodies, and were shown to be hydroxy-tyrosine modifications. These results demonstrate affinity- mass spectrometry approaches to be essential for unequivocal identification of biological tyrosine nitrations.

  4. Alkali-cation affinities of polyoxyethylene dodecylethers and helical conformations of their cationized molecules studied by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Hirajima, Rui; Morigaki, Ken; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Relative alkali-cation affinity of polyoxyethylene (POE) dodecylethers in gas phase was studied by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry using dodecylether-poly-ethoxylate (C(12)EO:n, "n" denotes ethyleneoxide unit number) nonionic surfactants, and possible helical conformations of the cationized molecules were demonstrated. The alkali-cation affinity highly depended on the cation diameters. The mass spectra of C(12)EO:8 cationized by alkali-metal ions were dominated by potassiated molecules. The results indicated that the POE moiety could have specific affinity to K(+) ions based on a host-guest interaction between POE helix and potassium ions. This is very similar to the relationships between 18-crown-6 and K(+). The ESI mass spectra exhibited the multiply cationized C(12)EO:n in addition to the singly cationized molecules. The critical EO unit numbers necessary for producing the multiply-charged cationized molecules also depended on the cation diameters. In addition, the POE surfactants highly preferred alkali cations to proton. The results were strongly supported by molecular mechanics/dynamics calculations. A helical conformation of the POE moiety of C(12)EO:15 including two K(+) ions gave a potential minimum, while a lowest energy structure of the protonated molecule took irregular conformations due to the formation of local hydrogen bonds.

  5. Phosphopeptide screening using nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films as affinity matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization targets in mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niklew, Marie-Luise; Hochkirch, Ulrike; Melikyan, Anna; Moritz, Thomas; Kurzawski, Sandra; Schlüter, Hartmut; Ebner, Ingo; Linscheid, Michael W

    2010-02-01

    The use of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films as affinity targets for the selective isolation and enrichment of phosphopeptides with subsequent analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is described. A strong affinity of phosphopeptides to anatase titanium dioxide surfaces is observed, and a standard protocol for the selective isolation and enrichment of phosphopeptides on titanium dioxide films using a proteolytic digest of alpha- and beta-casein was developed. All washing and elution procedures using these films can be processed directly on the MALDI target, thereby avoiding sample contamination and losses. In addition, the enrichment of the phosphopeptides was improved due to a considerable enlargement of the surface. Several film substrates compatible with routine inlet systems of mass spectrometers, as conductive glass, aluminum, and silicon, have been manufactured and tested. A biological application was examined by the human fibrinogen-thrombin system. For a quantification and comparison of different expression levels of phosphoproteins in biological systems, the peptides were labeled with S-methyl thioimidate reagents. The capability of this method for high-throughput applications make the use of mesoporous titanium dioxide films as an affinity MALDI target a promising tool in phosphoproteomics. A combination of an amidation protocol showed that a quantification of phosphorylated peptides can easily be performed using TiO(2) films.

  6. Identification of protein complexes in Escherichia coli using sequential peptide affinity purification in combination with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Kagan, Olga; Guo, Hongbo; Greenblatt, Jack; Emili, Andrew

    2012-11-12

    Since most cellular processes are mediated by macromolecular assemblies, the systematic identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and the identification of the subunit composition of multi-protein complexes can provide insight into gene function and enhance understanding of biological systems(1, 2). Physical interactions can be mapped with high confidence vialarge-scale isolation and characterization of endogenous protein complexes under near-physiological conditions based on affinity purification of chromosomally-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry (APMS). This approach has been successfully applied in evolutionarily diverse organisms, including yeast, flies, worms, mammalian cells, and bacteria(1-6). In particular, we have generated a carboxy-terminal Sequential Peptide Affinity (SPA) dual tagging system for affinity-purifying native protein complexes from cultured gram-negative Escherichia coli, using genetically-tractable host laboratory strains that are well-suited for genome-wide investigations of the fundamental biology and conserved processes of prokaryotes(1, 2, 7). Our SPA-tagging system is analogous to the tandem affinity purification method developed originally for yeast(8, 9), and consists of a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP) followed by the cleavage site for the highly specific tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease and three copies of the FLAG epitope (3X FLAG), allowing for two consecutive rounds of affinity enrichment. After cassette amplification, sequence-specific linear PCR products encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker are integrated and expressed in frame as carboxy-terminal fusions in a DY330 background that is induced to transiently express a highly efficient heterologous bacteriophage lambda recombination system(10). Subsequent dual-step purification using calmodulin and anti-FLAG affinity beads enables the highly selective and efficient recovery of even low abundance protein complexes from large

  7. Recent advances in bacteria identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using nanomaterials as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tai-Chia

    2014-04-28

    Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided.

  8. Recent Advances in Bacteria Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Nanomaterials as Affinity Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tai-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided. PMID:24786089

  9. Purification and identification of water-soluble phosphopeptides from cheese using Fe(III) affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lund, Martin; Ardö, Ylva

    2004-10-20

    Water-soluble phosphopeptides from cheese were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Phosphopeptides from aqueous cheese extracts were completely retained on iminodiacetic acid (IDA) Sepharose equilibrated with FeCl3 and subsequently eluted with ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. Peptides in the eluate from the IMAC-Fe(III) column were identified using reversed phase liquid chromatography-electronic spray identification-tandem mass spectrometry. Phosphopeptides from two different cheeses were analyzed using the described method: a 10-month-old semihard Herrgard cheese made with mesophilic starter and a 24-month-old Parmigiano Reggiano cheese made with thermophilic starter. Elution of the IMAC-Fe(III) column with a gradient of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate resulted in three distinct peaks for Herrgard cheese corresponding to peptides carrying one, two, and four phosphorylated serine residues, respectively. Sixty-five different phosphopeptides were identified from the Herrgard, whereas only 9 from the Parmigiano Reggiano. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  10. Affinity depletion of plasma and serum for mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaros, Julian A J; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Protein biomarker discovery in blood plasma and serum is severely hampered by the vast dynamic range of the proteome. With protein concentrations spanning 12 orders of magnitude, conventional mass spectrometric analysis allows for detection of only a few low-abundance proteins. Prior depletion of high-abundant proteins from the sample can increase analytical depth considerably and has become a widely used practice. We describe in detail an affinity depletion method that selectively removes 14 of the most abundant proteins in plasma and serum.

  11. Enrichment and Analysis of Nonenzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2007-06-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that ETD fragmentation mode resulted in a significantly higher number of glycated peptide identifications (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing dual glycation enrichment on both the protein and peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS with ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analyses of glycated proteins and can have broad applications in studies of diabetes mellitus.

  12. Enrichment and Analysis of Non-enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W. C.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John W.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. ETD fragmentation mode permitted identification of a significantly higher number of glycated peptides (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing enrichment on first the protein and then the peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS and using ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analysis of glycated proteins and may have broad application in studies of diabetes mellitus. PMID:17488106

  13. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  14. Using mass spectrometry to study the photo-affinity labeling of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leriche, Tammy; Skorey, Kathryn; Roy, Patrick; McKay, Dan; Bateman, Kevin P.

    2004-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a potential target for the treatment of Type II diabetes and several companies are developing small molecule inhibitors of this enzyme. Part of the characterization of these compounds as PTP1B inhibitors is the understanding of how they bind in the enzyme active site. The use of photo-activated inhibitors that target the active site can provide such insight. This paper describes the characterization of a photoprobe directed at the active site of PTP1B. Mass spectrometry revealed the specific binding of the probe to the intact protein. Digestion of the labeled protein followed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS was used to show that the photoprobe binds to a specific active site amino acid. This was confirmed by comparison with the X-ray structure of PTP1B with a PTP1B inhibitor. The probe labels a conserved acidic residue (Asp) that is required for catalytic activity. This photoprobe may prove to be a useful tool for the development of a PTP1B inhibitor or for the study of PTPs in general.

  15. Relative binding affinities of integrin antagonists by equilibrium dialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tipping, William J; Tshuma, Nkazimulo; Adams, James; Haywood, Harvey T; Rowedder, James E; Fray, M Jonathan; McInally, Thomas; Macdonald, Simon J F; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-02-12

    The integrin αvβ6 is a potential target for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Equilibrium dialysis (ED) was investigated for its ability to report ligand binding in an αvβ6 inhibitor screening assay. As a preliminary experiment, an established peptidomimetic inhibitor of the integrin was dialyzed against αvβ6, and the fraction bound (f b) and percentage saturation determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Quantitation of the inhibitor in the two chambers of the ED cartridge revealed an uneven distribution in the presence of αvβ6, corresponding to near saturation binding to the protein (93 ± 3%), while the control (without integrin) showed an equal partitioning of the inhibitor on either side of the dialysis membrane. A competitive ED assay with a 12 component mixture of antagonists was conducted, and the results compared with an established cell adhesion assay for quantifying αvβ6 inhibition of individual antagonists. Compounds clustered into three groupings: those with pIC 50 values between ca. 5.0 and 5.5, which possessed ED f b values indistinguishable from the controls, those with pIC 50s of 6.5 ± 0.2, which exhibited detectable integrin binding (f b 13-25%) in the ED assay, and a single compound of pIC 50 7.2 possessing an f b value of 38%. A good correlation between ED-derived f b and pIC 50 was observed despite the two assays utilizing quite different outputs. These results demonstrate that ED with LC-MS detection shows promise as a rapid αvβ6 integrin antagonist screening assay for mixtures of putative ligands.

  16. Quantitative characterization of galectin-3-C affinity mass spectrometry measurements: Comprehensive data analysis, obstacles, shortcuts and robustness.

    PubMed

    Haramija, Marko; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2017-10-30

    Affinity mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging tool in the field of the study of protein•carbohydrate complexes. However, experimental obstacles and data analysis are preventing faster integration of AMS methods into the glycoscience field. Here we show how analysis of direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) AMS data can be simplified for screening purposes, even for complex AMS spectra. A direct ESI-MS assay was tested in this study and binding data for the galectin-3C•lactose complex were analyzed using a comprehensive and simplified data analysis approach. In the comprehensive data analysis approach, noise, all protein charge states, alkali ion adducts and signal overlap were taken into account. In a simplified approach, only the intensities of the fully protonated free protein and the protein•carbohydrate complex for the main protein charge state were taken into account. In our study, for high intensity signals, noise was negligible, sodiated protein and sodiated complex signals cancelled each other out when calculating the Kd value, and signal overlap influenced the Kd value only to a minor extent. Influence of these parameters on low intensity signals was much higher. However, low intensity protein charge states should be avoided in quantitative AMS analyses due to poor ion statistics. The results indicate that noise, alkali ion adducts, signal overlap, as well as low intensity protein charge states, can be neglected for preliminary experiments, as well as in screening assays. One comprehensive data analysis performed as a control should be sufficient to validate this hypothesis for other binding systems as well. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  18. Proteomic analysis of human O {sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Niture, Suryakant K.; Doneanu, Catalin E.; Velu, Chinavenmeni S.; Bailey, Nathan I.; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S. . E-mail: Kalkunte.srivenugopal@ttuhsc.edu

    2005-12-02

    Recent evidence suggests that human O {sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein that protects the genome against mutagens and accords tumor resistance to many anticancer alkylating agents, may have other roles besides repair. Therefore, we isolated MGMT-interacting proteins from extracts of HT29 human colon cancer cells using affinity chromatography on MGMT-Sepharose. Specific proteins bound to this column were identified by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and/or Western blotting. These procedures identified >60 MGMT-interacting proteins with diverse functions including those involved in DNA replication and repair (MCM2, PCNA, ORC1, DNA polymerase {delta}, MSH-2, and DNA-dependent protein kinase), cell cycle progression (CDK1, cyclin B, CDK2, CDC7, CDC10, 14-3-3 protein, and p21{sup waf1/cip1}), RNA processing and translation (poly(A)-binding protein, nucleolin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, A2/B1, and elongation factor-1{alpha}), several histones (H4, H3.4, and H2A.1), and topoisomerase I. The heat shock proteins, HSP-90{alpha} and {beta}, also bound strongly with MGMT. The DNA repair activity of MGMT was greatly enhanced in the presence of interacting proteins or histones. These data, for the first time, suggest that human MGMT is likely to have additional functions, possibly, in sensing and integrating the DNA damage/repair-related signals with replication, cell cycle progression, and genomic stability.

  19. Monolith immuno-affinity enrichment liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for quantitative protein analysis of recombinant bovine somatotropin in serum.

    PubMed

    Smits, Nathalie G E; Blokland, Marco H; Wubs, Klaas L; Nessen, Merel A; van Ginkel, Leen A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2015-08-01

    The use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) to enhance milk production is approved in several countries, but it is prohibited in the European Union. According to EU legislation, it is necessary to confirm positive screening results prior to enforcement. Although adequate screening assays are available nowadays, development of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) confirmatory methods to detect low levels of rbST is still a challenge. Here, we present a novel approach using immuno-affinity enrichment on monolithic micro-columns in combination with state-of-the-art ultra-high pressure LC-MS/MS (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection. The developed approach enables detection and confirmation of rbST in serum at a decision limit (CCα) concentration of 0.8 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, the method is easy to handle, robust and reproducible. We successfully applied the confirmatory method to serum samples from rbST treated cows that were found suspect after immunoassay-based screening. The use of rbST could be confirmed over 1 week after treatment, and the developed method demonstrated the sensitivity needed for effective control. Graphical Abstract Graphical summary of the workflow, for serum preparation, enrichment with monolith microcolumns and LC-MS/MS measurement of rbST.

  20. Clinical use of phosphorylated proteins in blood serum analysed by immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaros, Julian A J; Guest, Paul C; Ramoune, Hassan; Rothermundt, Matthias; Leweke, F Markus; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Bahn, Sabine

    2012-12-05

    The process of protein phosphorylation in cells is well studied in the context of a wide range of biologic functions such as signalling, cell cycle, cell growth and differentiation, and others. In contrast, little progress has been made in the investigation of protein phosphorylation specifically in blood. Here, we focussed on the phosphoproteome in human blood serum to study its extent and characteristics, and to explore the potential clinical utility. Immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for the enrichment of intact phosphorylated proteins and label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) were used for the molecular analysis of a large number of serum samples. To obtain high-confidence results, phosphorylated peptides had to be detected in at least 2 out of 3 technical replicates per sample and in >70% of the serum samples drawn from 80 volunteers. Individual analysis of these 80 non-pooled samples resulted in the detection of 5825 unique phosphorylated peptides after filtering, which corresponded to 502 unique proteins. The results provided evidence that blood serum may be an untapped source of phosphoproteins suitable for potential use in understanding disease pathophysiology and for identification of disease and drug response biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inference of a Geminivirus-Host Protein-Protein Interaction Network through Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Ding, Xue; Xiao, Jiajing; Jiménez-Gόngora, Tamara; Liu, Renyi; Lozano-Durán, Rosa

    2017-09-25

    Viruses reshape the intracellular environment of their hosts, largely through protein-protein interactions, to co-opt processes necessary for viral infection and interference with antiviral defences. Due to genome size constraints and the concomitant limited coding capacity of viruses, viral proteins are generally multifunctional and have evolved to target diverse host proteins. Inference of the virus-host interaction network can be instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate the host machinery and how re-wiring of specific pathways can contribute to disease. Here, we use affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis (AP-MS) to define the global landscape of interactions between the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and its host Nicotiana benthamiana. For this purpose, we expressed tagged versions of each of TYLCV-encoded proteins (C1/Rep, C2/TrAP, C3/REn, C4, V2, and CP) in planta in the presence of the virus. Using a quantitative scoring system, 728 high-confidence plant interactors were identified, and the interaction network of each viral protein was inferred; TYLCV-targeted proteins are more connected than average, and connect with other proteins through shorter paths, which would allow the virus to exert large effects with few interactions. Comparative analyses of divergence patterns between N. benthamiana and potato, a non-host Solanaceae, showed evolutionary constraints on TYLCV-targeted proteins. Our results provide a comprehensive overview of plant proteins targeted by TYLCV during the viral infection, which may contribute to uncovering the underlying molecular mechanisms of plant viral diseases and provide novel potential targets for anti-viral strategies and crop engineering. Interestingly, some of the TYLCV-interacting proteins appear to be convergently targeted by other pathogen effectors, which suggests a central role for these proteins in plant-pathogen interactions, and pinpoints them as potential targets to

  2. Identification and affinity-quantification of ß-amyloid and α-synuclein polypeptides using on-line SAW-biosensor-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Slamnoiu, Stefan; Vlad, Camelia; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Moise, Adrian; Lindner, Kathrin; Engel, Nicole; Vilanova, Mar; Diaz, Mireia; Karreman, Christiaan; Leist, Marcel; Ciossek, Thomas; Hengerer, Bastian; Vilaseca, Marta; Przybylski, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Bioaffinity analysis using a variety of biosensors has become an established tool for detection and quantification of biomolecular interactions. Biosensors, however, are generally limited by the lack of chemical structure information of affinity-bound ligands. On-line bioaffinity-mass spectrometry using a surface-acoustic wave biosensor (SAW-MS) is a new combination providing the simultaneous affinity detection, quantification, and mass spectrometric structural characterization of ligands. We describe here an on-line SAW-MS combination for direct identification and affinity determination, using a new interface for MS of the affinity-isolated ligand eluate. Key element of the SAW-MS combination is a microfluidic interface that integrates affinity-isolation on a gold chip, in-situ sample concentration, and desalting with a microcolumn for MS of the ligand eluate from the biosensor. Suitable MS-acquisition software has been developed that provides coupling of the SAW-MS interface to a Bruker Daltonics ion trap-MS, FTICR-MS, and Waters Synapt-QTOF- MS systems. Applications are presented for mass spectrometric identifications and affinity (K(D)) determinations of the neurodegenerative polypeptides, ß-amyloid (Aß), and pathophysiological and physiological synucleins (α- and ß-synucleins), two key polypeptide systems for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Moreover, first in vivo applications of αSyn polypeptides from brain homogenate show the feasibility of on-line affinity-MS to the direct analysis of biological material. These results demonstrate on-line SAW-bioaffinity-MS as a powerful tool for structural and quantitative analysis of biopolymer interactions.

  3. Identification and Affinity-Quantification of ß-Amyloid and α-Synuclein Polypeptides Using On-Line SAW-Biosensor-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamnoiu, Stefan; Vlad, Camelia; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Moise, Adrian; Lindner, Kathrin; Engel, Nicole; Vilanova, Mar; Diaz, Mireia; Karreman, Christiaan; Leist, Marcel; Ciossek, Thomas; Hengerer, Bastian; Vilaseca, Marta; Przybylski, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Bioaffinity analysis using a variety of biosensors has become an established tool for detection and quantification of biomolecular interactions. Biosensors, however, are generally limited by the lack of chemical structure information of affinity-bound ligands. On-line bioaffinity-mass spectrometry using a surface-acoustic wave biosensor (SAW-MS) is a new combination providing the simultaneous affinity detection, quantification, and mass spectrometric structural characterization of ligands. We describe here an on-line SAW-MS combination for direct identification and affinity determination, using a new interface for MS of the affinity-isolated ligand eluate. Key element of the SAW-MS combination is a microfluidic interface that integrates affinity-isolation on a gold chip, in-situ sample concentration, and desalting with a microcolumn for MS of the ligand eluate from the biosensor. Suitable MS- acquisition software has been developed that provides coupling of the SAW-MS interface to a Bruker Daltonics ion trap-MS, FTICR-MS, and Waters Synapt-QTOF- MS systems. Applications are presented for mass spectrometric identifications and affinity (KD) determinations of the neurodegenerative polypeptides, ß-amyloid (Aß), and pathophysiological and physiological synucleins (α- and ß-synucleins), two key polypeptide systems for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Moreover, first in vivo applications of αSyn polypeptides from brain homogenate show the feasibility of on-line affinity-MS to the direct analysis of biological material. These results demonstrate on-line SAW-bioaffinity-MS as a powerful tool for structural and quantitative analysis of biopolymer interactions.

  4. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  5. Tandem Affinity Purification Approach Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Post-translational Modifications of Histones Associated with Chromatin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Sophie; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2017-01-01

    Protein purification by tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tag coupled to mass spectrometry analysis is usually used to reveal protein complex composition. Here we describe a TAP-tag purification of chromatin-bound proteins along with associated nucleosomes, which allow exhaustive identification of protein partners. Moreover, this method allows exhaustive identification of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the associated histones. Thus, in addition to partner characterization, this approach reveals the associated epigenetic landscape that can shed light on the function and properties of the studied chromatin-bound protein.

  6. Automated affinity capture-release of biotin-containing conjugates using a lab-on-valve apparatus coupled to UV/visible and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuko; Scampavia, Louis; Růzicka, Jaromír; Scott, C Ronald; Gelb, Michael H; Turecek, Frantisek

    2002-09-15

    We report a new method for automated affinity capture and release of biotin-containing conjugates on immobilized streptavidin using a lab-on-valve (LOV) bead injection apparatus. The apparatus is also coupled to UV/visible and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for monitoring the captured and released biotin-containing conjugates. Dissociation rate constants for release from streptavidin of two chromophore-tagged biotin conjugates were measured by UV/visible spectrometry and the dissociation was simultaneously monitored by ESI-MS. The LOV-ESI-MS instrument was also used for repetitive assays of lysosomal beta-galactosidase in human cell homogenates. Fast analysis in 4.5 min/full cycle and robust operation in 60 repetitive analyses are demonstrated that are promising for transfer of the LOV-ESI-MS technology into clinical practice.

  7. Multiple ligand detection and affinity measurement by ultrafiltration and mass spectrometry analysis applied to fragment mixture screening.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; Fu, Xu; Shen, Jie; Chen, Xin; Wang, Quan; Bi, Xin; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Lixin; Liang, Guangxin; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-07-30

    Binding affinity of a small molecule drug candidate to a therapeutically relevant biomolecular target is regarded the first determinant of the candidate's efficacy. Although the ultrafiltration-LC/MS (UF-LC/MS) assay enables efficient ligand discovery for a specific target from a mixed pool of compounds, most previous analysis allowed for relative affinity ranking of different ligands. Moreover, the reliability of affinity measurement for multiple ligands with UF-LC/MS has hardly been strictly evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of K(d) determination through UF-LC/MS by comparison with classical ITC measurement. A single-point K(d) calculation method was found to be suitable for affinity measurement of multiple ligands bound to the same target when binding competition is minimized. A second workflow based on analysis of the unbound fraction of compounds was then developed, which simplified sample preparation as well as warranted reliable ligand discovery. The new workflow implemented in a fragment mixture screen afforded rapid and sensitive detection of low-affinity ligands selectively bound to the RNA polymerase NS5B of hepatitis C virus. More importantly, ligand identification and affinity measurement for mixture-based fragment screens by UF-LC/MS were in good accordance with single ligand evaluation by conventional SPR analysis. This new approach is expected to become a valuable addition to the arsenal of high-throughput screening techniques for fragment-based drug discovery.

  8. Profiling of drug binding proteins by monolithic affinity chromatography in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepei; Wang, Tongdan; Zhang, Hanzhi; Han, Bing; Wang, Lishun; Kang, Jingwu

    2014-09-12

    A new approach for proteome-wide profiling drug binding proteins by using monolithic capillary affinity chromatography in combination with HPLC-MS/MS is reported. Two immunosuppresive drugs, namely FK506 and cyclosporin A, were utilized as the experimental models for proof-of-concept. The monolithic capillary affinity columns were prepared through a single-step copolymerization of the drug derivatives with glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate. The capillary chromatography with the affinity monolithic column facilitates the purification of the drug binding proteins from the cell lysate. By combining the capillary affinity column purification and the shot-gun proteomic analysis, totally 33 FK506- and 32 CsA-binding proteins including all the literature reported target proteins of these two drugs were identified. Among them, two proteins, namely voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 and serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5 were verified by using the recombinant proteins. The result supports that the monolithic capillary affinity chromatography is likely to become a valuable tool for profiling of binding proteins of small molecular drugs as well as bioactive compounds.

  9. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction.

  10. Determination of affinity, stoichiometry and sequence selectivity of minor groove binder complexes with double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Frederic; Gabelica, Valérie; Houssier, Claude; De Pauw, Edwin

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry was evaluated regarding the reliability of the determination of the stoichiometries and equilibrium association constants from single spectra. Complexes between minor groove binders (Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, DAPI, netropsin and berenil) and 12mer oligonucleotide duplexes with a central sequence (A/T)4 flanked by G/C base pairs were chosen as model systems. To validate the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) method, comparisons were made with circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. ESI-MS allowed the detection of minor (2 drug + DNA) species for Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, DAPI and berenil with duplex d(GGGG(A/T)4GGGG)· d(CCCC(A/T)4CCCC), which were undetectable with the other techniques. Assuming that the duplexes and the complexes have the same electrospray response factors, the equilbrium association constants of the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes were determined by ESI-MS, and the values show a good quantitative agreement with fluorescence determined constants for Hoechst 33258 and Hoechst 33342. It is also shown that ESI-MS can quickly give reliable information on the A/T sequence selectivity of a drug: the signal of a complex is directly related to the affinity of the drug for that particular duplex. The potential of ESI-MS as a qualitative and quantitative affinity screening method is emphasized. PMID:12177310

  11. Determination of affinity, stoichiometry and sequence selectivity of minor groove binder complexes with double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Frederic; Gabelica, Valérie; Houssier, Claude; De Pauw, Edwin

    2002-08-15

    Electrospray mass spectrometry was evaluated regarding the reliability of the determination of the stoichiometries and equilibrium association constants from single spectra. Complexes between minor groove binders (Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, DAPI, netropsin and berenil) and 12mer oligonucleotide duplexes with a central sequence (A/T)4 flanked by G/C base pairs were chosen as model systems. To validate the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) method, comparisons were made with circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. ESI-MS allowed the detection of minor (2 drug + DNA) species for Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, DAPI and berenil with duplex d(GGGG(A/T)4GGGG). d(CCCC(A/T)4CCCC), which were undetectable with the other techniques. Assuming that the duplexes and the complexes have the same electrospray response factors, the equilbrium association constants of the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes were determined by ESI-MS, and the values show a good quantitative agreement with fluorescence determined constants for Hoechst 33258 and Hoechst 33342. It is also shown that ESI-MS can quickly give reliable information on the A/T sequence selectivity of a drug: the signal of a complex is directly related to the affinity of the drug for that particular duplex. The potential of ESI-MS as a qualitative and quantitative affinity screening method is emphasized.

  12. Identification of differential protein binding affinities in an atropisomeric pharmaceutical compound by noncovalent mass spectrometry, equilibrium dialysis, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Maple, Hannah J; Garlish, Rachel A; Whitcombe, Ian; Hold, Adam; Prosser, Christine E; Ford, Daniel; Mackenzie, Harry; Crosby, John; Porter, John; Taylor, Richard J; Crump, Matthew P

    2013-06-18

    Atropisomerism of pharmaceutical compounds is a challenging area for drug discovery programs (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2009, 48, 6398-6401). Strategies for dealing with these compounds include raising the energy barrier to atropisomerization in order to develop the drug as a single isomer (Tetrahedron 2004, 60, 4337-4347) or reducing the barrier to rotation and developing a mixture of rapidly interconverting isomers (Chirality 1996, 8, 364-371). Commonly, however, the atropisomers will be differentiated in terms of their affinity for a given protein target, and it is therefore important to rapidly identify the most active component prior to further compound development. We present equilibrium dialysis and saturation transfer difference NMR (STD-NMR) as techniques for assessing relative affinities of an atropisomeric mixture against antiapoptotic protein targets Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. These techniques require no prior separation of the mixture of compounds and are therefore rapid and simple approaches. We also explore the use of noncovalent mass spectrometry for determining KD values of individual atropisomers separated from the equilibrium mixture and compare the results to solution-phase measurements. Results from equilibrium dialysis, STD-NMR, and noncovalent mass spectrometry are all in excellent agreement and provide complementary information on differential binding, amplification of the strongest binders, and KD values.

  13. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  14. Application of high-throughput affinity-selection mass spectrometry for screening of chemical compound libraries in lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Zehender, Hartmut; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2007-02-01

    High-throughput screening of chemical libraries for compounds that interfere with a particular molecular target is among the most powerful methodologies applied in lead discovery at present. In this review, the authors describe a label-free, homogeneous, affinity-selection-based technology developed at Novartis, termed SpeedScreen, which is compared with similar technologies used for high-throughput screening in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The focus at present of SpeedScreen is twofold: first, this technology is applied to orphan genomic targets and to those targets that are non-tractable by a functional assay; second, this technology is applied complementary to the well-established traditional methodologies for the screening of molecular targets. In summary, the authors discuss the value of affinity-selection-based high-throughput screening as a complementary technology to the common functional screening platforms and the benefits as well as the limitations of this new technology are outlined.

  15. Improved accuracy of low affinity protein-ligand equilibrium dissociation constants directly determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaquillard, Lucie; Saab, Fabienne; Schoentgen, Françoise; Cadene, Martine

    2012-05-01

    There is continued interest in the determination by ESI-MS of equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) that accurately reflect the affinity of a protein-ligand complex in solution. Issues in the measurement of K(D) are compounded in the case of low affinity complexes. Here we present a K(D) measurement method and corresponding mathematical model dealing with both gas-phase dissociation (GPD) and aggregation. To this end, a rational mathematical correction of GPD (f(sat)) is combined with the development of an experimental protocol to deal with gas-phase aggregation. A guide to apply the method to noncovalent protein-ligand systems according to their kinetic behavior is provided. The approach is validated by comparing the K(D) values determined by this method with in-solution K(D) literature values. The influence of the type of molecular interactions and instrumental setup on f(sat) is examined as a first step towards a fine dissection of factors affecting GPD. The method can be reliably applied to a wide array of low affinity systems without the need for a reference ligand or protein.

  16. A proteomic approach based on peptide affinity chromatography, 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify multiprotein complexes interacting with membrane-bound receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bécamel, Carine; Galéotti, Nathalie; Poncet, Joël; Jouin, Patrick; Dumuis, Aline; Bockaert, Joël

    2002-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that membrane-bound receptors interact with many intracellular proteins. Multiprotein complexes associated with ionotropic receptors have been extensively characterized, but the identification of proteins interacting with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has so far only been achieved in a piecemeal fashion, focusing on one or two protein species. We describe a method based on peptide affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and immunoblotting to identify the components of multiprotein complexes interacting directly or indirectly with intracellular domains of GPCRs or, more generally, any other membrane-bound receptor. Using this global approach, we have characterized multiprotein complexes that bind to the carboxy-terminal tail of the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2C receptor and are important for its subcellular localization in CNS cells (Bécamel et al., EMBO J., 21(10): 2332, 2002). PMID:12734563

  17. Evaluation of a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry System for the Analysis of Surface Deposited and Affinity Captured Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Ford, Michael J; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Kennel, Steve J

    2006-01-01

    A combined self-aspirating electrospray emitter/surfacing-sampling probe coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used to sample and mass analyze proteins from surfaces. The sampling probe mass spectrometer system was used to sample and detect lysozyme that had been deposited onto a glass slide using a piezoelectric spotter or murine gamma-interferon affinity captured on a glass slide using surface-immobilized anti-gamma-interferon antibody. The detection level for surface-deposited lysozyme (spot size {le}200 {micro}m) was approximately 1.0 fmol ({approx}100 fmol/mm{sup 2}) as determined from the ability to measure accurately the protein molecular mass from the mass spectrum acquired by sampling the deposit. These detection limits may be sufficient for certain applications in which protein fractions from a separation method are collected onto a surface. Radiolabeled proteins were used to quantify the surface density of immobilized antibody and the efficiency of capture of the gamma-interferon on glass and higher surface area ceramic supports. The capture density of gamma-interferon at surface saturation ranged from about 23 to 50 fmol/mm{sup 2} depending on the capture surface. Nonetheless, mass spectrometric detection of affinity capture protein was successful in some cases, but the results were not reproducible. Thus, improvement of the sampling system, ionization efficiency and/or capture density will be necessary for practical sampling of affinity-captured proteins. The means to accomplish improved sampling system detection limits and to increase the absolute amounts of protein captured per unit area are discussed.

  18. Cryptic antigenic determinants on the extracellular pyruvate dehydrogenase complex/mimeotope found in primary biliary cirrhosis. A probe by affinity mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E; Coppel, R L; Hutchens, T W

    1996-12-20

    Affinity mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to evaluate the structural diversity of the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in normal and diseased liver cells, including those from patients with the autoimmune disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Two different antibodies to PDC-E2, the immunodominant mitochondrial autoantigen in patients with PBC, were used. AMS was performed directly on frozen liver sections and purified bile duct epithelial cells. Mass spectrometric signals associated with the molecular recognition of PBC-specific antigenic determinants were enhanced by an in situ enzyme-linked signal amplification process. Samples from patients with PBC gave strong positive signals for the antigen(s) recognized by the monoclonal antibody C355.1. Conversely, tissues from normal and disease controls showed only a minimal signal. AMS was used to identify specific antigenic determinants within the E2 component of PDC for comparison with unknown antigenic determinants observed by affinity capture with C355.1 monoclonal antibody from PBC samples. PDC components bound to C355.1 were mapped and identified by mass before dissociation from the E2 component. A similar approach was used to identify unknown antigenic determinants associated with PBC. We believe AMS may be an important new approach with wide application to the identification of molecules associated with a number of disease states.

  19. Insights into chemoselectivity principles in metal oxide affinity chromatography using tailored nanocast metal oxide microspheres and mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Sakeye, Motolani; Zimmerli, Christian Eugen; Smått, Jan-Henrik

    2017-05-30

    The ability to comprehensively characterize biological samples, including tissues and body fluids, opens up new possibilities to diagnose and treat diseases and to better understand fundamental biological processes. For this purpose, suitable experimental workflows need to be designed. In this context, materials with particular chemoselective properties are used for the enrichment of certain classes of (bio)molecules. Metal oxides such as titanium dioxide have become the materials of choice for the large-scale study of protein phosphorylation in phosphoproteomics. Despite their widespread use, the main factors influencing their performance (for example, affinity and specificity) are not completely understood. This understanding is, however, crucial to develop improved materials and methods. Here, we used the nanocasting method to prepare microspheres of seven metal oxides with comparable textural properties, allowing an objective comparison of the materials and their binding properties. We evaluated these materials with samples of different complexity, ranging from synthetic peptides to whole cell lysates, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as a readout. A set of more than 7000 identified phosphopeptides allowed us to study differences between the metal oxide sorbents in detail. Importantly, the performance of the affinity materials was found to be mainly correlated with the oxides' isoelectric points (IEPs), with the materials that enriched the highest number of phosphopeptides having an IEP of around 6. This included the widely used TiO2 and ZrO2, but also In2O3 that was not previously known to possess affinity to phosphates. This finding supports the conclusion that the IEP has a stronger influence than the particular type of metal oxide and contrasts earlier reports that compared a limited number of materials with often unknown textural properties. Taken together, we introduce new metal oxides suitable for phosphopeptide enrichment, provide

  20. Screening for Natural Inhibitors of Topoisomerases I from Rhamnus davurica by Affinity Ultrafiltration and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2017-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Topo I) catalyzes topological interconversion of duplex DNA during DNA replication and transcription, and has been deemed as important antineoplastic targets. In this study, the fraction R.d-60 from ethyl acetate extracts of Rhamnus davurica showed higher inhibitory rates against SGC-7901 and HT-29 compared with the R.d-30 fraction in vitro. However, the specific active components of R.d-60 fraction remain elusive. To this end, a method based on bio-affinity ultrafiltration and high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC- ESI-MS/MS) was developed to rapidly screen and identify the Topo I inhibitors in this fraction. The enrichment factors (EFs) were calculated to evaluate the binding affinities between the bioactive constituents and Topo I. As a result, eight ligands were identified and six of which with higher EFs showed more potential antitumor activity. Furthermore, antiproliferative assays in vitro (IC50 values) with two representative candidates (apigenin, quercetin) against SGC-7901, HT-29 and Hep G2 cells were conducted and further validated. Finally, the structure-activity relationships revealed that flavones contain a C2-C3 double bond of C ring exhibited higher bio-affinities to Topo I than those without it. This integrated method combining Topo I ultrafiltration with HPLC-MS/MS proved to be very efficient in rapid screening and identification of potential Topo I inhibitors from the complex extracts of medicinal plants, and could be further explored as a valuable high-throughput screening platform in the early drug discovery stage.

  1. Detection and Identification of Heme c-Modified Peptides by Histidine Affinity Chromatography, High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Park, Jea H.; Belchik, Sara M.; Shi, Liang; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2012-12-07

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (proteins with covalently attached heme c moieties) play important roles in extracellular metal respiration in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-(LC-MS/MS) characterization of c-type cytochromes is hindered by the presence of multiple heme groups, since the heme c modified peptides are typically not observed, or if observed, not identified. Using a recently reported histidine affinity chromatography (HAC) procedure, we enriched heme c tryptic peptides from purified bovine heart cytochrome c, a bacterial decaheme cytochrome, and subjected these samples to LC-MS/MS analysis. Enriched bovine cytochrome c samples yielded three- to six-fold more confident peptide-spectrum matches to heme-c containing peptides than unenriched digests. In unenriched digests of the decaheme cytochrome MtoA from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1, heme c peptides for four of the ten expected sites were observed by LC-MS/MS; following HAC fractionation, peptides covering nine out of ten sites were obtained. Heme c peptide spiked into E. coli lysates at mass ratios as low as 10-4 was detected with good signal-to-noise after HAC and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to HAC, we have developed a proteomics database search strategy that takes into account the unique physicochemical properties of heme c peptides. The results suggest that accounting for the double thioether link between heme c and peptide, and the use of the labile heme fragment as a reporter ion, can improve database searching results. The combination of affinity chromatography and heme-specific informatics yielded increases in the number of peptide-spectrum matches of 20-100-fold for bovine cytochrome c.

  2. Detection and identification of heme c-modified peptides by histidine affinity chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and database searching.

    PubMed

    Merkley, Eric D; Anderson, Brian J; Park, Jea; Belchik, Sara M; Shi, Liang; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2012-12-07

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (proteins with covalently attached heme c moieties) play important roles in extracellular metal respiration in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) characterization of c-type cytochromes is hindered by the presence of multiple heme groups, since the heme c modified peptides are typically not observed or, if observed, not identified. Using a recently reported histidine affinity chromatography (HAC) procedure, we enriched heme c tryptic peptides from purified bovine heart cytochrome c, two bacterial decaheme cytochromes, and subjected these samples to LC-MS/MS analysis. Enriched bovine cytochrome c samples yielded 3- to 6-fold more confident peptide-spectrum matches to heme c containing peptides than unenriched digests. In unenriched digests of the decaheme cytochrome MtoA from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1, heme c peptides for 4 of the 10 expected sites were observed by LC-MS/MS; following HAC fractionation, peptides covering 9 out of 10 sites were obtained. Heme c peptide spiked into E. coli lysates at mass ratios as low as 1×10(-4) was detected with good signal-to-noise after HAC and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to HAC, we have developed a proteomics database search strategy that takes into account the unique physicochemical properties of heme c peptides. The results suggest that accounting for the double thioether link between heme c and peptide, and the use of the labile heme fragment as a reporter ion, can improve database searching results. The combination of affinity chromatography and heme-specific informatics yielded increases in the number of peptide-spectrum matches of 20-100-fold for bovine cytochrome c.

  3. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Koefoed, Klaus; Nygaard, Frank; Sen, Jette Wagtberg

    2013-08-06

    Characterization of conformational and dynamic changes associated with protein interactions can be done by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) by comparing the deuterium uptake in the bound and unbound state of the proteins. Investigation of local hydrogen/deuterium exchange in heteromultimeric protein complexes poses a challenge for the method due to the increased complexity of the mixture of peptides originating from all interaction partners in the complex. Previously, interference of peptides from one interaction partner has been removed by immobilizing the intact protein on beads prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture of biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We present a workflow for biotinylation and characterization of recombinant antibodies and demonstrate affinity capture of biotinylated antibodies under hydrogen/deuterium exchange quench conditions by the biotin-streptavidin strategy.

  4. Characterization of the novel broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor CTx-0294885 as an affinity reagent for mass spectrometry-based kinome profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxi; Holmes, Ian P; Hochgräfe, Falko; Walker, Scott R; Ali, Naveid A; Humphrey, Emily S; Wu, Jianmin; de Silva, Melanie; Kersten, Wilhelmus J A; Connor, Theresa; Falk, Hendrik; Allan, Lynda; Street, Ian P; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Monahan, Brendon J; Peat, Thomas S; Daly, Roger J

    2013-07-05

    Kinase enrichment utilizing broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors enables the identification of large proportions of the expressed kinome by mass spectrometry. However, the existing inhibitors are still inadequate in covering the entire kinome. Here, we identified a novel bisanilino pyrimidine, CTx-0294885, exhibiting inhibitory activity against a broad range of kinases in vitro, and further developed it into a Sepharose-supported kinase capture reagent. Use of a quantitative proteomics approach confirmed the selectivity of CTx-0294885-bound beads for kinase enrichment. Large-scale CTx-0294885-based affinity purification followed by LC-MS/MS led to the identification of 235 protein kinases from MDA-MB-231 cells, including all members of the AKT family that had not been previously detected by other broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors. Addition of CTx-0294885 to a mixture of three kinase inhibitors commonly used for kinase-enrichment increased the number of kinase identifications to 261, representing the largest kinome coverage from a single cell line reported to date. Coupling phosphopeptide enrichment with affinity purification using the four inhibitors enabled the identification of 799 high-confidence phosphosites on 183 kinases, ∼10% of which were localized to the activation loop, and included previously unreported phosphosites on BMP2K, MELK, HIPK2, and PRKDC. Therefore, CTx-0294885 represents a powerful new reagent for analysis of kinome signaling networks that may facilitate development of targeted therapeutic strategies. Proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier PXD000239.

  5. Development of a Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screen (MagMASS) Using Mass Spectrometry for Ligands to the Retinoid X Receptor-α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rush, Michael D.; Walker, Elisabeth M.; Prehna, Gerd; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2016-12-01

    To overcome limiting factors in mass spectrometry-based screening methods such as automation while still facilitating the screening of complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, magnetic microbead affinity selection screening (MagMASS) was developed. The screening process involves immobilization of a target protein on a magnetic microbead using a variety of possible chemistries, incubation with mixtures of molecules containing possible ligands, a washing step that removes non-bound compounds while a magnetic field retains the beads in the microtiter well, and an organic solvent release step followed by LC-MS analysis. Using retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα) as an example, which is a nuclear receptor and target for anti-inflammation therapy as well as cancer treatment and prevention, a MagMASS assay was developed and compared with an existing screening assay, pulsed ultrafiltration (PUF)-MS. Optimization of MagMASS involved evaluation of multiple protein constructs and several magnetic bead immobilization chemistries. The full-length RXRα construct immobilized with amylose beads provided optimum results. Additional enhancements of MagMASS were the application of 96-well plates to enable automation, use of UHPLC instead of HPLC for faster MS analyses, and application of metabolomics software for faster, automated data analysis. Performance of MagMASS was demonstrated using mixtures of synthetic compounds and known ligands spiked into botanical extracts.

  6. Development of a Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screen (MagMASS) Using Mass Spectrometry for Ligands to the Retinoid X Receptor-α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rush, Michael D.; Walker, Elisabeth M.; Prehna, Gerd; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2017-03-01

    To overcome limiting factors in mass spectrometry-based screening methods such as automation while still facilitating the screening of complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, magnetic microbead affinity selection screening (MagMASS) was developed. The screening process involves immobilization of a target protein on a magnetic microbead using a variety of possible chemistries, incubation with mixtures of molecules containing possible ligands, a washing step that removes non-bound compounds while a magnetic field retains the beads in the microtiter well, and an organic solvent release step followed by LC-MS analysis. Using retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα) as an example, which is a nuclear receptor and target for anti-inflammation therapy as well as cancer treatment and prevention, a MagMASS assay was developed and compared with an existing screening assay, pulsed ultrafiltration (PUF)-MS. Optimization of MagMASS involved evaluation of multiple protein constructs and several magnetic bead immobilization chemistries. The full-length RXRα construct immobilized with amylose beads provided optimum results. Additional enhancements of MagMASS were the application of 96-well plates to enable automation, use of UHPLC instead of HPLC for faster MS analyses, and application of metabolomics software for faster, automated data analysis. Performance of MagMASS was demonstrated using mixtures of synthetic compounds and known ligands spiked into botanical extracts.

  7. Direct analysis of the products of sequential cleavages of peptides and proteins affinity-bound to immobilized metal ion beads by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, X; Zhou, W; Khaledi, M G; Tomer, K B

    1999-10-15

    Consecutive enzymatic reactions on analytes affinity-bound to immobilized metal ion beads with subsequent direct analysis of the products by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry have been used for detecting protein synthesis errors occuring at the N-terminus. The usefulness of this method was demonstrated by analyzing two commercially available recombinant HIV proteins with affinity tags at the N-terminus, and histatin-5, a peptide with multiple histidine residues. The high specificity, sensitivity, and speed of analysis make this method especially useful in obtaining N-terminal sequencing information of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins.

  8. Quantification of Activated NF-κB/RelA Complexes Using ssDNA Aptamer Affinity – Stable Isotope Dilution—Selected Reaction Monitoring—Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingxin; Widen, Steven G.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Tian, Bing; Wood, Thomas G.; Edeh, Chukwudi B.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) is a family of inducible transcription factors regulated by stimulus-induced protein interactions. In the cytoplasm, the NF-κB member RelA transactivator is inactivated by binding inhibitory IκBs, whereas in its activated state, the serine-phosphorylated protein binds the p300 histone acetyltransferase. Here we describe the isolation of a ssDNA aptamer (termed P028F4) that binds to the activated (IκBα-dissociated) form of RelA with a KD of 6.4 × 10−10, and its application in an enrichment-mass spectrometric quantification assay. ssDNA P028F4 competes with cognate duplex high affinity NF-κB binding sites for RelA binding in vitro, binds activated RelA in eukaryotic nuclei and reduces TNFα-stimulated endogenous NF-κB dependent gene expression. Incorporation of P028F4 as an affinity isolation step enriches for serine 536 phosphorylated and p300 coactivator complexed RelA, simultaneously depleting IκBα·RelA complexes. A stable isotope dilution (SID)-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)- mass spectrometry (MS) assay for RelA was developed that produced a linear response over 1,000 fold dilution range of input protein and had a 200 amol lower limit of quantification. This multiplex SID-SRM-MS RelA assay was used to quantify activated endogenous RelA in cytokine-stimulated eukaryotic cells isolated by single-step P028F4 enrichment. The aptamer-SID-SRM-MS assay quantified the fraction of activated RelA in subcellular extracts, detecting the presence of a cytoplasmic RelA reservoir unresponsive to TNFα stimulation. We conclude that aptamer-SID-SRM-MS is a versatile tool for quantification of activated NF-κB/RelA and its associated complexes in response to pathway activation. PMID:21502374

  9. Simultaneous speciation of selenoproteins and selenometabolites in plasma and serum by dual size exclusion-affinity chromatography with online isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García-Sevillano, M A; García-Barrera, T; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2014-04-01

    A method for the simultaneous speciation of selenoproteins and selenometabolites in mouse plasma has been developed based on in series two-dimensional size exclusion and affinity high-performance liquid chromatography (2D/SE-AF-HPLC), using two columns of each type, and hyphenation to inductively coupled plasma-(quadrupole) mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The method allows the quantitative determination of selenoprotein P (SeP), extracellular glutathione peroxidase (eGPx), selenoalbumin (SeAlb), and selenometabolites in mouse plasma using species-unspecific isotope dilution (SUID). The 2D chromatographic separation is proposed to remove typical spectral interferences in plasma from chloride and bromide on (77)Se ((40)Ar(37)Cl) and (82)Se ((81)Br(1)H). In addition, the approach increases chromatographic resolution allowing the separation of eGPx from Se metabolites of low molecular mass. The method is robust, reliable, and fast with a typical chromatographic runtime less than 20 min. Precision in terms of relative standard deviation (n = 5) is in the order of 4 %, and detection limits are in the range of 0.2 to 1.0 ng Se g(-1). Method accuracy for determination of total protein bound to Se was assessed by analyzing human serum reference material (BCR-637) certified for total Se content, and latterly applied to mouse plasma (Mus musculus). In summary, a reliable speciation method for the analysis of eGPx, selenometabolites, SeP, and SeAlb in plasma/serum samples is proposed for the first time and is applicable to the evaluation of Se status in human in clinical studies and other mammals for environmental or toxicological assessment.

  10. Purification of antimicrobial peptides from an extract of the skin of Xenopus laevis using heparin-affinity HPLC: characterization by ion-spray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    James, S; Gibbs, B F; Toney, K; Bennett, H P

    1994-02-15

    A simple scheme was developed for the rapid purification of antimicrobial peptides from the skin of Xenopus laevis. An extract of the frog skin was prepared using an acidic medium designed to maximize the solubilization of low-molecular-weight peptides. This extract was subjected to an enrichment procedure using C18 Sep Pak cartridges to yield a salt-free fraction, devoid of high-molecular-weight proteins. This fraction was in turn subjected to heparin affinity high-performance liquid chromatography on a Shodex AF-Pak column. All the antibacterial activity bound to the column and could be eluted using a linear gradient of increasing sodium chloride concentration. Antibacterial activity emerged from the column in fractions corresponding to a sodium chloride concentration of 0.45 M. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography resolved this material into a series of compounds which could be readily characterized using a combination of amino acid analysis and ion-spray mass spectrometry. Each peptide was found to be antimicrobial and each was positively identified as belonging to a family of amphipathic helix-forming peptides characterized by other investigators. Listed in their order of elution from the reversed-phase column the peptides were magainin 2, magainin 1, peptide-glycine-leucine amide, xenopsin precursor fragment, levitide precursor fragment, and a mixture of fragments derived from the caerulein precursor. These peptides owe their antimicrobial properties to a predeliction to forming amphipathic alpha-helical structures when associated with lipid membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Evidence for phosphorylation of serine 753 in CFTR using a novel metal-ion affinity resin and matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, D. C.; Rozanas, C. R.; Price, E. M.; Gruis, D. B.; Verkman, A. S.; Townsend, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encodes an apical membrane Cl- channel regulated by protein phosphorylation. To identify cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-phosphorylated residues in full-length CFTR, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) was used to selectively purify phosphopeptides. The greater specificity of iron-loaded (Fe3+) nitrilotriacetic (NTA). Sepharose compared to iminodiacetic acid (IDA) metal-chelating matrices was demonstrated using a PKA-phosphorylated recombinant NBD1-R protein from CFTR. Fe(3+)-loaded NTA Sepharose preferentially bound phosphopeptides, whereas acidic and poly-His-containing peptides were co-purified using the conventional IDA matrices. IMAC using NTA Sepharose enabled the selective recovery of phosphopeptides and identification of phosphorylated residues from a complex proteolytic digest. Phosphopeptides from PKA-phosphorylated full-length CFTR, generated in Hi5 insect cells using a baculovirus expression system, were purified using NTA Sepharose. Phosphopeptides were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) with post-source decay (PSD) analysis and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Phosphorylated peptides were identified by mass and by the metastable loss of HPO3 and H3PO4 from the parent ions. Peptide sequence and phosphorylation at CFTR residues 660Ser, 737Ser, and 795Ser were confirmed using MALDI/PSD analysis. Peptide sequences and phosphorylation at CFTR residues 700Ser, 712Ser, 768Ser, and 813Ser were deduced from peptide mass, metastable fragment ion formation, and PKA consensus sequences. Peptide sequence and phosphorylation at residue 753Ser was confirmed using MALDI/CID analysis. This is the first report of phosphorylation of 753Ser in full-length CFTR. PMID:9385646

  12. Comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification by affinity zirconium oxide-silica composite monolithic column online solid-phase microextraction - Mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Chu, Jie-Mei; Lan, Meng-Dan; Liu, Ping; Yang, Na; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-02

    More than 140 modified ribonucleosides have been identified in RNA. Determination of endogenous modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive disease diagnostic strategy. However, detection of the modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids is challenging, especially for the low abundant modified ribonucleosides due to the serious matrix interferences of biological fluids. Here, we developed a facile preparation strategy and successfully synthesized zirconium oxide-silica (ZrO2/SiO2) composite capillary monolithic column that exhibited excellent performance for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds. Compared with the boronate-based affinity monolith, the ZrO2/SiO2 monolith showed ∼2 orders of magnitude higher extraction capacity and can be used under physiological pH (pH 6.5-7.5). Using the prepared ZrO2/SiO2 composite monolith as the trapping column and reversed-phase C18 column as the analytical column, we further established an online solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (online SPME-LC-MS/MS) analysis for the comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification in human urine. Our results showed that 68 cis-diol-containing ribosylated compounds were identified in human urine, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest numbers of cis-diol-containing compounds were determined in a single analysis. It is worth noting that four modified ribonucleosides were discovered in the human urine for the first time. In addition, the quantification results from the pooled urine samples showed that compared to healthy controls, the contents of sixteen ribose conjugates in the urine of gastric cancer, eleven in esophagus cancer and seven in lymphoma increased more than two folds. Among these ribose conjugates, four ribose conjugates increased more than two folds in both gastric cancer and esophagus cancer; three ribose conjugates increased more than two

  13. Simultaneous high-throughput determination of interaction kinetics for drugs and cyclodextrins by high performance affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caifen; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiaonan; Liu, Botao; Xu, Xu; Sun, Lixin; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-25

    The individual determination of the apparent dissociation rate constant (kd,app) using high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tedious process requiring numerous separate tests and massive data fitting, unable to provide the apparent association rate constant (ka) and equilibrium binding constant (Ka). In this study, a HPAC with mass spectrometry detection (HPAC-MS/MS) was employed to determine the drug-cyclodextrin (CD) interaction kinetics with low sample loading quantity (<10 ng per injection for single compound) and high-throughput yield as twenty drugs determined in one injection. The kd,app measured by HPAC-MS/MS approach were 0.89 ± 0.07, 4.34 ± 0.01, 1.48 ± 0.01 and 7.77 ± 0.04 s(-1) for ketoprofen, trimethoprim, indapamide and acetaminophen, with kd,app for acetaminophen consistent with that from the HPAC method with UV detector in our previous studies. For twenty drugs with diverse structures and chemical properties, good correlationship was found between kd,app measured by single compound analysis method and high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach, with the correlation coefficient of 0.987 and the significance F less than 0.001. Comprehensive quantification of ka,app, kd,app and Ka values was further performed based on the measurement of kd,app by peak profiling method and Ka by the peak fitting method. And the investigation of the drug-CD interaction kinetics under different conditions indicated that the column temperature and mobile phase composition significantly affected the determination of ka,app, kd,app and Ka while also dependent on the acidity and basicity of drugs. In summary, the high-throughput HPAC-MS/MS approach has been demonstrated high efficiency in determination of the drug-CD primary interaction kinetic parameter, especially, kd,app, being proven as a novel tool in screening the right CD for the solubilization of the right drug.

  14. High-sensitivity profiling of glycoproteins from human blood serum through multiple-lectin affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madera, Milan; Mechref, Yehia; Klouckova, Iveta; Novotny, Milos V

    2007-01-01

    We report here the use of high-performance lectin affinity enrichment of glycoproteins at microscale levels using a series of silica-bound lectins. The potential of this approach is being demonstrated for the glycoprotein enrichment from microliter volumes of human blood serum. Individual injections of sample to the affinity microcolumns packed with four lectin materials with different glycan specificities (Con A, SNA-I, UEA-I, PHA-L), followed by off-line reversed-phase pre-fractionation and nano-LC/MS/MS, permitted identification of 108 proteins in the lectin-bound fractions spanning a concentration dynamic range of 7-10 orders of magnitude. In contrast, multi-lectin microcolumn affinity chromatography, an alternative enrichment approach allowed identification of only 67 proteins. An attractive feature of high-performance lectin affinity chromatography at microscale levels is the substantial reduction of sample losses that are commonly experienced with extensive sample preparation needed for larger sample volumes.

  15. Affinity Capture and Detection of Immunoglobulin E in Human Serum using an Aptamer-Modified Surface in Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jacquelyn R.; Dick, Lawrence W.; Morgan, Elizabeth J.; McGown, Linda B.

    2008-01-01

    Capture and detection of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in simple solution and in human serum using an aptamer-modified probe surface for affinity Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (affinity MALDI-MS) detection is reported. Detectable signals were obtained for 1 amol of IgE applied either in a single, 1 μL application of 1 pM IgE or after 10 successive, 1 μL applications of 100 fM IgE. In both cases, the surface was rinsed after each application of IgE to remove sample concomitants including salts and free or non-specifically associated proteins. Detection of native IgE, which is the least abundant of the serum immunoglobulins and occurs at sub-nM levels, in human serum was demonstrated and interference from the high abundance immunoglobulins and albumin was investigated. The aptamermodified surface showed high selectivity towards immunoglobulins in serum, with no significant interference from serum albumin. Addition of IgE to the serum suppressed the signals from the other immunoglobulins, confirming the expected selectivity of the aptamer surface towards IgE. Dilution of the serum increased the selectivity toward IgE; the protein was detected without interference in a 10,000-fold dilution of the serum, which is consistent with detection of IgE at amol (pM) levels in standard solutions. PMID:17194151

  16. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  17. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications.

    PubMed

    Imaduwage, Kasun P; Go, Eden P; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Ultra-fast liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry determination of ochratoxin A in traditional Chinese medicines based on vortex-assisted solid-liquid microextraction and aptamer-affinity column clean-up.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihui; Hu, Yichen; Kong, Weijun; Chu, Xianfeng; Yang, Meihua; Zhao, Ming; Ouyang, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    A rapid, selective, and sensitive ultra-fast liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of ochratoxin A in traditional Chinese medicines based on vortex-assisted solid-liquid microextraction and aptamer-affinity column clean-up. Through optimizing the sample pretreatment procedures and chromatographic conditions, good linearity (r(2) ≥ 0.9993), low limit of detection (0.5-0.8 μg/kg), and satisfactory recovery (83.54-94.44%) expressed the good reliability and applicability of the established method in various traditional Chinese medicines. Moreover, the aptamer-affinity column, prepared in-house, showed an excellent feasibility owing to its specific identification of ochratoxin A in various kinds of selected traditional Chinese medicines. The maximum adsorption amount and applicability value were 188.96 ± 10.56 ng and 72.3%, respectively. The matrix effects were effectively eliminated, especially for m/z 404.2→358.0 of ochratoxin A. The application of the developed method for screening the natural contamination levels of ochratoxin A in 25 random traditional Chinese medicines on the market in China indicated that only eight samples were contaminated with low levels below the legal limit (5.0 μg/kg) set by the European Union. This study provided a preferred choice for the rapid and accurate monitoring of ochratoxin A in complex matrices.

  19. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Temporini, C; Pochetti, G; Fracchiolla, G; Piemontese, L; Montanari, R; Moaddel, R; Laghezza, A; Altieri, F; Cervoni, L; Ubiali, D; Prada, E; Loiodice, F; Massolini, G; Calleri, E

    2013-04-05

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening toward PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments toward new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Data for the identification of proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins associated to histones H3 and H4 in S. cerevisiae, using tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification method (TAP) allows the efficient purification of native protein complexes which incorporate a target protein fused with the TAP tag. Purified multiprotein complexes can then be subjected to diverse types of proteomic analyses. Here we describe the data acquired after applying the TAP strategy on histones H3 and H4 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify associated proteins and protein post-translational modifications in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mass spectrometry dataset described here consists of 14 files generated from four different analyses in a 5600 Triple TOF (Sciex) by information-dependent acquisition (IDA) LC-MS/MS. The above files contain information about protein identification, protein relative abundance, and PTMs identification. The instrumental raw data from these files has been also uploaded to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository, with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002671 and http://dx.doi.org/10.6019/PXD002671. These data are discussed and interpreted in http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.004. Valero et al. (2016) [1].

  1. Data for the identification of proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins associated to histones H3 and H4 in S. cerevisiae, using tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification method (TAP) allows the efficient purification of native protein complexes which incorporate a target protein fused with the TAP tag. Purified multiprotein complexes can then be subjected to diverse types of proteomic analyses. Here we describe the data acquired after applying the TAP strategy on histones H3 and H4 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify associated proteins and protein post-translational modifications in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mass spectrometry dataset described here consists of 14 files generated from four different analyses in a 5600 Triple TOF (Sciex) by information‐dependent acquisition (IDA) LC–MS/MS. The above files contain information about protein identification, protein relative abundance, and PTMs identification. The instrumental raw data from these files has been also uploaded to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository, with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002671 and http://dx.doi.org/10.6019/PXD002671. These data are discussed and interpreted in http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.004. Valero et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:26949727

  2. Combining affinity enrichment, cross-linking with photo-amino acids, and mass spectrometry for probing protein kinase D2 interactions.

    PubMed

    Häupl, Björn; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2017-04-07

    We present a novel approach that relies on the affinity capture of protein interaction partners from a complex mixture, followed by covalent fixation via UV-induced activation of incorporated diazirine photo-reactive amino acids (photo-methionine and photo-leucine). The captured protein complexes are enzymatically digested and interacting proteins are identified and quantified by label-free LC/MS analysis. Using HeLa cell lysates with photo-methionine and photo-leucine-labeled proteins, we were able to capture and preserve protein interactions that are otherwise elusive in conventional pull-down experiments. Our approach is exemplified for mapping the protein interaction network of protein kinase D2, but has the potential be applied to any protein system. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD005346 (photo-amino acid incorporation) and PXD005349 (enrichment experiments). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  4. Novel cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) neoepitopes identified in synovial fluids from patients with joint diseases using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Dahlberg, Leif E; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-07-25

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDSPAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization.Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided.

  5. Identification of phosphoproteins in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using polyethylene glycol fractionation, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Uma K; Krochko, Joan E; Ross, Andrew R S

    2012-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism in cells. Identification and characterization of phosphoproteins requires specialized enrichment methods, due to the relatively low abundance of these proteins, and is further complicated in plants by the high abundance of Rubisco in green tissues. We present a novel method for plant phosphoproteome analysis that depletes Rubisco using polyethylene glycol fractionation and utilizes immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography to enrich phosphoproteins. Subsequent protein separation by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is further improved by extracting the PEG-fractionated protein samples with SDS/phenol and methanol/chloroform to remove interfering compounds. Using this approach, we identified 132 phosphorylated proteins in a partial Arabidopsis leaf extract. These proteins are involved in a range of biological processes, including CO(2) fixation, protein assembly and folding, stress response, redox regulation, and cellular metabolism. Both large and small subunits of Rubisco were phosphorylated at multiple sites, and depletion of Rubisco enhanced detection of less abundant phosphoproteins, including those associated with state transitions between photosystems I and II. The discovery of a phosphorylated form of AtGRP7, a self-regulating RNA-binding protein that affects floral transition, as well as several previously uncharacterized ribosomal proteins confirm the utility of this approach for phosphoproteome analysis and its potential to increase our understanding of growth and development in plants.

  6. High throughput screening of high-affinity ligands for proteins with anion-binding sites using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  7. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  8. Profiling of cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites by boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid monolithic capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chu, Jie-Mei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-01-14

    RNA contains a large number of modified nucleosides. In the metabolic re-exchange of RNA, modified nucleosides cannot be recycled and are thus excreted from cells into biological fluids. Determination of endogenous modified nucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive cancers diagnostic methods. Here we prepared boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid capillary monolithic column (BOHCMC) that exhibited excellent selectivity toward the cis-diol-containing compounds. We then used the prepared BOHCMC as the on-line solid-phase microextraction (SPME) column and developed an on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method to comprehensively profile cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites in human urine. Forty-five cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites were successfully identified in human urine. And five ribose conjugates, for the first time, were identified existence in human urine in the current study. Furthermore, the relative quantification suggested 4 cis-diol-containing compounds (5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadensine, N(4)-acetylcytidine, 1-ribosyl-N-propionylhistamine and N(2),N(2),7-trimethylguanosine) increased more than 1.5 folds in all the 3 types of examined cancers (lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer) compared to healthy controls. The on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method demonstrates a promising method for the comprehensive profiling of cis-diol-containing ribose conjugates in human urines, which provides an efficient strategy for the identification and discovery of biomarkers and may be used for the screening of cancers.

  9. [Analysis of rice leaves proteomes by liquid chromatography-tandem, mass spectrometry based on the purification using a novel affinity detergent removal spin column].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolin; Gong, Jiadi; Chen, Mingxue; Yu, Shasha; Bian, Yingfang; Cao, Zhaoyun

    2014-11-01

    A purification method was established for the analysis of proteomes in rice leaves based on a novel detergent removal spin column (DRSC). The proteins were extracted by phenol protein extraction method followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) lysis. The lysate was purified by the detergent removal spin column and the enzymolytic peptides were detected by the nanoflow liquid chromatography-hybrid linear trap quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ/Orbitrap). In terms of SDS removal efficiencies and protein identification, the method of DRSC was compared with those of filter aided sample preparation (FASP) and acetone precipitation. As a result, there were good efficiencies ( > 95%) of SDS removal for the three methods. With the DRSC purification strategy, 563 proteins were identified from rice leaves, while only 196 and 306 proteins were identified by FASP and acetone precipitation procedures respectively, in spite of certain complementarities among these identified proteins by the three methods. DRSC is suitable for proteins with various relative molecular masses and pI values. However, there were similar losses of proteins with different relative molecular masses and pI values with the other two methods. Using the established method, 588 proteins were identified by once injection analysis. According to the molecular functions, 296 proteins with at least two identified peptides can be classified into eight categories with binding activity, enzyme activity, transporter activity, inhibitor activity, structural constitute, catalytic activity, other and unknown functions. The method provides technical reference for conducting rice proteomes.

  10. Profiling of cis-Diol-containing Nucleosides and Ribosylated Metabolites by Boronate-affinity Organic-silica Hybrid Monolithic Capillary Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chu, Jie-Mei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-01-01

    RNA contains a large number of modified nucleosides. In the metabolic re-exchange of RNA, modified nucleosides cannot be recycled and are thus excreted from cells into biological fluids. Determination of endogenous modified nucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive cancers diagnostic methods. Here we prepared boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid capillary monolithic column (BOHCMC) that exhibited excellent selectivity toward the cis-diol-containing compounds. We then used the prepared BOHCMC as the on-line solid-phase microextraction (SPME) column and developed an on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method to comprehensively profile cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites in human urine. Forty-five cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites were successfully identified in human urine. And five ribose conjugates, for the first time, were identified existence in human urine in the current study. Furthermore, the relative quantification suggested 4 cis-diol-containing compounds (5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadensine, N4-acetylcytidine, 1-ribosyl-N-propionylhistamine and N2,N2,7-trimethylguanosine) increased more than 1.5 folds in all the 3 types of examined cancers (lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer) compared to healthy controls. The on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method demonstrates a promising method for the comprehensive profiling of cis-diol-containing ribose conjugates in human urines, which provides an efficient strategy for the identification and discovery of biomarkers and may be used for the screening of cancers. PMID:25585609

  11. An analytical strategy for identification of a somatotropin-like bioactive peptide by ion trap liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after immuno-affinity purification from buffalo serum.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Pasquale; Vinci, Floriana; Fusco, Giovanna; Serpe, Luigi

    2009-02-01

    The use of growth hormones, such as native and recombinant somatotropins, is forbidden in the European Union (EU), but is legal in the USA. The misuse of recombinant bovine somatotropin in Italy is suspected for enhancing milk production, thanks to its availability on the illegal market. A synthetic bioactive peptide of 27 amino acids derived from bovine somatotropin was successfully tested in France and in southern Italy for scientific purposes, to stimulate milk production, both in cows and buffaloes. This somatotropin-like peptide (PEP-ST), suspected for illegal use in southern Italy, was synthesized by linking the 104-113 sequence of bovine somatotropin to the 323-339 sequence of ovalbumin. Herein, a method for detection and identification of the PEP-ST in buffalo serum is described; our strategy was based on the production of IgG anti-PEP-ST, used to synthesize an immuno-affinity column for peptide purification from buffalo serum, prior to analysis by ion trap liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS). The immuno-affinity column was successfully used to purify in a single step the bioactive PEP-ST from buffalo serum samples spiked at 20, 50 and 200 microg/mL for confirmatory analysis. Ion trap LC/ESI-MS/MS identification was based on detection of a multi-charged molecular ion and its characteristic fragmentation pattern. No significant matrix interference was observed, accounting for method specificity. We consider this strategy to be a basic approach that could be improved in the perspective of the official control of illegal use of somatotropin and somatotropin-like compounds in buffalo breeding. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Popular computational methods to assess multiprotein complexes derived from label-free affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments.

    PubMed

    Armean, Irina M; Lilley, Kathryn S; Trotter, Matthew W B

    2013-01-01

    Advances in sensitivity, resolution, mass accuracy, and throughput have considerably increased the number of protein identifications made via mass spectrometry. Despite these advances, state-of-the-art experimental methods for the study of protein-protein interactions yield more candidate interactions than may be expected biologically owing to biases and limitations in the experimental methodology. In silico methods, which distinguish between true and false interactions, have been developed and applied successfully to reduce the number of false positive results yielded by physical interaction assays. Such methods may be grouped according to: (1) the type of data used: methods based on experiment-specific measurements (e.g., spectral counts or identification scores) versus methods that extract knowledge encoded in external annotations (e.g., public interaction and functional categorisation databases); (2) the type of algorithm applied: the statistical description and estimation of physical protein properties versus predictive supervised machine learning or text-mining algorithms; (3) the type of protein relation evaluated: direct (binary) interaction of two proteins in a cocomplex versus probability of any functional relationship between two proteins (e.g., co-occurrence in a pathway, sub cellular compartment); and (4) initial motivation: elucidation of experimental data by evaluation versus prediction of novel protein-protein interaction, to be experimentally validated a posteriori. This work reviews several popular computational scoring methods and software platforms for protein-protein interactions evaluation according to their methodology, comparative strengths and weaknesses, data representation, accessibility, and availability. The scoring methods and platforms described include: CompPASS, SAINT, Decontaminator, MINT, IntAct, STRING, and FunCoup. References to related work are provided throughout in order to provide a concise but thorough introduction to a

  13. Quantification of the IgG2/4 kappa Monoclonal Therapeutic Eculizumab from Serum Using Isotype Specific Affinity Purification and Microflow LC-ESI-Q-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladwig, Paula M.; Barnidge, David R.; Willrich, Maria A. V.

    2017-05-01

    As therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) become more humanized, traditional tryptic peptide approaches used to measure biologics in serum become more challenging since unique clonotypic peptides used for quantifying the mAb may also be found in the normal serum polyclonal background. An alternative approach is to monitor the unique molecular mass of the intact light chain portion of the mAbs using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Distinguishing a therapeutic mAb from a patient's normal polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) repertoire is the primary limiting factor when determining the limit of quantitation (LOQ) in serum. The ability to selectively extract subclass specific Igs from serum reduces the polyclonal background in a sample. We present here the development of an LC-MS method to quantify eculizumab in serum. Eculizumab is a complement component 5 (C5) binding mAb that is fully humanized and contains portions of both IgG2 and IgG4 subclasses. Our group developed a method that uses Life Technologies CaptureSelect IgG4 (Hu) affinity matrix. We show here the ability to quantitate eculizumab with a LOQ of 5 mcg/mL by removing the higher abundance IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 from the polyclonal background, making this approach a simple and efficient procedure.

  14. Phosphoric acid enhances the performance of Fe(III) affinity chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry for recovery, detection and sequencing of phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Stensballe, Allan; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2004-01-01

    An integrated analytical strategy for enrichment, detection and sequencing of phosphorylated peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is reported. o-Phosphoric acid was found to enhance phosphopeptide ion signals in MALDI-MS when used as the acid dopant in 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB) matrix. The effect was largest for multiply phosphorylated peptides, which exhibited an up to ten-fold increase in ion intensity as compared with standard sample preparation methods. The enhanced phosphopeptide response was observed during MALDI-MS analysis of several peptide mixtures derived by proteolytic digestion of phosphoproteins. Furthermore, the mixture of 2,5-DHB and o-phosphoric acid was an excellent eluant for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Singly and multiply phosphorylated peptide species were efficiently recovered from Fe(III)-IMAC columns, reducing sample handling for phosphopeptide mapping by MALDI-MS and subsequent phosphopeptide sequencing by MALDI-MS/MS. The enhanced response of phosphopeptide ions in MALDI facilitates MS/MS of large (>3 kDa) multiply phosphorylated peptide species and reduces the amount of analyte needed for complete characterization of phosphoproteins.

  15. Quantification of the IgG2/4 kappa Monoclonal Therapeutic Eculizumab from Serum Using Isotype Specific Affinity Purification and Microflow LC-ESI-Q-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladwig, Paula M.; Barnidge, David R.; Willrich, Maria A. V.

    2016-12-01

    As therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) become more humanized, traditional tryptic peptide approaches used to measure biologics in serum become more challenging since unique clonotypic peptides used for quantifying the mAb may also be found in the normal serum polyclonal background. An alternative approach is to monitor the unique molecular mass of the intact light chain portion of the mAbs using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Distinguishing a therapeutic mAb from a patient's normal polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) repertoire is the primary limiting factor when determining the limit of quantitation (LOQ) in serum. The ability to selectively extract subclass specific Igs from serum reduces the polyclonal background in a sample. We present here the development of an LC-MS method to quantify eculizumab in serum. Eculizumab is a complement component 5 (C5) binding mAb that is fully humanized and contains portions of both IgG2 and IgG4 subclasses. Our group developed a method that uses Life Technologies CaptureSelect IgG4 (Hu) affinity matrix. We show here the ability to quantitate eculizumab with a LOQ of 5 mcg/mL by removing the higher abundance IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 from the polyclonal background, making this approach a simple and efficient procedure.

  16. Quantification of the IgG2/4 kappa Monoclonal Therapeutic Eculizumab from Serum Using Isotype Specific Affinity Purification and Microflow LC-ESI-Q-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Paula M; Barnidge, David R; Willrich, Maria A V

    2017-05-01

    As therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) become more humanized, traditional tryptic peptide approaches used to measure biologics in serum become more challenging since unique clonotypic peptides used for quantifying the mAb may also be found in the normal serum polyclonal background. An alternative approach is to monitor the unique molecular mass of the intact light chain portion of the mAbs using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Distinguishing a therapeutic mAb from a patient's normal polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) repertoire is the primary limiting factor when determining the limit of quantitation (LOQ) in serum. The ability to selectively extract subclass specific Igs from serum reduces the polyclonal background in a sample. We present here the development of an LC-MS method to quantify eculizumab in serum. Eculizumab is a complement component 5 (C5) binding mAb that is fully humanized and contains portions of both IgG2 and IgG4 subclasses. Our group developed a method that uses Life Technologies CaptureSelect IgG4 (Hu) affinity matrix. We show here the ability to quantitate eculizumab with a LOQ of 5 mcg/mL by removing the higher abundance IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 from the polyclonal background, making this approach a simple and efficient procedure. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Proteomic analysis of nipple aspirate fluid from women with early-stage breast cancer using isotope-coded affinity tags and tandem mass spectrometry reveals differential expression of vitamin D binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Pawlik, Timothy M; Hawke, David H; Liu, Yanna; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Fritsche, Herbert; Hunt, Kelly K; Kuerer, Henry M

    2006-01-01

    Background Isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) tandem mass spectrometry (MS) allows for qualitative and quantitative analysis of paired protein samples. We sought to determine whether ICAT technology could quantify and identify differential expression of tumor-specific proteins in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) from the tumor-bearing and contralateral disease-free breasts of patients with unilateral early-stage breast cancer. Methods Paired NAF samples from 18 women with stage I or II unilateral invasive breast carcinoma and 4 healthy volunteers were analyzed using ICAT labeling, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography, and MS. Proteins were identified by sequence database analysis. Western blot analysis of NAF from an independent sample set from 12 women (8 with early-stage breast cancer and 4 healthy volunteers) was also performed. Results 353 peptides were identified from tandem mass spectra and matched to peptide sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Equal numbers of peptides were up- versus down-regulated. Alpha2HS-glycoprotein [Heavy:Light (H:L) ratio 0.63] was underexpressed in NAF from tumor-bearing breasts, while lipophilin B (H:L ratio 1.42), beta-globin (H:L ratio 1.98), hemopexin (H:L ratio 1.73), and vitamin D-binding protein precursor (H:L ratio 1.82) were overexpressed. Western blot analysis of pooled samples of NAF from healthy volunteers versus NAF from women with breast cancer confirmed the overexpression of vitamin D-binding protein in tumor-bearing breasts. Conclusion ICAT tandem MS was able to identify and quantify differences in specific protein expression between NAF samples from tumor-bearing and disease-free breasts. Proteomic screening techniques using ICAT and NAF may be used to find markers for diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:16542425

  18. Continuous affinity-gradient nano-stationary phase served as a column for reversed-phase electrochromatography and matrix carrier in time-of-flight mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jen-Kuei; Yang, Chung-Shi; Wu, Yi-Shiuan; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2015-08-19

    This study developed an affinity-gradient nano-stationary phase (AG-NSP) for protein analysis using nanofluidic capillary electrochromatography (nano-CEC) conjugated with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The AG-NSP can be used for protein pre-separation in nano-CEC and as a matrix carrier for protein analysis in MALDI-TOF-MS. A hydrophobicity gradient in AG-NSP was photochemically formed by grafting 4-azidoaniline hydrochloride on vertically arrayed multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through gray-level exposure to UV light. The reversed-phase gradient stationary phase in AG-NSP was tailored according to the properties of the mobile phase gradient in capillary electrochromatography. As a result, the operation of the system is easily automated using a single buffer solution without the need for multiple solvents for elution. The use of nano-CEC with AG-NSP demonstrated excellent separation efficiency and high resolution for various types of DNA/protein/peptide. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis was then performed directly on the separated proteins and peptides on the chip. The proposed system was then used for the detection of three types of proteins with different molecular weights and PI values, including Cytochrome c (12,360, pI = 10), Lysozyme (14,300, pI = 11), and BSA (86,000, pI = 5)), and digested IgG fragments. The proposed system provided resolution of 1000 Da for the proteins in this study and the separation of digested IgG fragments at a low concentration of 1.2 pmol μL(-1).

  19. Discovery and characterization of EIIB, a new α-conotoxin from Conus ermineus venom by nAChRs affinity capture monitored by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Echterbille, Julien; Gilles, Nicolas; Araóz, Romulo; Mourier, Gilles; Amar, Muriel; Servent, Denis; De Pauw, Edwin; Quinton, Loic

    2017-05-01

    Animal toxins are peptides that often bind with remarkable affinity and selectivity to membrane receptors such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The latter are, for example, targeted by α-conotoxins, a family of peptide toxins produced by venomous cone snails. nAChRs are implicated in numerous physiological processes explaining why the design of new pharmacological tools and the discovery of potential innovative drugs targeting these receptor channels appear so important. This work describes a methodology developed to discover new ligands of nAChRs from complex mixtures of peptides. The methodology was set up by the incubation of Torpedo marmorata electrocyte membranes rich in nAChRs with BSA tryptic digests (>100 peptides) doped by small amounts of known nAChRs ligands (α-conotoxins). Peptides that bind to the receptors were purified and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry which revealed an enrichment of α-conotoxins in membrane-containing fractions. This result exhibits the binding of α-conotoxins to nAChRs. Negative controls were performed to demonstrate the specificity of the binding. The usefulness and the power of the methodology were also investigated for a discovery issue. The workflow was then applied to the screening of Conus ermineus crude venom, aiming at characterizing new nAChRs ligands from this venom, which has not been extensively investigated to date. The methodology validated our experiments by allowing us to bind two α-conotoxins (α-EI and α-EIIA) which have already been described as nAChRs ligands. Moreover, a new conotoxin, never described to date, was also captured, identified and sequenced from this venom. Classical pharmacology tests by radioligand binding using a synthetic homologue of the toxin confirm the activity of the new peptide, called α-EIIB. The Ki value of this peptide for Torpedo nicotinic receptors was measured at 2.2 ± 0.7 nM.

  20. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  1. Quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins with peptide affinity-based enrichment and pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring by hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hoe; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; An, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-07-02

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is commonly used for the quantitative analysis of proteins during mass pectrometry (MS), and has excellent specificity and sensitivity for an analyte in a complex sample. In this study, a pseudo-MRM method for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins was developed using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (hybrid Q-TOF) MS and peptide affinity-based enrichment. First, a pseudo-MRM-based analysis using hybrid Q-TOF MS was performed for synthetic peptides selected as targets and spiked into tryptic digests of human serum. By integrating multiple transition signals corresponding to fragment ions in the full scan MS/MS spectrum of a precursor ion of the target peptide, a pseudo-MRM MS analysis of the target peptide showed an increased signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and sensitivity, as well as an improved reproducibility. The pseudo-MRM method was then used for the quantitative analysis of the tryptic peptides of two low-abundance serological proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and tissue-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPκ), which were prepared with peptide affinity-based enrichment from human serum. Finally, this method was used to detect femtomolar amounts of target peptides derived from TIMP1 and PTPκ, with good coefficients of variation (CV 2.7% and 9.8%, respectively), using a few microliters of human serum from colorectal cancer patients. The results suggest that pseudo-MRM using hybrid Q-TOF MS, combined with peptide affinity-based enrichment, could become a promising alternative for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance target proteins of interest in complex serum samples that avoids protein depletion.

  2. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  3. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  4. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  5. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  6. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  7. Imaging of uranium on rat brain sections using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: a new tool for the study of critical substructures affined to heavy metals in tissues.

    PubMed

    Becker, J Sabine; Dobrowolska, Justina; Zoriy, Miroslav; Matusch, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    The specific toxicity of trace metals and compounds largely depends on their bioavailability in different organs or compartments of the organism considered. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) with a spatial resolution in the 100 microm range was developed and employed to study heavy metal distribution in brain tissues for toxicological screening. Rat brain post-mortem tissues were stained in an aqueous solution of either uranium or neodymium (metal concentration 100 microg g(-1)) for 3 h. The incubation of heavy metal in thin slices of brain tissue is followed by an imaging mass spectrometric LA-ICP-MS technique. Stained rat brain tissue (thickness 30 microm) were scanned with a focused laser beam (wavelength 266 nm, diameter of laser crater 100 microm and laser power density 3 x 10(9) W cm(-2)). The ion intensities of (235)U(+), (238)U(+), (145)Nd(+) and (146)Nd(+) were measured by LA-ICP-MS within the ablated area. For quantification purposes, matrix-matched laboratory standards were prepared by dosing each analyte to the pieces of homogenized brain tissue. Imaging LA-ICP-MS allows structures of interest to be identified and the relevant dose range to be estimated.

  8. A Method to Site-Specifically Identify and Quantitate Carbonyl End Products of Protein Oxidation Using Oxidation-Dependent Element Coded Affinity Tags (O-ECAT) and NanoLiquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Young, N L; Whetstone, P A; Cheal, S M; Benner, W H; Lebrilla, C B; Meares, C F

    2005-08-25

    Protein oxidation is linked to cellular stress, aging, and disease. Protein oxidations that result in reactive species are of particular interest, since these reactive oxidation products may react with other proteins or biomolecules in an unmediated and irreversible fashion, providing a potential marker for a variety of disease mechanisms. We have developed a novel system to identify and quantitate, relative to other states, the sites of oxidation on a given protein. A specially designed Oxidation-dependent carbonyl-specific Element-Coded Affinity Mass Tag (O-ECAT), AOD, ((S)-2-(4-(2-aminooxy)-acetamido)-benzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid, is used to covalently tag the residues of a protein oxidized to aldehyde or keto end products. After proteolysis, the resulting AOD-tagged peptides are affinity purified, and analyzed by nanoLC-FTICR-MS, which provides high specificity in extracting co-eluting AOD mass pairs with a unique mass difference and affords relative quantitation based on isotopic ratios. Using this methodology, we have mapped the surface oxidation sites on a model protein, recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in its native form (as purchased) and after FeEDTA oxidation. A variety of modified amino acid residues including lysine, arginine, proline, histidine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, were found to be oxidized to aldehyde and keto end products. The sensitivity of this methodology is shown by the number of peptides identified, twenty peptides on the native protein and twenty-nine after surface oxidation using FeEDTA and ascorbate. All identified peptides map to the surface of the HSA crystal structure validating this method for identifying oxidized amino acids on protein surfaces. In relative quantitation experiments between FeEDTA oxidation and native protein oxidation, identified sites showed different relative propensities towards oxidation independent of amino acid residue. We expect to extend

  9. Characterization of a benzyladenine binding-site peptide isolated from a wheat cytokinin-binding protein: Sequence analysis and identification of a single affinity-labeled histidine residue by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brinegar, A.C.; Cooper, G.; Stevens, A.; Hauer, C.R.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D.F.; Fox, J.E. )

    1988-08-01

    A wheat embryo cytokinin-binding protein was covalently modified with the radiolabeled photoaffinity ligand 2-azido-N{sup 6}-({sup 14}C)benzyladenine. A single labeled peptide was obtained after proteolytic digestion and isolation by reversed-phase and anion-exchange HPLC. Sequencing by classical Edman degradation identified 11 of the 12 residues but failed to identify the labeled amino acid. Analysis by laser photodissociation Fourier-transform mass spectrometry of 10 pmol of the peptide independently confirmed the Edman data and also demonstrated that the histidine residue nearest the C terminus (underlined) was modified by the reagent in the sequence Ala-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-His{und His}-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu.

  10. Stability of flavin semiquinones in the gas phase: the electron affinity, proton affinity, and hydrogen atom affinity of lumiflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlan; Papson, Kaitlin; Ochran, Richard; Ridge, Douglas P

    2013-11-07

    Examination of electron transfer and proton transfer reactions of lumiflavin and proton transfer reactions of the lumiflavin radical anion by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. From the equilibrium constant determined for electron transfer between 1,4-naphthoquinone and lumiflavin the electron affinity of lumiflavin is deduced to be 1.86 ± 0.1 eV. Measurements of the rate constants and efficiencies for proton transfer reactions indicate that the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion is between that of difluoroacetate (331.0 kcal/mol) and p-formyl-phenoxide (333.0 kcal/mol). Combining the electron affinity of lumiflavin with the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion gives a lumiflavin hydrogen atom affinity of 59.7 ± 2.2 kcal/mol. The ΔG298 deduced from these results for adding an H atom to gas phase lumiflavin, 52.1 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with ΔG298 for adding an H atom to aqueous lumiflavin from electrochemical measurements in the literature, 51.0 kcal/mol, and that from M06-L density functional calculations in the literature, 51.2 kcal/mol, suggesting little, if any, solvent effect on the H atom addition. The proton affinity of lumiflavin deduced from the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction between lumiflavin and 2-picoline is 227.3 ± 2.0 kcal mol(-1). Density functional theory calculations on isomers of protonated lumiflavin provide a basis for assigning the most probable site of protonation as position 1 on the isoalloxazine ring and for estimating the ionization potentials of lumiflavin neutral radicals.

  11. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  12. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  13. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  14. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  15. High oxygen affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Mangin, O

    2017-02-01

    High oxygen affinity hemoglobins are responsible for rare and heterogeneous autosomic dominant genetic diseases. They cause pure erythrocytosis, sometimes accountable for hyperviscosity and thrombosis, or hemolysis. Differential diagnoses must be first ruled out. The diagnosis is based on the identification of a decreased P50, and their possible characterization by cation exchange-high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Finally, genetic studies of the responsible globin chain gene will confirm the mutation. The prognosis mainly relies on the P50 decrease rate and on the hemoglobin cooperativity impairment. Disease management should be personalized, and it should primarily depend on smoking cessation and physical activity. Phlebotomy and platelet aggregation inhibitors' prescriptions can be discussed. There is no contraindication to flights, high-altitude conditions, or pregnancy. Nevertheless, blood donation must be prohibited. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  17. Ultrasensitive characterization of site-specific glycosylation of affinity-purified haptoglobin from lung cancer patient plasma using 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular liquid chromatography-linear ion trap collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L

    2011-03-15

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography-collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of the glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization, 200-500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrixes. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultranarrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap (LTQ) collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometer to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low picomole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patient plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol of Hpt digest (13 ng of protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS system allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ∼100 amol level. The PLOT LC-MS system is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace

  18. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  19. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    SciTech Connect

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-15

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  20. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  1. Affinity-based target deconvolution of safranal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Affinity-based target deconvolution is an emerging method for the identification of interactions between drugs/drug candidates and cellular proteins, and helps to predict potential activities and side effects of a given compound. In the present study, we hypothesized that a part of safranal pharmacological effects, one of the major constituent of Crocus sativus L., relies on its physical interaction with target proteins. Methods Affinity chromatography solid support was prepared by covalent attachment of safranal to agarose beads. After passing tissue lysate through the column, safranal-bound proteins were isolated and separated on SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot software. Results and major conclusion Data showed that safranal physically binds to beta actin, cytochrome b-c1 complex sub-unit 1, trifunctional enzyme sub-unit beta and ATP synthase sub-unit alpha and beta. These interactions may explain part of safranal’s pharmacological effects. However, phenotypic and/or biological relevance of these interactions remains to be elucidated by future pharmacological studies. PMID:23514587

  2. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  3. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  4. Use of The Yeast Two-Hybrid System to Identify Targets of Fungal Effectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) system is a binary method widely used to determine direct interactions between paired proteins. Although having certain limitations, this method has become one of the two main systemic tools (along with affinity purification/mass spectrometry) for interactome mapping in mo...

  5. The proton affinities of saturated and unsaturated heterocyclic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabli, Samira; van Beelen, Eric S. E.; Ingemann, Steen; Henriksen, Lars; Hammerum, Steen

    2006-03-01

    The proton affinities derived from G3-calculations of 23 five-membered ring heteroaromatic molecules agree well with the experimentally determined values available in the literature. The calculated local proton affinities show that the principal site of protonation of the heteroaromatic compounds examined is an atom of the ring, carbon when there is only one heteroatom in the ring, and nitrogen where there are two or more heteroatoms. The experimental proton affinities of non-aromatic cyclic ethers, amines and thioethers are also in excellent agreement with the calculated values, with two exceptions (oxetane, N-methylazetidine). The literature proton affinities of the four simple cyclic ethers, oxetane, tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran and oxepane were confirmed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, in order to examine the disagreement between the values predicted by extrapolation or additivity for tetrahydrofuran and tetrahydropyran and those determined by experiment and by calculation. The proton affinity differences between the pairs tetrahydropyran/1,4-dioxane, piperidine/morpholine and related compounds show that introduction of an additional oxygen atom in the ring considerably lowers the basicity.

  6. Boronate affinity materials for separation and molecular recognition: structure, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojin; Chen, Yang; Liu, Zhen

    2015-11-21

    Boronate affinity materials, as unique sorbents, have emerged as important media for the selective separation and molecular recognition of cis-diol-containing compounds. With the introduction of boronic acid functionality, boronate affinity materials exhibit several significant advantages, including broad-spectrum selectivity, reversible covalent binding, pH-controlled capture/release, fast association/desorption kinetics, and good compatibility with mass spectrometry. Because cis-diol-containing biomolecules, including nucleosides, saccharides, glycans, glycoproteins and so on, are the important targets in current research frontiers such as metabolomics, glycomics and proteomics, boronate affinity materials have gained rapid development and found increasing applications in the last decade. In this review, we critically survey recent advances in boronate affinity materials. We focus on fundamental considerations as well as important progress and new boronate affinity materials reported in the last decade. We particularly discuss on the effects of the structure of boronate ligands and supporting materials on the properties of boronate affinity materials, such as binding pH, affinity, selectivity, binding capacity, tolerance for interference and so on. A variety of promising applications, including affinity separation, proteomics, metabolomics, disease diagnostics and aptamer selection, are introduced with main emphasis on how boronate affinity materials can solve the issues in the applications and what merits boronate affinity materials can provide.

  7. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  8. Glucocorticoids: binding affinity and lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Ponec, M; Kempenaar, J; Shroot, B; Caron, J C

    1986-10-01

    The relative binding affinity of 35 steroids for the glucocorticoid receptor was determined in experiments in which the competition of various unlabeled steroids with either [6,7-3H]dexamethasone or [1,2-3H]hydrocortisone for the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor of cultured human keratinocytes was measured. The data obtained were correlated with steroid lipophilicity, measured as the partition coefficient of the steroid between 1-octanol and pH 7.4 aqueous buffer. The introduction of various substituents on the steroid molecule induced changes in the binding affinity and was associated in some cases with concomitant changes in steroid lipophilicity. The substitution by a 17 alpha-OH or 21-OH group leads in all cases to a decrease in steroid lipophilicity and to an increase in affinity. In contrast, 17 alpha-OAc and especially 21-OAc substitution on hydrocortisone and betamethasone causes a decrease in the steroid affinity for the receptor and an increase in steroid lipophilicity. The elongation of the ester chain from acetate to valerate in both position C-17 and C-21 leads to the increase in both the binding affinity for the receptor and the lipophilicity of steroids. However, all 21-esters showed lower binding affinity than the parent alcohol. The binding affinity of the highly lipophilic 17 alpha, 21-diester was found to be lower than that of the 17 alpha-ester but higher than that of the 21-ester or of the parent alcohol. Only in the series of 17 alpha- and 21-esters is there a correlation between the binding affinity of steroids for the glucocorticoid receptor and their lipophilicity.

  9. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P

    2016-12-09

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets.

  10. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets. PMID:28060343

  11. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  12. Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keliher, Peter N.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a review of selected literature on emission spectrometry published during 1982 and 1983. The review is organized under these headings: books and reviews; spectral descriptions and classifications; instrumentation; standards, samples, nomenclature, calibration, calculations; excitation sources; selected applications; and meetings. (JN)

  13. The electron affinity of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindahl, A. O.; Andersson, P.; Diehl, C.; Forstner, O.; Klason, P.; Hanstorp, D.

    2010-11-01

    The electron affinity of tungsten has been measured using laser photodetachment threshold spectroscopy in a collinear geometry. The electron affinity was determined to 6583.6(6) cm-1 by observing the onset of the process when W- ions in the 5d^56s^2 6S5/2 ground state are photodetached producing neutral W atoms in the 5d^46s^2 5D0 ground state. The measured value is in agreement with previous measurements and improves the accuracy by almost two orders of magnitude. Further, a photodetachment signal below the ground state photodetachment threshold was found, which indicates the existence of a bound excited state in W-.

  14. Peptide affinity chromatography based on combinatorial strategies for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia Andrea; Martínez-Ceron, María Camila; Giudicessi, Silvana Laura; Marani, Mariela Mirta; Albericio, Fernando; Cascone, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to develop affinity chromatography matrices with short peptide ligands for protein purification. The method entitles the following: (a) synthesis of a combinatorial library on the hydromethylbenzoyl (HMBA)-ChemMatrix resin by the divide-couple-recombine (DCR) method using the Fmoc chemistry, (b) library screening with the protein of interest labeled with a fluorescent dye or biotin, (c) identification of peptides contained on positive beads by tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS/MS), (d) solid-phase peptide ligand synthesis and immobilization in chromatographic supports, and (e) evaluation of protein adsorption on peptide affinity matrices from the equilibrium isotherms and breakthrough curves.

  15. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  16. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  17. Gravity theory through affine spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-08-01

    In this work it is argued that in order to improve our understanding of gravity and spacetime our most successful theory, general relativity, must be destructured. That is, some geometrical assumptions must be dropped and recovered just under suitable limits. Along this line of thought we pursue the idea that the roundness of the light cone, and hence the isotropy of the speed of light, must be relaxed and that, in fact, the shape of light cones must be regarded as a dynamical variable. Mathematically, we apply some important results from affine differential geometry to this problem, the idea being that in the transition we should preserve the identification of the spacetime continuum with a manifold endowed with a cone structure and a spacetime volume form. To that end it is suggested that the cotangent indicatrix (dispersion relation) must be described by an equation of Monge-Ampère type determining a hyperbolic affine sphere, at least whenever the matter content is negligible. Non-relativistic spacetimes fall into this description as they are recovered whenever the center of the affine sphere is at infinity. In the more general context of Lorentz-Finsler theories it is shown that the lightlike unparametrized geodesic flow is completely determined by the distribution of light cones. Moreover, the transport of lightlike momenta is well defined though there could be no notion of affine parameter. Finally, we show how the perturbed indicatrix can be obtained from the perturbed light cone.

  18. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    DOE PAGES

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; ...

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core mapsmore » and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.« less

  19. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF INORGANIC RADICALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    energy in the latter compound is 110 kcals/mole, distinctly higher than in ammonia. Cyanogen (CN)2 and hydrocyanic acid (HCN) yield values for the...ions very readily, and the electron affinity is 49 kcals/mole. A comparison with the results from thiocyanic acid (HNCS) indicates that the H-N bond

  20. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  1. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  2. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; Hargrove, Paul; Roman, Eric

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core maps and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.

  3. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  4. Dual-tagging system for the affinity purification of mammalian protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Huang, Ying; Wu, Jun; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Although affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful tool to study protein-protein interactions, this strategy has encountered numerous difficulties when adapted to mammalian cells. Here we describe a Gateway{reg_sign}-compatible dual-tag affinity purification system that integrates regulatable expression, tetracysteine motifs, and various combinations of affinity tags to facilitate the cloning, detection, and purification of bait proteins and their interacting partners. Utilizing the human telomere binding protein TRF2 as a benchmark, we demonstrate bait protein recoveries upwards of approximately 16% from as little as 1-7 x 10{sup 7} cells and successfully identify known TRF2 interacting proteins, suggesting that our dual-tag affinity purification approach is a capable new tool for expanding the capacity to explore mammalian proteomic networks.

  5. Affinity Spaces and 21st Century Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses video games as "attractors" to "affinity spaces." It argues that affinity spaces are key sites today where people teach and learn 21st Century skills. While affinity spaces are proliferating on the Internet as interest-and-passion-driven sites devoted to a common set of endeavors, they are not new, just…

  6. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  7. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  8. Application of mass spectrometry in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Kleiner, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has arguably become the core technology in proteomics. The application of mass spectrometry based techniques for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of global proteome samples derived from complex mixtures has had a big impact in the understanding of cellular function. Here, we give a brief introduction to principles of mass spectrometry and instrumentation currently used in proteomics experiments. In addition, recent developments in the application of mass spectrometry in proteomics are summarised. Strategies allowing high-throughput identification of proteins from highly complex mixtures include accurate mass measurement of peptides derived from total proteome digests and multidimensional peptide separations coupled with mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins permits the characterisation of protein isoforms. Recent developments in stable isotope labelling techniques and chemical tagging allow the mass spectrometry based differential display and quantitation of proteins, and newly established affinity procedures enable the targeted characterisation of post-translationally modified proteins. Finally, advances in mass spectrometric imaging allow the gathering of specific information on the local molecular composition, relative abundance and spatial distribution of peptides and proteins in thin tissue sections.

  9. Biotin-Streptavidin Affinity Purification of RNA-Protein Complexes Assembled In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuai; Shi, Lei; Lei, Haixin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-protein complexes are essential for the function of different RNAs, yet purification of specific RNA-protein complexes can be complicated and is a major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of regulatory RNAs. Here we present a protocol to purify RNA-protein complexes assembled in vitro based on biotin-streptavidin affinity. In vitro transcribed RNA is labeled with (32)P and biotin, ribonucleoprotein particles or RNPs are assembled by incubation of RNA in nuclear extract and fractionated using gel filtration, and RNP fractions are pooled for biotin-streptavidin affinity purification. The amount of RNA-protein complexes purified following this protocol is sufficient for mass spectrometry.

  10. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, Kenneth Sherman

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  11. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank-p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n-dimensions is bounded by (n + 1)!/p!(n − p)!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes. PMID:26858463

  12. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  13. Vertex representations of quantum affine algebras.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, I B; Jing, N

    1988-12-01

    We construct vertex representations of quantum affine algebras of ADE type, which were first introduced in greater generality by Drinfeld and Jimbo. The limiting special case of our construction is the untwisted vertex representation of affine Lie algebras of Frenkel-Kac and Segal. Our representation is given by means of a new type of vertex operator corresponding to the simple roots and satisfying the defining relations. In the case of the quantum affine algebra of type A, we introduce vertex operators corresponding to all the roots and determine their commutation relations. This provides an analogue of a Chevalley basis of the affine Lie algebra [unk](n) in the basic representation.

  14. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  15. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  16. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set.

  17. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  19. The eyes of Tullimonstrum reveal a vertebrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Clements, Thomas; Dolocan, Andrei; Martin, Peter; Purnell, Mark A; Vinther, Jakob; Gabbott, Sarah E

    2016-04-28

    Tullimonstrum gregarium is an iconic soft-bodied fossil from the Carboniferous Mazon Creek Lagerstätte (Illinois, USA). Despite a large number of specimens and distinct anatomy, various analyses over the past five decades have failed to determine the phylogenetic affinities of the 'Tully monster', and although it has been allied to such disparate phyla as the Mollusca, Annelida or Chordata, it remains enigmatic. The nature and phylogenetic affinities of Tullimonstrum have defied confident systematic placement because none of its preserved anatomy provides unequivocal evidence of homology, without which comparative analysis fails. Here we show that the eyes of Tullimonstrum possess ultrastructural details indicating homology with vertebrate eyes. Anatomical analysis using scanning electron microscopy reveals that the eyes of Tullimonstrum preserve a retina defined by a thick sheet comprising distinct layers of spheroidal and cylindrical melanosomes. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics provide further evidence that these microbodies are melanosomes. A range of animals have melanin in their eyes, but the possession of melanosomes of two distinct morphologies arranged in layers, forming retinal pigment epithelium, is a synapomorphy of vertebrates. Our analysis indicates that in addition to evidence of colour patterning, ecology and thermoregulation, fossil melanosomes can also carry a phylogenetic signal. Identification in Tullimonstrum of spheroidal and cylindrical melanosomes forming the remains of retinal pigment epithelium indicates that it is a vertebrate; considering its body parts in this new light suggests it was an anatomically unusual member of total group Vertebrata.

  20. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses.

  1. Integrin affinity modulation in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mahabeleshwar, Ganapati H.; Chen, Juhua; Feng, Weiyi; Somanath, Payaningal R.; Razorenova, Olga V.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2008-01-01

    Integrins, transmembrane glycoprotein receptors, play vital roles in pathological angiogenesis, but their precise regulatory functions are not completely understood and remain controversial. This study aims to assess the regulatory functions of individual beta subunits of endothelial integrins in angiogenic responses induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Inhibition of expression of β1, β3 or β5 integrins in endothelial cells resulted in down regulation of EC adhesion and migration on the primary ligand for the corresponding integrin receptor, while no effects on the recognition of other ligands were detected. Although inhibition of expression of each subunit substantially affected capillary growth stimulated by VEGF, the loss of β3 integrin was the most inhibitory. EC stimulation by VEGF induced formation of the high affinity (activated) state of αvβ3 in a monolayer and activated αvβ3 was co-localized with VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Inhibition of expression of β1, β3 or β5 did not affect expression levels of VEGFR-2 in EC. However, inhibition of β3, but not β1 or β5, resulted in substantial inhibition of VEGFR-2 phosphorylation stimulated by VEGF. Exogenous stimulation of αvβ3 integrin with activating antibodies augmented VEGF-dependent phosphorylation of VEGFR-2, whereas integrin blockade suppressed this response. Most importantly, activated αvβ3 was detected on endothelial cells of tumor vasculature. Activation of αvβ3 was substantially increased in highly-vascularized tumors as compared to normal tissues. Moreover, activated αvβ3 was co-localized with VEGFR-2 on endothelial cells of proliferating blood vessels. Together, these results show the unique role of αvβ3 integrin in cross-talk with VEGFR-2 in the context of pathological angiogenesis. PMID:18287811

  2. Reversible cyclic peptide libraries for the discovery of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Ward, Kevin Lawrence; Naik, Amith Dattatray; Kish, William Stanley; Blackburn, Robert Kevin; Carbonell, Ruben Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    A novel strategy is presented for the identification of cyclic peptide ligands from combinatorial libraries of reversible cyclic depsipeptides. A method for the solid-phase synthesis of individual cyclic depsipeptides and combinatorial libraries of these compounds is proposed, which employs lactic acid (Lact) and the dipeptide ester (Nα-Ac)-Ser(Ala)- as linkers for dilactonization. Upon alkaline treatment of the beads selected by screening a model library, the cyclic depsipeptides are linearized and released from the solid support to the liquid phase, to be sequenced via single-step tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The protocol presented for library synthesis provides for wide structural diversity. Two model sequences, VVWVVK and AAWAAR, were chosen to present different structural examples for depsipeptide libraries and demonstrate the process of sequence determination by mass spectrometry. Further, a case study using the IgG binding cyclic depsipeptide cyclo[(Nα-Ac)-S(A)-RWHYFK-Lact-E] is presented to demonstrate the process of library screening and sequence determination on the selected beads. Finally, a method is shown for synthesis of the irreversible cyclic peptide corresponding to the proposed depsipeptide structure, to make the ligand stable to the aqueous acid and alkaline conditions encountered in affinity chromatographic applications. The cyclic peptide ligand was synthesized on a poly(methacrylate) resin and used for chromatographic binding of the target IgG.

  3. The Cutting Edge of Affinity Electrophoresis Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is an important technique that is widely used to separate and analyze biomolecules in the fields of biology and medicine. Both quantitative and qualitative information can be gained through affinity electrophoresis. Affinity electrophoresis can be applied through a variety of strategies, such as mobility shift electrophoresis, charge shift electrophoresis or capillary affinity electrophoresis. These strategies are based on changes in the electrophoretic patterns of biological macromolecules that result from interactions or complex-formation processes that induce changes in the size or total charge of the molecules. Nucleic acid fragments can be characterized through their affinity to other molecules, for example transcriptional factor proteins. Hydrophobic membrane proteins can be identified by means of a shift in the mobility induced by a charged detergent. The various strategies have also been used in the estimation of association/disassociation constants. Some of these strategies have similarities to affinity chromatography, in that they use a probe or ligand immobilized on a supported matrix for electrophoresis. Such methods have recently contributed to profiling of major posttranslational modifications of proteins, such as glycosylation or phosphorylation. Here, we describe advances in analytical techniques involving affinity electrophoresis that have appeared during the last five years. PMID:28248262

  4. Biomarker Candidates of Chlamydophila pneumoniae Proteins and Protein Fragments Identified by Affinity-Proteomics Using FTICR-MS and LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susnea, Iuliana; Bunk, Sebastian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hermann, Corinna; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We report here an affinity-proteomics approach that combines 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with high performance mass spectrometry to the identification of both full length protein antigens and antigenic fragments of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae). The present affinity-mass spectrometry approach effectively utilized high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and LC-tandem-MS for protein identification, and enabled the identification of several new highly antigenic C. pneumoniae proteins that were not hitherto reported or previously detected only in other Chlamydia species, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Moreover, high resolution affinity-MS provided the identification of several neo-antigenic protein fragments containing N- and C-terminal, and central domains such as fragments of the membrane protein Pmp21 and the secreted chlamydial proteasome-like factor (Cpaf), representing specific biomarker candidates.

  5. Analysis of Biological Interactions by Affinity Chromatography: Clinical and Pharmaceutical Applications.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S

    2017-06-01

    The interactions between biochemical and chemical agents in the body are important in many clinical processes. Affinity chromatography and high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC), in which a column contains an immobilized biologically related binding agent, are 2 methods that can be used to study these interactions. This review presents various approaches that can be used in affinity chromatography and HPAC to characterize the strength or rate of a biological interaction, the number and types of sites that are involved in this process, and the interactions between multiple solutes for the same binding agent. A number of applications for these methods are examined, with an emphasis on recent developments and high-performance affinity methods. These applications include the use of these techniques for fundamental studies of biological interactions, high-throughput screening of drugs, work with modified proteins, tools for personalized medicine, and studies of drug-drug competition for a common binding agent. The wide range of formats and detection methods that can be used with affinity chromatography and HPAC for examining biological interactions makes these tools attractive for various clinical and pharmaceutical applications. Future directions in the development of small-scale columns and the coupling of these methods with other techniques, such as mass spectrometry or other separation methods, should continue to increase the flexibility and ease with which these approaches can be used in work involving clinical or pharmaceutical samples. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  6. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  7. Universality of affine formulation in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijowski, Jerzy; Werpachowski, Roman

    2007-02-01

    The affine variational principle for general relativity, proposed in 1978 by one of us, is a good remedy for the nonuniversal properties of the standard, metric formulation, arising when the matter Lagrangian depends upon the metric derivatives. The affine version of the theory cures the standard drawback of the metric version, where the leading (second-order) term of the field equations depends upon the matter fields and its causal structure violates the light cone structure of the metric. Choosing the affine connection (and not the metric one) as the gravitational configuration, simplifies considerably the canonical structure of the theory and is more suitable for the purposes of its quantization along the lines of Ashtekar and Lewandowski. We show how the affine formulation provides a simple method to handle boundary integrals in general relativity theory.

  8. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  9. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  10. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  11. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  12. Identification of proteins interacting with ammodytoxins in Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom by immuno-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brgles, Marija; Kurtović, Tihana; Kovačič, Lidija; Križaj, Igor; Barut, Miloš; Lang Balija, Maja; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their function, proteins frequently interact with other proteins. Various methods are used to reveal protein interacting partners, and affinity chromatography is one of them. Snake venom is composed mostly of proteins, and various protein complexes in the venom have been found to exhibit higher toxicity levels than respective components separately. Complexes can modulate envenomation activity of a venom and/or potentiate its effect. Our previous data indicate that the most toxic components of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes (Vaa) venom isolated so far-ammodytoxins (Atxs)-are contributing to the venom's toxicity only moderately; therefore, we aimed to explore whether they have some interacting partner(s) potentiating toxicity. For screening of possible interactions, immuno-affinity chromatography combined with identification by mass spectrometry was used. Various chemistries (epoxy, carbonyldiimidazole, ethylenediamine) as well as protein G functionality were used to immobilize antibodies on monolith support, a Convective Interaction Media disk. Monoliths have been demonstrated to better suit the separation of large biomolecules. Using such approach, several proteins were indicated as potential Atx-binding proteins. Among these, the interaction of Atxs with a Kunitz-type inhibitor was confirmed by far-Western dot-blot and surface plasmon resonance measurement. It can be concluded that affinity chromatography on monolithic columns combined with mass spectrometry identification is a successful approach for screening of protein interactions and it resulted with detection of the interaction of Atx with Kunitz-type inhibitor in Vaa venom for the first time.

  13. A novel multiple affinity purification tag and its use in identification of proteins associated with a cyclin-CDK complex.

    PubMed

    Honey, S; Schneider, B L; Schieltz, D M; Yates, J R; Futcher, B

    2001-02-15

    A novel multiple affinity purification (MAFT) or tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag has been constructed. It consists of the calmodulin binding peptide, six histidine residues, and three copies of the hemagglutinin epitope. This 'CHH' MAFT tag allows two or three consecutive purification steps, giving high purity. Active Clb2-Cdc28 kinase complex was purified from yeast cells after inserting the CHH tag into Clb2. Associated proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. These included the known associated proteins Cdc28, Sic1 and Cks1. Several other proteins were found including the 70 kDa chaperone, Ssa1.

  14. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  15. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  16. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  17. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same…

  18. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  19. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same…

  20. Stepparents' Affinity-Seeking and Affinity-Maintaining Strategies with Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Fine, Mark; Martin, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines the strategies that stepparents use to develop and maintain affinity with stepchildren and the effects that these strategies have on the development of stepparent-stepchildren relationships. Thirty-one affinity-seeking strategies are identified. Results show that dyadic activities worked best, but it is important that stepchildren…

  1. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  2. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  3. Affine coherent states and Toeplitz operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutníková, Mária; Hutník, Ondrej

    2012-06-01

    We study a parameterized family of Toeplitz operators in the context of affine coherent states based on the Calderón reproducing formula (= resolution of unity on L_2( {R})) and the specific admissible wavelets (= affine coherent states in L_2( {R})) related to Laguerre functions. Symbols of such Calderón-Toeplitz operators as individual coordinates of the affine group (= upper half-plane with the hyperbolic geometry) are considered. In this case, a certain class of pseudo-differential operators, their properties and their operator algebras are investigated. As a result of this study, the Fredholm symbol algebras of the Calderón-Toeplitz operator algebras for these particular cases of symbols are described. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  4. Use of Affinity Diagrams as Instructional Tools in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselden, Polly G.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how the affinity diagram, a tool for gathering information and organizing it into natural groupings, can be used in inclusive classrooms. It discusses how students can be taught to use an affinity diagram, how affinity diagrams can be used to reflect many voices, and how affinity diagrams can be used to plan class projects.…

  5. On the electron affinity of B2

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vanda A.; Taylor, Peter

    2009-02-02

    We present the results of high-level ab initio calculations on the electron affinity of B2. Our new best estimate of 1.93±0.03 eV is in agreement with previous calculations as well as the sole existing experimental estimate of 1.8 eV, as derived from quantities with an uncertainty of 0.4 eV. The electron affinity of atomic boron, which is much smaller, is also calculated for comparison, and again found to be in good agreement with experiment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  7. Affine Invariant Character Recognition by Progressive Removing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamura, Masakazu; Horimatsu, Akira; Niwa, Ryo; Kise, Koichi; Uchida, Seiichi; Omachi, Shinichiro

    Recognizing characters in scene images suffering from perspective distortion is a challenge. Although there are some methods to overcome this difficulty, they are time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a set of affine invariant features and a new recognition scheme called “progressive removing” that can help reduce the processing time. Progressive removing gradually removes less feasible categories and skew angles by using multiple classifiers. We observed that progressive removing and the use of the affine invariant features reduced the processing time by about 60% in comparison to a trivial one without decreasing the recognition rate.

  8. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  9. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  10. Asymptotic Representations of Quantum Affine Superalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huafeng

    2017-08-01

    We study representations of the quantum affine superalgebra associated with a general linear Lie superalgebra. In the spirit of Hernandez-Jimbo, we construct inductive systems of Kirillov-Reshetikhin modules based on a cyclicity result that we established previously on tensor products of these modules, and realize their inductive limits as modules over its Borel subalgebra, the so-called q-Yangian. A new generic asymptotic limit of the same inductive systems is proposed, resulting in modules over the full quantum affine superalgebra. We derive generalized Baxter's relations in the sense of Frenkel-Hernandez for representations of the full quantum group.

  11. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  12. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  13. Evidence of multi-affinity in the Japanese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    Fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (Tokyo Stock Price Index: TOPIX) are analyzed using a multi-affine analysis method. In the research to date, only some simulated self-affine models have shown multi-affinity. In most experiments using observations of self-affine fractal profiles, multi-affinity has not been found. However, we find evidence of multi-affinity in fluctuations of the Japanese stock market (TOPIX). The qth-order Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. This multi-affinity indicates that there are plural mechanisms that affect the same time scale as stock market price fluctuation dynamics.

  14. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual-Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter we describe a comprehensive methodology that utilizes our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we have demonstrated the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  15. Preparation and affinity identification of glutamic acid-urea small molecule analogs in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zheng; Yang, Deyong; Fan, Weiwei; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Xiancheng; Chen, Xiaochi; Wang, Qifeng; Song, Xishuang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, study concerning activity inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been concentrated on the glutamic urea (Glu-urea-R) small molecule and its analogs. The present study aimed to synthesize 4 analogs of Glu-urea-R and identify the affinities of these compounds to PSMA. The compounds were synthesized from raw materials, and the experimental procedures of the present study were in accordance with standard techniques under anhydrous and anaerobic conditions. Glu-urea-Lysine (Glu-urea-Lys), Glu-urea-Ornithine (Glu-urea-Orn), Glu-urea-Glutamine (Glu-urea-Gln) and Glu-urea-Asparagine (Glu-urea-Asn) were successfully synthesized, and their structures were confirmed to be as desired using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. An affinity assay was performed to detect the affinity between the various compounds and PSMA expressed from the prostate cancer LNCap cell line. Glu-urea-Gln had the highest affinity to PSMA, followed by Glu-urea-Asn, Glu-urea-Orn and Glu-urea-Lys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Glu-urea-R specifically binds PSMA expressed in the LNCap cell line and inhibits its activity. PMID:27446384

  16. Proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi developmental stages using isotope-coded affinity tag reagents.

    PubMed

    Paba, Jaime; Ricart, Carlos A O; Fontes, Wagner; Santana, Jaime M; Teixeira, Antonio R L; Marchese, Jason; Williamson, Brian; Hunt, Tony; Karger, Barry L; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis of developmental stages of the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi was carried out by isotope-coded affinity tag technology (ICAT) associated with liquid cromatography-mass spectrometry peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Protein extracts of the protozoan trypomastigote and amastigote stages were labeled with heavy (D8) and light (D0) ICAT reagents and subjected to cation exchange and avidin affinity chromatographies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. High confidence sequence information and expression levels for 41 T. cruzi polypeptides, including metabolic enzymes, paraflagellar rod components, tubulins, and heat-shock proteins were reported. Twenty-nine proteins displayed similar levels of expression in both forms of the parasite, nine proteins presented higher levels in trypomastigotes, whereas three were more expressed in amastigotes.

  17. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T.; Vinci, Chris R.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the “affinity maturation” step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  18. On modality and complexity of affine embeddings

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    2001-08-31

    Let G be a reductive algebraic group and let H be a reductive subgroup of G. The modality of a G-variety X is the largest number of the parameters in a continuous family of G-orbits in X. A precise formula for the maximum value of the modality over all affine embeddings of the homogeneous space G/H is obtained.

  19. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  20. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  1. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  3. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  4. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  5. Stabilization of the Motion of Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, E. A.; Martynyuk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient conditions for the stability of a nonlinear affine system subject to interval initial conditions are established. These conditions are based on new estimates of the norms of the solutions of the systems of perturbed equations of motion. This stabilization method is used to analyze an electromechanical system with permanent magnet

  6. Nonuniform speaker normalization using affine transformation.

    PubMed

    Bharath Kumar, S V; Umesh, S

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, a well-motivated nonuniform speaker normalization model that affinely relates the formant frequencies of speakers enunciating the same sound is proposed. Using the proposed affine model, the corresponding universal-warping function that is required for normalization is shown to have the same parametric form as the mel scale formula. The parameters of this universal-warping function are estimated from the vowel formant data and are shown to be close to the commonly used formula for the mel scale. This shows an interesting connection between nonuniform speaker normalization and the psychoacoustics based mel scale. In addition, the affine model fits the vowel formant data better than commonly used ad hoc normalization models. This work is motivated by a desire to improve the performance of speaker-independent speech recognition systems, where speaker normalization is conventionally done by assuming a linear-scaling relationship between spectra of speakers. The proposed affine relation is extended to describe the relationship between spectra of speakers enunciating the same sound. On a telephone-based connected digit recognition task, the proposed model provides improved recognition performance over the linear-scaling model.

  7. Estimating electron affinity from the lifetime of negative molecular ions: Cycloheptatriene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfandiarov, N. L.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.; Vorob'ev, A. S.; Nafikova, E. P.; Mavrodiev, V. K.; Furlei, I. I.; Dokichev, V. A.; Platonov, D. N.; Belyy, A. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    Cycloheptatriene derivatives are studied by means of resonance electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry (REC NIMS). The average lifetimes of molecular negative ions (NIs) are measured with respect to electron autodetachment. Using the Arrhenius approach, electron affinity EAa of the molecules under study is estimated, and the effective temperature of the resulting negative molecular ions is determined as a function of the electron energy. It is assumed that the dissociation of negative molecular ions in the ground electronic state is a process similar to that of the thermal degradation of molecules.

  8. Evidence of land plant affinity for the Devonian fossil Protosalvinia (Foerstia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romankiw, L.A.; Hatcher, P.G.; Roen, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The Devonian plant fossil Protosalvinia (Foerstia) has been examined by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PY-GC-MS). Results of these studies reveal that the chemical structure of Protosalvinia is remarkably similar to that of coalified wood. A well-defined phenolic carbon peak in the NMR spectra and the appearance of phenol and alkylated phenols in pyrolysis products are clearly indicative of lignin-like compounds. These data represent significant new information on the chemical nature of Protosalvinia and provide the first substantial organic geochemical evidence for land plant affinity. -Authors

  9. Evaluation of SDS depletion using an affinity spin column and IMS-MS detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hengel, Shawna M.; Floyd, Erica A.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Zhao, Rui; Wu, Si; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2012-11-01

    While the use of detergents is necessary for a variety of protein isolation preparation protocols, often prior to mass spectral (MS) analysis, they are not compatible with MS analysis due to ion suppression and adduct formation. This manuscript describes optimization of detergent removal, using commercially available SDS depletion spin columns containing an affinity resin, providing for both increased protein recovery and thorough SDS removal. Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) allowed for a concurrent analysis of both analyte and detergent. In the case of both proteins and peptides, higher detergent concentrations than previously reported provided an increase of sample recovery; however there was a limit as SDS was detected by IMS-MS at higher levels of SDS indicating incomplete detergent depletion. The results also suggest optimal conditions for SDS removal are dependent on the sample concentration. Overall, this study provides a useful guide for proteomic studies where SDS is required for efficient sample preparation.

  10. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  11. Affinity-based methods in drug-target discovery.

    PubMed

    Rylova, Gabriela; Ozdian, Tomas; Varanasi, Lakshman; Soural, Miroslav; Hlavac, Jan; Holub, Dusan; Dzubak, Petr; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Target discovery using the molecular approach, as opposed to the more traditional systems approach requires the study of the cellular or biological process underlying a condition or disease. The approaches that are employed by the "bench" scientist may be genetic, genomic or proteomic and each has its rightful place in the drug-target discovery process. Affinity-based proteomic techniques currently used in drug-discovery draw upon several disciplines, synthetic chemistry, cell-biology, biochemistry and mass spectrometry. An important component of such techniques is the probe that is specifically designed to pick out a protein or set of proteins from amongst the varied thousands in a cell lysate. A second component, that is just as important, is liquid-chromatography tandem massspectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS and the supporting theoretical framework has come of age and is the tool of choice for protein identification and quantification. These proteomic tools are critical to maintaining the drug-candidate supply, in the larger context of drug discovery.

  12. Mass spectrometry innovations in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Papac, D I; Shahrokh, Z

    2001-02-01

    This review highlights the many roles mass spectrometry plays in the discovery and development of new therapeutics by both the pharmaceutical and the biotechnology industries. Innovations in mass spectrometer source design, improvements to mass accuracy, and implementation of computer-controlled automation have accelerated the purification and characterization of compounds derived from combinatorial libraries, as well as the throughput of pharmacokinetics studies. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry, chemical reaction interface-mass spectrometry and continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry are promising alternatives for conducting mass balance studies in man. To meet the technical challenges of proteomics, discovery groups in biotechnology companies have led the way to development of instruments with greater sensitivity and mass accuracy (e.g., MALDI-TOF, ESI-Q-TOF, Ion Trap), the miniaturization of separation techniques and ion sources (e.g., capillary HPLC and nanospray), and the utilization of bioinformatics. Affinity-based methods coupled to mass spectrometry are allowing rapid and selective identification of both synthetic and biological molecules. With decreasing instrument cost and size and increasing reliability, mass spectrometers are penetrating both the manufacturing and the quality control arenas. The next generation of technologies to simplify the investigation of the complex fate of novel pharmaceutical entities in vitro and in vivo will be chip-based approaches coupled with mass spectrometry.

  13. Optimal Affine-Invariant Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mauro S.; Haralick, Robert M.; Phillips, Tsaiyun I.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    1989-03-01

    The affine-transformation matching scheme proposed by Hummel and Wolfson (1988) is very efficient in a model-based matching system, not only in terms of the computational complexity involved, but also in terms of the simplicity of the method. This paper addresses the implementation of the affine-invariant point matching, applied to the problem of recognizing and determining the pose of sheet metal parts. It points out errors that can occur with this method due to quantization, stability, symmetry, and noise problems. By beginning with an explicit noise model which the Hummel and Wolfson technique lacks, we can derive an optimal approach which overcomes these problems. We show that results obtained with the new algorithm are clearly better than the results from the original method.

  14. Weight Representations of Admissible Affine Vertex Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Tomoyuki; Futorny, Vyacheslav; Ramirez, Luis Enrique

    2017-08-01

    For an admissible affine vertex algebra {V_k{(\\mathfrak{g})}} of type A, we describe a new family of relaxed highest weight representations of {V_k{(\\mathfrak{g})}}. They are simple quotients of representations of the affine Kac-Moody algebra {\\widehat{\\mathfrak{g}}} induced from the following {\\mathfrak{g}}-modules: (1) generic Gelfand-Tsetlin modules in the principal nilpotent orbit, in particular all such modules induced from {\\mathfrak{sl}_2}; (2) all Gelfand-Tsetlin modules in the principal nilpotent orbit that are induced from {\\mathfrak{sl}_3}; (3) all simple Gelfand-Tsetlin modules over {\\mathfrak{sl}_3}. This in particular gives the classification of all simple positive energy weight representations of {V_k{(\\mathfrak{g})}} with finite dimensional weight spaces for {\\mathfrak{g}=\\mathfrak{sl}_3}.

  15. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  16. Affinity chromatography in nonionic detergent solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J B; Strottmann, J M; Wick, D G; Stellwagen, E

    1980-01-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberatd from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfuly translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. PMID:6934517

  17. Affine Non-Local Means Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Vadim; Ballester, Coloma

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an extension of the Non-Local Means denoising method, that effectively exploits the affine invariant self-similarities present in the images of real scenes. Our method provides a better image denoising result by grounding on the fact that in many occasions similar patches exist in the image but have undergone a transformation. The proposal uses an affine invariant patch similarity measure that performs an appropriate patch comparison by automatically and intrinsically adapting the size and shape of the patches. As a result, more similar patches are found and appropriately used. We show that this image denoising method achieves top-tier performance in terms of PSNR, outperforming consistently the results of the regular Non-Local Means, and that it provides state-of-the-art qualitative results.

  18. Purification of swine haptoglobin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Eurell, T E; Hall, W F; Bane, D P

    1990-01-01

    A globin-agarose affinity chromatography technique was used to purify swine haptoglobin. This technique provides a highly specific, single-step purification method without the contamination of extraneous serum proteins reported by previous studies. Complex formation between the haptoglobin isolate and swine hemoglobin confirmed that biological activity was maintained during the purification process. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion methods revealed that the swine haptoglobin isolate cross-reacted with polyvalent antisera against human haptoglobin. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2123414

  19. Negative affinity X-ray photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Duckett, S.

    1974-01-01

    A new X-ray image intensifier is described. The device should eventually have a quantum efficiency which is an order of magnitude greater than that of presently available high spatial resolution X-ray detectors, such as microchannel plates. The new intesifier is based upon a GaAs crystal photocathode which is activated to achieve negative electron affinity. Details concerning the detector concept are discussed together with the theoretical relations involved, X-ray data, and optical data.

  20. Affine algebraic groups with periodic components

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, Stanislav N

    2009-08-31

    A connected component of an affine algebraic group is called periodic if all its elements have finite order. We give a characterization of periodic components in terms of automorphisms with finitely many fixed points. Also discussed is which connected groups have finite extensions with periodic components. The results are applied to the study of the normalizer of a maximal torus in a simple algebraic group. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  1. Excited state electron affinity calculations for aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Adnan Yousif

    2017-08-01

    Excited states of negative aluminum ion are reviewed, and calculations of electron affinities of the states (3s^23p^2)^1D and (3s3p^3){^5}{S}° relative to the (3s^23p)^2P° and (3s3p^2)^4P respectively of the neutral aluminum atom are reported in the framework of nonrelativistic configuration interaction (CI) method. A priori selected CI (SCI) with truncation energy error (Bunge in J Chem Phys 125:014107, 2006) and CI by parts (Bunge and Carbó-Dorca in J Chem Phys 125:014108, 2006) are used to approximate the valence nonrelativistic energy. Systematic studies of convergence of electron affinity with respect to the CI excitation level are reported. The calculated value of the electron affinity for ^1D state is 78.675(3) meV. Detailed Calculations on the ^5S°c state reveals that is 1216.8166(3) meV below the ^4P state.

  2. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field.

  3. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  4. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture.

  5. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  6. Early Detection of Cancer by Affinity Mass Spectrometry-Set Aside funds — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A.   RATIONALE The recent introduction of multiple reaction monitoring capabilities offers unprecedented capability to the research arsenal available to protein based biomarker discovery. Specific to the discovery process this technology offers an ability to monitor specific protein changes in concentration and/or post-translational modification. The ability to accurately confirm specific biomarkers in a sensitive and reproducible manner is critical to the confirmation and pre-validation process. We are proposing two collaborative studies that promise to develop Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) work flows for the biomarker scientific community and specifically for EDRN. B.   GOALS The overall goal for this proposal is the identification of protein biomarkers that can be associated with prostate cancer detection. The underlying goal is the application of a novel technological approach aided by MRM toward biomarker discovery. An additional goal will be the dissemination of knowledge gained from these studies EDRN wide.

  7. Specific Affinity Enrichment of Electrochemically Cleaved Peptides Based on Cu(II)-Mediated Spirolactone Tagging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Specific digestion of proteins is an essential step for mass spectrometry-based proteomics, and the chemical labeling of the resulting peptides is often used for peptide enrichment or the introduction of desirable tags. Electrochemical oxidation yielding specific cleavage C-terminal to tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues provides a potential alternative to enzymatic digestion and a possibility for further chemical labeling by introducing reactive spirolactone moieties. However, spirolactone-containing peptides suffer from low stability due to hydrolysis and intramolecular side reactions. We found that Cu(II) ions stabilize the spirolactone and prevent intramolecular side reactions during chemical labeling, allowing efficient chemical tagging with a reduced excess of labeling reagent without intramolecular side reactions. On the basis of this reaction, we developed an analytical procedure combining electrochemical digestion, Cu(II)-mediated spirolactone biotinylation, and enrichment by avidin affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry. The method was optimized with the tripeptide LWL and subsequently applied to chicken egg white lysozyme, in which one biotinylated electrochemistry (EC)-cleaved peptide was identified after affinity enrichment. This proof-of-principle shows that specific enrichment of electrochemically cleaved spirolactone-containing peptides can be used for protein identification and notably that inclusion of Cu(II) ions is essential for stabilizing spirolactones for subsequent biotinylation. PMID:28593756

  8. Topological and affine classification of complete noncompact flat 4-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Michał

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we give topological and affine classification of complete noncompact flat 4-manifolds. In particular, we show that the number of diffeomorphism classes of them is equal to 44. The affine classification uses the results of [M. Sadowski, Affinely equivalent complete flat manifolds, Cent. Eur. J. Math. 2 (2) (2004) 332-338]. The affine and the topological equivalence classes are the same for flat manifolds not homotopy equivalent to S1,T2 or the Klein bottle.

  9. Functional phosphoproteomic mass spectrometry-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics tools are crucial for understanding the structure and dynamics of signaling networks. Approaches such as affinity purification followed by MS have also been used to elucidate relevant biological questions in health and disease. The study of proteomes and phosphoproteomes as linked systems, rather than research studies of individual proteins, are necessary to understand the functions of phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated proteins under spatial and temporal conditions. Phosphoproteome studies also facilitate drug target protein identification which may be clinically useful in the near future. Here, we provide an overview of general principles of signaling pathways versus phosphorylation. Likewise, we detail chemical phosphoproteomic tools, including pros and cons with examples where these methods have been applied. In addition, basic clues of electrospray ionization and collision induced dissociation fragmentation are detailed in a simple manner for successful phosphoproteomic clinical studies. PMID:23369623

  10. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms form high affinity complexes with human and porcine beta-microseminoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Karin; Kjellberg, Margareta; Fernlund, Per

    2009-08-01

    BETA-microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10 kDa protein in human seminal plasma, binds human cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) with high affinity. CRISP-3 is a member of the family of CRISPs, which are widespread among animals. In this work we show that human as well as porcine MSP binds catrin, latisemin, pseudecin, and triflin, which are CRISPs present in the venoms of the snakes Crotalus atrox, Laticauda semifasciata, Pseudechis porphyriacus, and Trimeresurus flavoviridis, respectively. The CRISPs were purified from the venoms by affinity chromatography on a human MSP column and their identities were settled by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their interactions with human and porcine MSPs were studied with size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The binding affinities at 25 degrees C were between 10(-10)M and 10(-7)M for most of the interactions, with higher affinities for the interactions with porcine MSP compared to human MSP and with Elapidae CRISPs compared to Viperidae CRISPs. The high affinities of the bindings in spite of the differences in amino acid sequence between the MSPs as well as between the CRISPs indicate that the binding is tolerant to amino acid sequence variation and raise the question how universal this cross-species reaction between MSPs and CRISPs is.

  11. Different affinity of galectins for human serum glycoproteins: galectin-3 binds many protease inhibitors and acute phase proteins.

    PubMed

    Cederfur, Cecilia; Salomonsson, Emma; Nilsson, Jonas; Halim, Adnan; Oberg, Christopher T; Larson, Göran; Nilsson, Ulf J; Leffler, Hakon

    2008-05-01

    Here we report the first survey of galectins binding to glycoproteins of human serum. Serum was subjected to affinity chromatography using immobilized galectins, and the bound glycoproteins were analyzed by electrophoresis, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry. Galectins-3, -8, and -9 bound a much broader range of ligands in serum than previously known, galectin-1 bound less, and galectins-2, -4, and -7 bound only traces or no serum ligands. Galectin-3 bound most major glycoproteins, including alpha-2-macroglobulin and acute phase proteins such as haptoglobin. It bound only a selected minor fraction of transferrin, and bound none or little of IgG. Galectins-8 and -9 bound a similar range of glycoproteins as galectin-3, but in lower amounts, and galectin-8 had a relative preference for IgA. Galectin-1 bound mainly a fraction of alpha-2-macroglobulin and only traces of other glycoproteins. The binding of galectin-3 to serum glycoproteins requires affinity for LacNAc, since a mutant (R186S), which has lost this affinity, did not bind any serum glycoproteins. The average affinity of galectin-3 for serum glycoproteins was estimated to correspond to K(d) approximately 1-5 muM by modeling of the affinity chromatography and a fluorescence anisotropy assay. Since galectins are expressed on endothelial cells and other cells exposed to serum components, this report gives new insight into function of galectins and the role of their different fine specificity giving differential binding to the serum glycoproteins.

  12. Solution assembly of the pseudo-high affinity and intermediate affinity interleukin-2 receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.; Goldstein, B.; Laue, T. M.; Liparoto, S. F.; Nemeth, M. J.; Ciardelli, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The high affinity interleukin-2 receptor is composed of three cell surface subunits, IL-2Ralpha, IL-2Rbeta, and IL-2Rgamma. Functional forms of the IL-2 receptor exist, however, that enlist only two of the three subunits. On activated T-cells, the alpha- and beta-subunits combine as a preformed heterodimer (the pseudo-high affinity receptor) that serves to capture IL-2. On a subpopulation of natural killer cells, the beta- and gamma-subunits interact in a ligand-dependent manner to form the intermediate affinity receptor site. Previously, we have demonstrated the feasibility of employing coiled-coil molecular recognition for the solution assembly of a heteromeric IL-2 receptor complex. In that study, although the receptor was functional, the coiled-coil complex was a trimer rather than the desired heterodimer. We have now redesigned the hydrophobic heptad sequences of the coiled-coils to generate soluble forms of both the pseudo-high affinity and the intermediate affinity heterodimeric IL-2 receptors. The properties of these complexes were examined and their relevance to the physiological IL-2 receptor mechanism is discussed. PMID:10091650

  13. Integrin avidity regulation: are changes in affinity and conformation underemphasized?

    PubMed

    Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-10-01

    Integrins play critical roles in development, wound healing, immunity and cancer. Central to their function is their unique ability to modulate dynamically their adhesiveness through both affinity- and valency-based mechanisms. Recent advances have shed light on the structural basis for affinity regulation and on the signaling mechanisms responsible for both affinity and valency modes of regulation.

  14. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  15. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  16. Theoretical and Experimental Determination of the Proton Affinity of (CF3CH2)2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Ball, David W.

    1998-01-01

    We report the experimental determination of the proton affinity of the molecule (CF3CH2)2O using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and we compare it to the theoretical value obtained for protonation at the oxygen atom using the calculational methodology (MP2/6-31G**//MP2/3-21G). The proton affinity for this molecule as measured by bracketing experiments was between 724 kJ/mole and 741 kJ/mole. Ab initio (MP2/6-31G**//MP2/3-21G) calculations yield a value of about 729 kJ/mole, in agreement with the chemical ionization experiments. The results of these and related calculations suggest that the (MP2/6-31G**//MP2/3-21G) methodology is acceptable for estimating the proton affinities of partially-and fully-fluorinated methyl and ethyl ethers. We submit that any conclusions about the chemistry of fluoroether polymer lubricants based on their basicity can also be predicted reliably with such calculations.

  17. Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Reproducible Quantification of Phospho-signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jacob J.; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Moore, Heather D.; Lin, Chenwei; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Reding, Kerryn W.; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    A major goal in cell signaling research is the quantification of phosphorylation pharmacodynamics following perturbations. Traditional methods of studying cellular phospho-signaling measure one analyte at a time with poor standardization, rendering them inadequate for interrogating network biology and contributing to the irreproducibility of preclinical research. In this study, we test the feasibility of circumventing these issues by coupling immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based enrichment of phosphopeptides with targeted, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to achieve precise, specific, standardized, multiplex quantification of phospho-signaling responses. A multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay targeting phospho-analytes responsive to DNA damage was configured, analytically characterized, and deployed to generate phospho-pharmacodynamic curves from primary and immortalized human cells experiencing genotoxic stress. The multiplexed assays demonstrated linear ranges of ≥3 orders of magnitude, median lower limit of quantification of 0.64 fmol on column, median intra-assay variability of 9.3%, median inter-assay variability of 12.7%, and median total CV of 16.0%. The multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay enabled robust quantification of 107 DNA damage-responsive phosphosites from human cells following DNA damage. The assays have been made publicly available as a resource to the community. The approach is generally applicable, enabling wide interrogation of signaling networks. PMID:26621847

  18. Emerging Affinity-Based Proteomic Technologies for Large-Scale Plasma Profiling in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Gustav; Gerszten, Robert E

    2017-04-25

    Plasma biomarkers that reflect molecular states of the cardiovascular system are central for clinical decision making. Routinely used plasma biomarkers include troponins, natriuretic peptides, and lipoprotein particles, yet interrogate only a modest subset of pathways relevant to cardiovascular disease. Systematic profiling of a larger portion of circulating plasma proteins (the plasma proteome) will provide opportunities for unbiased discovery of novel markers to improve diagnostic or predictive accuracy. In addition, proteomic profiling may inform pathophysiological understanding and point to novel therapeutic targets. Obstacles for comprehensive proteomic profiling include the immense size and structural heterogeneity of the proteome, and the broad range of abundance levels, as well. Proteome-wide, untargeted profiling can be performed in tissues and cells with tandem mass spectrometry. However, applications to plasma are limited by the need for complex preanalytical sample preparation stages limiting sample throughput. Multiplexing of targeted methods based on capture and detection of specific proteins are therefore receiving increasing attention in plasma proteomics. Immunoaffinity assays are the workhorse for measuring individual proteins but have been limited for proteomic applications by long development times, cross-reactivity preventing multiplexing, specificity issues, and incomplete sensitivity to detect proteins in the lower range of the abundance spectrum (below picograms per milliliter). Emerging technologies to address these issues include nucleotide-labeled immunoassays and aptamer reagents that can be automated for efficient multiplexing of thousands of proteins at high sample throughput, coupling of affinity capture methods to mass spectrometry for improved specificity, and ultrasensitive detection systems to measure low-abundance proteins. In addition, proteomics can now be integrated with modern genomics tools to comprehensively relate

  19. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kwon; Jung, Kyung-Sik; Son, Cagdas D; Kim, Heejung; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  20. Etalon Array Reconstructive Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    Compact spectrometers are crucial in areas where size and weight may need to be minimized. These types of spectrometers often contain no moving parts, which makes for an instrument that can be highly durable. With the recent proliferation in low-cost and high-resolution cameras, camera-based spectrometry methods have the potential to make portable spectrometers small, ubiquitous, and cheap. Here, we demonstrate a novel method for compact spectrometry that uses an array of etalons to perform spectral encoding, and uses a reconstruction algorithm to recover the incident spectrum. This spectrometer has the unique capability for both high resolution and a large working bandwidth without sacrificing sensitivity, and we anticipate that its simplicity makes it an excellent candidate whenever a compact, robust, and flexible spectrometry solution is needed. PMID:28074883

  1. Etalon Array Reconstructive Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    Compact spectrometers are crucial in areas where size and weight may need to be minimized. These types of spectrometers often contain no moving parts, which makes for an instrument that can be highly durable. With the recent proliferation in low-cost and high-resolution cameras, camera-based spectrometry methods have the potential to make portable spectrometers small, ubiquitous, and cheap. Here, we demonstrate a novel method for compact spectrometry that uses an array of etalons to perform spectral encoding, and uses a reconstruction algorithm to recover the incident spectrum. This spectrometer has the unique capability for both high resolution and a large working bandwidth without sacrificing sensitivity, and we anticipate that its simplicity makes it an excellent candidate whenever a compact, robust, and flexible spectrometry solution is needed.

  2. Regular subalgebras of affine Kac Moody algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felikson, Anna; Retakh, Alexander; Tumarkin, Pavel

    2008-09-01

    We classify regular subalgebras of Kac-Moody algebras in terms of their root systems. In the process, we establish that a root system of a subalgebra is always an intersection of the root system of the algebra with a sublattice of its root lattice. We also discuss applications to investigations of regular subalgebras of hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras and conformally invariant subalgebras of affine Kac-Moody algebras. In particular, we provide explicit formulae for determining all Virasoro charges in coset constructions that involve regular subalgebras.

  3. On the electron affinity of Be2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the electron affinity (EA) of Be2 using a large Slater-type orbital basis set and extensive correlation based upon a CASSCF reference are reported. The adiabatic EAs are estimated to be 0.44 eV for the 2Sigma sub g(+) state and 0.56 eV for the 2Pi sub u state. The extra electron attaches into an empty bonding orbital, causing a shortening of the bond length and an increase in omega(e). The D(e) of the 2Pi sub u state of Be2 is six times as large as the D(e) of Be2.

  4. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  5. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  6. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  7. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  8. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  9. Affinity purification of protein complexes for analysis by multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Kong, Stephanie E; Washburn, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing protein complexes and identifying their subunits promote our understanding of the machinery involved in many in vivo processes. Proteomic studies can identify a protein's binding partners, and this can provide insight into how protein complexes function and how they are regulated. In addition, the composition of a protein complex within an organism can be investigated as a function of time, as a function of location, or during the response of an organism to a change in environment. There are many ways to isolate a complex and identify its constituents. This review will focus on complex isolation using affinity purification and will address issues that biochemists should bear in mind as they isolate protein complexes for mass spectrometric analysis by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT)(1). Protein complex analysis by mass spectrometry frequently involves the collaborative efforts of biochemists or biologists who purify protein complexes and proteomic specialists who analyze the samples - for fruitful collaborations it can be helpful for these specialized groups to be acquainted with basic principles of their collaborator's discipline. With this in mind, we first review the variety of affinity purification methods which might be considered for preparing complexes for analysis, and then provide brief primers on the principles of MudPIT mass spectrometry and data analysis. From this foundation, we then discuss how these techniques are integrated and optimized and suggest salient points to consider when preparing purified samples for protein identification, performing mass spectrometry runs, and analyzing the resulting data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  11. Extraction of haemoglobin from human blood by affinity precipitation using a haptoglobin-based stimuli-responsive affinity macroligand.

    PubMed

    Stocker-Majd, Gisela; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-06-13

    Affinity precipitation was compared to affinity chromatography and batch adsorption as the final purification step in a protocol for the isolation of haemoglobin from human blood. Haptoglobin was the affinity ligand. The first steps on the process were realized by traditional methods (lyses of red blood cells followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation). For affinity chromatography (and batch adsorption) the ligand was linked to Sepharose, for affinity precipitation to a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Five haptoglobin-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bioconjugates (affinity macroligands) were constructed with different polymer: haptoglobin-coupling ratios. Conjugation of haptoglobin to the soluble poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) apparently does not change the interaction thermodynamics with haemoglobin, as the haemoglobin binding constants calculated by a Scatchard analysis for the affinity macroligand were of the same order of magnitude as those described in the literature for the haemoglobin-haptoglobin complex in solution. Two elution protocols were used for haemoglobin release from the various affinity materials, one at pH 2, the other with 5 M urea at pH 11. Both affinity chromatography and affinity precipitation yielded a pure haemoglobin of high quality. Compared to the affinity chromatography, affinity precipitation showed a significantly higher ligand efficiency (ratio of the experimental capacity to the theoretical one). The method thus makes better use of the expensive affinity ligands. As affinity precipitation only requires small temperature changes to bring about precipitation/redissolution of the affinity complexes and a centrifugation step for recovery of the precipitate, the method in addition has advantages in term of scalability and simplicity.

  12. Gravitational Goldstone fields from affine gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo; Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2000-08-01

    In order to facilitate the application of standard renormalization techniques, gravitation should be described, in the pure connection formalism, as a Yang-Mills theory of a certain spacetime group, say the Poincaré or the affine group. This embodies the translational as well as the linear connection. However, the coframe is not the standard Yang-Mills-type gauge field of the translations, since it lacks the inhomogeneous gradient term in the gauge transformations. By explicitly restoring this ``hidden'' piece within the framework of nonlinear realizations, the usual geometrical interpretation of the dynamical theory becomes possible, and in addition one can avoid the metric or coframe degeneracy which would otherwise interfere with the integrations within the path integral. We claim that nonlinear realizations provide the general mathematical scheme for the foundation of gauge theories of spacetime symmetries. When applied to construct the Yang-Mills theory of the affine group, tetrads become identified with nonlinear translational connections; the anholonomic metric no longer constitutes an independent gravitational potential, since its degrees of freedom reveal a correspondence to eliminateable Goldstone bosons. This may be an important advantage for quantization.

  13. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  14. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  15. Functional gold nanoparticles for optical affinity biosensing.

    PubMed

    Špringer, Tomáš; Chadtová Song, Xue; Ermini, Maria Laura; Lamačová, Josefína; Homola, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    Functional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are commonly used to enhance the response of optical affinity biosensors. In this work, we investigated the effect of preparation conditions on functional properties of AuNPs functionalized with antibody (Ab-AuNPs), specifically AuNPs with antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) covalently attached via carboxy-terminated oligo-ethylene thiolate linker layer. The following parameters of preparation of Ab-AuNP have been found to have a significant effect on Ab-AuNP performance in affinity biosensors: the time of reaction of activated AuNPs with antibody, concentrations of antibody and amino-coupling reagents, and composition of immobilization buffer (molarity and salt content). In contrast, pH of immobilization buffer has been demonstrated to have only a minor influence. Our experiments showed that the Ab-AuNPs prepared under optimum conditions offered a binding efficiency of Ab-AuNPs to CEA as high as 63%, which is more than 4 times better than the best efficiencies reported for similar functional AuNPs so far. We employed these Ab-AuNPs with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for the detection of CEA and showed that the Ab-AuNPs enhanced the sensor response to CEA by a factor of 1000. We also demonstrated that the Ab-AuNPs allow the biosensor to detect CEA at concentrations as low as 12 and 40 pg/mL in buffer and 50% blood plasma, respectively.

  16. Improvement of Aptamer Affinity by Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Taira, Ken-ichi; Sode, Koji; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2008-01-01

    To increase the affinities of aptamers for their targets, we designed an aptamer dimer for thrombin and VEGF. This design is based on the avidity of the antibody, which enables the aptamer to connect easily since it is a single-strand nucleic acid. In this study, we connected a 15-mer thrombin-binding aptamer with a 29-mer thrombin-binding aptamer. Each aptamer recognizes a different part of the thrombin molecule, and the aptamer dimer has a Kd value which is 1/10 of that of the monomers from which it is composed. Also, the designed aptamer dimer has higher inhibitory activity than the reported (15-mer) thrombin-inhibiting aptamer. Additionally, we connected together two identical aptamers against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165), which is a homodimeric protein. As in the case of the anti-thrombin aptamer, the dimeric anti-VEGF aptamer had a much lower Kd value than that of the monomer. This study demonstrated that the dimerization of aptamers effectively improves the affinities of those aptamers for their targets. PMID:27879754

  17. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  18. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  19. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  20. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  1. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  2. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  3. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  4. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  5. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  6. Electron affinities of atoms, molecules and radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, A. A.; McCorkle, D. L.; Christophorou, L. G.

    The theoretical, semiempirical and experimental methods employed to determine electron affinities (EAs) of atoms, molecules and radicals, and summarize the EA data obtained by these methods were reviewed. The detailed processes underlying the principles of the experimental methods are discussed very briefly. It is, nonetheless, instructive to recapitulate the definition of EA and those of the related quantities, namely, the vertical detachment energy, VDE, and the vertical attachment energy, VAE. The EA of an atom is defined as the difference in total energy between the ground state of the neutral atom (plus the electron at rest at infinity) and its negative ion. The EA of a molecule is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion when both, the neutral molecules and the negative ion, are in their ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states.

  7. The affine cohomology spaces and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraj, Nizar Ben; Laraiedh, Ismail

    2016-12-01

    We compute the nth cohomology space of the affine Lie superalgebra 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1) on the (1,1)-dimensional real superspace with coefficient in a large class of 𝔞𝔣𝔣(1)-modules M. We apply our results to the module of weight densities and the module of linear differential operators acting on a superspace of weighted densities. This work is the generalization of a result by Basdouri et al. [The linear 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-invariant differential operators on weighted densities on the superspace ℝ1|n and 𝔞𝔣𝔣(n|1)-relative cohomology, Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 10 (2013), Article ID: 1320004, 9 pp.

  8. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  9. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  10. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J; Spaltenstein, A

    1995-09-26

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats.

  11. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  12. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  13. Differential Mobility Spectrometry: Preliminary Findings on Determination of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti; Boyd, John

    2007-01-01

    The electron capture detector (ECD) has been used for 40+ years (1) to derive fundamental constants such as a compound's electron affinity. Given this historical perspective, it is not surprising that differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) might be used in a like manner. This paper will present data from a gas chromatography (GC)-DMS instrument that illustrates the potential capability of this device to derive fundamental constants for electron-capturing compounds. Potential energy curves will be used to provide possible explanation of the data.

  14. Gravitation, Electromagnetism and the Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    The Eddington Lagrangian in the purely affine formulation of general relativity generates the Einstein equations with the cosmological constant. The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, which has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian in the metric formulation. We show that the sum of the two affine Lagrangians is dynamically inequivalent to the sum of the analogous Lagrangians in the metric-affine/metric formulation. We also show that such a construction is valid only for weak electromagnetic fields. Therefore the purely affine formulation that combines gravitation, electromagnetism and the cosmological constant cannot be a simple sum of terms corresponding to separate fields. Consequently, this formulation of electromagnetism seems to be unphysical, unlike the purely metric and metric-affine pictures, unless the electromagnetic field couples to the cosmological constant.

  15. Study on the degeneracy of antisense peptides using affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Yu, X; Liu, H; Zhai, L; Xiong, S; Su, T; Liu, G

    2001-04-13

    The degeneracy of antisense peptides was studied by high-performance affinity chromatography. A model sense peptide (AAAA) and its antisense peptides (CGGG, GGGG, RGGG, SGGG) were designed and synthesized according to the degeneracy of genetic codes. An affinity column with AAAA as the ligand was prepared. The affinity chromatographic behaviors of antisense peptides on the column were evaluated. The results indicated that model antisense peptides have clear retention on the immobilized AAAA affinity column. RGGG showed the strongest affinity interaction. Similar result was obtained from another experiment that Arg-substituted antisense peptide of fusion peptide (1-11) of influenza virus A was also shown the highest affinity binding to immobilized fusion peptide.

  16. Classical affine W-algebras associated to Lie superalgebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, we prove classical affine W-algebras associated to Lie superalgebras (W-superalgebras), which can be constructed in two different ways: via affine classical Hamiltonian reductions and via taking quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-superalgebras. Also, we show that a classical finite W-superalgebra can be obtained by a Zhu algebra of a classical affine W-superalgebra. Using the definition by Hamiltonian reductions, we find free generators of a classical W-superalgebra associated to a minimal nilpotent. Moreover, we compute generators of the classical W-algebra associated to spo(2|3) and its principal nilpotent. In the last part of this paper, we introduce a generalization of classical affine W-superalgebras called classical affine fractional W-superalgebras. We show these have Poisson vertex algebra structures and find generators of a fractional W-superalgebra associated to a minimal nilpotent.

  17. Immunoproteomics using polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled affinity-purified recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Edfors, Fredrik; Boström, Tove; Forsström, Björn; Zeiler, Marlis; Johansson, Henrik; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Lehtiö, Janne; Mann, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    The combination of immuno-based methods and mass spectrometry detection has great potential in the field of quantitative proteomics. Here, we describe a new method (immuno-SILAC) for the absolute quantification of proteins in complex samples based on polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragments to allow affinity enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis and accurate quantification. We took advantage of the antibody resources publicly available from the Human Protein Atlas project covering more than 80% of all human protein-coding genes. Epitope mapping revealed that a majority of the polyclonal antibodies recognized multiple linear epitopes, and based on these results, a semi-automated method was developed for peptide enrichment using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. A protocol based on the simultaneous multiplex capture of more than 40 protein targets showed that approximately half of the antibodies enriched at least one functional peptide detected in the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The approach was further developed to also generate quantitative data via the addition of heavy isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragment standards prior to trypsin digestion. Here, we show that we were able to use small amounts of antibodies (50 ng per target) in this manner for efficient multiplex analysis of quantitative levels of proteins in a human HeLa cell lysate. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated via immunization of recombinant protein fragments could be used for the enrichment of target peptides to allow for rapid mass spectrometry analysis taking advantage of a substantial reduction in sample complexity. The possibility of building up a proteome-wide resource for immuno-SILAC assays based on publicly available antibody resources is discussed. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  19. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  20. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  1. Smooth affine shear tight frames: digitization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly discuss one of the recent developed directional multiscale representation systems: smooth affine shear tight frames. A directional wavelet tight frame is generated by isotropic dilations and translations of directional wavelet generators, while an affine shear tight frame is generated by anisotropic dilations, shears, and translations of shearlet generators. These two tight frames are actually connected in the sense that the affine shear tight frame can be obtained from a directional wavelet tight frame through subsampling. Consequently, an affine shear tight frame indeed has an underlying filter bank from the MRA structure of its associated directional wavelet tight frame. We call such filter banks affine shear filter banks, which can be designed completely in the frequency domain. We discuss the digitization of affine shear filter banks and their implementations: the forward and backward digital affine shear transforms. Redundancy rate and computational complexity of digital affine shear transforms are also investigated in this paper. Numerical experiments and comparisons in image/video processing show the advantages of digital affine shear transforms over many other state-of-art directional multiscale representation systems.

  2. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  3. A universal immuno-PCR platform for comparative and ultrasensitive quantification of dual affinity-tagged proteins in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Askin, Samuel P; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2012-11-21

    Protein detection in complex biological fluids and matrices has become a widely diversified field utilizing a number of different technologies. The quantification of target proteins in complex media such as serum remains a challenge for most technologies such as mass spectrometry, ELISA and western blot. Quantitative Immuno-PCR has been heavily used for antigen detection in immunoassays, but minimally so for quantifying affinity-tagged proteins expressed or circulating in complex matrices--despite its high sensitivity and robustness--because it suffers from detrimental background effects arising from its extreme detection power. We report the development of a universal qIPCR-based platform for the reproducible detection of dual affinity-tagged protein analytes in crude complex matrices such as serum and cell culture media or lysates. The system uses a couple of high-affinity antibodies against two affinity tags (GFP and HA) for the detection of dual-tagged proteins. The dual-tagged analyte is immuno-captured by one of its tags, while the second tag is bound by a detection device consisting of a new kind of self-assembled antibody-DNA conjugate. The new qIPCR platform enabled picomolar quantification of dual-tagged sortase in crude serum in 4 h including the PCR step.

  4. A Genome-Inspired DNA Ligand for Affinity Capture of Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junfeng; Carter, Jennifer A.; Frederick, Kimberley A.; McGown, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-linked polymorphic region (ILPR) of the human insulin gene contains tandem repeats of similar G-rich sequences, some of which form intramolecular G-quadruplex structures in vitro. Previous work showed affinity binding of insulin to an intramolecular G-quadruplex formed by ILPR variant a. Here we report on interactions of insulin and the highly homologous insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) with ILPR variants a, h and i. Circular dichroism indicated intramolecular G-quadruplex formation for variants a and h. Affinity MALDI mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance were used to compare protein capture and binding strengths. Insulin and IGF-2 exhibited high binding affinity for variants a and h but not i, indicating the involvement of intramolecular G-quadruplexes. Interaction between insulin and variant a was unique in the appearance of two binding interactions with KD~10−13 M and KD~10−7 M, which was not observed for insulin with variant h (KD~10−8 M) or IGF-2 with either variant (KD’s~10−9 D M). The results provide a basis for design of DNA binding ligands for insulin and IGF-2 and support a new approach to discovery of DNA affinity binding ligands based on genome-inspired sequences rather than the traditional combinatorial selection route to aptamer discovery. PMID:19391177

  5. May the Best Molecule Win: Competition ESI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Sarah; Wilson, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has become invaluable in the characterization of macromolecular biological systems such as nucleic acids and proteins. Recent advances in the field of mass spectrometry and the soft conditions characteristic of electrospray ionization allow for the investigation of non-covalent interactions among large biomolecules and ligands. Modulation of genetic processes through the use of small molecule inhibitors with the DNA minor groove is gaining attention as a potential therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the development of a competition method using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to probe the interactions of multiple DNA sequences with libraries of minor groove binding molecules. Such an approach acts as a high-throughput screening method to determine important information including the stoichiometry, binding mode, cooperativity, and relative binding affinity. In addition to small molecule-DNA complexes, we highlight other applications in which competition mass spectrometry has been used. A competitive approach to simultaneously investigate complex interactions promises to be a powerful tool in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors with high specificity and for specific, important DNA sequences. PMID:26501262

  6. Characterization of naturally-occurring and modified fullerenes by Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettich, Robert L.; Jin, Changming; Compton, Robert N.; Buseck, Peter R.; Tsipursky, Semeon J.

    1993-10-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) employing both laser desorption/ionization and thermal desorption/electron ionization is useful for the detection and structural characterization of fullerenes and chemically-modified fullerenes. Examination of a carbon-rich shungite rock sample from Russia by transmission electron microscopy and FTMS provided evidence of naturally-occurring fullerenes. Ion-molecule reactions can be studied with FTMS to investigate the electron affinities of modified fullerenes. By monitoring charge exchange reactions, the electron affinities of C60Fx (x=44,46) and C70Fy (y=52,54) were found to be substantially higher than the values for the parent fullerenes.

  7. Toward improving selectivity in affinity chromatography with PEGylated affinity ligands: the performance of PEGylated protein A.

    PubMed

    González-Valdez, José; Yoshikawa, Alex; Weinberg, Justin; Benavides, Jorge; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Przybycien, Todd M

    2014-01-01

    Chemical modification of macromolecular affinity chromatography ligands with polyethylene glycol chains or "PEGylation" can potentially improve selectivity by sterically suppressing non-specific binding interactions without sacrificing binding capacity. For a commercial protein A affinity media and with yeast extract (YE) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) serving as mock contaminants, we found that the ligand accounted for more than 90% of the media-associated non-specific binding, demonstrating an opportunity for improvement. The IgG static binding affinity of protein A mono-PEGylated with 5.0 and 20.7 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) chains was found to be preserved using a biomolecular interaction screening platform. Similar in situ PEGylations of the commercial protein A media were conducted and the modified media was functionally characterized with IgG solutions spiked with YE and FBS. Ligand PEGylation reduced the mass of media-associated contaminants by a factor of two to three or more. Curiously, we also found an increase of up to 15% in the average recovery of IgG on elution after PEGylation. Combined, these effects produced an order of magnitude increase in the IgG selectivity on average when spiked with YE and a two- to three-fold increase when spiked with FBS relative to the commercial media. Dynamic binding capacity and mass-transfer resistance measurements revealed a reduction in dynamic capacity attributed to a decrease in IgG effective pore diffusivity and possibly slower IgG association kinetics for the PEGylated protein A ligands. Ligand PEGylation is a viable approach to improving selectivity in affinity chromatography with macromolecular ligands. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Hybrid instruments for mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glish, G.L.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to refine further the technique of mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry efforts are being made to combine the desirable features of sector based tandem instruments with those of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. This has resulted in the construction of tandem mass spectrometers which incorporate both sector type analyzers and quadrupole mass filters. These so-called hybrid instruments, designed specifically for mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry applications, are appearing in a variety of geometries each with unique features. This review describes the hybrid instruments reported to data and discusses general considerations for evaluating hybrid instruments with regard to application. 100 references.

  9. Protein-protein interactions of tandem affinity purified protein kinases from rice.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald L; Dardick, Christopher; Canlas, Patrick; Fujii, Hiroaki; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Knoflicek, Lucas; Stevenson, Becky; Xie, Mingtang; Xu, Xia; Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E

    2009-08-19

    Eighty-eight rice (Oryza sativa) cDNAs encoding rice leaf expressed protein kinases (PKs) were fused to a Tandem Affinity Purification tag (TAP-tag) and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged PKs and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five TAP-tagged PKs were recovered in this study and thirteen of these were found to interact with other rice proteins with a high probability score. In vivo phosphorylated sites were found for three of the PKs. A comparison of the TAP-tagged data from a combined analysis of 129 TAP-tagged rice protein kinases with a concurrent screen using yeast two hybrid methods identified an evolutionarily new rice protein that interacts with the well conserved cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) protein complex.

  10. Protein-protein interactions of tandem affinity purification-tagged protein kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald; Dardick, Chris; Canlas, Patrick; Xu, Xia; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E

    2006-04-01

    Forty-one rice cDNAs encoding protein kinases were fused to the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged kinases and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by mass spectrometry. Ninety-five percent of the TAP-tagged kinases were recovered. Fifty-six percent of the TAP-tagged kinases were found to interact with other rice proteins. A number of these interactions were consistent with known protein complexes found in other species, validating the TAP-tag method in rice plants. Phosphorylation sites were identified on four of the kinases that interacted with either 14-3-3 proteins or cyclins.

  11. Protein-Protein Interactions of Tandem Affinity Purified Protein Kinases from Rice

    PubMed Central

    Rohila, Jai S.; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald L.; Dardick, Christopher; Canlas, Patrick; Fujii, Hiroaki; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Knoflicek, Lucas; Stevenson, Becky; Xie, Mingtang; Xu, Xia; Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Eighty-eight rice (Oryza sativa) cDNAs encoding rice leaf expressed protein kinases (PKs) were fused to a Tandem Affinity Purification tag (TAP-tag) and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged PKs and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five TAP-tagged PKs were recovered in this study and thirteen of these were found to interact with other rice proteins with a high probability score. In vivo phosphorylated sites were found for three of the PKs. A comparison of the TAP-tagged data from a combined analysis of 129 TAP-tagged rice protein kinases with a concurrent screen using yeast two hybrid methods identified an evolutionarily new rice protein that interacts with the well conserved cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) protein complex. PMID:19690613

  12. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation.

  13. Single-Step Affinity Purification of ERK Signaling Complexes Using the Streptavidin-Binding Peptide (SBP) Tag.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Veraksa, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of biological functions of signaling proteins is facilitated by studying their protein-protein interaction networks. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a favorite method to study protein complexes. Here we describe a procedure for single-step purification of ERK (Rolled) and associated proteins from Drosophila cultured cells. The use of the streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) tag allows for a highly efficient isolation of native ERK signaling complexes, which are suitable for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. Our analysis of the ERK interactome has identified both known and novel signaling components. This method can be easily adapted for SBP-based purification of protein complexes in any expression system.

  14. Macroporous chitin affinity membranes for lysozyme separation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, E; Zeng, X

    1997-12-20

    Macroporous chitin membranes with high, controlled porosity and good mechanical properties have been prepared using a technique developed in this laboratory based on silica particles as porogen. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme. Chitin membranes (1 mm thickness) can be operated at high fluxes (>/=1.1 mL/min/cm(2)) corresponding to pressure drops >/=2 psi. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme ( approximately 50 mg/mL membrane) is by an order of magnitude higher than that of the chitin beads employed in column separation. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the membranes showed very high selectivity towards lysozyme. The effect of some important operation parameters, such as the flow rates during loading and elution were investigated. Lysozyme of very high purity (>98%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and from egg white. The results indicate that the macroporous chitin membranes can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme at large scale. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 610-617, 1997.

  15. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  16. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  17. Glycoprotein enrichment through lectin affinity techniques.

    PubMed

    Mechref, Yehia; Madera, Milan; Novotny, Milos V

    2008-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTM) of proteins are among the key biological regulators of function, activity, localization, and interaction. The fact that no more than 30,000-50,000 proteins are encoded by the human genome underlines the importance of posttranslational modifications in modulating the activities and functions of proteins in health and disease. With approximately 50% of all proteins now considered to be glycosylated, its physiological importance in mammalian systems is imperative. Aberrant glycosylation has now been recognized as an attribute of many mammalian diseases, including hereditary disorders, immune deficiencies, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular conditions, and cancer. As many potential disease biomarkers may be glycoproteins present in only minute quantities in tissue extracts and physiological fluids, glycoprotein isolation and enrichment may be critical in a search for such biomarkers. For decades, efforts have been focused on the development of glycoprotein enrichment from complex biological samples. Logically, the great majority of these enrichment methodologies rely on the use of immobilized lectins, which permit selective enrichment of the pools of glycoproteins for proteomic/glycomic studies. In this chapter, lectin affinity chromatography in different formats are described, including tubes; packed columns, and microfluidic channels.

  18. Affine connection form of Regge calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Regge action is represented analogously to how the Palatini action for general relativity (GR) as some functional of the metric and a general connection as independent variables represents the Einstein-Hilbert action. The piecewise flat (or simplicial) spacetime of Regge calculus is equipped with some world coordinates and some piecewise affine metric which is completely defined by the set of edge lengths and the world coordinates of the vertices. The conjugate variables are the general nondegenerate matrices on the three-simplices which play the role of a general discrete connection. Our previous result on some representation of the Regge calculus action in terms of the local Euclidean (Minkowsky) frame vectors and orthogonal connection matrices as independent variables is somewhat modified for the considered case of the general linear group GL(4, R) of the connection matrices. As a result, we have some action invariant w.r.t. arbitrary change of coordinates of the vertices (and related GL(4, R) transformations in the four-simplices). Excluding GL(4, R) connection from this action via the equations of motion we have exactly the Regge action for the considered spacetime.

  19. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  20. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  1. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  2. Cambrian trilobites with Siberian affinities, southwestern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.R.; Egbert, R.M.; Sullivan, R.; Knoth, J.S.

    1985-02-01

    Cambrian trilobites occur in two levels (about 7 m apart) in the core of a large, complex anticlinal structure in the area between the Taylor Mountains and the Hoholitna River in southwestern Alaska. The lower collection contains Erbia, Macannaia (a species close to Soviet forms described as Pagetia ferox Lermontova), two species of Kootenia (including one perhaps cospecific with forms from the central Brooks range), and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. It is clear that biogeographic affinities are with the transitional facies of the eastern Siberian platform and the south Siberian foldbelt. In Soviet terms, the age of the collection falls in a disputed interval called latest Early Cambrian (Tojonian) by some authors, and earliest Middle Cambrian (Amgan) by others. In North American terms, Macannaia is known only from early Middle Cambrian beds. The younger collection contains abundant agnostids, a variety of conocoryphids, Paradoxides, and several species of ptychoparioid trilobites. This is an assemblage of undoubted late Middle Cambrian age, comparable to faunas described from the Maya State of the Siberian platform and the Paradoxides paradoxissimus Stage of the Baltic region. Both faunas are from ocean-facing or outer shelf environments. None of the key non-agnostid or non-pagetiid elements have been seen previously in deposits of Cambrian North America.

  3. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)- d-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α- d-Gal-(1→2)-[α- d-Abe-(1→3)]-α- d-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GalNAc-(1→4)[α- d-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α- l-Fuc-(1→2)-β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  4. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  5. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kyle G; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-28

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein's affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states.

  6. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  7. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  8. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  9. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  10. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  11. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  12. Combustion diagnostics by laser spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Morita, Shigeaki; Kodama, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kozo

    2009-03-01

    We have developed three different types of visualization methods for energy conversion systems by means of laser spectrometry. (1) Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and (2) laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS) have been applied to visualization of chemical species in combustion fields of flames. (3) Near-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy has been used for visualization of water in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Complex physicochemical processes in the energy conversion systems have been revealed by laser spectrometry.

  13. Camelid VHH affinity ligands enable separation of closely related biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Timothy M.; Wendeler, Michaela; Wang, Xiangyang; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interest in new and diverse classes of molecules such as recombinant toxins, enzymes, and blood factors continues to grow for use a biotherapeutics. Compared to monoclonal antibodies, these novel drugs typically lack a commercially available affinity chromatography option, which leads to greater process complexity, longer development timelines, and poor platformability. To date, for both monoclonal antibodies and novel molecules, affinity chromatography has been mostly reserved for separation of process‐related impurities such as host cell proteins and DNA. Reports of affinity purification of closely related product variants and modified forms are much rarer. In this work we describe custom affinity chromatography development using camelid VHH antibody fragments as "tunable" immunoaffinity ligands for separation of product‐related impurities. One example demonstrates high selectivity for a recombinant immunotoxin where no binding was observed for an undesired deamidated species. Also discussed is affinity purification of a coagulation factor through specific recognition of the gamma‐carboxylglutamic acid domain. PMID:27677057

  14. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  15. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  16. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  17. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  18. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  19. Gravitation, Electromagnetism and Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2009-03-01

    The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, that has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the metric Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian, except the zero-field limit, for which the metric tensor is not well-defined. This feature indicates that, for the Ferraris-Kijowski model to be physical, there must exist a background field that depends on the Ricci tensor. The simplest possibility, supported by recent astronomical observations, is the cosmological constant, generated in the purely affine formulation of gravity by the Eddington Lagrangian. In this paper we combine the electromagnetic field and the cosmological constant in the purely affine formulation. We show that the sum of the two affine (Eddington and Ferraris-Kijowski) Lagrangians is dynamically inequivalent to the sum of the analogous ( ΛCDM and Einstein-Maxwell) Lagrangians in the metric-affine/metric formulation. We also show that such a construction is valid, like the affine Einstein-Born-Infeld formulation, only for weak electromagnetic fields, on the order of the magnetic field in outer space of the Solar System. Therefore the purely affine formulation that combines gravity, electromagnetism and cosmological constant cannot be a simple sum of affine terms corresponding separately to these fields. A quite complicated form of the affine equivalent of the metric Einstein-Maxwell- Λ Lagrangian suggests that Nature can be described by a simpler affine Lagrangian, leading to modifications of the Einstein-Maxwell- ΛCDM theory for electromagnetic fields that contribute to the spacetime curvature on the same order as the cosmological constant.

  20. Characterization of hemoglobin bassett (alpha94Asp-->Ala), a variant with very low oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Safo, Martin K; Lerner, Norma B; Ochotorena, Josiree; Daikhin, Evgueni; Lakka, Vinaysagar; Santacroce, Rosa; Abraham, Donald J; Asakura, Toshio

    2004-11-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Bassett, an abnormal Hb variant with a markedly reduced oxygen affinity, was discovered in a Caucasian (Anglo-Saxon) male child who experienced episodes of cyanosis. Cation-exchange and reversed-phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the patient has an abnormal Hb, with a mutation in the alpha-globin. Tryptic peptide digest of the abnormal alpha-globin with subsequent HPLC analysis revealed abnormal elution of the alpha-T11 peptide. Further studies with Edman sequencing and electrospray mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide alpha-T11, as well as structural analysis by X-ray crystallography revealed an Asp-->Ala substitution at the alpha94 (G1) position, a match for Hb Bassett. Detailed functional studies showed that this Hb variant had a markedly reduced oxygen affinity (P(50) at pH 7.0 = 22 mmHg; Hb A P(50) = 10.5 mmHg), reduced Bohr effect (-0.26 compared to - 0.54 in Hb A), and low subunit cooperativity (n = 1.4, compared to 2.6 in Hb A). X-ray crystallography results explain the probable effects of the structural modification on the oxygen-binding properties of this Hb variant.

  1. Affinity capillary electrophoresis: the theory of electromigration.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Dvořák, Martin; Ansorge, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We focus on the state-of-the-art theory of electromigration under single and multiple complexation equilibrium. Only 1:1 complexation stoichiometry is discussed because of its unique status in the field of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). First, we summarize the formulas for the effective mobility in various ACE systems as they appeared since the pioneering days in 1992 up to the most recent theories till 2015. Disturbing phenomena that do not alter the mobility of the analyte directly but cause an unexpected peak broadening have been studied only recently and are also discussed in this paper. Second, we turn our attention to the viscosity effects in ACE. Change in the background electrolyte viscosity is unavoidable in ACE but numerous observations scattered throughout the literature have not been reviewed previously. This leads to an uncritical employment of correction factors that may or may not be appropriate in practice. Finally, we consider the ionic strength effects in ACE, too. Limitations of the current theories are also discussed and the tasks identified where open problems still prevail. Graphical Abstract A weak base (A) undergoes an acidic-basic equilibria (in blue) and migrates with an electrophoretic mobility of [Formula: see text]. Simultaneously, it interacts with a selector (sel) while the analyte-selector complex migrates with an electrophoretic mobility of [Formula: see text]. The strength of the interaction (in orange) is governed by the binding constant, K A , and the concentration of the selector, c sel . This all gives the analyte an effective mobility of [Formula: see text] and moves it out of the zero position (EOF; right top insert). The interaction of the positively charged analyte with the neutral selector slows down the analyte with increasing selector concentration (right bottom insert).

  2. An affinity pull-down approach to identify the plant cyclic nucleotide interactome.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Lara; Meier, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides (CNs) are intracellular second messengers that play an important role in mediating physiological responses to environmental and developmental signals, in species ranging from bacteria to humans. In response to these signals, CNs are synthesized by nucleotidyl cyclases and then act by binding to and altering the activity of downstream target proteins known as cyclic nucleotide-binding proteins (CNBPs). A number of CNBPs have been identified across kingdoms including transcription factors, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and channels, all of which harbor conserved CN-binding domains. In plants however, few CNBPs have been identified as homology searches fail to return plant sequences with significant matches to known CNBPs. Recently, affinity pull-down techniques have been successfully used to identify CNBPs in animals and have provided new insights into CN signaling. The application of these techniques to plants has not yet been extensively explored and offers an alternative approach toward the unbiased discovery of novel CNBP candidates in plants. Here, an affinity pull-down technique for the identification of the plant CN interactome is presented. In summary, the method involves an extraction of plant proteins which is incubated with a CN-bait, followed by a series of increasingly stringent elutions that eliminates proteins in a sequential manner according to their affinity to the bait. The eluted and bait-bound proteins are separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, excised, and digested with trypsin after which the resultant peptides are identified by mass spectrometry-techniques that are commonplace in proteomics experiments. The discovery of plant CNBPs promises to provide valuable insight into the mechanism of CN signal transduction in plants.

  3. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  4. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  5. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach.

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  7. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  8. Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screening (MagMASS) of Botanical Extracts for Inhibitors of 15-Lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rush, Michael D; Walker, Elisabeth M; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-11-23

    To expedite the identification of active natural products in complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, a magnetic microbead affinity selection screening (MagMASS) procedure was developed. This technique utilizes target proteins immobilized on magnetic beads for rapid bioaffinity isolation of ligands from complex mixtures. A MagMASS method was developed and validated for 15-lipoxygenase. As a proof of concept, several North American prairie plants used medicinally by Native Americans were extracted with MeOH and screened. A hit from an extract of Proserpinaca palustris, also known as mermaid weed, was flagged for further characterization using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, dereplication, and identification using XCMS online. Through the application of high-resolution product ion tandem mass spectrometry, comparison with natural product databases, and confirmation using standards, the hit was identified as quercitrin, which is a known inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase. The overall workflow of MagMASS is faster and more amendable to automation than alternative methods designed for screening botanical extracts or complex mixtures of combinatorial libraries.

  9. Aggregation of two carboxylic derivatives of porphyrin and their affinity to bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Bing; Wang, Yi-Nong; Ma, Jian-Biao

    2006-07-01

    Aggregation of two porphyrin derivatives with carboxylic groups, 4-oxo-4-((4-(10,15,20-triphenyl-21 H,23 H-porphin-5-yl)phenyl)amino)butanoic acid (MAC) and 4,4',4″,4‴-[21 H,23 H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(4,1-phenyleneimino)]tetrakis(4-oxo-butanoic acid) (TA4C), and their affinity to bovine serum albumin were investigated via absorption spectrometry, 1H NMR and fluorescence spectrometry. MAC and its complexes with β-cyclodextrin could form aggregates in an aqueous solution while TA4C was self-associated loosely. From the absorbance profiles of MAC in the titration of bovine serum albumin, hypochromicity was observed without any shift of the maximum absorbance wavelength. In both absorption spectra of TA4C in aqueous solutions and in solid state, three Q bands appeared in the visible region. In the measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra upon titration of BSA, some spectral changes of TA4C were observed. The whole procedure of titration could be divided into three successive stages. The three-banded profiles of TA4C might be explained according to a loose dimer model.

  10. Aggregation of two carboxylic derivatives of porphyrin and their affinity to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yao-Bing; Wang, Yi-Nong; Ma, Jian-Biao

    2006-07-01

    Aggregation of two porphyrin derivatives with carboxylic groups, 4-oxo-4-((4-(10,15,20-triphenyl-21H,23H-porphin-5-yl)phenyl)amino)butanoic acid (MAC) and 4,4',4'',4'''-[21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(4,1-phenyleneimino)]tetrakis(4-oxo-butanoic acid) (TA4C), and their affinity to bovine serum albumin were investigated via absorption spectrometry, (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectrometry. MAC and its complexes with beta-cyclodextrin could form aggregates in an aqueous solution while TA4C was self-associated loosely. From the absorbance profiles of MAC in the titration of bovine serum albumin, hypochromicity was observed without any shift of the maximum absorbance wavelength. In both absorption spectra of TA4C in aqueous solutions and in solid state, three Q bands appeared in the visible region. In the measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra upon titration of BSA, some spectral changes of TA4C were observed. The whole procedure of titration could be divided into three successive stages. The three-banded profiles of TA4C might be explained according to a loose dimer model.

  11. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  12. Affinities of dihydrocodeine and its metabolites to opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Helmut; Vormfelde, Stefan v; Klinder, Klaus; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Gleiter, Christoph H; Skopp, Gisela; Aderjan, Rolf; Fuhr, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    Dihydrocodeine is metabolized to dihydromorphine, dihydrocodeine-6-O-, dihydromorphine-3-O- and dihydromorphine-6-O-glucuronide, and nordihydrocodeine. The current study was conducted to evaluate the affinities of dihydrocodeine and its metabolites to mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors. Codeine, morphine, d,1-methadone and levomethadone were used as controls. Displacement binding experiments were carried out at the respective opioid receptor types using preparations of guinea pig cerebral cortex and the specific opioid agonists [5H]DAMGO (mu-opioid receptor), [3H]DPDPE (delta-opioid receptor) and [3H]U69,593 (K-opioid receptor) as radioactive ligands at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.0 nmol/l, respectively. All substances had their greatest affinity to the mu-opioid receptor. The affinities of dihydromorphine and dihydromorphine-6-O-glucuronide were at least 70 times greater compared with dihydrocodeine (Ki 0.3 micromol/l), whereas the other metabolites yielded lower affinities. For the delta-opioid receptor, the order of affinities was similar with the exception that dihydrocodeine-6-O-glucuronide revealed a doubled affinity in relation to dihydrocodeine (Ki 5.9 micromol/l). In contrast, for the K-opioid receptor, dihydrocodeine-6-O- and dihydromorphine-6-O-glucuronide had clearly lower affinities compared to the respective parent compounds. The affinity of nordihydrocodeine was almost identical to that of dihydrocodeine (Ki 14 micromol/l), whereas dihydromorphine had a 60 times higher affinity. These results suggest that dihydromorphine and its 6-O-glucuronide may provide a relevant contribution to the pharmacological effects of dihydrocodeine. The O-demethylation of dihydrocodeine to dihydromorphine is mediated by the polymorphic cytochrome P-450 enzyme CYP2D6, resulting in different metabolic profiles in extensive and poor metabolizers. About 7% of the caucasian population which are CYP2D6 poor metabolizers thus may experience therapeutic failure after

  13. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  14. International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS).

    PubMed

    Cooks, R G; Gelpi, E; Nibbering, N M

    2001-02-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the recently formalized International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS). It is presented here in order to increase awareness of the opportunities for collaboration in mass spectrometry in an international context. It also describes the recent 15th International Mass Spectrometry Conference, held August/September 2000, in Barcelona. Each of the authors is associated with the IMSS. The 15th Conference, which covers all of mass spectrometry on a triennial basis, was chaired by Professor Emilio Gelpi of the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Barcelona. The outgoing and founding President of the IMSS is Professor Graham Cooks, Purdue University, and the incoming President is Professor Nico Nibbering, University of Amsterdam. Similar material has been provided to the Editors of other journals that cover mass spectrometry.

  15. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  16. An improved affine projection algorithm for active noise cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congyan; Wang, Mingjiang; Han, Yufei; Sun, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-01

    Affine projection algorithm is a signal reuse algorithm, and it has a good convergence rate compared to other traditional adaptive filtering algorithm. There are two factors that affect the performance of the algorithm, which are step factor and the projection length. In the paper, we propose a new variable step size affine projection algorithm (VSS-APA). It dynamically changes the step size according to certain rules, so that it can get smaller steady-state error and faster convergence speed. Simulation results can prove that its performance is superior to the traditional affine projection algorithm and in the active noise control (ANC) applications, the new algorithm can get very good results.

  17. Binding Affinities Controlled by Shifting Conformational Equilibria: Opportunities and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Michielssens, Servaas; de Groot, Bert L.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Conformational selection is an established mechanism in molecular recognition. Despite its power to explain binding events, it is hardly used in protein/ligand design to modulate molecular recognition. Here, we explore the opportunities and limitations of design by conformational selection. Using appropriate thermodynamic cycles, our approach predicts the effects of a conformational shift on binding affinity and also allows one to disentangle the effects induced by a conformational shift from other effects influencing the binding affinity. The method is assessed and applied to explain the contribution of a conformational shift on the binding affinity of six ubiquitin mutants showing different conformational shifts in six different complexes. PMID:25992736

  18. The dataset for protein-RNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiufeng; Li, Haotian; Huang, Yangyu; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a non-redundant protein-RNA binding benchmark dataset derived from the available protein-RNA structures in the Protein Database Bank. It consists of 73 complexes with measured binding affinity. The experimental conditions (pH and temperature) for binding affinity measurements are also listed in our dataset. This binding affinity dataset can be used to compare and develop protein-RNA scoring functions. The predicted binding free energy of the 73 complexes from three available scoring functions for protein-RNA docking has a low correlation with the binding Gibbs free energy calculated from Kd.

  19. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  20. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  1. Bidirectional Elastic Image Registration Using B-Spline Affine Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Wang, Chen; Kaminski, Naftali; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-01-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-Spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bi-directional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective / cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy. PMID:24530210

  2. Bidirectional elastic image registration using B-spline affine transformation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Sciurba, Frank C; Ma, Hongxia; Leader, Joseph; Kaminski, Naftali; Gur, David; Pu, Jiantao

    2014-06-01

    A registration scheme termed as B-spline affine transformation (BSAT) is presented in this study to elastically align two images. We define an affine transformation instead of the traditional translation at each control point. Mathematically, BSAT is a generalized form of the affine transformation and the traditional B-spline transformation (BST). In order to improve the performance of the iterative closest point (ICP) method in registering two homologous shapes but with large deformation, a bidirectional instead of the traditional unidirectional objective/cost function is proposed. In implementation, the objective function is formulated as a sparse linear equation problem, and a sub-division strategy is used to achieve a reasonable efficiency in registration. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed using both two-dimensional (2D) synthesized dataset and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric computed tomography (CT) data. Our experiments showed that the proposed B-spline affine model could obtain reasonable registration accuracy.

  3. A thermodynamic approach to the affinity optimization of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ernesto

    2009-11-01

    High throughput screening and other techniques commonly used to identify lead candidates for drug development usually yield compounds with binding affinities to their intended targets in the mid-micromolar range. The affinity of these molecules needs to be improved by several orders of magnitude before they become viable drug candidates. Traditionally, this task has been accomplished by establishing structure activity relationships to guide chemical modifications and improve the binding affinity of the compounds. As the binding affinity is a function of two quantities, the binding enthalpy and the binding entropy, it is evident that a more efficient optimization would be accomplished if both quantities were considered and improved simultaneously. Here, an optimization algorithm based upon enthalpic and entropic information generated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry is presented.

  4. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  5. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  6. Considering affinity: an ethereal conversation (part two of three).

    PubMed

    Winsor, Mary P

    2015-06-01

    In 1840 Hugh Strickland published a diagram showing the relationships of genera of birds in the kingfisher family. Three years later he applied this mapping idea to genera of birds of prey and songbirds, creating a large wall chart that he displayed to colleagues but never published. Both of his diagrams featured a scale of degrees of affinity. The meaning of taxonomic affinity was something Darwin thought about deeply. Details in the chart undermine Strickland's claim that his method was purely inductive.

  7. Electrospun polyethersulfone affinity membrane: membrane preparation and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zuwei; Lan, Zhengwei; Matsuura, Takeshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Non-woven polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were prepared by electrospinning. After heat treatment and surface activation, the membranes were covalently functionalized with ligands to be used as affinity membranes. The membranes were characterized in terms of fiber diameter, porosity, specific area, pore size, ligand density and binding capacities. To evaluate the binding efficiency of the membrane, dynamic adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the Cibacron blue F3GA (CB) functionalized PES membrane was studied. Experimental breakthrough curves were fitted with the theoretical curves based on the plate model to estimate plate height (H(p)) of the affinity membrane. The high value of H(p) (1.6-8 cm) of the affinity membrane implied a poor dynamic binding efficiency, which can be explained by the intrinsic microstructures of the material. Although the electrospun membrane might not be an ideal candidate for the preparative affinity membrane chromatography for large-scale production, it still can be used for fast small-scale protein purification in which a highly efficient binding is not required. Spin columns packed with protein A/G immobilized PES membranes were demonstrated to be capable of binding IgG specifically. SDS-PAGE results demonstrated that the PES affinity membrane had high specific binding selectivity for IgG molecules and low non-specific protein adsorption. Compared with other reported affinity membranes, the PES affinity membrane had a comparable IgG binding capacity of 4.5 mg/ml, and had a lower flow through pressure drop due to its larger pore size. In conclusion, the novel PES affinity membrane is an ideal spin column packing material for fast protein purification.

  8. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3′ end of dengue virus (DENV) 5′–3′ UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions. PMID:26389898

  9. Sequential peptide affinity purification system for the systematic isolation and identification of protein complexes from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Butland, Gareth; Pogoutse, Oxana; Li, Joyce; Greenblatt, Jack F; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical purification of affinity-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry methods is increasingly seen as a cornerstone of systems biology, as it allows for the systematic genome-scale characterization of macromolecular protein complexes, representing demarcated sets of stably interacting protein partners. Accurate and sensitive identification of both the specific and shared polypeptide components of distinct complexes requires purification to near homogeneity. To this end, a sequential peptide affinity (SPA) purification system was developed to enable the rapid and efficient isolation of native Escherichia coli protein complexes (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). SPA purification makes use of a dual-affinity tag, consisting of three modified FLAG sequences (3X FLAG) and a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP), spaced by a cleavage site for tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). Using the lambda-phage Red homologous recombination system (PNAS 97:5978-5983, 2000), a DNA cassette, encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker flanked by gene-specific targeting sequences, is introduced into a selected locus in the E. coli chromosome so as to create a C-terminal fusion with the protein of interest. This procedure aims for near-endogenous levels of tagged protein production in the recombinant bacteria to avoid spurious, non-specific protein associations (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). In this chapter, we describe a detailed, optimized protocol for the tagging, purification, and subsequent mass spectrometry-based identification of the subunits of even low-abundance bacterial protein complexes isolated as part of an ongoing large-scale proteomic study in E. coli (Nature 433:531-537, 2005).

  10. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as affinity ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Li, C. M.; Zhou, Q.; Gan, Y.; Bao, Q. L.

    2007-03-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes is very challenging for their applications. The paper here describes a new method to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as specific affinity adsorbents. MWCNTs were acid purified and pretreated with (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (APTES) in order to introduce abundant amino groups on the surface of MWCNTs. After the conversion of amino groups to carboxyl groups by succinic acid anhydride, MWCNTs were attached to protein A or aminodextran using 1-ethyl-3,3' (dimethylamion)-propylcarbodiimide as a biofunctional crosslinker. The incorporation of aminodextran as a spacer arm noticeably increased the binding capacity of the APTES-modified MWCNTs for protein A. The application of affinity MWCNTs for purification of immunoglobulin G was then evaluated. The affinity of MWCNTs with AMD spacer exhibited a high adsorption capacity of ~361 µg IgG/mg MWCNT (wet basis). About 75% of bound IgG was eluted from affinity MWCNTs (ANT-I and ANT-II) and ELISA confirmed that the biological activity of IgG was well preserved during the course of affinity separation. The functionalized MWCNTs could be potentially used in affinity chromatography.

  11. Protein-protein interactions: scoring schemes and binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Yugandhar, K; Jemimah, Sherlyn

    2017-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediate several cellular functions, which can be understood from the information obtained using the three-dimensional structures of protein-protein complexes and binding affinity data. This review focuses on computational aspects of predicting the best native-like complex structure and binding affinities. The first part covers the prediction of protein-protein complex structures and the advantages of conformational searching and scoring functions in protein-protein docking. The second part is devoted to various aspects of protein-protein interaction thermodynamics, such as databases for binding affinities and other thermodynamic parameters, computational methods to predict the binding affinity using either the three-dimensional structures of complexes or amino acid sequences, and change in binding affinities of the complexes upon mutations. We provide the latest developments on protein-protein docking and binding affinity studies along with a list of available computational resources for understanding protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surfactant-free Colloidal Particles with Specific Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    van der Wel, Casper; Bossert, Nelli; Mank, Quinten J; Winter, Marcel G T; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J

    2017-09-26

    Colloidal particles with specific binding affinity are essential for in vivo and in vitro biosensing, targeted drug delivery, and micrometer-scale self-assembly. Key to these techniques are surface functionalizations that provide high affinities to specific target molecules. For stabilization in physiological environments, current particle coating methods rely on adsorbed surfactants. However, spontaneous desorption of these surfactants typically has an undesirable influence on lipid membranes. To address this issue and create particles for targeting molecules in lipid membranes, we present here a surfactant-free coating method that combines high binding affinity with stability at physiological conditions. After activating charge-stabilized polystyrene microparticles with EDC/Sulfo-NHS, we first coat the particles with a specific protein and subsequently covalently attach a dense layer of poly(ethyelene) glycol. This polymer layer provides colloidal stability at physiological conditions as well as antiadhesive properties, while the protein coating provides the specific affinity to the targeted molecule. We show that NeutrAvidin-functionalized particles bind specifically to biotinylated membranes and that Concanavalin A-functionalized particles bind specifically to the glycocortex of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. The affinity of the particles changes with protein density, which can be tuned during the coating procedure. The generic and surfactant-free coating method reported here transfers the high affinity and specificity of a protein onto colloidal polystyrene microparticles.

  13. Direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Premer, Scott A; Hoy, Julie A; Trent, James T; Hargrove, Mark S

    2003-06-01

    The biological functions of heme proteins are linked to their rate and affinity constants for ligand binding. Kinetic experiments are commonly used to measure equilibrium constants for traditional hemoglobins comprised of pentacoordinate ligand binding sites and simple bimolecular reaction schemes. However, kinetic methods do not always yield reliable equilibrium constants with more complex hemoglobins for which reaction mechanisms are not clearly understood. Furthermore, even where reaction mechanisms are clearly understood, it is very difficult to directly measure equilibrium constants for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to high-affinity (K(D) < 1 micro M) hemoglobins. This work presents a method for direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins that utilizes a competition for ligands between the "target" protein and an array of "scavenger" hemoglobins with known affinities. This method is described for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to two hexacoordinate hemoglobins: rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and Synechocystis hemoglobin. Our results demonstrate that although these proteins have different mechanisms for ligand binding, their affinities for oxygen and carbon monoxide are similar. Their large affinity constants for oxygen, 285 and approximately 100 micro M(-1) respectively, indicate that they are not capable of facilitating oxygen transport.

  14. Regulatory mechanisms of hemoglobin oxygen affinity in acidosis and alkalosis

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, A. J.; Detter, J. C.; Lenfant, C.

    1971-01-01

    The recent reports of the effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) on hemoglobin affinity for oxygen suggested that this substance may play a role in man's adaptation to acidosis and alkalosis. A study of the effect of induced acidosis and alkalosis on the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve of normal man was therefore carried out, and the mechanisms involved in the physiological regulation of hemoglobin oxygen affinity examined. In acute changes of plasma pH there was no alteration in red cell 2,3-DPG content. However, there were changes in hemoglobin oxygen affinity and these correlated with changes in mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). With maintained acidosis and alkalosis, red cell 2,3-DPG content was altered and correlated with the changes in hemoglobin oxygen affinity. Both of these mechanisms shift the hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curve opposite to the direct pH (Bohr) effect, and providing the rate of pH change is neither too rapid nor too large, they counteract the direct pH effect and the in vivo hemoglobin oxygen affinity remains unchanged. It is also shown that approximately 35% of the change in hemoglobin oxygen affinity resulting from an alteration in red cell 2,3-DPG, is explained by effect of 2,3-DPG on the red cell pH. PMID:5545127

  15. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided.

  16. Mass spectrometry in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2014-01-01

    In environmental toxicology, mass spectrometry can be applied to evaluate both exposure to chemicals as well as their effects in organisms. Various ultra-trace techniques are employed today to measure pollutants in different environmental compartments. Increasingly, effect-directed analysis is being applied to focus chemical monitoring on sites of ecotoxicological concern. Mass spectrometry is also very instrumental for studying the interactions of chemicals with organisms on the molecular and cellular level, providing new insights into mechanisms of toxicity. In the future, diverse mass spectrometry-based techniques are expected to become even more widely used in this field, contributing to the refinement of currently used environmental risk assessment strategies.

  17. Local BLyS production by T follicular cells mediates retention of high affinity B cells during affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Radhika; Matthews, Andrew H.; Zhang, Bochao; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Scholz, Jean L.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Leonard, Warren J.; Stohl, William; Hershberg, Uri

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the role of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and its receptors in the germinal center (GC) reaction and affinity maturation. Despite ample BLyS retention on B cells in follicular (FO) regions, the GC microenvironment lacks substantial BLyS. This reflects IL-21–mediated down-regulation of the BLyS receptor TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) on GC B cells, thus limiting their capacity for BLyS binding and retention. Within the GC, FO helper T cells (TFH cells) provide a local source of BLyS. Whereas T cell–derived BLyS is dispensable for normal GC cellularity and somatic hypermutation, it is required for the efficient selection of high affinity GC B cell clones. These findings suggest that during affinity maturation, high affinity clones rely on TFH-derived BLyS for their persistence. PMID:24367004

  18. Methods for Neutron Spectrometry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1961-01-09

    The appropriate theories and the general philosophy of methods of measurement and treatment of data neutron spectrometry are discussed. Methods of analysis of results for liquids using the Van Hove formulation, and for crystals using the Born-von Karman theory, are reviewed. The most useful of the available methods of measurement are considered to be the crystal spectrometer methods and the pulsed monoenergetic beam/time-of-flight method. Pulsed-beam spectrometers have the advantage of higher counting rates than crystal spectrometers, especially in view of the fact that simultaneous measurements in several counters at different angles of scattering are possible in pulsed-beam spectrometers. The crystal spectrometer permits several valuable new types of specialized experiments to be performed, especially energy distribution measurements at constant momentum transfer. The Chalk River triple-axis crystal-spectrometer is discussed, with reference to its use in making the specialized experiments. The Chalk River rotating crystal (pulsed-beam) spectrometer is described, and a comparison of this type instrument with other pulsed-beam spectrometers is made. A partial outline of the theory of operation of rotating-crystal spectrometers is presented. The use of quartz-crystal filters for fast neutron elimination and for order elimination is discussed. (auth)

  19. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Supervised Machine Learning Methods Applied to Predict Ligand- Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Heck, Gabriela S; Pintro, Val O; Pereira, Richard R; de Ávila, Mauricio B; Levin, Nayara M B; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2017-01-01

    Calculation of ligand-binding affinity is an open problem in computational medicinal chemistry. The ability to computationally predict affinities has a beneficial impact in the early stages of drug development, since it allows a mathematical model to assess protein-ligand interactions. Due to the availability of structural and binding information, machine learning methods have been applied to generate scoring functions with good predictive power. Our goal here is to review recent developments in the application of machine learning methods to predict ligand-binding affinity. We focus our review on the application of computational methods to predict binding affinity for protein targets. In addition, we also describe the major available databases for experimental binding constants and protein structures. Furthermore, we explain the most successful methods to evaluate the predictive power of scoring functions. Association of structural information with ligand-binding affinity makes it possible to generate scoring functions targeted to a specific biological system. Through regression analysis, this data can be used as a base to generate mathematical models to predict ligandbinding affinities, such as inhibition constant, dissociation constant and binding energy. Experimental biophysical techniques were able to determine the structures of over 120,000 macromolecules. Considering also the evolution of binding affinity information, we may say that we have a promising scenario for development of scoring functions, making use of machine learning techniques. Recent developments in this area indicate that building scoring functions targeted to the biological systems of interest shows superior predictive performance, when compared with other approaches. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Increased hemoglobin O2 affinity protects during acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxia requires time to complete the adaptation mechanisms that influence oxygen (O2) transport and O2 utilization. Although decreasing hemoglobin (Hb) O2 affinity would favor the release of O2 to the tissues, increasing Hb O2 affinity would augment arterial O2 saturation during hypoxia. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pharmacologically increasing the Hb O2 affinity will augment O2 transport during severe hypoxia (10 and 5% inspired O2) compared with normal Hb O2 affinity. RBC Hb O2 affinity was increased by infusion of 20 mg/kg of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF). Control animals received only the vehicle. The effects of increasing Hb O2 affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model, in terms of systemic and microvascular hemodynamics and partial pressures of O2 (Po2). Pimonidazole binding to hypoxic areas of mice heart and brain was also studied. 5HMF decreased the Po2 at which the Hb is 50% saturated with O2 by 12.6 mmHg. During 10 and 5% O2 hypoxia, 5HMF increased arterial blood O2 saturation by 35 and 48% from the vehicle group, respectively. During 5% O2 hypoxia, blood pressure and heart rate were 58 and 30% higher for 5HMF compared with the vehicle. In addition, 5HMF preserved microvascular blood flow, whereas blood flow decreased to 40% of baseline in the vehicle group. Consequently, perivascular Po2 was three times higher in the 5HMF group compared with the control group at 5% O2 hypoxia. 5HMF also reduced heart and brain hypoxic areas in mice. Therefore, increased Hb O2 affinity resulted in hemodynamics and oxygenation benefits during severe hypoxia. This acute acclimatization process may have implications in survival during severe environmental hypoxia when logistic constraints prevent chronic acclimatization. PMID:22636677

  3. Nanoparticle multivalency counterbalances the ligand affinity loss upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Robert; Pollinger, Klaus; Veser, Anika; Breunig, Miriam; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-11-28

    The conjugation of receptor ligands to shielded nanoparticles is a widely used strategy to precisely control nanoparticle-cell interactions. However, it is often overlooked that a ligand's affinity can be severely impaired by its attachment to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains that are frequently used to protect colloids from serum protein adsorption. Using the model ligand EXP3174, a small-molecule antagonist for the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R), we investigated the ligand's affinity before and after its PEGylation and when attached to PEGylated nanoparticles. The PEGylated ligand displayed a 580-fold decreased receptor affinity compared to the native ligand. Due to their multivalency, the nanoparticles regained a low nanomolar receptor affinity, which is in the range of the affinity of the native ligand. Moreover, a four orders of magnitude higher concentration of free ligand was required to displace PEGylated nanoparticles carrying EXP3174 from the receptor. On average, one nanoparticle was decorated with 11.2 ligand molecules, which led to a multivalent enhancement factor of 22.5 compared to the monovalent PEGylated ligand. The targeted nanoparticles specifically bound the AT1R and showed no interaction to receptor negative cells. Our study shows that the attachment of a small-molecule ligand to a PEG chain can severely affect its receptor affinity. Concomitantly, when the ligand is tethered to nanoparticles, the immense avidity greatly increases the ligand-receptor interaction. Based on our results, we highly recommend the affinity testing of receptor ligands before and after PEGylation to identify potent molecules for active nanoparticle targeting.

  4. Gradient-based habitat affinities predict species vulnerability to drought.

    PubMed

    Debinski, Diane M; Caruthers, Jennet C; Cook, Dianne; Crowley, Jason; Wickham, Hadley

    2013-05-01

    Ecological fingerprints of climate change are becoming increasingly evident at broad geographical scales as measured by species range shifts and changes in phenology. However, finer-scale species-level responses to environmental fluctuations may also provide an important bellwether of impending future community responses. Here we examined changes in abundance of butterfly species along a hydrological gradient of six montane meadow habitat types in response to drought. Our data collection began prior to the drought, and we were able to track changes for 11 years, of which eight were considered mild to extreme drought conditions. We separated the species into those that had an affinity for hydric vs. xeric habitats. We suspected that drought would favor species with xeric habitat affinities, but that there could be variations in species-level responses along the hydrological gradient. We also suspected that mesic meadows would be most sensitive to drought conditions. Temporal trajectories were modeled for both species groups (hydric vs. xeric affinity) and individual species. Abundances of species with affinity for xeric habitats increased in virtually all meadow types. Conversely, abundances of species with affinity for hydric habitats decreased, particularly in mesic and xeric meadows. Mesic meadows showed the most striking temporal abundance trajectory: Increasing abundances of species with xeric habitat affinity were offset by decreasing or stable abundances of species with hydric habitat affinity. The one counterintuitive finding was that, in some hydric meadows, species with affinity for hydric habitats increased. In these cases, we suspect that decreasing moisture conditions in hydric meadows actually increased habitat suitability because sites near the limit of moisture extremes for some species became more acceptable. Thus, species responses were relatively predictable based upon habitat affinity and habitat location along the hydrological gradient, and

  5. Fluorogen-activating-proteins as universal affinity biosensors for immunodetection.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Eugenio; Vasilev, Kalin V; Jarvik, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Fluorogen-activating-proteins (FAPs) are a novel platform of fluorescence biosensors utilized for protein discovery. The technology currently demands molecular manipulation methods that limit its application and adaptability. Here, we highlight an alternative approach based on universal affinity reagents for protein detection. The affinity reagents were engineered as bi-partite fusion proteins, where the specificity moiety is derived from IgG-binding proteins-Protein A or Protein G-and the signaling element is a FAP. In this manner, primary antibodies provide the antigenic selectivity against a desired protein in biological samples, while FAP affinity reagents target the constant region (Fc) of antibodies and provide the biosensor component of detection. Fluorescence results using various techniques indicate minimal background and high target specificity for exogenous and endogenous proteins in mammalian cells. Additionally, FAP-based affinity reagents provide enhanced properties of detection previously absent using conventional affinity systems. Distinct features explored in this report include: (1) unfixed signal wavelengths (excitation and emission) determined by the particular fluorogen chosen, (2) real-time user controlled fluorescence on-set and off-set, (3) signal wavelength substitution while performing live analysis, and (4) enhanced resistance to photobleaching. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Affine kinematics in planar fibrous connective tissues: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Jayyosi, C; Affagard, J-S; Ducourthial, G; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Lynch, B; Bancelin, S; Ruggiero, F; Schanne-Klein, M-C; Allain, J-M; Bruyère-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2017-03-29

    The affine transformation hypothesis is usually adopted in order to link the tissue scale with the fibers scale in structural constitutive models of fibrous tissues. Thanks to the recent advances in imaging techniques, such as multiphoton microscopy, the microstructural behavior and kinematics of fibrous tissues can now be monitored at different stretching within the same sample. Therefore, the validity of the affine hypothesis can be investigated. In this paper, the fiber reorientation predicted by the affine assumption is compared to experimental data obtained during mechanical tests on skin and liver capsule coupled with microstructural imaging using multiphoton microscopy. The values of local strains and the collagen fibers orientation measured at increasing loading levels are used to compute a theoretical estimation of the affine reorientation of collagen fibers. The experimentally measured reorientation of collagen fibers during loading could not be successfully reproduced with this simple affine model. It suggests that other phenomena occur in the stretching process of planar fibrous connective tissues, which should be included in structural constitutive modeling approaches.

  7. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  8. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  9. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  10. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%.

  11. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva, M S; Graça, V C; Reis, L V; Santos, P F; Almeida, P; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2013-12-01

    The most selective purification method for proteins and other biomolecules is affinity chromatography. This method is based on the unique biological-based specificity of the biomolecule-ligand interaction and commonly uses biological ligands. However, these ligands may present some drawbacks, mainly because of their cost and lability. Dye-affinity chromatography overcomes the limitations of biological ligands and is widely used owing to the low cost of synthetic dyes and to their resistance to biological and chemical degradation. In this work, immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dyes are used in order to exploit affinity interactions with standard proteins such as lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin. These studies evaluate the affinity interactions occurring between the immobilized ligand and the different proteins, as a reflection of the sum of several molecular interactions, namely ionic, hydrophobic and van der Waals, spread throughout the structure, in a defined spatial manner. The results show the possibility of using an aminosquarylium cyanine dye bearing a N-hexyl pendant chain, with a ligand density of 1.8 × 10(-2) mmol of dye/g of chromatographic support, to isolate lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin from a mixture. The application of a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient resulted in the recovery of lysozyme in the flowthrough. On the other hand, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin were retained, involving different interactions with the ligand. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential applicability of ligands such as aminosquarylium cyanine dyes for the separation and purification of proteins by affinity chromatography.

  12. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Preparation of multiprotein complexes from Arabidopsis chloroplasts using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Charles; Agne, Birgit; Kessler, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Since its first description in 1998 (Rigaut et al., Nat Biotech 17:1030-1032, 1999), the TAP method, for Tandem Affinity Purification, has become one of the most popular methods for the purification of in vivo protein complexes and the identification of their composition by subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The TAP method is based on the use of a tripartite tag fused to a target protein expressed in the organism of interest. A TAP tag has two independent binding regions separated by a protease cleavage site, and therefore allows two successive affinity purification steps. The most common TAP tag consists of two IgG binding repeats of Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (ProtA) separated from a calmodulin-binding peptide by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage site. Using the TAP method, native protein complexes can be purified efficiently with a reduced contaminant background when compared to single step purification methods. Initially developed in the yeast model system, the TAP method has been adapted to most common model organisms. The first report of the purification of protein complexes from plant tissue by the TAP method was published in 2004 by Rohila et al. (Plant J 38:172-181, 2004). The synthetic TAP tag gene described in this study has been optimized for use in plants, and since then, has been successfully used from single gene analyses to high-throughput studies of whole protein families (Rohila et al., PLoS ONE 4:e6685, 2009). Here, we describe a TAP tag purification method for the purification of protein complexes from total Arabidopsis extracts, that we employed successfully using a TAP-tagged chloroplast outer envelope protein.

  14. Development of Substrate-Selective Probes for Affinity Pulldown of Histone Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases (JHDMs) play critical roles in many key cellular processes and have been implicated in multiple disease conditions. Each enzyme within this family is known to have a strict substrate scope, specifically the position of the lysine within the histone and its degree of methylation. While much progress has been made in determining the substrates of each enzyme, new methods with which to systematically profile each histone mark are greatly needed. Novel chemical tools have the potential to fill this role and, furthermore, can be used as probes to answer fundamental questions about these enzymes and serve as potential therapeutic leads. In this work, we first investigated three small-molecule probes differing in the degree of “methylation state” and their differential bindings to JHDM1A (an H3K36me1/2 demethylase) using a fluorescence polarization-based competition assay. We then applied this specificity toward the “methylation state” and combined it with specificity toward lysine position in the design and synthesis of a peptidic probe targeting H3K36me2 JHDMs. The probe is further functionalized with a benzophenone cross-linking moiety and a biotin for affinity purification. Results showed binding of the peptidic probe to JHDM1A and specific enrichment of this protein in the presence of its native histone substrates. Affinity purification pulldown experiments from nuclear lysate coupled with mass spectrometry revealed the capability of the probe to pull out and enrich JHDMs along with other epigenetic proteins and transcriptional regulators. PMID:25335116

  15. Nanoprobe-based immobilized metal affinity chromatography for sensitive and complementary enrichment of multiply phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan-Ting; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Lin, Po-Chiao; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, <100 nm) have rapidly evolved as sensitive affinity probes for phosphopeptide enrichment. By taking advantage of the easy magnetic separation and flexible surface modification of the MNP, we developed a surface-blocked, nanoprobe-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (NB-IMAC) method for the enhanced purification of multiply phosphorylated peptides. The NB-IMAC method allowed rapid and specific one-step enrichment by blocking the surface of titanium (IV) ion-charged nitrilotriacetic acid-conjugated MNP (Ti⁴-NTA-PEG@MNP) with low molecular weight polyethylene glycol. The MNP demonstrated highly sensitive and unbiased extraction of both mono- and multiply phosphorylated peptides from diluted β-casein (2 × 10⁻¹⁰  M). Without chemical derivation or fractionation, 1283 phosphopeptides were identified from 400 μg of Raji B cells with 80% purification specificity. We also showed the first systematic comparison on the particle size effect between nano-sclae IMAC and micro-scale IMAC. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis revealed that MNP had a 4.6-fold higher capacity for metal ions per unit weight than did the magnetic micro-sized particle (MMP, 2-10 μm), resulting in the identification of more phosphopeptides as well as a higher percentage of multiply phosphorylated peptides (31%) at the proteome scale. Furthermore, NB-IMAC complements chromatography-based IMAC and TiO₂ methods because <13% of mono- and 12% of multiply phosphorylated peptide identifications overlapped among the 2700 phosphopeptides identified by the three methods. Notably, the number of multiply phosphorylated peptides was enriched twofold and threefold by NB-IMAC relative to micro-scale IMAC and TiO₂, respectively. NB-IMAC is an innovative material for increasing the identification coverage in phosphoproteomics. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Enhanced Local Disorder in a Clinically Elusive von Willebrand Factor Provokes High-Affinity Platelet Clumping.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Machha, Venkata R; Frontroth, Juan P; Brehm, Maria A; Obser, Tobias; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Mayne, Leland; Walter Englander, S; Auton, Matthew

    2017-07-07

    Mutation of the cysteines forming the disulfide loop of the platelet GPIbα adhesive A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF) causes quantitative VWF deficiencies in the blood and von Willebrand disease. We report two cases of transient severe thrombocytopenia induced by DDAVP treatment. Cys1272Trp and Cys1458Tyr mutations identified by genetic sequencing implicate an abnormal gain-of-function phenotype, evidenced by thrombocytopenia, which quickly relapses back to normal platelet counts and deficient plasma VWF. Using surface plasmon resonance, analytical rheology, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS), we decipher mechanisms of A1-GPIbα-mediated platelet adhesion and resolve dynamic secondary structure elements that regulate the binding pathway. Constrained by the disulfide, conformational selection between weak and tight binding states of A1 takes precedence and drives normal platelet adhesion to VWF. Less restrained through mutation, loss of the disulfide preferentially diverts binding through an induced-fit disease pathway enabling high-affinity GPIbα binding and firm platelet adhesion to a partially disordered A1 domain. HXMS reveals a dynamic asymmetry of flexible and ordered regions common to both variants, indicating that the partially disordered A1 lacking the disulfide retains native-like structural dynamics. Both binding mechanisms share common structural and thermodynamic properties, but the enhanced local disorder in the disease state perpetuates high-affinity platelet agglutination, characteristic of type 2B VWD, upon DDAVP-stimulated secretion of VWF leading to transient thrombocytopenia and a subsequent deficiency of plasma VWF, characteristic of type 2A VWD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The affine structure of gravitational theories: Symplectic groups and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2014-09-01

    We give a geometrical description of gravitational theories from the viewpoint of symmetries and affine structure. We show how gravity, considered as a gauge theory, can be consistently achieved by the nonlinear realization of the conformal-affine group in an indirect manner: due to the partial isomorphism between CA(3, 1) and the centrally extended Sp( 8), we perform a nonlinear realization of the centrally extended (CE)Sp( 8) in its semi-simple version. In particular, starting from the bundle structure of gravity, we derive the conformal-affine Lie algebra and then, by the nonlinear realization, we define the coset field transformations, the Cartan forms and the inverse Higgs constraints. Finally, we discuss the geometrical Lagrangians where all the information on matter fields and their interactions can be contained.

  18. Generalized Rogers-Ramanujan identities for twisted affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genish, Arel; Gepner, Doron

    2017-07-01

    The characters of parafermionic conformal field theories are given by the string functions of affine algebras, which are either twisted or untwisted algebras. Expressions for these characters as generalized Rogers-Ramanujan algebras have been established for the untwisted affine algebras. However, we study the identities for the string functions of the twisted affine Lie algebras. A conjecture for the string functions was proposed by Hatayama et al., for the unit fields, which expresses the string functions as Rogers-Ramanujan type sums. Here we propose to check the Hatayama et al. conjecture, using Lie algebraic theoretic methods. We use Freudenthal’s formula, which we computerized, to verify the identities for all the algebras at low rank and low level. We find complete agreement with the conjecture.

  19. Image registration under affine transformation using cellular simultaneous recurrent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Anderson, Keith

    2010-08-01

    Cellular simultaneous recurrent networks (CSRN)s have been traditionally exploited to solve the digital control and conventional maze traversing problems. In previous works, we investigated the use of CSRNs to register simulated binary images with in-plane rotations between +/-20° using two different CSRN architectures such as one with a general multi-layered perceptron (GMLP) architecture; and another with modified MLP architecture with multilayered feedback. We further exploit the CSRN for registration of realistic binary and gray scale images under rotation. In this current work we report results of applying CSRNs to perform image registration under affine transformations such as rotation and translation. We further provide extensive analyses of CSRN affine registration results for appropriate cost function formulation. Our CSRN results analyses show that formulation of locally varying cost function is desirable for robust image registration under affine transformation.

  20. AMPK beta subunits display isoform specific affinities for carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Koay, Ann; Woodcroft, Ben; Petrie, Emma J; Yue, Helen; Emanuelle, Shane; Bieri, Michael; Bailey, Michael F; Hargreaves, Mark; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Ralph, Stuart; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R

    2010-08-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimer of catalytic (alpha) and regulatory (beta and gamma) subunits with at least two isoforms for each subunit. AMPK beta1 is widely expressed whilst AMPK beta2 is highly expressed in muscle and both beta isoforms contain a mid-molecule carbohydrate-binding module (beta-CBM). Here we show that beta2-CBM has evolved to contain a Thr insertion and increased affinity for glycogen mimetics with a preference for oligosaccharides containing a single alpha-1,6 branched residue. Deletion of Thr-101 reduces affinity for single alpha-1,6 branched oligosaccharides by 3-fold, while insertion of this residue into the equivalent position in the beta1-CBM sequence increases affinity by 3-fold, confirming the functional importance of this residue. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A fast quantum algorithm for the affine Boolean function identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm (the one-query algorithm) can identify a completely specified linear Boolean function using a single query to the oracle with certainty. The first aim of the paper is to show that if the provided Boolean function is affine, then one more query to the oracle (the two-query algorithm) is required to identify the affinity of the function with certainty. The second aim of the paper is to show that if the provided Boolean function is incompletely defined, then the one-query and the two-query algorithms can be used as bounded-error quantum polynomial algorithms to identify certain classes of incompletely defined linear and affine Boolean functions respectively with probability of success at least 2/3.

  2. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity (EA) of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, using 2p electron full configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions expanded in a 6s5p3d2f Slater-type orbital basis. The best complete active space self-consistent field - multireference CI (CASSCF-MRCI) result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell correlation increases the computed EA to 1.290 at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. This study clearly establishes the synergistic effect between the higher excitations and basis set completeness on the electron affinity when the 2s electrons are correlated.

  3. On the electron affinity of the oxygen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron affinity of oxygen is computed to be 1.287 eV, at the full CI level using a 6s5p3d 2f Slater-type orbital basis and correlating only the 2p electrons. The best CASSCF-MRCI result including only 2p correlation is 1.263 eV. However, inclusion of 2s intrashell and 2s2p intershell coorelation increases the computed EA to 1.290 eV at the CASSCF-MRCI level. At the full CI basis set limit, the 2s contribution to the electron affinity is estimated to be as large as 0.1 eV. The higher excitation contribution to the electron affinity is found to increase substantially with basis set completeness, especially when the 2s electrons are correlated. Relativistic effects are shown to make a small (less than 0.01 eV) change in the EA.

  4. Efficacy of glycoprotein enrichment by microscale lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Madera, Milan; Mann, Benjamin; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V

    2008-08-01

    Reproducible and efficient affinity enrichment is increasingly viewed as an essential step in many investigations leading to the discovery of new biomarkers. In this work, we have evaluated the repeatability of lectin enrichment of glycoproteins from human blood serum through both qualitative and quantitative proteomic approaches. In a comprehensive evaluation of lectin binding, we have performed 30 separate microscale lectin affinity chromatography experiments, followed by a conventional sample purification, and LC-MS/MS analysis of the enriched glycoproteins. Two lectin affinity matrixes, both with Con A lectin, immobilized to the same solid support but differing in the amount of immobilized lectin, were investigated to characterize their binding properties. Both qualitative and quantitative data indicate acceptable repeatability and binding efficiency for the lectin materials received from two different commercial sources.

  5. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  6. Enhancing Community Detection By Affinity-based Edge Weighting Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    Community detection refers to an important graph analytics problem of finding a set of densely-connected subgraphs in a graph and has gained a great deal of interest recently. The performance of current community detection algorithms is limited by an inherent constraint of unweighted graphs that offer very little information on their internal community structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to address this issue that weights the edges in a given graph based on recently proposed vertex affinity. The vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength, and therefore, it is ideal for graph analytics applications such as community detection. We also demonstrate that the affinity-based edge weighting scheme can improve the performance of community detection algorithms significantly.

  7. Isolation and mass spectrometry of transcription factor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sebastiaan Winkler, G; Lacomis, Lynne; Philip, John; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Svejstrup, Jesper Q; Tempst, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Protocols are described that enable the isolation of novel proteins associated with a known protein and the subsequent identification of these proteins by mass spectrometry. We review the basics of nanosample handling and of two complementary approaches to mass analysis, and provide protocols for the entire process. The protein isolation procedure is rapid and based on two high-affinity chromatography steps. The method does not require previous knowledge of complex composition or activity and permits subsequent biochemical characterization of the isolated factor. As an example, we provide the procedures used to isolate and analyze yeast Elongator, a histone acetyltransferase complex important for transcript elongation, which led to the identification of three novel subunits.

  8. Ferromagnetic Levan Composite: An Affinity Matrix to Purify Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Renata; da Paz, Nathalia V. N.; Maciel, Jackeline C.; Araújo, Flávia F. B.; Paiva, Patrícia M. G.; Calazans, Glícia M. T.; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Carvalho, Luiz B.; Silva, Maria da Paz C.; dos Santos Correia, Maria Tereza

    2009-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A) and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1, 4) did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column. PMID:19547713

  9. Affine generalization of the Komar complex of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2001-02-01

    On the basis of the ``on shell'' Noether identities of the metric-affine gauge approach of gravity, an affine superpotential is derived which comprises the energy- and angular-momentum content of exact solutions. In the special case of general relativity (GR) or its teleparallel equivalent, the Komar or Freud complex, respectively, are recovered. Applying this to the spontaneously broken anti-de Sitter gauge model of McDowell and Mansouri with an induced Euler term automatically yields the correct mass and spin of the Kerr-AdS solution of GR with a (induced) cosmological constant without the factor two discrepancy of the Komar formula.

  10. A quantum affine algebra for the deformed Hubbard chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisert, Niklas; Galleas, Wellington; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2012-09-01

    The integrable structure of the one-dimensional Hubbard model is based on Shastry's R-matrix and the Yangian of a centrally extended \\mathfrak {sl}(2|2) superalgebra. Alcaraz and Bariev have shown that the model admits an integrable deformation whose R-matrix has recently been found. This R-matrix is of trigonometric type and here we derive its underlying exceptional quantum affine algebra. We also show how the algebra reduces to the above-mentioned Yangian and to the conventional quantum affine \\mathfrak {sl}(2|2) algebra in two special limits.

  11. Silicon based affinity biochips viewed with imaging ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, Danny; Rumberg, Jens; Jager, Edwin W. H.; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we report on the fabrication of an affinity biochip with a matrix of 900 targets for detection with imaging ellipsometry. Two methods of fabrication of chips are shown: one based on wet etching of a silicon surface and the other on the preparation of so-called tension wells on the silicon surface. The dispensing of reagents and ligands was performed using a pipetting robot equipped with a micro-capillary, a syringe pump and micro-stepping motors. Measurements were performed on the chips in real time with carbohydrate model substances selected for six common lectins. Affinity binding was shown for three of the tested model substances.

  12. Positron affinity in Zn1-xCdxSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benosman, N.; Amrane, N.; Méçabih, S.; Aourag, H.

    2000-11-01

    The independent particle model (IPM) coupled with the use of the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) which incorporates compositional disorder as an effective potential was used to compute the positron charge distribution in the cubic structured ternary alloy Zn1-xCdxSe. The positron charge density with respect to the variation of the mole fraction is discussed. The results show that positrons have a strong affinity for the anion than for the cation. This relative positron affinity should lead to the positron preferentially annihilating with the anion rather than the cation.

  13. A general technique to rank protein-ligand binding affinities and determine allosteric versus direct binding site competition in compound mixtures.

    PubMed

    Annis, D Allen; Nazef, Naim; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Scott, Margaret Porter; Nash, Huw M

    2004-12-01

    To realize the full potential of combinatorial chemistry-based drug discovery, generic and efficient tools must be developed that apply the strengths of diversity-oriented chemical synthesis to the identification and optimization of lead compounds for disease-associated protein targets. We report an affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) method for protein-ligand affinity ranking and the classification of ligands by binding site. The method incorporates the following steps: (1) an affinity selection stage, where protein-binding compounds are selected from pools of ligands in the presence of varying concentrations of a competitor ligand, (2) a first chromatography stage to separate unbound ligands from protein-ligand complexes, and (3) a second chromatography stage to dissociate the ligands from the complexes for identification and quantification by MS. The ability of the competitor ligand to displace a target-bound library member, as measured by MS, reveals the binding site classification and affinity ranking of the mixture components. The technique requires no radiolabel incorporation or direct biochemical assay, no modification or immobilization of the compounds or target protein, and all reaction components, including any buffers or cofactors required for protein stability, are free in solution. We demonstrate the method for several compounds of wide structural variety against representatives of the most important protein classes in contemporary drug discovery, including novel ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors of the Akt-1 (PKB) and Zap-70 kinases, and previously undisclosed antagonists of the M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). The theoretical basis of the technique is analyzed mathematically, allowing quantitative estimation of binding affinities and, in the case of allosteric interaction, absolute determination of binding cooperativity. The method is readily applicable to high-throughput screening hit

  14. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Foote, Linda J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  15. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  16. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  17. Mass spectrometry for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Demirev, Plamen A

    2004-11-01

    A physical method currently being developed for malaria parasite detection and diagnosis in blood is reviewed in this article. The method - direct laser desorption mass spectrometry - is based on the detection of heme (iron protoporphyrin) as a unique qualitative and quantitative molecular biomarker for malaria. In infected erythrocytes, the parasite sequesters heme in a molecular crystal (hemozoin) - a volume of highly concentrated and purified biomarker molecules. Laser desorption mass spectrometry detects only heme from hemozoin in parasite-infected blood, and not heme that is bound to hemoglobin or other proteins in uninfected blood samples. The method requires only a drop of blood with minimal sample preparation. Laser desorption mass spectrometry may become a rapid and high-throughput tool for specific and sensitive pan-malaria detection at levels below 10 parasites/mul of blood.

  18. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  19. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  20. Harmonic fusion and pitch affinity: Is there a direct link?

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Damien; Dauman, René; Semal, Catherine; Demany, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Simultaneous pure tones approximately one octave apart tend to be fused perceptually and to evoke a single pitch sensation. Besides, sequentially presented pure tones show a subjective "affinity" or similarity in pitch when their frequency ratio is close to one octave. The aim of the study reported here was to determine if these two perceptual phenomena are directly related. Each stimulus was a triplet of simultaneous or successive pure tones forming frequency ratios varying across stimuli between 0.96 and 1.04 octaves. The tones were presented at a low sensation level (15 dB) within broadband threshold-equalizing noise, in order to prevent them from interacting in the cochlea when they were simultaneous. A large set of stimulus comparisons made by 18 listeners indicated that: (1) when the tones were simultaneous, maximal fusion was obtained for a mean frequency ratio deviating by less than 0.2% from one octave, and fusion decreased less rapidly above this frequency ratio than below it; (2) when the tones were presented successively, maximal pitch affinity was obtained for a mean frequency ratio significantly larger than one octave, and pitch affinity decreased more rapidly above this frequency ratio than below it. The differences between the results obtained for simultaneous and successive tones suggest that harmonic fusion and pitch affinity are unrelated phenomena. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Student Engagement and Neoliberalism: Mapping an Elective Affinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to argue that student engagement, an important area for research about learning and teaching in formal higher education, has an elective affinity with neoliberalism, a hegemonic ideology in many countries of the developed world. The paper first surveys an extensive research literature examining student engagement and…

  2. An axially symmetric solution of metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachynsky, E. J.; Tresguerres, R.; Obukhov, Yu N.; Hehl, F. W.

    1996-12-01

    We present an exact stationary axially symmetric vacuum solution of metric-affine gravity (MAG) which generalizes the recently reported spherically symmetric solution; besides the metric, it carries nonmetricity and torsion as post-Riemannian geometrical structures. The parameters of the solution are interpreted as mass and angular momentum and as dilation, shear and spin charges.

  3. Low and high affinity receptors mediate cellular uptake of heparanase

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Zaken, Olga; Shafat, Itay; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Bangio, Haim; Kelson, Idil Kasuto; Alergand, Tal; Amor, Yehudit; Maya, Ruth Ben-Yakar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2008-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase which cleaves heparan sulfate and hence participates in degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Importantly, heparanase activity correlated with the metastatic potential of tumor-derived cells, attributed to enhanced cell dissemination as a consequence of heparan sulfate cleavage and remodeling of the extracellular matrix barrier. Heparanase has been characterized as a glycoprotein, yet glycan biochemical analysis was not performed to date. Here, we applied the Qproteome™ GlycoArray kit to perform glycan analysis of heparanase, and compared the kit results with the more commonly used biochemical analyses. We employed fibroblasts isolated from patients with I-cell disease (mucolipidosis II), fibroblasts deficient of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and fibroblasts lacking mannose 6-phosphate receptor, to explore the role of mannose 6-phosphate in heparanase uptake. Iodinated heparanase has been utilized to calculate binding affinity. We provide evidence for hierarchy of binding to cellular receptors as a function of heparanase concentration. We report the existence of a high affinity, low abundant (i.e., low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, mannose 6-phosphate receptor), as well as a low affinity, high abundant (i.e., heparan sulfate proteoglycan) receptors that mediate heparanase binding, and suggest that these receptors cooperate to establish high affinity binding sites for heparanase, thus maintaining extracellular retention of the enzyme tightly regulated. PMID:17981072

  4. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6.

  5. Limit measures for affine cellular automata on topological Markov subgroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Alejandro; Martínez, Servet; Sobottka, Marcelo

    2006-09-01

    Consider a topological Markov subgroup which is ps-torsion (with p prime) and an affine cellular automaton defined on it. We show that the Cesàro mean of the iterates, by the automaton of a probability measure with complete connections and summable memory decay that is compatible with the topological Markov subgroup, converges to the Haar measure.

  6. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  7. Affinities and beyond! Developing Ways of Seeing in Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Julia

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an insider view of an online community of adults involved in sharing digital photography through a host website, Flickr. It describes how reciprocal teaching and learning partnerships in a dynamic multimodal environment are achieved through the creation of a "Third Space" or "Affinity Space", where "Funds of Knowledge" are…

  8. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  9. "The Hunger Games": Literature, Literacy, and Online Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article examines adolescent literacy practices related to "The Hunger Games," a young adult novel and the first of a trilogy. By focusing on the interaction of social identities, discourses, and media paratexts within an online affinity space, this ethnographic study offers insight into how young adults engage with contemporary…

  10. Lorentzian affine hypersurfaces with an almost symplectic form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szancer, Michal

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study affine hypersurfaces with a Lorentzian second fundamental form additionally equipped with an almost symplectic structure ω. We prove that the rank of the shape operator is at most one if the hypersurface is of dimension at least 6 and Rk ṡ ω = 0 or ∇k ω = 0 for some positive integer k.

  11. "The Hunger Games": Literature, Literacy, and Online Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article examines adolescent literacy practices related to "The Hunger Games," a young adult novel and the first of a trilogy. By focusing on the interaction of social identities, discourses, and media paratexts within an online affinity space, this ethnographic study offers insight into how young adults engage with contemporary…

  12. Toward an Affinity Space Methodology: Considerations for Literacy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammers, Jayne C.; Curwood, Jen Scott; Magnifico, Alecia Marie

    2012-01-01

    As researchers seek to make sense of young people's online literacy practices and participation, questions of methodology are important to consider. In our work to understand the culture of physical, virtual and blended spheres that adolescents inhabit, we find it necessary to expand Gee's (2004) notion of affinity spaces. In this article, we draw…

  13. Student Engagement and Neoliberalism: Mapping an Elective Affinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to argue that student engagement, an important area for research about learning and teaching in formal higher education, has an elective affinity with neoliberalism, a hegemonic ideology in many countries of the developed world. The paper first surveys an extensive research literature examining student engagement and…

  14. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  15. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Affinity through Mathematical Activity: Cultivating Democratic Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta-Irving, Tesha

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author demonstrates how a broader view of what shapes affinity is ideologically and practically linked to creating democratic learning communities. Specifically, the author explores how a teacher employed complex instruction (an equity pedagogy) with her ethnically and racially diverse students in the "lowest track"…

  17. Mass spectrometry guided structural biology.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M; Hopper, Jonathan Ts; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-10-01

    With the convergence of breakthroughs in structural biology, specifically breaking the resolution barriers in cryo-electron microscopy and with continuing developments in crystallography, novel interfaces with other biophysical methods are emerging. Here we consider how mass spectrometry can inform these techniques by providing unambiguous definition of subunit stoichiometry. Moreover recent developments that increase mass spectral resolution enable molecular details to be ascribed to unassigned density within high-resolution maps of membrane and soluble protein complexes. Importantly we also show how developments in mass spectrometry can define optimal solution conditions to guide downstream structure determination, particularly of challenging biomolecules that refuse to crystallise.

  18. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  19. Selection and mass spectrometry characterization of peptides targeting semiconductor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Estephan, Elias; Larroque, Christian; Bec, Nicole; Martineau, Pierre; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2009-12-15

    We report on elaboration of 12-mer peptides that reveal specific recognition for the following semiconductor (SC) surfaces: GaAs(100), InAs(100), GaN(0001), ZnSe(100), ZnTe(100), GaAs(111)A, GaSb(100), CdSe(100). A M13 bacteriophage library was used to screen 10(9) different 12-mer peptides against these substrates to finally isolate, in maximum six amplification cycles, peptides that bind to the target surfaces. The specific peptides for the InAs and ZnSe surfaces were obtained. Contrary, for the other SC surfaces several peptides with high affinities have been isolated. Aiming for a better specificity, when the phage display has been conducted through six cycles, the screening procedure got dominated by a phage present in the M13 bacteriophage library and the SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide has been selected for different SCs. The high amplification potential of this phage has been observed previously with different targets. Thus, precaution should be undertaken in defining adhesion peptides with the phage display technique and real affinity of the obtained biolinkers should be studied with other methods. We employed mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) to demonstrate the preferential attachment (or not) of the SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide to the different SC surfaces. This allows us to define a realistic selection of the expressed peptides presenting affinity for the studied eight SC surfaces. We demonstrate that with increasing the dielectric constants of the employed solvents, adhesion of the SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide onto GaN(0001) is hindered. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Myoglobin oxygen affinity in aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Traver J; Davis, Randall W

    2015-07-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is an oxygen binding protein found in vertebrate skeletal muscle, where it facilitates intracellular transport and storage of oxygen. This protein has evolved to suit unique physiological needs in the muscle of diving vertebrates that express Mb at much greater concentrations than their terrestrial counterparts. In this study, we characterized Mb oxygen affinity (P50) from 25 species of aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals. Among diving species, we tested for correlations between Mb P50 and routine dive duration. Across all species examined, Mb P50 ranged from 2.40 to 4.85 mmHg. The mean P50 of Mb from terrestrial ungulates was 3.72±0.15 mmHg (range 3.70-3.74 mmHg). The P50 of cetaceans was similar to terrestrial ungulates ranging from 3.54 to 3.82 mmHg, with the exception of the melon-headed whale, which had a significantly higher P50 of 4.85 mmHg. Among pinnipeds, the P50 ranged from 3.23 to 3.81 mmHg and showed a trend for higher oxygen affinity in species with longer dive durations. Among diving birds, the P50 ranged from 2.40 to 3.36 mmHg and also showed a trend of higher affinities in species with longer dive durations. In pinnipeds and birds, low Mb P50 was associated with species whose muscles are metabolically active under hypoxic conditions associated with aerobic dives. Given the broad range of potential globin oxygen affinities, Mb P50 from diverse vertebrate species appears constrained within a relatively narrow range. High Mb oxygen affinity within this range may be adaptive for some vertebrates that make prolonged dives. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Semiempirical Theories of the Affinities of Negative Atomic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, John W.

    1961-01-01

    The determination of the electron affinities of negative atomic ions by means of direct experimental investigation is limited. To supplement the meager experimental results, several semiempirical theories have been advanced. One commonly used technique involves extrapolating the electron affinities along the isoelectronic sequences, The most recent of these extrapolations Is studied by extending the method to Include one more member of the isoelectronic sequence, When the results show that this extension does not increase the accuracy of the calculations, several possible explanations for this situation are explored. A different approach to the problem is suggested by the regularities appearing in the electron affinities. Noting that the regular linear pattern that exists for the ionization potentials of the p electrons as a function of Z, repeats itself for different degrees of ionization q, the slopes and intercepts of these curves are extrapolated to the case of the negative Ion. The method is placed on a theoretical basis by calculating the Slater parameters as functions of q and n, the number of equivalent p-electrons. These functions are no more than quadratic in q and n. The electron affinities are calculated by extending the linear relations that exist for the neutral atoms and positive ions to the negative ions. The extrapolated. slopes are apparently correct, but the intercepts must be slightly altered to agree with experiment. For this purpose one or two experimental affinities (depending on the extrapolation method) are used in each of the two short periods. The two extrapolation methods used are: (A) an isoelectronic sequence extrapolation of the linear pattern as such; (B) the same extrapolation of a linearization of this pattern (configuration centers) combined with an extrapolation of the other terms of the ground configurations. The latter method Is preferable, since it requires only experimental point for each period. The results agree within

  2. Distance and affinity dependence of triplex-induced recombination.

    PubMed

    Knauert, Melissa P; Lloyd, Janice A; Rogers, Faye A; Datta, Hirock J; Bennett, Michael L; Weeks, Daniel L; Glazer, Peter M

    2005-03-15

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have the potential to serve as gene therapeutic agents on the basis of their ability to mediate site-specific genome modification via induced recombination. However, high-affinity triplex formation is limited to polypurine/polypyrimidine sites in duplex DNA. Because of this sequence restriction, careful analysis is needed to identify suitable TFO target sites within or near genes of interest. We report here an examination of two key parameters which influence the efficiency of TFO-induced recombination: (1) binding affinity of the TFO for the target site and (2) the distance between the target site and the mutation to be corrected. To test the influence of binding affinity, we compared induced recombination in human cell-free extracts by a series of G-rich oligonucleotides with an identical base composition and an increasing number of mismatches in the third strand binding code. As the number of mismatches increased and, therefore, binding affinity decreased, induced recombination frequency also dropped. There was an apparent threshold at an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1 x 10(-)(7) M. In addition, TFO chemical modification with N,N-diethylethylenediamine (DEED) internucleoside linkages to confer improved binding was found to yield increased levels of induced recombination. To test the ability of triplex formation to induce recombination at a distance, episomal targets with informative reporter genes were constructed to contain polypurine TFO target sites at varying distances from the mutations to be corrected. TFO-induced recombination in mammalian cells between a plasmid vector and a donor oligonucleotide was detected at distances ranging from 24 to 750 bp. Together, these results indicate that TFO-induced recombination requires high-affinity binding but can affect sites hundreds of base pairs away from the position of triplex formation.

  3. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  4. Affine Covariant Features for Fisheye Distortion Local Modelling.

    PubMed

    Furnari, Antonino; Farinella, Giovanni; Bruna, Arcangelo; Battiato, Sebastiano

    2016-11-10

    Perspective cameras are the most popular imaging sensors used in Computer Vision. However, many application fields including automotive, surveillance and robotics, require the use of wide angle cameras (e.g., fisheye), which allow to acquire a larger portion of the scene using a single device at the cost of the introduction of noticeable radial distortion in the images. Affine covariant feature detectors have proven successful in a variety of Computer Vision applications including object recognition, image registration and visual search. Moreover, their robustness to a series of variabilities related to both the scene and the image acquisition process has been thoroughly studied in the literature. In this paper, we investigate their effectiveness on fisheye images providing both theoretical and experimental analyses. As theoretical outcome, we show that the inherently non-linear radial distortion can be locally approximated by linear functions with a reasonably small error. The experimental analysis builds on Mikolajczyk's benchmark to assess the robustness of three popular affine region detectors (i.e., Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER), Harris and Hessian affine region detectors), with respect to different variabilities as well as to radial distortion. To support the evaluations, we rely on the Oxford dataset and introduce a novel benchmark dataset comprising 50 images depicting different scene categories. Experiments are carried out on rectilinear images to which radial distortion is artificially added, and on real-world images acquired using fisheye lenses. Our analysis points out that affine region detectors can be effectively employed directly on fisheye images and that the radial distortion is locally modelled as an additional affine variability.

  5. Deciphering metal ion preference and primary coordination sphere robustness of a designed zinc finger with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Laitaoja, Mikko; Isoniemi, Sari; Valjakka, Jarkko; Mándity, István M; Jänis, Janne

    2017-02-01

    Small zinc finger (ZnF) motifs are promising molecular scaffolds for protein design owing to their structural robustness and versatility. Moreover, their characterization provides important insights into protein folding in general. ZnF motifs usually possess an exceptional specificity and high affinity towards Zn(II) ion to drive folding. While the Zn(II) ion is canonically coordinated by two cysteine and two histidine residues, many other coordination spheres also exist in small ZnFs, all having four amino acid ligands. Here we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to study metal ion binding specificity and primary coordination sphere robustness of a designed zinc finger, named MM1. Based on the results, MM1 possesses high specificity for zinc with sub-micromolar binding affinity. Surprisingly, MM1 retains metal ion binding affinity even in the presence of selective alanine mutations of the primary zinc coordinating amino acid residues. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  6. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  7. A fluorescence nanosensor for glycoproteins with activity based on the molecularly imprinted spatial structure of the target and boronate affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Wei; Li, Ping; Xiao, Haibin; Wang, Hui; Tang, Bo

    2014-11-10

    Glycoproteins are closely associated with the occurrence of diverse diseases, and they have been used as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in clinical diagnostics. Currently, mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful tool for glycoprotein analysis, but it is almost impossible to directly identify glycoproteins without the preparation and pretreatment of samples. Furthermore, biological samples, especially proteins, are damaged by this process. Herein, we describe a novel fluorescence nanosensor based on a molecularly imprinted spatial structure and boronate affinity that is well-suited for monitoring glycoproteins selectively. Results showed that the recognition performance of the nanosensor for glycoproteins was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Moreover, the nanosensor was successfully applied to the detection of HRP in biological fluids. This study provides a facile and efficient fluorescence tool for glycoprotein detection in clinical diagnostics.

  8. Tandem metal-oxide affinity chromatography for enhanced depth of phosphoproteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gerold J M; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Röhrig, Horst; Conrath, Uwe; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells many diverse cellular functions are regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. In recent years, phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool to study protein phosphorylation because it allows unbiased localization, and site-specific quantification, of in vivo phosphorylation of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. A common strategy to identify phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation sites from complex biological samples is the enrichment of phosphopeptides from digested cellular lysates followed by mass spectrometry. However, despite the high sensitivity of modern mass spectrometers the large dynamic range of protein abundance and the transient nature of protein phosphorylation remained major pitfalls in MS-based phosphoproteomics. Tandem metal-oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC) represents a robust and highly selective approach for the identification and site-specific quantification of low abundant phosphoproteins that is based on the successive enrichment of phosphoproteins and -peptides. This strategy combines protein extraction under denaturing conditions, phosphoprotein enrichment using Al(OH)3-based MOAC, tryptic digestion of enriched phosphoproteins followed by TiO2-based MOAC of phosphopeptides. Thus, tandem MOAC effectively targets the phosphate moiety of phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides and, thus, allows probing of the phosphoproteome to unprecedented depth.

  9. Improved tandem affinity purification tag and methods for isolation of protein heterocomplexes from plants.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Cerny, Ronald; Fromm, Michael E

    2004-04-01

    A synthetic gene encoding the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag has been constructed, and the TAP tag assayed for its effects on expression levels and subcellular localization by fusion to green fluorescent protein (GFP) as well as for its effects on steroid-dependent translocation to the nucleus and transcription when fused to a hybrid glucocorticoid receptor. A nuclear localization signal (NLS) was detected in the calmodulin-binding protein (CBP) domain and removed by mutation to improve the usefulness of the TAP tag. Additionally, purification improvements were made, including inhibition of a co-purifying protease, and adding a protein cross-linking step to increase the recovery of interacting proteins. The improved synthetic TAP tag gene and methods were used to isolate proteins interacting with the hybrid glucocorticoid receptor and to identify them by mass spectrometry. The two proteins identified, HSP70 and HSP90, are known to interact with the glucocorticoid receptor in vivo in mammalian cells and in vitro in plants.

  10. High Confidence Fission Yeast SUMO Conjugates Identified by Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Minghua; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Boddy, Michael N

    2015-09-25

    Covalent attachment of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to key targets in the proteome critically regulates the evolutionarily conserved processes of cell cycle control, transcription, DNA replication and maintenance of genome stability. The proteome-wide identification of SUMO conjugates in budding yeast has been invaluable in helping to define roles of SUMO in these processes. Like budding yeast, fission yeast is an important and popular model organism; however, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe community currently lacks proteome-wide knowledge of SUMO pathway targets. To begin to address this deficiency, we adapted and used a highly stringent Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification (TDAP) method, coupled with mass spectrometry, to identify fission yeast SUMO conjugates. Comparison of our data with that compiled in budding yeast reveals conservation of SUMO target enrichment in nuclear and chromatin-associated processes. Moreover, the SUMO "cloud" phenomenon, whereby multiple components of a single protein complex are SUMOylated, is also conserved. Overall, SUMO TDAP provides both a key resource of high confidence SUMO-modified target proteins in fission yeast, and a robust method for future analyses of SUMO function.

  11. A novel affinity-based method for the isolation of highly purified extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Wataru; Yoshida, Takeshi; Diez, Diego; Miyatake, Yuji; Nishibu, Takahiro; Imawaka, Naoko; Naruse, Ken; Sadamura, Yoshifusa; Hanayama, Rikinari

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as exosomes and microvesicles serve as messengers of intercellular network, allowing exchange of cellular components between cells. EVs carry lipids, proteins, and RNAs derived from their producing cells, and have potential as biomarkers specific to cell types and even cellular states. However, conventional methods (such as ultracentrifugation or polymeric precipitation) for isolating EVs have disadvantages regarding purity and feasibility. Here, we have developed a novel method for EV purification by using Tim4 protein, which specifically binds the phosphatidylserine displayed on the surface of EVs. Because the binding is Ca2+-dependent, intact EVs can be easily released from Tim4 by adding Ca2+ chelators. Tim4 purification, which we have applied to cell conditioned media and biofluids, is capable of yielding EVs of a higher purity than those obtained using conventional methods. The lower contamination found in Tim4-purified EV preparations allows more EV-specific proteins to be detected by mass spectrometry, enabling better characterization and quantification of different EV populations’ proteomes. Tim4 protein can also be used as a powerful tool for quantification of EVs in both ELISA and flow cytometry formats. Thus, the affinity of Tim4 for EVs will find abundant applications in EV studies. PMID:27659060

  12. Binding site on human immunoglobulin G for the affinity ligand HWRGWV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiou; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Williams, D. Keith; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Cavanagh, John; Muddiman, David C.; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity ligand HWRGWV has demonstrated the ability to isolate human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from mammalian cell culture media. The ligand specifically binds hIgG through its Fc portion. This work shows that deglycosylation of hIgG has no influence on its binding to the HWRGWV ligand and the ligand does not compete with Protein A or Protein G in binding hIgG. It is suggested by the mass spectrometry (MS) data and docking simulation that HWRGWV binds to the pFc portion of hIgG and interacts with the amino acids in the loop Ser383–Asn389 (SNGQPEN) located in the CH3 domain. Subsequent modeling has suggested a possible three-dimensional minimized solution structure for the interaction of hIgG and the HWRGWV ligand. The results support the fact that a peptide as small as a hexamer can have specific interactions with large proteins such as hIgG. PMID:20049844

  13. Fabrication of enzyme-immobilized halloysite nanotubes for affinity enrichment of lipase inhibitors from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Zhao, Xiaoping; Wang, Shufang; Tao, Shan; Ai, Ni; Wang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is the key enzyme for catalyzing triglyceride hydrolysis in vivo, and lipase inhibitors have been used in the management of obesity. We present the first report on the use of lipase-adsorbed halloysite nanotubes as an efficient medium for the selective enrichment of lipase inhibitors from natural products. A simple and rapid approach was proposed to fabricate lipase-adsorbed nanotubes through electrostatic interaction. Results showed that more than 85% lipase was adsorbed into nanotubes in 90 min, and approximately 80% of the catalytic activity was maintained compared with free lipase. The specificity and reproducibility of the proposed approach were validated by screening a known lipase inhibitor (i.e., orlistat) from a mixture that contains active and inactive compounds. Moreover, we applied this approach with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique to screen lipase inhibitors from the Magnoliae cortex extract, a medicinal plant used for treating obesity. Two novel biphenyl-type natural lipase inhibitors magnotriol A and magnaldehyde B were identified, and their IC50 values were determined as 213.03 and 96.96 μM, respectively. The ligand-enzyme interactions of magnaldehyde B were further investigated by molecular docking. Our findings proved that enzyme-adsorbed nanotube could be used as a feasible and selective affinity medium for the rapid screening of enzyme inhibitors from complex mixtures.

  14. Direct isolation of specific RNA-interacting proteins using a novel affinity medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding-Gan; Sun, Li

    2005-08-26

    Isolation of proteins that specifically interact with a given RNA or RNA regulation element is essential for studies on the molecular mechanisms of gene expression. Here, a novel method for direct isolation of such interacting proteins is described. It uses an affinity medium that consists of an interacting RNA with an artificially added 'tail', which is annealed to one end of a DNA 'arm', the other end of which is fixed covalently on the surface of aminosilanized glass powder. Thus the RNA itself is fully suspending, facilitating its interactions with proteins in its natural conformation. The proteins bound on the interacting RNA are eluted and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and the Coomassie-stained protein bands are cut and subjected to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Using this method, three proteins specifically interacting with the C/EBPbeta 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) RNA were isolated and identified. This method is simple and convenient, and the DNA-glass powder medium can be used repeatedly.

  15. Rapid Screening for α-Glucosidase Inhibitors from Gymnema sylvestre by Affinity Ultrafiltration-HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2017-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae) has been known to posses potential anti-diabetic activity, and the gymnemic acids were reported as the main bioactive components in this plant species. However, the specific components responsible for the hypoglycemic effect still remain unknown. In the present study, the in vitro study revealed that the extract of G. sylvestre exhibited significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase with IC50 at 68.70 ± 1.22 μg/mL compared to acarbose (positive control) at 59.03 ± 2.30 μg/mL, which further indicated the potential anti-diabetic activity. To this end, a method based on affinity ultrafiltration coupled with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UF-HPLC-MS) was established to rapidly screen and identify the α-glucosidase inhibitors from G. sylvestre. In this way, 9 compounds with higher enrichment factors (EFs) were identified according to their MS/MS spectra. Finally, the structure-activity relationships revealed that glycosylation could decrease the potential antisweet activity of sapogenins, and other components except gymnemic acids in G. sylvestre could also be good α-glucosidase inhibitors due to their synergistic effects. Taken together, the proposed method combing α-glucosidase and UF-HPLC-MS presents high efficiency for rapidly screening and identifying potential inhibitors of α-glucosidase from complex natural products, and could be further explored as a valuable high-throughput screening (HTS) platform in the early anti-diabetic drug discovery stage.

  16. PHOS-Select Iron Affinity beads enrich peptides for detection of organophosphorus adducts on albumin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Dubrovskii, Yaroslav A; Podolskaya, Ekaterina P; Murashko, Ekaterina A; Babakov, Vladimir; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Albumin is covalently modified by organophosphorus toxicants (OP) on tyrosine 411, but less than 1% of albumin is modified in humans by lethal OP doses that inhibit 95% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase. A method that enriches OP-modified albumin peptides could aid analysis of low dose exposures. Soman or chlorpyrifos oxon treated human plasma was digested with pepsin. Albumin peptides were enriched by binding to Fe3+ beads at pH 11 and eluted with pH 2.6 buffer. Similarly, mouse and guinea pig albumin modified by chlorpyrifos oxon were digested with pepsin and enriched by binding to Fe3+ beads. Peptides were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. PHOS-select Iron Affinity beads specifically enriched albumin peptides VRY411TKKVPQVST and LVRY411TKKVPQVST in a pepsin digest of human plasma. The unmodified as well as OP-modified peptides bound to the beads. The binding capacity of 500 μl beads was the pepsin digest of 2.1 μL human plasma. The limit of detection was 0.2% of OP-modified albumin peptide in 0.43 μL plasma. Enrichment of OP-modified albumin peptides by binding to Fe3+ beads is a method with potential application to diagnosis of OP pesticide and nerve agent exposure in humans, mice, and guinea pigs. PMID:24187955

  17. Purification of prenylated proteins by affinity chromatography on cyclodextrin-modified agarose

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jinhwa A.; Wollack, James W.; Hovlid, Marisa L.; Okesli, Ayse; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.; Distefano, Mark D.; Taton, T. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although protein prenylation is widely studied, there are few good methods for isolating prenylated proteins from their non-prenylated relatives. We report that crosslinked agarose (e.g., Sepharose) chromatography media that has been chemically functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is extremely effective in affinity chromatography of prenylated proteins. In this study, a variety of proteins with C-terminal prenylation target (“CAAX box”) sequences were enzymatically prenylated in vitro with natural and non-natural prenyl diphosphate substrates. The prenylated protein products could then be isolated from starting materials by gravity chromatography or fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a β-CD-Sepharose column. One particular prenylation reaction—farnesylation of a mCherry-CAAX fusion construct—was studied in detail. In this case, purified farnesylated product was unambiguously identified by electrospray mass spectrometry. In addition, when mCherry-CAAX was prenylated with a non-natural, functional isoprenoid substrate, the functional group was maintained by chromatography on β-CD-Sepharose, such that the resulting protein could be selectively bound at its C terminus to complementary functionality on a solid substrate. Finally, β-CD-Sepharose FPLC was used to isolate prenylated mCherry-CAAX from crude HeLa cell lysate, as a model for purifying prenylated proteins from cell extracts. We propose that this method could be generally useful to the community of researchers studying protein prenylation. PMID:18834849

  18. Isolation of transcription factor complexes from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures by tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Van Leene, Jelle; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Geerinck, Jan; Van Isterdael, Gert; Witters, Erwin; De Jaeger, Geert

    2011-01-01

    Defining protein complexes is critical to virtually all aspects of cell biology because most cellular processes are regulated by stable or more dynamic protein interactions. Elucidation of the protein-protein interaction network around transcription factors is essential to fully understand their function and regulation. In the last decade, new technologies have emerged to study protein-protein interactions under near-physiological conditions. We have developed a high-throughput tandem affinity purification (TAP)/mass spectrometry (MS) platform for cell suspension cultures to analyze protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana. This streamlined platform follows an integrated approach comprising generic Gateway-based vectors with high cloning flexibility, the fast generation of transgenic suspension cultures, TAP adapted for plant cells, and tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS for the identification of purified proteins. Recently, we evaluated the GS tag, originally developed to study mammalian protein complexes, that combines two IgG-binding domains of protein G with a streptavidin-binding peptide, separated by two tobacco etch virus cleavage sites. We found that this GS tag outperforms the traditional TAP tag in plant cells, regarding both specificity and complex yield. Here, we provide detailed protocols of the GS-based TAP platform that allowed us to characterize transcription factor complexes involved in signaling in response to the plant phytohormone jasmonate.

  19. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice selectively bred to produce high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Major, P J; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; Holland, G P; Dal Canto, M C; Paterson, P Y

    1990-01-01

    Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice genetically selected to produce either high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses has revealed significant differences in disease susceptibility between the two lines. HA mice were highly susceptible to EAE following subcutaneous sensitization to mouse central nervous system (CNS) tissue emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Furthermore, of HA mice surviving acute EAE, up to 93% subsequently developed chronic relapsing disease (CREAE) characterized by variable demyelinating inflammatory changes within the spinal cord. In contrast, LA mice, despite having a major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotype associated with susceptibility to EAE, were highly resistant to the disease and showed no signs of CREAE when observed for up to 100 days post-sensitization. Antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP) were detected in both lines but rising titres of high functional affinity antibodies were only seen in HA mice. These HA and LA lines of mice provide a new approach to the study of EAE and, in particular, the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the chronic relapsing form of the disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:2335373

  20. Tuning Hydrophobicity in Abiotic Affinity Reagents: Polymer Hydrogel Affinity Reagents for Molecules with Lipid-like Domains.

    PubMed

    Chou, Beverly; Mirau, Peter; Jiang, Tian; Wang, Szu-Wen; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-05-09

    Hydrophobic interactions often dominate the associative forces between biomacromolecules. A synthetic affinity reagent must be able to exploit and optimize these interactions. We describe synthesis of abiotic affinity reagents that sequester biomacromolecules with lipid-like domains. NIPAm-based copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) containing C4-C8 hydrophobic groups were evaluated for their affinity for lipopolysaccharides (LPS), the lipophilic component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Optimal affinity was found for NPs incorporating a linear C4 hydrocarbon group. 1D and 2D (1)H NMR studies revealed that in water, the longer chain (C6 and C8) alkyl groups in the hydrogel NPs were engaged in intrachain association, rendering them less available to interact with LPS. Optimal LPS-NP interaction requires maximizing hydrophobicity, while avoiding side chain aggregation. Polymer compositions with high LPS binding were grafted onto agarose beads and evaluated for LPS clearance from solution; samples containing linear C4 groups also showed the highest LPS clearance capacity.

  1. Phosphoproteomics by mass spectrometry and classical protein chemistry approaches.

    PubMed

    Salih, Erdjan

    2005-01-01

    The general fields of biological sciences have seen phenomenal transformations in the past two decades at the level of data acquisition, understanding biological processes, and technological developments. Those advances have been made partly because of the advent of molecular biology techniques (which led to genomics) coupled to the advances made in mass spectrometry (MS) to provide the current capabilities and developments in proteomics. However, our current knowledge that approximately 30,000 human genes may code for up to 1 million or more proteins disengage the interface between the genome sequence database algorithms and MS to generate a major interest in independent de novo MS/MS sequence determination. Significant progress has been made in this area through procedures to covalently modify peptide N- and C-terminal amino-acids by sulfonation and guanidination to permit rapid de novo sequence determination by MS/MS analysis. A number of strategies that have been developed to perform qualitative and quantitative proteomics range from 2D-gel electrophoresis, affinity tag reagents, and stable-isotope labeling. Those procedures, combined with MS/MS peptide sequence analysis at the subpicomole level, permit the rapid and effective identification and quantification of a large number of proteins within a given biological sample. The identification of proteins per se, however, is not always sufficient to interpret biological function because many of the naturally occurring proteins are post-translationally modified. One such modification is protein phosphorylation, which regulates a large array of cellular biochemical pathways of the biological system. Traditionally, the study of phosphoprotein structure-function relationships involved classical protein chemistry approaches that required protein purification, peptide mapping, and the identification of the phosphorylated peptide regions and sites by N-terminal sequence analysis. Recent advances made in mass

  2. The genetic control of antibody affinity. Evidence from breeding studies with mice selectively bred for either high or low affinity antibody production.

    PubMed Central

    Steward, M W; Reinhardt, M C; Staines, N A

    1979-01-01

    The genetic control of antibody affinity has been studied in mice selectively bred on the basis of the affinity of antibody they produce to protein antigens injected in saline. Two lines of mice have been obtained, one producing predominantly high and the other predominantly low affinity antibody. Breeding experiments have been performed with these two lines after ten generations of selection and the level and affinity of antibody to protein measured in parents, F1 hybrids and backcross offspring. The results indicate that antibody affinity is a genetically controlled parameter of the immune response and that this control is exerted independently of that controlling antibody levels. Furthermore, high and low affinity line mice have been typed for major histocompatibility complex antigens and the results show that the two lines are not significantly different. This therefore suggests that genes controlling antibody affinity are not linked to the major histocompatibility locus. PMID:500124

  3. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  4. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  5. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  6. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  7. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  8. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  9. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the definitive data that environmental scientists rely upon for identifying the molecular compositions (and ultimately the structures) of chemicals. This is not to ignore the complementary, critical roles played by the adjunct practices of sample enrichment (via any of various means of selective extraction) and analyte separation (via the myriad forms of chromatography and electrophoresis).While the power of mass spectrometry has long been highly visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on continued obscurity to the lay public and most non-chemists. Even though mass spectrometry has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing or undergirdidng our existing knowledge about environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is ususally the relevance of ssignificance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the knowledge was acquired. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in

  10. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  11. PDZ affinity chromatography: a general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2014-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ∼90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins.

  12. Review: mass spectrometry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zaikin, Vladimir G; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    The present review covers the main research in the area of mass spectrometry from the 1990s which was about the same time as the Russian Federation emerged from the collapse of the Soviet Union (USSR). It consists of two main parts-application of mass spectrometry to chemistry and related fields and creation and development of mass spectrometric technique. Both traditional and comparatively new mass spectrometric methods were used to solve various problems in organic chemistry (reactivity of gas-phase ions, structure elucidation and problems of identification, quantitative and trace analysis, differentiation of stereoisomers, derivatization approaches etc.), biochemistry (proteomics and peptidomics, lipidomics), medical chemistry (mainly the search of biomarkers, pharmacology, doping control), environmental, petrochemistry, polymer chemistry, inorganic and physical chemistry, determination of natural isotope ratio etc. Although a lot of talented mass spectrometrists left Russia and moved abroad after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the vitality of the mass spectral community proved to be rather high, which allowed the continuation of new developments in the field of mass spectrometric instrumentation. They are devoted to improvements in traditional magnetic sector mass spectrometers and the development of new ion source types, to analysis and modification of quadrupole, time-of-flight (ToF) and ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) analyzers. The most important achievements are due to the creation of multi-reflecting ToF mass analyzers. Special attention was paid to the construction of compact mass spectrometers, particularly for space exploration, of combined instruments, such as ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer and accelerating mass spectrometers. The comparatively young Russian Mass Spectrometry Society is working hard to consolidate the mass spectrometrists from Russia and foreign countries, to train young professionals on new appliances and regularly

  13. Applications of a catch and release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay for carbohydrate library screening.

    PubMed

    El-Hawiet, Amr; Shoemaker, Glen K; Daneshfar, Rambod; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2012-01-03

    Applications of a catch and release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against target proteins are described. Direct ESI-MS measurements were performed on solutions containing a target protein (a single chain antibody, an antigen binding fragment, or a fragment of a bacterial toxin) and a library of carbohydrates containing multiple specific ligands with affinities in the 10(3) to 10(6) M(-1) range. Ligands with moderate affinity (10(4) to 10(6) M(-1)) were successfully detected from mixtures containing >200 carbohydrates (at concentrations as low as 0.25 μM each). Additionally, the absolute affinities were estimated from the abundance of free and ligand-bound protein ions determined from the ESI mass spectrum. Multiple low affinity ligands (~10(3) M(-1)) were successfully detected in mixtures containing >20 carbohydrates (at concentrations of ~10 μM each). However, identification of specific interactions required the use of the reference protein method to correct the mass spectrum for the occurrence of nonspecific carbohydrate-protein binding during the ESI process. The release of the carbohydrate ligands, as ions, was successfully demonstrated using collision-induced dissociation performed on the deprotonated ions of the protein-carbohydrate complexes. The use of ion mobility separation, performed on deprotonated carbohydrate ions following their release from the complex, allowed for the positive identification of isomeric ligands.

  14. Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data

  15. Characterization of naturally-occurring and modified fullerenes by Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, R.L.; Jin, C.; Compton, R.N. ); Buseck, P.R.; Tsipursky, S.J. )

    1993-10-10

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) employing both laser desorption/ionization and thermal desorption/electron ionization is useful for the detection and structural characterization of fullerenes and chemically-modified fullerenes. Examination of a carbon-rich shungite rock sample from Russia by transmission electron microscopy and FTMS provided evidence of naturally-occurring fullerenes. Ion-molecule reactions can be studied with FTMS to investigate the electron affinities of modified fullerenes. By monitoring charge exchange reactions, the electron affinities of C[sub 60]F[sub x] (x=44,46) and C[sub 70]F[sub y] (y=52,54) were found to be substantially higher than the values for the parent fullerenes.

  16. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  17. Purification of papain by metal affinity partitioning in aqueous two-phase polyethylene glycol/sodium sulfate systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Hai-De; Wang, Wei-Tao

    2015-05-01

    A simple and inexpensive aqueous two-phase affinity partitioning system using metal ligands was introduced to improve the selectivity of commercial papain extraction. Polyethylene glycol 4000 was first activated using epichlorohydrin, then it was covalently linked to iminodiacetic acid. Finally, the specific metal ligand Cu(2+) was attached to the polyethylene glycol-iminodiacetic acid. The chelated Cu(2+) content was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry as 0.88 mol/mol (polyethylene glycol). The effects on the purification at different conditions, including polyethylene glycol molecular weight (2000, 4000, and 6000), concentration of phase-forming components (polyethylene glycol 12-20% w/w and sodium sulfate 12-20%, w/w), metal ligand type, and concentration, system pH and the commercial papain loading on papain extraction, were systematically studied. Under optimum conditions of the system, i.e. 18% w/w sodium sulfate, 18% w/w polyethylene glycol 4000, 1% w/w polyethylene glycol-iminodiacetic acid-Cu(2+) and pH 7, a maximum yield of 90.3% and a degree of purification of 3.6-fold were obtained. Compared to aqueous two phase extraction without ligands, affinity partitioning was found to be an effective technique for the purification of commercial papain with higher extraction efficiency and degree of purification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ultra sensitive affinity chromatography on avidin-functionalized PMMA microchip for low abundant post-translational modified protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Murray, Kermit; Soper, Steven; Feng, June

    2012-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins play essential roles in cellular physiology and disease. The identification of protein substrates and detection of modification site helps understand PTM-mediated regulation in essential biological pathways and functions in various diseases. However, PTM proteins are typically present only at trace levels, making them difficult to identify in mass spectrometry based proteomics. In this paper, we report a novel and sensitive affinity chromatography on the avidin-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip for enrichment of nanogram (ng) amount of PTMs. The chemical modification of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces yield avidin-terminated PMMA surfaces after UV radiation and consecutive EDC mediated coupling (amide reaction). This functionalized PMMA micro-device was developed to identify and specifically trap biotinylated PTM proteins of low abundance from complex protein mixture. Here we selected carbonylated protein as a representative PTM to illustrate the wide application of this affinity microchip for any PTMs converted into a tractable tag after derivatization. The surface topography, surface functional group mapping and elemental composition changes after each modification step of the treatment process were systematically measured qualitatively and quantitatively by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative study of biotinlated carbonylated protein capture recovery and elution efficiency of the device was also studied. We also envision that this subproteome enrichment micro-device can be assembled with other lab-on-a-chip components for follow-up protein analysis.

  19. An in vivo imaging-based assay for detecting protein interactions over a wide range of binding affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Owens, Elizabeth T; Standaert, Robert F; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Billings, Amanda N

    2009-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing protein interactions are fundamental steps towards understanding and modeling biological networks. Methods that detect protein interactions in intact cells rather than buffered solutions are likely more relevant to natural systems since molecular crowding events in the cytosol can influence the diffusion and reactivity of individual proteins. One in vivo, imaging-based method relies on the co-localization of two proteins of interest fused to DivIVA, a cell division protein from Bacillus subtilis, and green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have modified this imaging-based assay to facilitate rapid cloning by constructing new vectors encoding N- and C-terminal DivIVA or GFP molecular tag fusions based on site-specific recombination technology. The sensitivity of the assay was defined using a well-characterized protein interaction system involving the eukaryotic nuclear import receptor subunit, Importin (Imp ) and variant nuclear localization signals (NLS) representing a range of binding affinities. These data demonstrate that the modified co-localization assay is sensitive enough to detect protein interactions with Kd values that span over four orders of magnitude (1nM to 15 M). Lastly, this assay was used to confirm numerous protein interactions identified from mass spectrometry-based analyses of affinity isolates as part of an interactome mapping project in Rhodopseudomonas palustris

  20. A generic protocol for the purification and characterization of water-soluble complexes of affinity-tagged proteins and lipids.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenji; Poletto, Mattia; Chiapparino, Antonella; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2014-09-01

    Interactions between lipids and proteins in the aqueous phases of cells contribute to many aspects of cell physiology. Here we describe a detailed protocol to systematically characterize in vivo-assembled complexes of soluble proteins and lipids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing physiological amounts of a protein of interest fused to the tandem-affinity purification (TAP) tag are first lysed in the absence of detergent to capture intact protein-lipid complexes. The affinity-purified complexes (typically 30-50 kDa) are subjected to analytical size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) to remove contaminating lipids that elute at the void volume (>600 kDa), in order to achieve sufficient signal-to-background lipid ratios. Proteins in the SEC fractions are then analyzed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Lipidomics techniques such as high-performance thin-layer chromatography or gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry can then be applied to measure the elution profiles of lipids and to pinpoint the true interactors co-eluting with the TAP fusions. The procedure (starting from cell lysis) requires 2 d, and it can easily be adapted to other organisms.

  1. Synthesis and application of novel phenylboronate affinity materials based on organic polymer particles for selective trapping of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Preinerstorfer, Beatrix; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2009-05-01

    We report on synthesis concepts for the fabrication of various novel phenylboronate affinity materials based on polymethacrylate epoxy beads (Fractogel EMD Epoxy (M) 40-90 microm) and the testing of these functionalized polymer particles for selective trapping of a glycoprotein from a standard mixture containing a glycosylated and a nonglycosylated protein. Two inherently different approaches for the functionalization of the bare beads with boronate groups have been elucidated. In the first, the epoxy residues of the polymer particles were converted into reactive thiol groups which were subsequently used as anchor moieties for the immobilization of 4-vinylphenylboronic acid by radical addition or radical polymerization reaction. Three different ways for the generation of sulfhydryl groups have been examined leading to materials with distinct linker chemistries. In the second and more straightforward approach, the epoxy groups were reacted with 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid. The novel materials were thoroughly characterized by (i) quantitation of the sulfur content by elemental analysis, (ii) reactive sulfhydryls were determined in a photospectrometric assay, (iii) boron content was measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, and (iv) the amount of reactive boronate groups was evaluated in a fast binding assay employing adenosine as test compound. A maximum concentration of 1.2 mmol boronate groups per gram dry beads could be achieved by the presented synthesis routes. Employing the novel phenylboronate affinity materials in capture and release experiments in the batch mode, a standard glycoprotein, viz. transferrin (Tf) from human serum was separated from a nonglycosylated protein, BSA. A commercial boronate affinity material based on 3-aminophenylboronic acid modified agarose gel was employed as reference material and was found to perform significantly worse compared to the herein presented novel polymethacrylate particles.

  2. Robust Spectral Clustering Using Statistical Sub-Graph Affinity Model

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, Justin A.; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods. PMID:24386111

  3. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  4. Separation of enantiomers by affinity electrokinetic chromatography using avidin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Matsubara, N; Terabe, S

    1994-06-01

    Avidin, a basic protein isolated from egg white, was employed as a chiral selector in affinity electrokinetic chromatography (EKC) for the separation of acidic enantiomers. Optical isomers of vanilmandelic acid, warfarin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, flurbiprofen, and folinic acid were successfully resolved within 20 min with 25 microM avidin in a linear polyacrylamide-coated capillary under weakly acidic conditions. The effects of pH, the concentration of avidin, addition of an organic solvent such as ethanol and 2-propanol, and temperature on enantioselectivity were investigated. The choice of pH and the organic solvent additive was critical to improve the separation. Some general considerations about affinity EKC are also described, based on a simple one-site interaction model.

  5. Memory in the B-cell compartment: antibody affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, M S; Ehrenstein, M R; Rada, C; Sale, J; Batista, F D; Williams, G; Milstein, C

    2000-01-01

    In the humoral arm of the immune system, the memory response is not only more quickly elicited and of greater magnitude than the primary response, but it is also different in quality. In the recall response to antigen, the antibodies produced are of higher affinity and of different isotype (typically immunoglobulin G rather than immunoglobulin M). This maturation rests on the antigen dependence of B-cell maturation and is effected by programmed genetic modifications of the immunoglobulin gene loci. Here we consider how the B-cell response to antigen depends on the affinity of the antigen receptor interaction. We also compare and draw parallels between the two processes, which underpin the generation of secondary-response antibodies: V gene somatic hypermutation and immunoglobulin heavy-chain class switching. PMID:10794054

  6. "Clickable" affinity ligands for effective separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Suksrichavalit, Thummaruk; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Bülow, Leif; Ye, Lei

    2010-06-04

    In this paper, we present a new modular approach to immobilize boronic acid ligands that can offer effective separation of glycoproteins. A new "clickable" boronic acid ligand was synthesized by introducing a terminal acetylene group into commercially available 3-aminophenyl boronic acid. The clickable ligand, 3-(prop-2-ynyloxycarbonylamino)phenylboronic acid (2) could be easily coupled to azide-functionalized hydrophilic Sepharose using Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction under mild condition. Compared to other boronic acid affinity gels, the new affinity gel displayed superior effectiveness in separating model glycoproteins (ovalbumin and RNase B) from closely related bovine serum albumin and RNase A in the presence of crude Escherichia coli proteins. Because of the simplicity of the immobilization through "click chemistry", the new ligand 2 is expected to not only offer improved glycoprotein separation in other formats, but also act as a useful building block to develop new chemical sensors for analysis of other glycan compounds.

  7. Double-ternary complex affinity chromatography: preparation of alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Lange, L G; Vallee, B L

    1976-10-19

    A general affinity chromatographic method for alcohol dehydrogenase purification has been developed by employing immobilized 4-substituted pyrazole derivatives that isolate the enzyme through formation of a specific ternary complex. Sepharose 4B is activated with 300 mg of cyanogen bromide/ml of packed gel and coupled to 4-[3-(N-6-aminocaproyl)aminopropyl]pyrazole. From crude liver extracts in 50 mM phosphate-0.37 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pH 7.5, alcohol dehydrogenase is optimally bound at a capacity of 4-5 mg of enzyme/ml of gel. Addition of ethanol, propanol, or butanol, 500 mM, results in the formation of a second ternary complex, which allows the elution of bound enzyme in high yield and purity. This double-ternary complex affinity chromatography has been applied successfully to human, horse, rat, and rabbit liver extracts to isolate the respective homogeneous alcohol dehydrogenases.

  8. Absolute FKBP binding affinities obtained via nonequilibrium unbinding simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2009-01-01

    We compute the absolute binding affinities for two ligands bound to the FKBP protein using nonequilibrium unbinding simulations. The methodology is straightforward requiring little or no modification to many modern molecular simulation packages. The approach makes use of a physical pathway, eliminating the need for complicated alchemical decoupling schemes. We compare our nonequilibrium results to those obtained via a fully equilibrium approach and to experiment. The results of this study suggest that to obtain accurate results using nonequilibrium approaches one should use the stiff-spring approximation with the second cumulant expansion. From this study we conclude that nonequilibrium simulation could provide a simple means to estimate protein-ligand binding affinities. PMID:19405629

  9. The genetic control of antibody affinity in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, F E; Steward, M W

    1975-01-01

    Random-bred TO mice have been selectively bred into two lines on the basis of the relative affinity (KR) of antibody produced to protein antigens, one line producing high and the other low KR antibody. After four generations of selective breeding the difference in KR between the two lines was highly significant (P less than 0-001). The selection on the basis of KR did not result in a corresponding selection for antibody levels (Abt), which were not significantly different in the two lines. These results indicate that antibody affinity is a genetically controlled parameter of the immune response. Furthermore, this control appears to be expressed by a mechanism which is independent of the amount of antibody produced. PMID:1165110

  10. Affinity Screening Using Competition with Fluorine-19 Hyperpolarized Ligands**

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (KD) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand to the binding pocket of interest is known. PMID:25703090

  11. Learning factorizations in estimation of distribution algorithms using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; Larrañaga, Pedro; Lozano, José A

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs) that use marginal product model factorizations have been widely applied to a broad range of mainly binary optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce the affinity propagation EDA (AffEDA) which learns a marginal product model by clustering a matrix of mutual information learned from the data using a very efficient message-passing algorithm known as affinity propagation. The introduced algorithm is tested on a set of binary and nonbinary decomposable functions and using a hard combinatorial class of problem known as the HP protein model. The results show that the algorithm is a very efficient alternative to other EDAs that use marginal product model factorizations such as the extended compact genetic algorithm (ECGA) and improves the quality of the results achieved by ECGA when the cardinality of the variables is increased.

  12. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method.

  13. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Prediction of kinase-inhibitor binding affinity using energetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Singaravelu; Selvaraj, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The combination of physicochemical properties and energetic parameters derived from protein-ligand complexes play a vital role in determining the biological activity of a molecule. In the present work, protein-ligand interaction energy along with logP values was used to predict the experimental log (IC50) values of 25 different kinase-inhibitors using multiple regressions which gave a correlation coefficient of 0.93. The regression equation obtained was tested on 93 kinase-inhibitor complexes and an average deviation of 0.92 from the experimental log IC50 values was shown. The same set of descriptors was used to predict binding affinities for a test set of five individual kinase families, with correlation values > 0.9. We show that the protein-ligand interaction energies and partition coefficient values form the major deterministic factors for binding affinity of the ligand for its receptor. PMID:28149052

  15. Tandem affinity purification vectors for use in gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Doherty, Geoff P; Lewis, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has become a valuable tool for the isolation of protein complexes. Here we describe the construction and use of a series of plasmid vectors for Gram positive bacteria. The vectors utilize the SPA tag as well as variants containing a 3C rather than the TEV protease site as 3C protease has been shown to work efficiently at the low temperatures (4 degrees C) used to isolate protein complexes. In addition, a further vector incorporates a GST moiety in place of the 3xFLAG of the SPA tag which provides an additional tagging option for situations where SPA binding may be inefficient. The vectors are all compatible with previously constructed fluorescent protein fusion vectors enabling construction of a suite of affinity and fluorescently tagged genes using a single PCR product.

  16. Multiplicative equations related to the affine Weyl group E8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammaticos, B.; Ramani, A.; Willox, R.; Satsuma, J.

    2017-08-01

    We derive integrable equations starting from autonomous mappings with a general form inspired by the multiplicative systems associated with the affine Weyl group E8(1 ). Five such systems are obtained, three of which turn out to be linearisable and the remaining two are integrable in terms of elliptic functions. In the case of the linearisable mappings, we derive non-autonomous forms which contain a free function of the independent variable and we present the linearisation in each case. The two remaining systems are deautonomised to new discrete Painlevé equations. We show that these equations are in fact special forms of much richer systems associated with the affine Weyl groups E7(1 ) and E8(1 ), respectively.

  17. Structural origins of high-affinity biotin binding to streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Weber, P C; Ohlendorf, D H; Wendoloski, J J; Salemme, F R

    1989-01-06

    The high affinity of the noncovalent interaction between biotin and streptavidin forms the basis for many diagnostic assays that require the formation of an irreversible and specific linkage between biological macromolecules. Comparison of the refined crystal structures of apo and a streptavidin:biotin complex shows that the high affinity results from several factors. These factors include the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions between biotin and the protein, together with the ordering of surface polypeptide loops that bury the biotin in the protein interior. Structural alterations at the biotin binding site produce quaternary changes in the streptavidin tetramer. These changes apparently propagate through cooperative deformations in the twisted beta sheets that link tetramer subunits.

  18. Model updating based on an affine scaling interior optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Jia, C. X.; Li, Jian; Spencer, B. F.

    2013-11-01

    Finite element model updating is usually considered as an optimization process. Affine scaling interior algorithms are powerful optimization algorithms that have been developed over the past few years. A new finite element model updating method based on an affine scaling interior algorithm and a minimization of modal residuals is proposed in this article, and a general finite element model updating program is developed based on the proposed method. The performance of the proposed method is studied through numerical simulation and experimental investigation using the developed program. The results of the numerical simulation verified the validity of the method. Subsequently, the natural frequencies obtained experimentally from a three-dimensional truss model were used to update a finite element model using the developed program. After updating, the natural frequencies of the truss and finite element model matched well.

  19. Bioskin as an affinity matrix for the separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vicente, C; Sebastián, B; Fontaniella, B; Márquez, A; Xavier Filho, L; Legaz, M E

    2001-05-11

    Bioskin is a natural product produced by a mixed culture of Acetobacter xylinum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pombe cultured on media containing sucrose. It is of fibrillar nature able to retain some proteins, such as cytochrome c, by adsorption, and mainly composed of glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This makes it possible that, at an adequate pH value, proteins charged as polyanionic molecules, such as catalase, can be retained by ionic adsorption using the positively charged amino groups of the matrix. In addition, bioskin can also be used as an affinity matrix to retain glycoproteins able to perform specific affinity reactions with the amino sugars of the matrix, such as invertase, fetuin or ovalbumin. Its possible use as a chromatographic support is discussed.

  20. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  1. Mullerian inhibiting substance fractionation by dye affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Budzik, G P; Powell, S M; Kamagata, S; Donahoe, P K

    1983-08-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS), a large glycoprotein secreted by the fetal and neonatal testis, is responsible for regression of the Mullerian ducts in the male embryo. This fetal growth regulator has been purified more than 2000-fold from crude testicular incubation medium following fractionation on a triazinyl dye affinity support. A high yield of 60% recovered activity was achieved in the absence of exogenous carrier protein by stabilizing MIS with 2-mercaptoethanol, EDTA, and Nonidet-P40 and eliminating losses in the handling and concentration of MIS fractions. Although affinity elution with nucleotides has proved successful in other systems, MIS could not be eluted with ATP, GTP, or AMP, with or without divalent metal ions. Nucleotide elution, however, does remove contaminating proteins prior to MIS recovery with high ionic strength. The 2000-fold-purified MIS fraction, although not homogeneous, shows a reduction-sensitive band after SDS-gel electrophoresis that has been proposed to be the MIS dimer.

  2. Polysulfone affinity membranes for the treatment of amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rodemann, K; Staude, E

    1995-06-20

    Affinity membranes for the treatment of solutions containing amino acids were obtained via lithiating polysulfone that was subsequently converted with glycidylether. From this polymer asymmetric ultrafiltration membranes were cast. The membranes were reacted with iminodiacetic acid yielding membranes fitted out with bidentate chelates. The same reaction path was applied to commercially available symmetric microfiltration membranes. The chelate-bearing membranes were complexed with Cu, Ni, and Zn ions. For the experiments with amino acids only the Cu-complexed membranes were used. The complexation constants for histidine and tryptophan for six different membranes were determined. Because of the affinity of these two amino acids for the complexed Cu ions, they could easily be separated from solutions containing amino acids such as alanine, glycine, and valine. Also, concentrating very dilute amino acid solutions was carried out successfully.

  3. Protein separation using affinity-based reversed micelles

    PubMed

    Sun; Gu; Tong; Bai; Ichikawa; Furusaki

    1999-05-01

    Reversed micellar two-phase extraction is a developing technique for protein separation. Introduction of an affinity ligand is considered to be an effective approach to increase the selectivity and capacity of reversed micelles. In this article, Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB) as an affinity ligand was immobilized to reversed micelles composed of soybean lecithin by a two-phase reaction. The affinity partitioning of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the CB-lecithin micelles was studied. Formation of mixed micelles by additionally introducing a nonionic surfactant, Tween 85, to the CB-lecithin micelles was effective to increase the solubilization of lysozyme due to the increase of W0 (water/surfactant molar ratio)/micellar size. The partitioning isotherms of lysozyme to the CB-lecithin micelles with and without Tween 85 were expressed by the Langmuir equation. The dissociation constants in the Langmuir equation decreased on addition of Tween 85, indicating the increase of the effectiveness of lysozyme binding to the immobilized CB. On addition of 20 g/L Tween 85 to 50 g/L lecithin/hexane micellar phase containing 0.1 mmol/L CB, the extraction capacity for lysozyme could be increased by 42%. Moreover, the CB-lecithin micelles with or without Tween 85 showed significant size exclusion for BSA due to its high molecular weight. Thus, lysozyme and BSA were separated from artificial solutions containing the two proteins. In addition, the affinity-based reversed micellar phase containing Tween 85 was recycled three times for lysozyme purification from crude egg-white solutions. Lysozyme purity increased by 16-18-fold, reaching 60-70% in the recycled use.

  4. pp-waves with torsion and metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasic, Vedad; Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2005-10-01

    A classical pp-wave is a four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetime which admits a nonvanishing parallel spinor field; here the connection is assumed to be Levi-Civita. We generalize this definition to metric compatible spacetimes with torsion and describe basic properties of such spacetimes. We use our generalized pp-waves for constructing new explicit vacuum solutions of quadratic metric-affine gravity.

  5. Self-affinity and Crossover of A Clay Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.; Huru Bergene, H.; Hansen, A.; Manificat, G.

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM software, and wavelet methods. The deposited surfaces show an anti-persistent to persistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is thus concluded that the investigated electrolyte concentrations play a minor role

  6. Optimizing molecular electrostatic interactions: Binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik

    The design of molecules that bind tightly and specifically to designated target molecules is an important goal in many fields of molecular science. While the shape of the molecule to be designed is a relatively well defined problem with an intuitive answer, determination of the distribution of electrostatic charge that it should have in order to possess high affinity and/or specificity for a target is a subtle problem involving a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred due to the removal of solvent from the interacting surfaces of the reactants, and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. In this thesis, a theoretical formalism based on a continuum electrostatic approximation is developed in which charge distributions leading to optimal affinity and/or high specificity may be obtained. Methods for obtaining these charge distributions are developed in detail and analytical solutions are obtained in several special cases (where the molecules are shaped as infinite membranes, spheres, and spheroids). Their existence and non-uniqueness are also shown, and it is proven that the resulting optimized electrostatic binding free energies are favorable (negative) in many cases of physical interest. Affinity and specificity optimization is then applied to the chorismate mutase family of enzymes, including the catalytic antibody 1F7. It is shown that affinity optimization can be used to suggest better molecular inhibitors and that specificity optimization can be used to help elucidate molecular function and possibly aid in the creation of improved haptens. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  7. Correlations and multi-affinity in high frequency financial datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baviera, Roberto; Pasquini, Michele; Serva, Maurizio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we perform a quantitative check of long term correlations and multi-affinity in Deutsche Mark/US Dollar exchange rates using high frequency data. We show that the use of business time, i.e., the ranking of the quotes in the sequences, eliminates most of the seasonality in financial-time series, allowing a precise estimation of some return anomalies.

  8. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  9. [Ettore Majorana and philosophy : Between elective affinities and philosophical reflections].

    PubMed

    Alunni, Charles

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to "take on" Ettore Majorana by establishing his "philosophical profile." Doing so, one not only finds that the question of "fiction" was central to his work, but one also discovers the important superationalist - and European - dimension of his elective affinities with Giovanni Gentile Junior. Indeed their work was part of a constructive and inductive mathematism (Gaston Bachelard, later Robert Blanché) that was in opposition to classical geometricism (Emile Meyerson), and spiritualist Pythagoreanism (Arthur Eddington).

  10. Methylated-antibody affinity purification to improve proteomic identification of plant RNA polymerase Pol V complex and the interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guochen; Ma, Jun; Chen, Xiaomei; Chu, Zhaoqing; She, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Affinity purification followed by enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry has been widely utilized for the sensitive detection of interacting proteins and protein complexes in various organisms. In plants, the method is technically challenging due to the low abundance proteins, non-specific binding and difficulties of eluting interacting proteins from antibody beads. In this report, we describe a strategy to modify antibodies by reductive methylation of lysines without affecting their binding properties, followed by on-bead digestion of bound proteins with endoproteinase Lys-C. By this method, the antibody remains intact and does not interfere with the downstream identification of interacting proteins. Non-specific binding proteins were excluded using 14N/15N-metabolic labeling of wild-type and the transgenic plant counterparts. The method was employed to identify 12 co-immunoprecipitated protein subunits in Pol V complex and to discover 17 potential interacting protein targets in Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the modification of antibodies by reductive dimethylation can improve the reliability and sensitivity of identifying low-abundance proteins through on-bead digestion and mass spectrometry. We also show that coupling this technique with chemical crosslinking enables in-depth characterization of endogenous protein complexes and the protein-protein interaction networks including mapping the surface topology and post-translational modifications of interacting proteins. PMID:28224978

  11. Methylated-antibody affinity purification to improve proteomic identification of plant RNA polymerase Pol V complex and the interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guochen; Ma, Jun; Chen, Xiaomei; Chu, Zhaoqing; She, Yi-Min

    2017-02-22

    Affinity purification followed by enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry has been widely utilized for the sensitive detection of interacting proteins and protein complexes in various organisms. In plants, the method is technically challenging due to the low abundance proteins, non-specific binding and difficulties of eluting interacting proteins from antibody beads. In this report, we describe a strategy to modify antibodies by reductive methylation of lysines without affecting their binding properties, followed by on-bead digestion of bound proteins with endoproteinase Lys-C. By this method, the antibody remains intact and does not interfere with the downstream identification of interacting proteins. Non-specific binding proteins were excluded using (14)N/(15)N-metabolic labeling of wild-type and the transgenic plant counterparts. The method was employed to identify 12 co-immunoprecipitated protein subunits in Pol V complex and to discover 17 potential interacting protein targets in Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the modification of antibodies by reductive dimethylation can improve the reliability and sensitivity of identifying low-abundance proteins through on-bead digestion and mass spectrometry. We also show that coupling this technique with chemical crosslinking enables in-depth characterization of endogenous protein complexes and the protein-protein interaction networks including mapping the surface topology and post-translational modifications of interacting proteins.

  12. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides.

  13. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach.

    PubMed

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2011-04-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount of HLA molecules, giving a selective force in the binding. The peptide libraries can be designed so that the sequence length, the alignment of binding registers, the numbers and composition of random positions are controlled, and also modified amino acids can be included. Selected library peptides bound to HLA are then isolated by size exclusion chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry online coupled to liquid chromatography. The MS/MS data are subsequently searched against a library defined database using a search engine such as Mascot, followed by manual inspection of the results. We used two dodecamer and two decamer peptide libraries and HLA-DQ2.5 to test possibilities and limits of this method. The selected sequences which we identified in the fraction eluted from HLA-DQ2.5 showed a higher average of their predicted binding affinity values compared to the original peptide library. The eluted sequences fit very well with the previously described HLA-DQ2.5 peptide binding motif. This novel method, limited by library complexity and sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of several thousand synthetic sequences concomitantly in a simple water soluble format.

  14. Beyond hairballs: the use of quantitative mass spectrometry data to understand protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Anne-Claude; Raught, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The past 10 years have witnessed a dramatic proliferation in the availability of protein interaction data. However, for interaction mapping based on affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS), there is a wealth of information present in the datasets that often goes unrecorded in public repositories, and as such remains largely unexplored. Further, how this type of data is represented and used by bioinformaticians has not been well established. Here, we point out some common mistakes in how AP-MS data are handled, and describe how protein complex organization and interaction dynamics can be inferred using quantitative AP-MS approaches. PMID:22710165

  15. Recombinant spider silk genetically functionalized with affinity domains.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Ronnie; Thatikonda, Naresh; Lindberg, Diana; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Nygren, Per-Åke; Hedhammar, My

    2014-05-12

    Functionalization of biocompatible materials for presentation of active protein domains is an area of growing interest. Herein, we describe a strategy for functionalization of recombinant spider silk via gene fusion to affinity domains of broad biotechnological use. Four affinity domains of different origin and structure; the IgG-binding domains Z and C2, the albumin-binding domain ABD, and the biotin-binding domain M4, were all successfully produced as soluble silk fusion proteins under nondenaturing purification conditions. Silk films and fibers produced from the fusion proteins were demonstrated to be chemically and thermally stable. Still, the bioactive domains are concluded to be folded and accessible, since their respective targets could be selectively captured from complex samples, including rabbit serum and human plasma. Interestingly, materials produced from mixtures of two different silk fusion proteins displayed combined binding properties, suggesting that tailor-made materials with desired stoichiometry and surface distributions of several binding domains can be produced. Further, use of the IgG binding ability as a general mean for presentation of desired biomolecules could be demonstrated for a human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF) model system, via a first capture of anti-VEGF IgG to silk containing the Z-domain, followed by incubation with hVEGF. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential of recombinant silk, genetically functionalized with affinity domains, for construction of biomaterials capable of presentation of almost any desired biomolecule.

  16. Comparative analysis of affinity-based 5-hydroxymethylation enrichment techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, John P.; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Nestor, Colm E.; Dunican, Donncha S.; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G.; Meehan, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The epigenetic modification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is receiving great attention due to its potential role in DNA methylation reprogramming and as a cell state identifier. Given this interest, it is important to identify reliable and cost-effective methods for the enrichment of 5hmC marked DNA for downstream analysis. We tested three commonly used affinity-based enrichment techniques; (i) antibody, (ii) chemical capture and (iii) protein affinity enrichment and assessed their ability to accurately and reproducibly report 5hmC profiles in mouse tissues containing high (brain) and lower (liver) levels of 5hmC. The protein-affinity technique is a poor reporter of 5hmC profiles, delivering 5hmC patterns that are incompatible with other methods. Both antibody and chemical capture-based techniques generate highly similar genome-wide patterns for 5hmC, which are independently validated by standard quantitative PCR (qPCR) and glucosyl-sensitive restriction enzyme digestion (gRES-qPCR). Both antibody and chemical capture generated profiles reproducibly link to unique chromatin modification profiles associated with 5hmC. However, there appears to be a slight bias of the antibody to bind to regions of DNA rich in simple repeats. Ultimately, the increased specificity observed with chemical capture-based approaches makes this an attractive method for the analysis of locus-specific or genome-wide patterns of 5hmC. PMID:24214958

  17. Predicting MHC-II binding affinity using multiple instance regression

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2011-01-01

    Reliably predicting the ability of antigen peptides to bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules is an essential step in developing new vaccines. Uncovering the amino acid sequence correlates of the binding affinity of MHC-II binding peptides is important for understanding pathogenesis and immune response. The task of predicting MHC-II binding peptides is complicated by the significant variability in their length. Most existing computational methods for predicting MHC-II binding peptides focus on identifying a nine amino acids core region in each binding peptide. We formulate the problems of qualitatively and quantitatively predicting flexible length MHC-II peptides as multiple instance learning and multiple instance regression problems, respectively. Based on this formulation, we introduce MHCMIR, a novel method for predicting MHC-II binding affinity using multiple instance regression. We present results of experiments using several benchmark datasets that show that MHCMIR is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods for predicting MHC-II binding peptides. An online web server that implements the MHCMIR method for MHC-II binding affinity prediction is freely accessible at http://ailab.cs.iastate.edu/mhcmir. PMID:20855923

  18. Composite affinity sorbents and their cleaning in place.

    PubMed

    Girot, P; Moroux, Y; Duteil, X P; Nguyen, C; Boschetti, E

    1990-06-27

    Making large-scale affinity sorbents that are reusable under acceptable hygienic conditions implies specific treatments for cleaning in place with known aqueous solutions of chemical agents. However, common agents such as sodium hydroxide are frequently considered too drastic for the stability of macromolecular biologically active immobilized ligands. According to a large series of trials, it was found that only a mixture of sodium hydroxide and ethanol was actually effective in sterilizing a sorbent in a single step. When hydroxide or an ethanol-acetic acid mixture were used alone, they were not totally efficient in the inactivation of sporulated Bacillus subtilis. Conversely, they were efficient when used sequentially. All these solutions were able to remove pyrogens from chromatographic sorbents. As the sterilizing solutions contained a certain amount of ethanol, the most suitable chromatographic affinity sorbents had to be based on an incompressible matrix. When washing an affinity silica sorbent that had proteins as ligands with solutions such as sodium hydroxide, ethanol-acetic acid or ethanol-sodium hydroxide, it was found that certain sorbents were able to tolerate the treatments without a noticeable decrease in their biochemical activity.

  19. Affinity labeling of the ribosomal P site in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    North, D.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent studies have probed the peptidyl transferase region of the Drosophila ribosome via the use of reactive site specific analogues (affinity labels). P site proteins adjacent to the 3' end of the amino acid bearing tRNA strand were labeled with modified tRNA fragments. Drugs affecting the binding of these agents were used to further clarify the nature of the region. The nascent peptide region of the P site was not labeled in previous experiments. To label that region radioactive Bromoacetylphenylalanyl-tRNA (BrAcphe-tRNA) was synthesized. The alpha-bromoacetyl group of this analogue is potentially reactive with nucleophiles present in either proteins or RNAs. Charged tRNAs and tRNA analogues bearing a peptide bond on the N-terminus of their amino acid are recognized as having affinity for the ribosomal P site. Specific labeling of the P site by BrAcphe-tRNA was confirmed by its ability to radioactively label proteins indirectly. As many as 8 ribosomal proteins may be labeled under these conditions, however, the majority of the bound label is associated with 3 large subunit proteins and 2 small subunit proteins. Overlaps between the proteins labeled by BrAcphe-tRNA and those labeled by other affinity labels are examined and a model of the peptidyl transferase region of Drosophila ribosomes is presented.

  20. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in <4 h (corresponding to >3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.