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Sample records for affinity receptor binding

  1. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  2. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  3. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  4. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  5. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  6. PREDICTING RETINOID RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY: COREPA-M APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated vitamin A derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that activate different retinoic acid receptors RARs). Transcriptional events subsequent to this activation are key to controlling several aspects of vertebrate development. As such, identi...

  7. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Mace G.

    2017-01-01

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors. PMID:28061508

  8. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  9. Correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding affinity in non-preorganized receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Romen; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín, Víctor S; Martín, Tomás

    2013-08-16

    Positive cooperativity between host conformational equilibria and guest binding has been widely reported in protein receptors. However, reported examples of this kind of cooperativity in synthetic hosts are scarce and largely serendipitous, among other things because it is hard to envision systems which display this kind of cooperativity. In order to shed some light on the correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding, selected structural modifications have been performed over a family of nonpreorganized hosts in order to induce conformational changes and to analyze their effect on the binding affinity. The conformational effect was evaluated by a theoretical conformational search and correlated with the ability of the receptors. All data suggest that those receptors that display the best association constants are able to sample folded conformations analogous to the conformational requirements for the binding of the guests. On the contrary, for those receptors where folded conformers are scarce, then the association constant and enantioselectivity clearly drop.

  10. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  11. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  13. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  14. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  15. Imaging progesterone receptor in breast tumors: Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of fluoroalkyl-substituted analogs of Tanaproget

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bing; Lee, Jae Hak; Mayne, Christopher G.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) is estrogen regulated, and PR levels in breast tumors can be used to predict the success of endocrine therapies targeting the estrogen receptor (ER). Tanaproget is a non-steroidal progestin agonist with very high PR binding affinity and excellent in vivo potency. When appropriately radiolabeled, it might be used to image PR-positive breast tumors non-invasively, by positron emission tomography (PET). We describe the synthesis and PR binding affinities of a series of fluoroalkyl-substituted 6-aryl-1,4-dihydrobenzo[d][1,3]oxazine-2-thiones, analogs of Tanaproget. Some of these compounds have subnanomolar binding affinities, higher than that of either Tanaproget itself or the high affinity PR ligand R5020. Structure-binding affinity relationships can be rationalized by molecular modeling of ligand complexes with PR, and the enantioselectivity of binding has been predicted. These compounds are being further evaluated as potential diagnostic PET imaging agents for breast cancer, and enantiomerically pure materials of defined stereochemistry are being prepared. PMID:20355713

  16. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  17. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  18. Free energy calculations offer insights into the influence of receptor flexibility on ligand-receptor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Jožica; Riniker, Sereina; Gaspari, Roberto; Daura, Xavier; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-08-01

    Docking algorithms for computer-aided drug discovery and design often ignore or restrain the flexibility of the receptor, which may lead to a loss of accuracy of the relative free enthalpies of binding. In order to evaluate the contribution of receptor flexibility to relative binding free enthalpies, two host-guest systems have been examined: inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin (αCD) with 1-chlorobenzene (ClBn), 1-bromobenzene (BrBn) and toluene (MeBn), and complexes of DNA with the minor-groove binding ligands netropsin (Net) and distamycin (Dist). Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations reveal that restraining of the flexibility of the receptor can have a significant influence on the estimated relative ligand-receptor binding affinities as well as on the predicted structures of the biomolecular complexes. The influence is particularly pronounced in the case of flexible receptors such as DNA, where a 50% contribution of DNA flexibility towards the relative ligand-DNA binding affinities is observed. The differences in the free enthalpy of binding do not arise only from the changes in ligand-DNA interactions but also from changes in ligand-solvent interactions as well as from the loss of DNA configurational entropy upon restraining.

  19. Receptor affinity purification of a lipid-binding adhesin from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, C A; Wasfy, G; Han, H; Huesca, M

    1993-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Helicobacter pylori specifically recognizes gangliotetraosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, and phosphatidylethanolamine in vitro. This binding specificity is shared by exoenzyme S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and monoclonal antibodies against this adhesin prevent the attachment of H. pylori to its lipid receptors. We now report the use of a novel, versatile affinity matrix to purify a 63-kDa exoenzyme S-like adhesin from H. pylori which is responsible for the lipid-binding specificity of this organism. Images PMID:8500882

  20. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J.; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L.; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R2 = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R2 = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures.

  1. Computational analysis of binding affinity and neural response at the l-alanine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Thomas J.; Bryant, Bruce P.; Venanzi, Carol A.

    1995-10-01

    A model of analogue-receptor binding is developed for the l-alanine receptor in the channel catfish using the AM1-SM2 and ab initio SCRF computational methods. Besides interactions involving the zwitterionic moiety of the amino acid analogue and complementary subsites on the receptor, the model suggests the presence of a hydrophobic pocket with dispersion interactions between the receptor and the residue on the amino acid analogue. Conformational analysis suggests not only a small compact active site on the receptor, but also that the analogues with the highest affinity occupy nearly identical regions of space. Although the binding interaction is dominated by the ionic terms, AM1-SM2 calculations indicate that free energy terms associated with cavity formation, solvent reorganization, and dispersion interactions can be correlated to activation and neural response. From a consideration of this model, molecular features of the analogues that are important for binding and neural response were deduced and other analogues or ligands were developed and tested.

  2. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  3. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  4. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  5. Receptor binding profiles and quantitative structure-affinity relationships of some 5-substituted-N,N-diallyltryptamines.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Daley, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    N,N-Diallyltryptamine (DALT) and 5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT) are two tryptamines synthesized and tested by Alexander Shulgin. In self-experiments, 5-MeO-DALT was reported to be psychoactive in the 12-20mg range, while the unsubstituted compound DALT had few discernible effects in the 42-80 mg range. Recently, 5-MeO-DALT has been used in nonmedical settings for its psychoactive effects, but these effects have been poorly characterized and little is known of its pharmacological properties. We extended the work of Shulgin by synthesizing additional 5-substituted-DALTs. We then compared them to DALT and 5-MeO-DALT for their binding affinities at 45 cloned receptors and transporter proteins. Based on in vitro binding affinity, we identified 27 potential receptor targets for the 5-substituted-DALT compounds. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 10-80 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2B receptors, while the affinity of DALT itself at 5-HT1A receptors was slightly lower at 100 nM. Among the 5-HT2 subtypes, the weakest affinity was at 5-HT2A receptors, spanning 250-730 nM. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 50-400 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors; again, it was the unsubstituted DALT that had the weakest affinity at all three subtypes. The test drugs had even weaker affinity for 5-HT1B, 5-HT1E, and 5-HT5A subtypes and little or no affinity for the 5-HT3 subtype. These compounds also had generally nanomolar affinities for adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C receptors, sigma receptors σ1 and σ2, histamine H1 receptors, and norepinephrine and serotonin uptake transporters. They also bound to other targets in the nanomolar-to-low micromolar range. Based on these binding results, it is likely that multiple serotonin receptors, as well as several nonserotonergic sites are important for the psychoactive effects of DALT drugs. To learn whether any quantitative structure-affinity relationships existed, we evaluated

  6. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier.

  7. Are high-affinity progesterone binding site(s) from porcine liver microsomes members of the sigma receptor family?

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Schmieding, K; Falkenstein, E; Wehling, M

    1998-04-24

    Membrane progesterone binding sites have been purified recently from pig liver. Since progesterone is considered as an endogenous sigma (sigma) receptor ligand, these sites were characterized pharmacologically by ligands selective for sigma receptor and dopamine receptor binding sites, and by other drugs from distinct pharmacological classes. Binding studies using the radioligand [3H]progesterone were done in crude membrane preparations and solubilized fractions to determine half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, from which inhibitory constants (Ki values) were calculated. Radioligand binding was inhibited by the sigma receptor ligands haloperidol, carbetapentane citrate, 1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2 aminopropane HCl (R(-)-PPAAP HCl), or sigma receptor antagonists like (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine HCl (R(+)-PPP HCl) and cis-9-[3-(3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-9H-carbazole dihydrochloride (rimcazole 2HCl). The hierarchy of inhibitory action was not fully compatible with either sigma receptor class I (moderate affinity of pentazocine, diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) insensitivity) or II sites (high affinity of carbetapentane). The data thus suggest that progesterone binding sites in porcine liver membranes are related to the sigma receptor binding site superfamily, but may represent a particular species with progesterone specificity.

  8. Conformational Destabilization of Immunoglobulin G Increases the Low pH Binding Affinity with the Neonatal Fc Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Jensen, Pernille F.; Larraillet, Vincent; Lin, Kevin; Patapoff, Thomas; Schlothauer, Tilman; Rand, Kasper D.; Zhang, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic evidence suggests that the pH-dependent affinity of IgG molecules for the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) receptor primarily arises from salt bridges involving IgG histidine residues, resulting in moderate affinity at mildly acidic conditions. However, this view does not explain the diversity in affinity found in IgG variants, such as the YTE mutant (M252Y,S254T,T256E), which increases affinity to FcRn by up to 10×. Here we compare hydrogen exchange measurements at pH 7.0 and pH 5.5 with and without FcRn bound with surface plasmon resonance estimates of dissociation constants and FcRn affinity chromatography. The combination of experimental results demonstrates that differences between an IgG and its cognate YTE mutant vary with their pH-sensitive dynamics prior to binding FcRn. The conformational dynamics of these two molecules are nearly indistinguishable upon binding FcRn. We present evidence that pH-induced destabilization in the CH2/3 domain interface of IgG increases binding affinity by breaking intramolecular H-bonds and increases side-chain adaptability in sites that form intermolecular contacts with FcRn. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of pH-dependent affinity in IgG-FcRn interactions and exemplify the important and often ignored role of intrinsic conformational dynamics in a protein ligand, to dictate affinity for biologically important receptors. PMID:26627822

  9. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  10. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling.

  11. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  12. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A; Jain, Mukesh K; Phang, Tzu L; Stormo, Gary D; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-08-07

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r(2) = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r(2) = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes.

  13. Further characterization of the low and high affinity binding components of the thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McQuade, R.; Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Nayfeh, S.N.

    1986-05-29

    Following cross-linking with disuccinimdiyl suberate and analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, both the high- and low-affinity TSH binding components exhibited two similar /sup 125/I-TSH-labeled bands, with Mr values of 80,000 and 68,000. IgG fractions from patients with Graves' disease inhibited /sup 125/I-TSH binding to both components, while normal IgG had no effect. Although not entirely conclusive, these results suggest that the high- and low-affinity components share similar subunit composition and antigenic determinants.

  14. Synthesis and binding affinity of novel mono- and bivalent morphinan ligands for κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Tangzhi; Sromek, Anna W; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2011-05-01

    A novel series of homo- and heterodimeric ligands containing κ/μ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist pharmacophores joined by a 10-carbon ester linker chain were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity at κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors, and their functional activities were determined at κ and μ receptors in [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays. Most of these compounds had high binding affinity at μ and κ receptors (K(i) values less than 1nM). Compound 15b, which contains butorphan (1) at one end of linking chain and butorphanol (5) at the other end, was the most potent ligand in this series with binding affinity K(i) values of 0.089nM at the μ receptor and 0.073nM at the κ receptor. All of the morphinan-derived ligands were found to be partial κ and μ agonists; ATPM-derived ligands 12 and 11 were found to be full κ agonists and partial μ agonists.

  15. Omega-conotoxin GVIA binding to a high-affinity receptor in brain: characterization, calcium sensitivity, and solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Snowman, A.M.; Biswas, A.; Olivera, B.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    We describe unique, high-affinity binding sites for omega(/sup 125/I)conotoxin GVIA in membranes from rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglia which appear to be primarily associated with N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The dissociation constant (KD) for the toxin in rat brain membranes is 60 pM. Physiologic extracellular concentrations of calcium inhibit toxin binding noncompetitively (IC50 = 0.2 mM). The regional distribution of the binding sites in rat brain differs markedly from that of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist receptors associated with L-type calcium channels. In detergent-solubilized brain membranes, toxin binding retains the same affinity, specificity, and ionic sensitivity as in particulate preparations.

  16. Differences in receptor binding affinity of several phytocannabinoids do not explain their effects on neural cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rosenthaler, Sarah; Pöhn, Birgit; Kolmanz, Caroline; Huu, Chi Nguyen; Krewenka, Christopher; Huber, Alexandra; Kranner, Barbara; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids are potential candidates for neurodegenerative disease treatment. Nonetheless, the exact mode of action of major phytocannabinoids has to be elucidated, but both, receptor and non-receptor mediated effects are discussed. Focusing on the often presumed structure-affinity-relationship, Ki values of phytocannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarin (CBDV), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabigerol (CBG), cannabinol (CBN), THC acid (THCA) and THC to human CB1 and CB2 receptors were detected by using competitive inhibition between radioligand [(3)H]CP-55,940 and the phytocannabinoids. The resulting Ki values to CB1 range from 23.5 nM (THCA) to 14711 nM (CBDV), whereas Ki values to CB2 range from 8.5 nM (THC) to 574.2 nM (CBDV). To study the relationship between binding affinity and effects on neurons, we investigated possible CB1 related cytotoxic properties in murine mesencephalic primary cell cultures and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cell line. Most of the phytocannabinoids did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, whereas propidium iodide and resazurin formation assays revealed cytotoxic properties of CBN, CBDV and CBG. However, THC showed positive effects on N18TG2 cell viability at a concentration of 10 μM, whereas CBC and THCA also displayed slightly positive activities. These findings are not linked to the receptor binding affinity therewith pointing to another mechanism than a receptor mediated one. [Corrected

  17. Mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine abuse: synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinity of N-substituted derivatives of morphinan.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Gu, X H; van Vliet, L A; DeNunzio, N J; Rusovici, D E; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Bidlack, J M

    2001-10-22

    A series of new N-substituted derivatives of morphinan was synthesized and their binding affinity for the three opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa) was determined. A paradoxical effect of N-propargyl (MCL-117) and N-(3-iodoprop-(2E)-enyl) (MCL-118) substituents on the binding affinities for the mu and kappa opioid receptors was observed. All of these novel derivatives showed a preference for the mu and kappa versus delta binding.

  18. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  19. Photocontrol of Anion Binding Affinity to a Bis-urea Receptor Derived from Stiff-Stilbene

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Toward the development of photoresponsive anion receptors, a stiff-stilbene photoswitch has been equipped with two urea anion-binding motifs. Photoinduced E/Z isomerization has been studied in detail by UV–vis and NMR spectroscopy. Titration experiments (1H NMR) reveal strong binding of acetate and phosphate to the (Z)-isomer, in which the urea groups are closely together. Isomerization to the (E)-form separates the urea motifs, resulting in much weaker binding. Additionally, geometry optimizations by density functional theory (DFT) illustrate that oxo-anion binding to the (Z)-form involves four hydrogen bonds. PMID:28074657

  20. Drug design for protein kinases and phosphatases: flexible-receptor docking, binding affinity and specificity, and drug-binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung F; Bairy, Sneha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews some of our experiences on applying computational techniques to aid the design of drugs targeting protein kinases and phosphatases. It is not a comprehensive review. Rather, it focuses on several less explored approaches or ideas that we have experiences on. It reviews some recent improvements on the Poisson-Boltzmann/Surface Area model for calculating binding affinity and discusses ways to perform calculations that are more tolerant to statistical and systematic errors. Several new ways to incorporate protein flexibility in molecular docking and estimating binding affinity are also discussed. Its discussions also go beyond binding affinity to considering drug-binding kinetics, not only on investigating protein-ligand interactions in isolation, but also on accounting for upstream and downstream influences that can occur in cells, through kinetic modeling of cell signaling. This review also describes a quick molecular simulation method for understanding drug-binding kinetics at the molecular level, with the hope of generating guiding principles for designing drugs with the desired kinetic properties. Sources of drug-binding selectivity that appear obvious but often overlooked are also discussed.

  1. Comparison of Relative Binding Affinities for Trout and Human Estrogen Receptor Based upon Different Competitive Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a predictive model based upon a single aquatic species inevitably raises the question of whether this information is valid for other species. To partially address this question, relative binding affinities (RBA) for six alkylphenols (para-substituted, n- and b...

  2. Synthesis, characterization and binding affinities of rhenium(I) thiosemicarbazone complexes for the estrogen receptor (α/β).

    PubMed

    Núñez-Montenegro, Ara; Carballo, Rosa; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2014-11-01

    The binding affinities towards estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β of a set of thiosemicarbazone ligands (HL(n)) and their rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes [ReX(HL(n))(CO)3] (X=Cl, Br) were determined by a competitive standard radiometric assay with [(3)H]-estradiol. The ability of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone ligands to undergo deprotonation and the lability of the ReX bond were used as a synthetic strategy to obtain [Re(hpy)(L(n))(CO)3] (hpy=3- or 4-hydroxypyridine). The inclusion of the additional hpy ligand endows the new thiosemicarbazonate complexes with an improved affinity towards the estrogen receptors and, consequently, the values of the inhibition constant (Ki) could be determined for some of them. In general, the values of Ki for both ER subtypes suggest an appreciable selectivity towards ERα.

  3. Identification of Key Residues in Subgroup A Avian Leukosis Virus Envelope Determining Receptor Binding Affinity and Infectivity of Cells Expressing Chicken or Quail Tva Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Holmen, Sheri L.; Melder, Deborah C.; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    To better understand retroviral entry, we have characterized the interactions between subgroup A avian leukosis virus [ALV(A)] envelope glycoproteins and Tva, the receptor for ALV(A), that result in receptor interference. We have recently shown that soluble forms of the chicken and quail Tva receptor (sTva), expressed from genes delivered by retroviral vectors, block ALV(A) infection of cultured chicken cells (∼200-fold antiviral effect) and chickens (>98% of the birds were not infected). We hypothesized that inhibition of viral replication by sTva would select virus variants with mutations in the surface glycoprotein (SU) that altered the binding affinity of the subgroup A SU for the sTva protein and/or altered the normal receptor usage of the virus. Virus propagation in the presence of quail sTva-mIgG, the quail Tva extracellular region fused to the constant region of the mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein, identified viruses with three mutations in the subgroup A hr1 region of SU, E149K, Y142N, and Y142N/E149K. These mutations reduced the binding affinity of the subgroup A envelope glycoproteins for quail sTva-mIgG (32-, 324-, and 4,739-fold, respectively) but did not alter their binding affinity for chicken sTva-mIgG. The ALV(A) mutants efficiently infected cells expressing the chicken Tva receptor but were 2-fold (E149K), 10-fold (Y142N), and 600-fold (Y142N/E149K) less efficient at infecting cells expressing the quail Tva receptor. These mutations identify key determinants of the interaction between the ALV(A) glycoproteins and the Tva receptor. We also conclude from these results that, at least for the wild-type and variant ALV(A)s tested, the receptor binding affinity was directly related to infection efficiency. PMID:11134286

  4. Using three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships to examine estrogen receptor binding affinities of polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, C.L.; Minor, D.L.; McKinney, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    Certain phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system of animals, apparently in association with their estrogenic properties. Competition with natural estrogens for the estrogen receptor is a possible mechanism by which such effects could occur. We used comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) paradigm, to examine the underlying structural properties of ortho-chlorinated hydroxybiphenyl analogs known to bind to the estrogen receptor. The cross-validated and conventional statistical results indicate a high degree of internal predictability for the molecules included in the training data set. In addition to the phenolic (A) ring system, conformational restriction of the overall structure appears to play an important role in estrogen receptor binding affinity. Hydrophobic character as assessed using hydropathic interaction fields also contributes in a positive way to binding affinity. The CoMFA-derived QSARs may be useful in examining the estrogenic activity of a wider range of phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Laccase-mediated transformations of endocrine disrupting chemicals abolish binding affinities to estrogen receptors and their estrogenic activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Viana, María Teresa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are known to mainly affect aquatic organisms, producing negative effects in aquaculture. Transformation of the estrogenic compounds 17β-estradiol (E2), bisphenol-A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), and triclosan (TCS) by laccase of Coriolopsis gallica was studied. Laccase is able to efficiently transform them into polymers. The estrogenic activity of the EDCs and their laccase transformation products was evaluated in vitro as their affinity for the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERα) and for the ligand binding domain of zebrafish (Danio rerio) estrogen receptor alpha (zfERαLBD). E2, BPA, NP, and TCS showed higher affinity for the zfERαLBD than for hERα. After laccase treatment, no affinity was found, except a marginal affinity of E2 products for the zfERαLBD. Endocrine disruption studies in vivo on zebrafish were performed using the induction of vitellogenin 1 as a biomarker (VTG1 mRNA levels). The use of enzymatic bioreactors, containing immobilized laccase, efficiently eliminates the endocrine activity of BPA and TCS, and significantly reduces the effects of E2. The potential use of enzymatic reactors to eliminate the endocrine activity of EDCs in supply water for aquaculture is discussed.

  6. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  7. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  8. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes.

  9. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  10. Mapping of the high affinity Fc epsilon receptor binding site to the third constant region domain of IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, A; Jouvin, M H; Eshhar, Z

    1991-01-01

    Identification of the precise region(s) on the IgE molecule that take part in the binding of IgE to its high affinity receptor (Fc epsilon RI) may lead to the design of IgE analogues able to block the allergic response. To localize the Fc epsilon RI-binding domain of mouse IgE, we attempted to confer on human IgE, which normally does not bind to the rodent receptor, the ability to bind to the rat Fc epsilon RI. Employing exon shuffling, we have expressed chimeric epsilon-heavy chain genes composed of a mouse (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetic acid (NP)-binding VH domain, and human C epsilon in which various domains were replaced by their murine counterparts. This has enabled us to test the Fc epsilon RI-binding of each mouse IgE domain while maintaining the overall conformation of the molecule. All of the chimeric IgE molecules which contain the murine C epsilon 3, bound equally to both the rodent and human receptor, as well as to monoclonal antibodies recognizing a site on IgE which is identical or very close to the Fc epsilon RI binding site. Deletion of the second constant region domain did not impair either the binding capacity of the mutated IgE or its ability to mediate mast cell degradation. These results assign the third epsilon domain of IgE as the principal region involved in the interaction with the Fc epsilon RI. Images PMID:1824934

  11. Isopropylamino and isobutylamino groups as recognition sites for carbohydrates: acyclic receptors with enhanced binding affinity toward β-galactosides.

    PubMed

    Mazik, Monika; Sonnenberg, Claudia

    2010-10-01

    Binding motifs observed in the crystal structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes, in particular the participation of the isopropyl/isobutyl side chain of valine/leucine in the formation of van der Waals contacts, have inspired the design of new artificial carbohydrate receptors. The new compounds, containing a trisubstituted triethylbenzene core, were expected to recognize sugar molecules through a combination of NH···O and OH···N hydrogen bonds, CH···π interactions, and numerous van der Waals contacts. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations in competitive and noncompetitive media, as well as binding studies in two-phase systems, such as dissolution of solid carbohydrates in apolar media and phase transfer of sugars from aqueous into organic solvents, revealed effective recognition of neutral carbohydrates and β- vs α-anomer binding preferences in the recognition of glycosides as well as significantly increased binding affinity of the receptors toward β-galactoside in comparison with the previously described receptors.

  12. Mutational Analysis of the Putative High-Affinity Propofol Binding Site in Human β3 Homomeric GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Megan M.; Cao, Lily Q.; Chen, Ziwei; Franks, Nicholas P.; Evers, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a sedative and anesthetic agent that can both activate GABAA receptors and potentiate receptor activation elicited by submaximal concentrations of the transmitter. A recent modeling study of the β3 homomeric GABAA receptor postulated a high-affinity propofol binding site in a hydrophobic pocket in the middle of a triangular cleft lined by the M1 and M2 membrane-spanning domains of one subunit and the M2 domain of the neighboring subunit. The goal of the present study was to gain functional evidence for the involvement of this pocket in the actions of propofol. Human β3 and α1β3 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of substitutions of selected residues were probed on channel activation by propofol and pentobarbital. The data demonstrate the vital role of the β3(Y143), β3(F221), β3(Q224), and β3(T266) residues in the actions of propofol but not pentobarbital in β3 receptors. The effects of β3(Y143W) and β3(Q224W) on activation by propofol are likely steric because propofol analogs with less bulky ortho substituents activated both wild-type and mutant receptors. The T266W mutation removed activation by propofol in β3 homomeric receptors; however, this mutation alone or in combination with a homologous mutation (I271W) in the α1 subunit had almost no effect on activation properties in α1β3 heteromeric receptors. We hypothesize that heteromeric α1β3 receptors can be activated by propofol interactions with β3–β3, α1–β3, and β3–α1 interfaces, but the exact locations of the binding site and/or nature of interactions vary in different classes of interfaces. PMID:26206487

  13. Mutational Analysis of the Putative High-Affinity Propofol Binding Site in Human β3 Homomeric GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Cao, Lily Q; Chen, Ziwei; Franks, Nicholas P; Evers, Alex S; Akk, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    Propofol is a sedative and anesthetic agent that can both activate GABA(A) receptors and potentiate receptor activation elicited by submaximal concentrations of the transmitter. A recent modeling study of the β3 homomeric GABA(A) receptor postulated a high-affinity propofol binding site in a hydrophobic pocket in the middle of a triangular cleft lined by the M1 and M2 membrane-spanning domains of one subunit and the M2 domain of the neighboring subunit. The goal of the present study was to gain functional evidence for the involvement of this pocket in the actions of propofol. Human β3 and α1β3 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of substitutions of selected residues were probed on channel activation by propofol and pentobarbital. The data demonstrate the vital role of the β3(Y143), β3(F221), β3(Q224), and β3(T266) residues in the actions of propofol but not pentobarbital in β3 receptors. The effects of β3(Y143W) and β3(Q224W) on activation by propofol are likely steric because propofol analogs with less bulky ortho substituents activated both wild-type and mutant receptors. The T266W mutation removed activation by propofol in β3 homomeric receptors; however, this mutation alone or in combination with a homologous mutation (I271W) in the α1 subunit had almost no effect on activation properties in α1β3 heteromeric receptors. We hypothesize that heteromeric α1β3 receptors can be activated by propofol interactions with β3-β3, α1-β3, and β3-α1 interfaces, but the exact locations of the binding site and/or nature of interactions vary in different classes of interfaces.

  14. Inhibition of Coxsackie B Virus Infection by Soluble Forms of Its Receptors: Binding Affinities, Altered Particle Formation, and Competition with Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Ian G.; Evans, David J.; Blom, Anna M.; Kerrigan, Dave; Miners, J. Scott; Morgan, B. Paul; Spiller, O. Brad

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that soluble decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) blocked coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis in mice, but only soluble CAR blocked CVB3-mediated pancreatitis. Here, we report that the in vitro mechanisms of viral inhibition by these soluble receptors also differ. Soluble DAF inhibited virus infection through the formation of reversible complexes with CVB3, while binding of soluble CAR to CVB induced the formation of altered (A) particles with a resultant irreversible loss of infectivity. A-particle formation was characterized by loss of VP4 from the virions and required incubation of CVB3-CAR complexes at 37°C. Dimeric soluble DAF (DAF-Fc) was found to be 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting CVB3 than monomeric DAF, which corresponded to a 100-fold increase in binding affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Soluble CAR and soluble dimeric CAR (CAR-Fc) bound to CVB3 with 5,000- and 10,000-fold-higher affinities than the equivalent forms of DAF. While DAF-Fc was 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting virus than monomeric DAF, complement regulation by DAF-Fc was decreased 4 fold. Therefore, while the virus binding was a cooperative event, complement regulation was hindered by the molecular orientation of DAF-Fc, indicating that the regions responsible for complement regulation and virus binding do not completely overlap. Relative contributions of CVB binding affinity, receptor binding footprint on the virus capsid, and induction of capsid conformation alterations for the ability of cellular DAF and CAR to act as receptors are discussed. PMID:16140777

  15. Opiorphin highly improves the specific binding and affinity of MERF and MEGY to rat brain opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Fanni; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sándor; Rougeot, Catherine; Wollemann, Mária

    2012-10-10

    Endogenously occurring opioid peptides are rapidly metabolized by different ectopeptidases. Human opiorphin is a recently discovered natural inhibitor of the enkephalin-inactivating neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase-N (AP-N) (Wisner et al., 2006). To date, in vitro receptor binding experiments must be performed either in the presence of a mixture of peptidase inhibitors and/or at low temperatures, to block peptidase activity. Here we demonstrate that, compared to classic inhibitor cocktails, opiorphin dramatically increases the binding of [(3)H]MERF and [(3)H]MEGY ligands to rat brain membrane preparations. We found that at 0 °C the increase in specific binding is as high as 40-60% and at 24 °C this rise was even higher. In contrast, the binding of the control [(3)H]endomorphin-1, which is relatively slowly degraded in rat brain membrane preparations, was not enhanced by opiorphin compared to other inhibitors. In addition, in homologous binding displacement experiments, the IC(50) affinity values measured at 24 °C were also significantly improved using opiorphin compared to the inhibitor cocktail. In heterologous binding experiments the differences were less obvious, but still pronounced using [(3)H]MERF and MEGY compared to dynorphin(1-11), or naloxone and DAGO competitor ligands.

  16. Phenylalanine-780 near the C-terminus of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is important for ligand binding affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Kohli, K; Zhang, S; Danielsen, M; Stallcup, M R

    1994-04-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to make two single amino acid substitutions for highly conserved amino acid residues near the C-terminus of the 783-amino acid mouse glucocorticoid receptor. Substitution of leucine for histidine-781 caused little or no change in the concentration of dexamethasone required for half-maximal activation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expressed from a mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. However, when phenylalanine-780 was changed to alanine, the half-maximal concentrations of various agonists were increased as follows, compared with the wild-type glucocorticoid receptor: triamcinolone acetonide by 7-fold, dexamethasone by 25-fold, and hydrocortisone and deoxycorticosterone by more than 150-fold. Binding of labeled steroids by the mutant receptor in vitro and in vivo was also decreased. In contrast, this mutation caused a small decrease in the concentration of RU486 required for antagonist or partial agonist activity. Thus, the phenyl group of phenylalanine-780 of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is an important determinant of ligand binding affinity and specificity.

  17. Familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein B. Identification of a new mutation that decreases LDL receptor binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullinger, C R; Hennessy, L K; Chatterton, J E; Liu, W; Love, J A; Mendel, C M; Frost, P H; Malloy, M J; Schumaker, V N; Kane, J P

    1995-01-01

    Detection of new ligand-defective mutations of apolipoprotein B (apoB) will enable identification of sequences involved in binding to the LDL receptor. Genomic DNA from patients attending a lipid clinic was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel mutations in the putative LDL receptor-binding domain of apoB-100. A 46-yr-old woman of Celtic and Native American ancestry with primary hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol [TC] 343 mg/dl; LDL cholesterol [LDL-C] 241 mg/dl) and pronounced peripheral vascular disease was found to be heterozygous for a novel Arg3531-->Cys mutation, caused by a C-->T transition at nucleotide 10800. One unrelated 59-yr-old man of Italian ancestry was found with the same mutation after screening 1,560 individuals. He had coronary heart disease, a TC of 310 mg/dl, and an LDL-C of 212 mg/dl. A total of eight individuals were found with the defect in the families of the two patients. They had an age- and sex-adjusted TC of 240 +/- 14 mg/dl and LDL-C of 169 +/- 10 mg/dl. This compares with eight unaffected family members with age- and sex-adjusted TC of 185 +/- 12 mg/dl and LDL-C of 124 +/- 12 mg/dl. In a dual-label fibroblast binding assay, LDL from the eight subjects with the mutation had an affinity for the LDL receptor that was 63% that of control LDL. LDL from eight unaffected family members had an affinity of 91%. By way of comparison, LDL from six patients heterozygous for the Arg3500-->Gln mutation had an affinity of 36%. The percentage mass ratio of the defective Cys3531 LDL to normal LDL was 59:41, as determined using the mAb MB19 and dynamic laser light scattering. Thus, the defective LDL had accumulated in the plasma of these patients. Using this mass ratio, it was calculated that the defective Cys3531 LDL particles bound with 27% of normal affinity. Deduced haplotypes using 10 apoB gene markers showed the Arg3531-->Cys alleles to be different in the two kindreds and indicates that the mutations arose

  18. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  19. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  20. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off

  1. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  2. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  3. The MC3 receptor binding affinity of melanocortins correlates with the nitric oxide production inhibition in mice brain inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Muceniece, Ruta; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Kirjanova, Olga; Baumane, Larisa; Petrovska, Ramona; Mutulis, Felikss; Mutule, Ilze; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Dambrova, Maija

    2006-06-01

    Melanocortins possess strong anti-inflammatory effects acting in the central nervous system via inhibition of the production of nitric oxide (NO) during brain inflammation. To shed more light into the role of melanocortin (MC) receptor subtypes involved we synthesized and evaluated some novel peptides, modified in the melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) core structure, natural MCs and known MC receptor selective peptides - MS05, MS06. Since the study included both selective, high affinity binders and the novel peptides, it was possible to do the correlation analysis of binding activities and the NO induction-related anti-inflammatory effect of the peptides. beta-MSH, gamma1-MSH, gamma2-MSH, alpha-MSH, MS05, Ac-MS06 and Ac-[Ser12]MS06 caused dose dependent inhibition of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase of NO overproduction in the mice forebrain whereas MSH core modified peptides Ac-[Asp9,Ser12]MS06, [Asp9]alpha-MSH and [Asp16]beta-MSH were devoid of this effect in doses up to 10 nmol per mouse. When the minimal effective dose required for inhibition of NO production was correlated with the in vitro binding activity to MC receptor subtypes a strong and significant correlation was found for the MC3 receptor (r = 0.90; p = 0.0008), whereas weak correlation was present for the other receptors. Our results suggest that the MC3 receptor is the major player in mediating the anti-inflammatory activity of MCs in the central nervous system.

  4. Antibody to FcεRIα Suppresses Immunoglobulin E Binding to High-Affinity Receptor I in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung Yeon; Bae, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mina; Kim, Min Hee; Kang, Hyun Jung; Park, Eun Hye; Yoo, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-affinity receptor I (FcεRI) on mast cells and basophils plays a key role in the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity mediated by allergen cross-linking of the specific IgE-FcεRI complex. Thus, prevention of IgE binding to FcεRI on these cells is an effective therapy for allergic disease. We have developed a strategy to disrupt IgE binding to FcεRI using an antibody targeting FcεRIα. Materials and Methods Fab fragment antibodies, which lack the Fc domain, with high affinity and specificity for FcεRIα and effective inhibitory activity against IgE-FcεRI binding were screened. IgE-induced histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in basophils were determined by ELISA. A B6.Cg-Fcer1atm1Knt Tg(FCER1A)1Bhk/J mouse model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to examine the inhibitory effect of NPB311 on allergic skin inflammation. Results NPB311 exhibited high affinity to human FcεRIα (KD=4 nM) and inhibited histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner in hFcεRI-expressing cells. In hFcεRIα-expressing mice, dye leakage was higher in the PCA group than in controls, but decreased after NPB311 treatment. NPB311 could form a complex with FcεRIα and inhibit the release of inflammation mediators. Conclusion Our approach for producing anti-FcεRIα Fab fragment antibody NPB311 may enable clinical application to a therapeutic pathway in IgE/FcεRI-mediated diseases. PMID:27593869

  5. Synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinities of 2-substituted and 3-aminomorphinans: ligands for mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Si, Yu-Gui; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-01-14

    The phenolic group of the potent mu and kappa opioid morphinan agonist/antagonists cyclorphan and butorphan was replaced by phenylamino and benzylamino groups including compounds with para-substituents in the benzene ring. These compounds are highly potent mu and kappa ligands, e.g., p-methoxyphenylaminocyclorphan showing a K(i) of 0.026 nM at the mu receptor and a K(i) of 0.03 nM at the kappa receptor. Phenyl carbamates and phenylureas were synthesized and investigated. Selective o-formylation of butorphan and levorphanol was achieved. This reaction opened the way to a large set of 2-substituted 3-hydroxymorphinans, including 2-hydroxymethyl-, 2-aminomethyl-, and N-substituted 2-aminomethyl-3-hydroxymorphinans. Bivalent ligands bridged in the 2-position were also synthesized and connected with secondary and tertiary aminomethyl groups, amide bonds, and hydroxymethylene groups, respectively. Although most of the 2-substituted morphinans showed considerably lower affinities compared to their parent compounds, the bivalent ligand approach led to significantly higher affinities compared to the univalent 2-substituted morphinans.

  6. High-affinity insulin binding to an atypical insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, G; Yip, C C; Maddux, B A; Vigneri, R; Goldfine, I D

    1992-01-01

    We studied the nature of insulin receptor binding in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In both intact cells and solubilized receptor preparations, high-affinity insulin binding was seen. However, unlabeled insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was five-fold more potent in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding than insulin itself. With monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor, 30% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. In contrast when alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes typical IGF-I receptor, was employed over 60% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. The B29-MAB-125I-insulin photoprobe was then cross-linked to MCF-7 membranes. Cross-linking was inhibited by both unlabeled insulin and IGF-I. Further, the B29-MAB-125I-insulin photoprobe cross-linked to MCF-7 membranes was strongly immunoprecipitated by alpha-IR3. Employing sequential affinity chromatography with insulin-Affi-gel followed by insulin receptor monoclonal antibody agarose, atypical insulin binding activity was separated from insulin receptor binding activity. This atypical receptor had intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Both insulin and IGF-I stimulated the phosphorylation of the receptor's beta subunit. In MCF-7 cells both IGF-I and insulin stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation; alpha-IR3 blocked all of the IGF-I effect but only 50-60% of the insulin effect. This study demonstrates in MCF-7 cells that, in addition to typical insulin and IGF-I receptors, there is another receptor that binds both insulin and IGF-I with high affinity. Images PMID:1311720

  7. Novel histamine H3 receptor antagonists: affinities in an H3 receptor binding assay and potencies in two functional H3 receptor models.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Reidemeister, S; Stark, H; Schunack, W

    1994-08-01

    1. We determined the affinities of ten novel H3 receptor antagonists in an H3 receptor binding assay and their potencies in two functional H3 receptor models. The novel compounds differ from histamine in that the aminoethyl side chain is replaced by a propyl or butyl chain linked to a polar group (amide, thioamide, ester, guanidine, guanidine ester or urea) which, in turn, is connected to a hexocyclic ring or to an alicyclic ring-containing alkyl residue [corrected]. 2. The specific binding of [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine to rat brain cortex membranes was monophasically displaced by each of the ten compounds at pKi values ranging from 7.56 to 8.68. 3. Inhibition by histamine of the electrically evoked tritium overflow from mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline was antagonized by the ten compounds and the concentration-response curve was shifted to the right with apparent pA2 values ranging from 7.07 to 9.20. 4. The electrically induced contraction in guinea-pig ileum strips (which was abolished by atropine) was inhibited by the H3 receptor agonists R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (pEC50 7.76), N alpha-methylhistamine (7.90) and imetit (8.18). The concentration-response curve of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine was shifted to the right by thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.79) and by the ten novel compounds (range of pA2 values 6.64-8.81). 5. The affinities and potencies were compared by linear regression analysis. This analysis was extended to thioperamide, the standard H3 receptor antagonist, which is also capable of differentiating between H3A and H3B sites. Comparison of the apparent pA2 values in the two functional H3 receptor models yielded a regression coefficient of 0.77 (P<0.02). When the pA2 of the drugs in the mouse brain cortex were compared to the pXj for H3 sites (ten novel compounds) and for H3A sites (thioperamide), a significant correlation (r = 0.87; P<0.001) was obtained. There was, however, no significant correlation when the pKi of

  8. New neoclerodane diterpenoids isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum and their binding affinities for human kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, David Y W; Ma, Zhongze; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Yong; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the leaves of Salvia divinorum has resulted in the isolation of three new neoclerodane diterpenoids: divinatorin D (1), divinatorin E (2), and salvinorin G (3), together with 10 known terpenoids, divinatorin C (4), hardwickiic acid (5), salvinorin-A (6), -B (7), -C (8), -D (9), -E (10), and -F (11), presqualene alcohol (12), and (E)-phytol (13). The structures of these three new compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods. All these compounds were evaluated for their binding affinities to the human kappa opioid receptors. In comparison with divinatorin D (1), divinatorin E (2), and salvinorin G (3), salvinorin A (6) is still the most potent kappa agonist.

  9. Measurement of the relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol for uterine and oviduct estrogen receptors in swine, rats and chickens: an indicator of estrogenic potencies.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, D W; Picken, C A; Murphy, L C; Buhr, M M

    1989-01-01

    1. The relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol, and beta-zearalenol for estrogen receptors was determined in the pig, rat and chicken. 2. Similar relative binding patterns were observed, with alpha-zearalenol exhibiting greater affinity than zearalenone and beta-zearalenol the least binding affinity in all species. 3. The relative binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol was greater in pig, than in rat and significantly greater than in chicken. 4. Interspecies differences in zearalenone sensitivity may be due to the binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol for estrogen receptors and differences in zearalenone metabolites formed.

  10. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS TO ESTROGEN RECEPTOR IN TWO SPECIES OF FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. To evaluate the potential for chemicals to cause endocrine disruption in fish we have previously measured the affinity of a number of chemicals for the rainbow trout estr...

  11. Predicting the effects of amino acid replacements in peptide hormones on their binding affinities for class B GPCRs and application to the design of secretin receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te, Jerez A.; Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J.; Bordner, Andrew J.

    2012-07-01

    Computational prediction of the effects of residue changes on peptide-protein binding affinities, followed by experimental testing of the top predicted binders, is an efficient strategy for the rational structure-based design of peptide inhibitors. In this study we apply this approach to the discovery of competitive antagonists for the secretin receptor, the prototypical member of class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Proteins in this family are involved in peptide hormone-stimulated signaling and are implicated in several human diseases, making them potential therapeutic targets. We first validated our computational method by predicting changes in the binding affinities of several peptides to their cognate class B GPCRs due to alanine replacement and compared the results with previously published experimental values. Overall, the results showed a significant correlation between the predicted and experimental ΔΔG values. Next, we identified candidate inhibitors by applying this method to a homology model of the secretin receptor bound to an N-terminal truncated secretin peptide. Predictions were made for single residue replacements to each of the other nineteen naturally occurring amino acids at peptide residues within the segment binding the receptor N-terminal domain. Amino acid replacements predicted to most enhance receptor binding were then experimentally tested by competition-binding assays. We found two residue changes that improved binding affinities by almost one log unit. Furthermore, a peptide combining both of these favorable modifications resulted in an almost two log unit improvement in binding affinity, demonstrating the approximately additive effect of these changes on binding. In order to further investigate possible physical effects of these residue changes on receptor binding affinity, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on representatives of the successful peptide analogues (namely A17I, G25R, and A17I/G25R) in bound and

  12. Acylation of the alpha-amino group in neuropeptide Y(12-36) increases binding affinity for the Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Murase, S; Yumoto, N; Petukhov, M G; Yoshikawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Competition assays using three series of analogs of neuropeptide Y (NPY) ([Xaa11]NPY(11-36), [Xaa12]NPY(12-36), and [Xaa13]NPY(13-36) revealed that the binding affinity for the Y2 receptor was considerably lowered by truncation of residue 11. Upon acetylation or succinylation of the alpha-amino group, the binding affinity of [Xaa12]NPY(12-36) recovered to a level similar to that of [Xaa11]NPY(11-36). No significant difference was observed between the increases caused by acetylation and those caused by succinylation, suggesting that the increase in binding affinity cannot be explained by the change in the net charge at the N-terminus as a consequence of the modification. The scattered data points on a plot of the alpha-helix content vs. IC50 of all these analogs revealed the absence of any apparent relationship, an indication that prior formation of the alpha-helix is not necessary for binding to the Y2 receptor. It has been widely accepted that fewer than 12 residues from the C-terminus are directly involved in binding of NPY to the Y2 receptor, while the remaining part of NPY only assists in the adoption of a favorable conformation by the C-terminal hexapeptide for recognition by the receptor. However, the present results suggest that the region around residue 12 does not project from the Y2 receptor.

  13. Distinction between high-affinity (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine binding sites and muscarinic receptors in guinea-pig ileum muscle

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fakahany, E.E.; Triggle, D.J.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1984-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Phencyclidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP) binding was studied in guinea-pig ileum muscle membranes. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PCP was time dependent, reversible and saturable, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 154 nM and maximum binding of 12.9 pmol/mg of protein at pH 9. Its pH dependency suggests that the un-ionized PCP is the pharmacologically active form. The binding site was on a protein which was sensitive to heat, proteolytic enzymes and the carboxylic group reagent dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, but insensitive to phospholipase A and C, concanavalin A, dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide. Specific (/sup 3/H)PCP binding was displaced effectively by several PCP analogs and Ca/sup + +/ channel antagonists including verapamil, to which these sites had a high affinity. These high-affinity PCP-binding sites were found at a much higher concentration in the same membrane preparation than muscarinic receptor sites identified by their specific binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. PCP bound to both sites, but with a lower affinity to the muscarinic receptor sites. The PCP and muscarinic receptor sites differed in their sensitivities to pH and drug specifities.

  14. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  15. Structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I with reduced affinity for serum binding proteins and the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, M.L.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.G.; Hayes, N.S.; Green, B.G.; Cascieri, M.A.

    1988-05-05

    Four structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) have been prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of a synthetic IGF-I gene and subsequent expression and purification of the mutant protein from the conditioned media of transformed yeast. (Phe/sup -1/, Val/sup 1/, Asn/sup 2/, Gln/sup 3/, His/sup 4/, Ser/sup 8/, His/sup 9/, Glu/sup 12/, Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I (B-chain mutant), in which the first 16 amino acids of hIGF-I were replaced with the first 17 amino acids of the B-chain of insulin, has >1000-, 100-, and 2-fold reduced potency for human serum binding proteins, the rat liver type 2 IGF receptor, and the human placental type 1 IGF receptor, respectively. The B-chain mutant also has 4-fold increased affinity for the human placental insulin receptor. (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/) IGF-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins, but is equipotent to hIGF-I at the types 1 and 2 IGF and insulin receptors. (Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/) IGH-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins and 10-fold increased affinity for the insulin receptor. The peptide in which these four-point mutations are combined, (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/, Tyr/sup 15/,Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I, has 600-fold reduced affinity for the serum binding proteins. All four of these mutants stimulate DNA synthesis in the rat vascular smooth muscle cell line A10 with potencies reflecting their potency at the type 1 IGF receptor. These studies identify some of the domains of hIGF-I which are responsible for maintaining high affinity binding with the serum binding protein and the type 2 IGF receptor. In addition, These peptides will be useful in defining the role of the type 2 IGF receptor and serum binding proteins in the physiological actions of hIGF-I.

  16. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    PubMed

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors.

  17. Production of a Purified Marine Neurotoxin and Demonstration of its Binding Affinity to Ion Channel Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-10

    the ciguatera Implicated toxins, maitotoxin, does not displace brevetoxin from its unique receptor and therefore must produce its toxic 49octs with a...James R. Balthrop, John A. Babinchak, Penny B. Travis, Teresa L. Herring and Pam Y. Brown-Eyo Ciguatera is a tropical fish-borne disease in which both a...synaptosome bound toxin from free toxin following in vitro bindina. we have demonstruted that one of the ciguatera implicated toxins, maitotoxin

  18. Comparison of Relative Binding Affinities for Trout and Human Estrogen Receptor Based upon Different Competitive Binding Assays, oral

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. To evaluate the potential for chemicals to cause endocrine disruption in fish we have previously measured the affinity of a number of chemicals for the rainbow trout estr...

  19. Nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and imetit: affinities for H3 binding sites and potencies in a functional H3 receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Detzner, M; Timmerman, H

    1993-11-01

    We determined the affinities of nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and imetit for H3 binding sites (labelled by 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine) in rat brain cortex homogenates and their potencies at presynaptic H3A receptors on noradrenergic nerve endings in mouse brain cortex slices. 3H-N alpha-Methylhistamine bound saturably to rat brain cortex homogenates with a Kd of 0.70 nmol/l and a Bmax of 98 fmol/mg protein. Binding of 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine was displaced monophasically by dimaprit (pKi 6.55), nordimaprit (5.94), homodimaprit (6.44), clobenpropit (9.16), imetit (9.83), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (8.87) and histamine (8.20), and biphasically by burimamide (pKi high 7.73, pKi low 5.97). In superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow was inhibited by imetit (pIC35 8.93), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.87) and histamine (7.03). The effect of histamine was attenuated by nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and N-ethoxycarbonyl-2- ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ); EEDQ (but not nordimaprit, homodimaprit and clobenpropit) attenuated the effect of histamine also in slices pre-exposed to the drug 60-30 min prior to superfusion. The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by homodimaprit and clobenpropit; Schild plots yielded straight lines with a slope of unity for both drugs (pA2 5.94 and 9.55, respectively). Nordimaprit depressed the maximum effect of histamine (pD'2 5.55) and also slightly increased the concentration of histamine producing the half-maximum effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Toxicological profiles of selected synthetic cannabinoids showing high binding affinities to the cannabinoid receptor subtype CB₁.

    PubMed

    Koller, Verena J; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Auwärter, Volker; Fuchs, Sabine; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Products containing synthetic cannabinoids are consumed as a surrogate for marihuana due to their non-detectability with commonly used drug tests and their strong cannabimimetic effects. Because data concerning their toxicological properties are scarce, the cytotoxic, genotoxic, immunomodulatory, and hormonal activities of four naphthoylindole compounds (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-122 and JWH-210) and of one benzoylindole (AM-694) were studied in human cell lines and primary cells; tetrahydrocannabinol was included as the classical non-endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand. All compounds induced damage to the cell membranes of buccal (TR146) and breast (MCF-7) derived cells at concentrations of ≥75-100 μM. No cytotoxic responses were seen in other assays which reflect mitochondrial damage, protein synthesis, and lysosomal activities. JWH-073 and JWH-122 induced DNA migration in buccal and liver cells (HepG2) in single cell gel electrophoresis assays, while JWH-210 was only in the latter cell line active. No estrogenic activities were detected in bone marrow cells (U2-OS), but all compounds caused anti-estrogenic effects at levels between 2.1 and 23.0 μM. Furthermore, no impact on cytokine release (i.e., on IL-10, IL-6, IL-12/23p40 and TNFα levels) was seen in LPS-stimulated human PBMCs, except with JWH-210 and JWH-122 which caused a decrease of TNFα and IL-12/23p40. All toxic effects were observed with concentrations higher than those expected in body fluids of users. Since genotoxic effects are in general linear over a wide concentration range and the exposure levels may be higher in epithelial cells than [corrected] in serum, further experimental work is required to find out if DNA damage takes place in drug users.

  1. Different Thermodynamic Binding Mechanisms and Peptide Fine Specificities Associated with a Panel of Structurally Similar High-Affinity T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.; Colf, L; Bankovich, A; Stone, J; Gao, Y; Chan, C; Huang, R; Garcia, K; Kranz, D

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms that govern T cell receptor (TCR)-peptide MHC (pMHC) binding and the role that different regions of the TCR play in affinity and antigen specificity, we have studied the TCR from T cell clone 2C. High-affinity mutants of the 2C TCR that bind QL9-L{sup d} as a strong agonist were generated previously by site-directed mutagenesis of complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1{Beta}, 2{alpha}, 3{alpha}, or 3{Beta}. We performed isothermal titration calorimetry to assess whether they use similar thermodynamic mechanisms to achieve high affinity for QL9-L{sup d}. Four of the five TCRs examined bound to QL9-L{sup d} in an enthalpically driven, entropically unfavorable manner. In contrast, the high-affinity CDR1{Beta} mutant resembled the wild-type 2C TCR interaction, with favorable entropy. To assess fine specificity, we measured the binding and kinetics of these mutants for both QL9-L{sup d} and a single amino acid peptide variant of QL9, called QL9-Y5-Ld. While 2C and most of the mutants had equal or higher affinity for the Y5 variant than for QL9, mutant CDR1{Beta} exhibited 8-fold lower affinity for Y5 compared to QL9. To examine possible structural correlates of the thermodynamic and fine specificity signatures of the TCRs, the structure of unliganded QL9-L{sup d} was solved and compared to structures of the 2C TCR/QL9-L{sup d} complex and three high-affinity TCR/QL9-L{sup d} complexes. Our findings show that the QL9-L{sup d} complex does not undergo major conformational changes upon binding. Thus, subtle changes in individual CDRs account for the diverse thermodynamic and kinetic binding mechanisms and for the different peptide fine specificities.

  2. Synergistic Binding of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Its Receptors to Heparin Selectively Modulates Complex Affinity.

    PubMed

    Teran, Madelane; Nugent, Matthew A

    2015-06-26

    Angiogenesis is a highly regulated process orchestrated by the VEGF system. Heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) have been identified as co-receptors, yet the mechanisms of action have not been fully defined. In the present study, we characterized molecular interactions between receptors and co-receptors, using surface plasmon resonance and in vitro binding assays. Additionally, we demonstrate that these binding events are relevant to VEGF activity within endothelial cells. We defined interactions and structural requirements for heparin/HS interactions with VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-1, NRP-1, and VEGF165 in complex with VEGFR-2 and NRP-1. We demonstrate that these structural requirements are distinct for each interaction. We further show that VEGF165, VEGFR-2, and monomeric NRP-1 bind weakly to heparin alone yet show synergistic binding to heparin when presented together in various combinations. This synergistic binding appears to translate to alterations in VEGF signaling in endothelial cells. We found that soluble NRP-1 increases VEGF binding and activation of VEGFR-2 and ERK1/2 in endothelial cells and that these effects require sulfated HS. These data suggest that the presence of HS/heparin and NRP-1 may dictate the specific receptor type activated by VEGF and ultimately determine the biological output of the system. The ability of co-receptors to fine-tune VEGF responsiveness suggests the possibility that VEGF-mediated angiogenesis can be selectively stimulated or inhibited by targeting HS/heparin and NRP-1.

  3. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP MODELS FOR PREDICTION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY OF STRUCTURALLY DIVERSE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demonstrated ability of a variety of structurally diverse chemicals to bind to the estrogen receptor has raised the concern that chemicals in the environment may be causing adverse effects through interference with nuclear receptor pathways. Many structure-activity relationsh...

  4. Reconstitution of high-affinity binding of a beta-scorpion toxin to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on purified sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, W; Martin-Eauclaire, M F; Rochat, H; Catterall, W A

    1995-09-01

    Reconstitution of purified sodium channels into phospholipid vesicles restores many aspects of sodium channel function including high-affinity neurotoxin binding and action at neurotoxin receptor sites 1-3 and 5, but neurotoxin binding and action at receptor site 4 has not previously been demonstrated in purified and reconstituted preparations. Toxin IV from the venom of the American scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css IV), a beta-scorpion toxin, shifts the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by binding with high affinity to neurotoxin receptor site 4. Sodium channels were purified from rat brain and reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine (65:35). 125I-Css IV, purified by reversed-phase HPLC, bound rapidly and specifically to reconstituted sodium channels. Dissociation of the bound toxin was biphasic with half-times of 0.22 min-1 and 0.015 min-1. At equilibrium, the toxin bound to two classes of specific high-affinity sites, a variable minor class with KD of approximately 0.1 nM and a major class with a KD of approximately 5 nM. Approximately 0.8 mol 125I-Css IV was bound per mole of reconstituted, right-side-out sodium channels, as assessed from comparison of binding of saxitoxin and Css IV. Binding of Css IV was unaffected by membrane potential or by neurotoxins that bind at sites 1-3 or 5, consistent with the characteristics of binding of beta-scorpion toxins to sodium channels in cells and membrane preparations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  6. Affinities and densities of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-09-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using (/sup 3/H)muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Analogs of JHU75528, a PET ligand for imaging of cerebral cannabinoid receptors (CB1): development of ligands with optimized lipophilicity and binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong; Kotsikorou, Evangelia; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Holt, Daniel; Hurst, Dow P.; Lupica, Carl R.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Dannals, Robert F.; Horti, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    Cyano analogs of Rimonabant with high binding affinity for the cerebral cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and with optimized lipophilicity have been synthesized as potential positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. The best ligands of the series are optimal targets for the future radiolabeling with PET isotopes and in vivo evaluation as radioligands with enhanced properties for PET imaging of CB1 receptors in human subjects. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings in rodent brain slices demonstrated that JHU75528, 4, the lead compound of the new series, has functional CB antagonist properties that are consistent with its structural relationship to Rimonabant. Molecular modeling analysis revealed an important role of the binding of the cyano-group with the CB1 binding pocket. PMID:18511157

  8. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-08

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  9. Insulin-like Growth Factor-II (IGF-II) and IGF-II Analogs with Enhanced Insulin Receptor-a Binding Affinity Promote Neural Stem Cell Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Forbes, Briony E.; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to employ genetically engineered IGF-II analogs to establish which receptor(s) mediate the stemness promoting actions of IGF-II on mouse subventricular zone neural precursors. Neural precursors from the subventricular zone were propagated in vitro in culture medium supplemented with IGF-II analogs. Cell growth and identity were analyzed using sphere generation and further analyzed by flow cytometry. F19A, an analog of IGF-II that does not bind the IGF-2R, stimulated an increase in the proportion of neural stem cells (NSCs) while decreasing the proportion of the later stage progenitors at a lower concentration than IGF-II. V43M, which binds to the IGF-2R with high affinity but which has low binding affinity to the IGF-1R and to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A) failed to promote NSC growth. The positive effects of F19A on NSC growth were unaltered by the addition of a functional blocking antibody to the IGF-1R. Altogether, these data lead to the conclusion that IGF-II promotes stemness of NSCs via the IR-A and not through activation of either the IGF-1R or the IGF-2R. PMID:24398690

  10. Evolution of human receptor binding affinity of H1N1 hemagglutinins from 1918 to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Malaisree, Maturos; Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Decha, Panita; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Poovorawan, Yong; Hannongbua, Supot

    2010-08-23

    The recent outbreak of the novel 2009 H1N1 influenza in humans has focused global attention on this virus, which could potentially have introduced a more dangerous pandemic of influenza flu. In the initial step of the viral attachment, hemagglutinin (HA), a viral glycoprotein surface, is responsible for the binding to the human SIA alpha2,6-linked sialopentasaccharide host cell receptor (hHAR). Dynamical and structural properties, based on molecular dynamics simulations of the four different HAs of Spanish 1918 (H1-1918), swine 1930 (H1-1930), seasonal 2005 (H1-2005), and a novel 2009 (H1-2009) H1N1 bound to the hHAR were compared. In all four HA-hHAR complexes, major interactions with the receptor binding were gained from HA residue Y95 and the conserved HA residues of the 130-loop, 190-helix, and 220-loop. However, introduction of the charged HA residues K145 and E227 in the 2009 HA binding pocket was found to increase the HA-hHAR binding efficiency in comparison to the three previously recognized H1N1 strains. Changing of the noncharged HA G225 residue to a negatively charged D225 provides a larger number of hydrogen-bonding interactions. The increase in hydrophilicity of the receptor binding region is apparently an evolution of the current pandemic flu from the 1918 Spanish, 1930 swine, and 2005 seasonal strains. Detailed analysis could help the understanding of how different HAs effectively attach and bind with the hHAR.

  11. Identification of the high affinity binding site in the Streptococcus intermedius toxin intermedilysin for its membrane receptor, the human complement regulator CD59.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy R; Ross, Kirsty S; Cowan, Graeme J M; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Harris, Claire L; Mitchell, Timothy J; Morgan, B Paul

    2009-04-01

    The unique species specificity of the bacterial cytolysin intermedilysin is explained by its requirement for the human complement regulator CD59 as the primary receptor. Binding studies using individual domains of intermedilysin mapped the CD59-binding site to domain 4 and swap mutants between human and rabbit (non-intermedilysin-binding) CD59 implicated a short sequence (residues 42-59) in human CD59 in binding intermedilysin. We set out to map more closely the CD59 binding site in intermedilysin. We first looked for regions of homology between domain 4 in intermedilysin and the terminal complement components that bind CD59, C8 and C9. A nine amino acid sequence immediately adjacent the undecapeptide segment in intermedilysin domain 4 matched (5 of 9 identical, 3 of 9 conserved) a sequence in C9. A peptide containing this sequence caused dose-dependent inhibition of intermedilysin-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and rendered erythrocytes more susceptible to complement lysis. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of intermedilysin binding to immobilized CD59 revealed saturable fast-on, fast-off binding and a calculated affinity of 4.9 nM. Substitution of three residues from the putative binding site caused a 5-fold reduction in lytic potency of intermedilysin and reduced affinity for immobilized CD59 by 2.5-fold. The demonstration that a peptide modeled on the CD59-binding site inhibits intermedilysin-mediated haemolysis leads us to suggest that such peptides might be useful in treating infections caused by intermedilysin-producing bacteria.

  12. Receptor-associated protein (RAP) has two high-affinity binding sites for the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP): consequences for the chaperone functions of RAP.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Schar, Christine; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-06-26

    RAP (receptor-associated protein) is a three domain 38 kDa ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-resident protein that is a chaperone for the LRP (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein). Whereas RAP is known to compete for binding of all known LRP ligands, neither the location, the number of binding sites on LRP, nor the domains of RAP involved in binding is known with certainty. We have systematically examined the binding of each of the three RAP domains (D1, D2 and D3) to tandem and triple CRs (complement-like repeats) that span the principal ligand-binding region, cluster II, of LRP. We found that D3 binds with low nanomolar affinity to all (CR)2 species examined. Addition of a third CR domain increases the affinity for D3 slightly. A pH change from 7.4 to 5.5 gave only a 6-fold increase in Kd for D3 at 37 degrees C, whereas temperature change from 22 degrees C to 37 degrees C has a similar small effect on affinity, raising questions about the recently proposed D3-destabilization mechanism of RAP release from LRP. Surprisingly, and in contrast to literature suggestions, D1 and D2 also bind to most (CR)2 and (CR)3 constructs with nanomolar affinity. Although this suggested that there might be three high-affinity binding sites in RAP for LRP, studies with intact RAP showed that only two binding sites are available in the intact chaperone. These findings suggest a new model for RAP to function as a folding chaperone and also for the involvement of YWTD domains in RAP release from LRP in the Golgi.

  13. Domain one of the high affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRI, regulates binding to IgE through its interface with domain two.

    PubMed

    Rigby, L J; Epa, V C; Mackay, G A; Hulett, M D; Sutton, B J; Gould, H J; Hogarth, P M

    2000-03-31

    The high affinity receptor for IgE, FcepsilonRI, binds IgE through the second Ig-like domain of the alpha subunit. The role of the first Ig-like domain is not well understood, but it is required for optimal binding of IgE to FcepsilonRI, either through a minor contact interaction or in a supporting structural capacity. The results reported here demonstrate that domain one of FcepsilonRI plays a major structural role supporting the presentation of the ligand-binding site, by interactions generated within the interdomain interface. Analysis of a series of chimeric receptors and point mutants indicated that specific residues within the A' strand of domain one are crucial to the maintenance of the interdomain interface, and IgE binding. Mutation of the Arg(15) and Phe(17) residues caused loss in ligand binding, and utilizing a homology model of FcepsilonRI-alpha based on the solved structure of FcgammaRIIa, it appears likely that this decrease is brought about by collapse of the interface and consequently the IgE-binding site. In addition discrepancies in results of previous studies using chimeric IgE receptors comprising FcepsilonRIalpha with either FcgammaRIIa or FcgammaRIIIA can be explained by the presence or absence of Arg(15) and its influence on the IgE-binding site. The data presented here suggest that the second domain of FcepsilonRI-alpha is the only domain involved in direct contact with the IgE ligand and that domain one has a structural function of great importance in maintaining the integrity of the interdomain interface and, through it, the ligand-binding site.

  14. Identification of a soluble leptin receptor in crucian carp with different binding affinity to leptin-a and leptin-b.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feifei; Li, Xin; Huang, Saifan; Li, Jiyuan; Guo, Xiaopin; Cao, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Soluble leptin receptor (sLepR) is the main leptin-binding protein in plasma and contributes to activation of circulating leptin. In this study, we identified a sLepR in plasma of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) using a pull-down assay, and the interaction of sLepR with its ligand is confirmed by a cross-linking study. In addition, we found that leptin-a has higher affinity than leptin-b for sLepR. According to our knowledge, this is the first experimental report about the main ligand of sLepR in teleost.

  15. Neuronal acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila: the ARD protein is a component of a high-affinity alpha-bungarotoxin binding complex.

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, P; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I; Betz, H; Gundelfinger, E D

    1988-01-01

    The ard gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a structural homologue of vertebrate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) and is expressed exclusively in nervous tissue. To study the nature of the ARD protein, antibodies were raised against fusion constructs containing two regions of this polypeptide. One segment is putatively extracellular (amino acids 65-212), the other domain is exposed to the cytoplasm (amino acids 305-444). The ARD antisera obtained served to investigate the physical relationship between the ARD protein and alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Btx) binding sites occurring in Drosophila. Two different high-affinity binding sites for [125I]alpha-Btx, a highly potent antagonist of vertebrate muscle AChR, were detected in fly head membranes. Equilibrium binding and kinetic studies revealed Kd values of approximately 0.1 nM (site 1) and approximately 4 nM (site 2). The estimated maximal binding (Bmax) was approximately 240 and 1080 fmol/mg protein respectively. Both sites exhibited a nicotinic-cholinergic pharmacology. Immunoprecipitation experiments with the ARD antisera indicated that the ARD protein is associated with the [125I]alpha-Btx binding site 1 only. These data support the previously postulated hypothesis that the ARD protein is part of an alpha-Btx binding neuronal AChR of Drosophila. Furthermore, they indicate heterogeneity in nicotinic-cholinergic binding sites in the insect nervous system. PMID:3141150

  16. SIGMA RECEPTOR BINDING ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    CHU, UYEN B.; RUOHO, ARNOLD E.

    2016-01-01

    Sigma receptors belong to a class of small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated receptors, of which there are two subtypes: the Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) and the Sigma-2 receptor (S2R). Both S1R and S2R bind to a number of drugs including antipsychotic, haloperidol, and the opioid analgesic, (+)-pentazocine. Sigma receptors are implicated in multiple disease pathologies associated with the nervous system including diseases affecting motor control such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzeimher's disease. This unit describes methods for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R using radioligand-binding assays. In the first section, radioligand saturation binding assay to determine receptor densities and competitive inhibition assays to characterize affinities of novel compounds are presented for S1R using the selective S1R ligand, [3H]-(+)-pentazocine. The second section describes radioligand saturation binding assay and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R using a non-selective S1R and S2R ligand, [3H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([3H]-DTG). PMID:26646191

  17. Discovery of high-affinity ligands of sigma1 receptor, ERG2, and emopamil binding protein by pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Laggner, Christian; Schieferer, Claudia; Fiechtner, Birgit; Poles, Gloria; Hoffmann, Rémy D; Glossmann, Hartmut; Langer, Thierry; Moebius, Fabian F

    2005-07-28

    ERG2, emopamil binding protein (EBP), and sigma-1 receptor (sigma(1)) are enzymes of sterol metabolism and an enzyme-related protein, respectively, that share high affinity for various structurally diverse compounds. To discover novel high-affinity ligands, pharmacophore models were built with Catalyst based upon a series of 23 structurally diverse chemicals exhibiting K(i) values from 10 pM to 100 microM for all three proteins. In virtual screening experiments, we retrieved drugs that were previously reported to bind to one or several of these proteins and also tested 11 new hits experimentally, of which three, among them raloxifene, had affinities for sigma(1) or EBP of <60 nM. When used to search a database of 3525 biochemicals of intermediary metabolism, a slightly modified ERG2 pharmacophore model successfully retrieved 10 substrate candidates among the top 28 hits. Our results indicate that inhibitor-based pharmacophore models for sigma(1), ERG2, and EBP can be used to screen drug and metabolite databases for chemically diverse compounds and putative endogenous ligands.

  18. The low binding affinity of D-serine at the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluD2 can be attributed to the hinge region

    PubMed Central

    Tapken, Daniel; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Leth, Rasmus; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Gerbola, Alexander; Gajhede, Michael; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Olsen, Lars; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are responsible for most of the fast excitatory communication between neurons in our brain. The GluD2 receptor is a puzzling member of the iGluR family: It is involved in synaptic plasticity, plays a role in human diseases, e.g. ataxia, binds glycine and D-serine with low affinity, yet no ligand has been discovered so far that can activate its ion channel. In this study, we show that the hinge region connecting the two subdomains of the GluD2 ligand-binding domain is responsible for the low affinity of D-serine, by analysing GluD2 mutants with electrophysiology, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular dynamics calculations. The hinge region is highly variable among iGluRs and fine-tunes gating activity, suggesting that in GluD2 this region has evolved to only respond to micromolar concentrations of D-serine. PMID:28387240

  19. The contribution of major histocompatibility complex contacts to the affinity and kinetics of T cell receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Lim, Hong-Sheng; Knapp, Berhard; Deane, Charlotte M.; Aleksic, Milos; Dushek, Omer; van der Merwe, P. Anton

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and antigenic peptide in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is a crucial step in T cell activation. The relative contributions of TCR:peptide and TCR:MHC contacts to the overall binding energy remain unclear. This has important implications for our understanding of T cell development and function. In this study we used site directed mutagenesis to estimate the contribution of HLA-A2 side-chains to the binding of four TCRs. Our results show that these TCRs have very different energetic ‘footprints’ on HLA-A2, with no residues contributing to all TCR interactions. The estimated overall contribution of MHC side-chains to the total interaction energy was variable, with lower limits ranging from 11% to 50%. Kinetic analysis suggested a minor and variable contribution of MHC side-chains to the transition state complex, arguing against a two-step mechanism for TCR binding. PMID:27734930

  20. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-17 beta by an estrogen receptor in the liver of the turtle

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.M.; Fehrer, S.; Yu, M.; Liang, L.C.; Press, D.

    1988-06-01

    Specific (3H)estradiol-17 beta ((3H)E2) binding activity (EBA) with characteristics of an estrogen receptor (ER) was demonstrated in cytosols and nuclear extracts of the female turtle, Chrysemys picta. Three different receptor assays (dextran-coated charcoal assay, hydroxylapatite batch procedure, and DNA-cellulose chromatography) were evaluated in terms of their applicability in analyzing large numbers of samples. For the measurement of cytosolic EBA, the hydroxylapatite batch procedure was found to be the most reliable assay. On the other hand, the dextran-coated charcoal assay was found to be the most appropriate method for the measurement of nuclear EBA. Turtle hepatic EBA binds (3H)E2 with high affinity (cytosolic, 17.4 +/- 2.8 X 10(9) M-1; nuclear, 17.7 +/- 1.9 X 10(9) M-1), limited capacity (cytosolic, 133.7 +/- 4.6 fmol/g tissue; nuclear, 81.1 +/- 9.0 fmol/g tissue), and strict steroid specificity. The EBA bound natural estrogens (E2, estrone, estriol) as well as the nonsteroidal estrogen, diethylstilbestrol, but exhibited little affinity for androgens, progesterone, or corticosterone. The turtle hepatic EBA resembled mammalian and avian ERs in terms of binding characteristics; however, unlike mammalian and avian ERs it was shown to be heat-labile. Incubation at 30 degrees caused rapid loss of (3H)E2 binding activity in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions. The exchange between (3H)E2 and the endogenously bound estrogen was slow at 4 and 15 degrees, but the exchange process was facilitated in the presence of the chaotropic salt, NaSCN. Establishment of quantitation methods for both cytosolic and nuclear forms of EBA will enable future investigation of the mechanism and regulation of estrogen action in the liver of this turtle species.

  1. New ligands with affinity for the alpha4beta2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Synthesis, receptor binding, and 3D-QSAR modeling.

    PubMed

    Audouze, Karine; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Olsen, Gunnar M; Ahring, Philip; Jørgensen, Tino Dyhring; Peters, Dan; Liljefors, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    A new series of piperazines, diazepanes, diazocanes, diazabicyclononanes, and diazabicyclodecanes with affinity for the alpha4beta2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were synthesized on the basis of results from a previous computational study. A predictive 3D-QSAR model was developed using the GRID/GOLPE approach (R2 = 0.94, Q2 = 0.83, SDEP = 0.34). The SAR was interpreted in terms of contour maps of the PLS coefficients and in terms of a homology model of the alpha4beta2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The results reveal that hydrogen bonding from both hydrogens on the protonated amine and from the pyridine nitrogen to a water molecule as well as van der Waals interactions between the substituent bearing the protonated amine and the receptor is of importance for ligand affinity. The combination of 3D-QSAR and homology modeling proved successful for the interpretation of structure-affinity relationships as well as the validation of the individual modeling approaches.

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  3. IL-1 binds to high affinity receptors on human osteosarcoma cells and potentiates prostaglandin E2 stimulation of cAMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Rodan, S.B.; Wesolowski, G.; Chin, J.; Limjuco, G.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1990-08-15

    IL-1 is a potent bone resorbing agent. Its mechanism of action is unknown, but the presence of osteoblasts was shown to be necessary for IL-1 stimulation of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This study examines the presence of IL-1R and IL-1 effects in osteoblastic cells from a clonal human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2/B-10. We found that the binding affinity and the number of binding sites increases substantially during the postconfluent stage. Scatchard and curve-fitting analysis revealed one class of high affinity binding sites, with Kd/Ki's of 40 +/- 17 pM (mean +/- SD) for IL-1 alpha (n = 5) and 9 +/- 7 pM for IL-1 beta (n = 5) and 2916 +/- 2438 (n = 6) receptors/cell. Incubation of the cells with 125I-IL-1 alpha (100 pM) at 4 degrees C, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C up to 4 h, revealed internalization of receptor-bound IL-1 alpha. Chemical cross-linking studies showed that the IL-1R in Saos-2/B-10 cells had a molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. To assess the biologic effect of IL-1 in Saos-2/B-10 cells, we determined PGE2 content and adenylate cyclase activity. Although IL-1 had no effect on PGE2 synthesis, both IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta enhanced PGE2 stimulation of adenylate cyclase two- to four-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximal effect for IL-1 alpha was seen at 8 to 10 pM and for IL-1 beta at 0.6 to 1.8 pM. IL-1 did not enhance basal adenylate cyclase or stimulation by parathyroid hormone, isoproterenol, or forskolin. IL-1 enhancement of PGE2-stimulated adenylate cyclase was detected between 1 to 2 h, was maximal at 4 to 5 h, was not prevented by cycloheximide treatment, and was seen in membranes from IL-1 pretreated cells. These data show effects of IL-1 on a human osteoblast-like cell line that are mediated by high affinity receptors. These IL-1 effects could contribute to the biologic action of IL-1 on bone.

  4. A mutation in the first ligand-binding repeat of the human very-low-density lipoprotein receptor results in high-affinity binding of the single V1 module to human rhinovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Nizet, Stephane; Wruss, Juergen; Landstetter, Nathalie; Snyers, Luc; Blaas, Dieter

    2005-12-01

    Minor group human rhinoviruses (HRVs) bind members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family for cell entry. The ligand-binding domains of these membrane proteins are composed of various numbers of direct repeats of about 40 amino acids in length. Residues involved in binding of module 3 (V3) of the very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) to HRV2 have been identified by X-ray crystallography (N. Verdaguer, I. Fita, M. Reithmayer, R. Moser, and D. Blaas, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 11:429-434, 2004). Sequence comparisons of the eight repeats of VLDLR with respect to the residues implicated in the interaction between V3 and HRV2 suggested that (in addition to V3) V1, V2, V5, and V6 also fulfill the requirements for interacting with the virus. Using a highly sensitive binding assay employing phage display, we demonstrate that single modules V2, V3, and V5 indeed bind HRV2. However, V1 does not. A single mutation from threonine 17 to proline converted the nonbinding wild-type form of V1 into a very strong binder. We interpret the dramatic increase in affinity by the generation of a hydrophobic patch between virus and receptor; in the presence of threonine, the contact area might be disturbed. This demonstrates that the interaction between virus and its natural receptors can be strongly enhanced by mutation.

  5. LYR3, a high-affinity LCO-binding protein of Medicago truncatula, interacts with LYK3, a key symbiotic receptor.

    PubMed

    Fliegmann, Judith; Jauneau, Alain; Pichereaux, Carole; Rosenberg, Charles; Gasciolli, Virginie; Timmers, Antonius C J; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Cullimore, Julie; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-01

    LYR3, LYK3, and NFP are lysin motif-containing receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs) from Medicago truncatula, involved in perception of symbiotic lipo-chitooligosaccharide (LCO) signals. Here, we show that LYR3, a high-affinity LCO-binding protein, physically interacts with LYK3, a key player regulating symbiotic interactions. In vitro, LYR3 is phosphorylated by the active kinase domain of LYK3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging/Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM/FRET) experiments in tobacco protoplasts show that the interaction between LYR3 and LYK3 at the plasma membrane is disrupted or inhibited by addition of LCOs. Moreover, LYR3 attenuates the cell death response, provoked by coexpression of NFP and LYK3 in tobacco leaves.

  6. Downstream signaling molecules bind to different phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) peptides of the high affinity IgE receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Kihara, H; Bhattacharyya, S; Sakamoto, H; Appella, E; Siraganian, R P

    1996-11-01

    The cytoplasmic tails of both the beta and gamma subunits of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) contain a consensus sequence termed the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This motif plays a critical role in receptor-mediated signal transduction. Synthetic peptides based on the ITAM sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of FcepsilonRI were used to investigate which proteins associate with these motifs. Tyrosine-phosphorylated beta and gamma ITAM peptides immobilized on beads precipitated Syk, Lyn, Shc, Grb2, and phospholipase C-gamma1 from lysates of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Syk was precipitated predominantly by the tyrosine-diphosphorylated gamma ITAM peptide, but much less by the diphosphorylated beta ITAM peptide or by the monophosphorylated peptides. Phospholipase C-gamma1, Shc, and Grb2 were precipitated only by the diphosphorylated beta ITAM peptide. Non-phosphorylated ITAM peptides did not precipitate these proteins. In membrane binding assays, fusion proteins containing the Src homology 2 domains of phospholipase C-gamma1, Shc, Syk, and Lyn directly bound the tyrosine-phosphorylated ITAM peptides. Although the ITAM sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of FcepsilonRI are similar, once they are tyrosine-phosphorylated they preferentially bind different downstream signaling molecules. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the ITAM of the gamma subunit recruits and activates Syk, whereas the beta subunit may be important for the Ras signaling pathway.

  7. Effects of Midgut-Protein-Preparative and Ligand Binding Procedures on the Toxin Binding Characteristics of BT-R1, a Common High-Affinity Receptor in Manduca sexta for Cry1A Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Timothy P.; Francis, Brian R.; Maaty, Walid S. A.; Bulla, Lee A.

    1998-01-01

    The identity of the physiologically important Cry1A receptor protein(s) in the lepidopteran Manduca sexta has been a matter of dispute due to the multiple proteins which bind the Cry1Ac toxin. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac exhibit essentially identical toxicities toward M. sexta larvae and show a high degree of sequence and presumed structural identities. These similarities make it likely that there is a common mechanism of toxicity in these lepidopteran-specific toxins in terms of both mode of action and the receptor proteins through which these toxins exert their lepidopteran-specific toxicity. Investigators in our laboratory previously demonstrated that the cloned 210-kDa glycoprotein BT-R1 binds all three Cry1A toxins (T. P. Keeton and L. A. Bulla, Jr., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3419–3425, 1997). This protein remains a common binding protein even after being subjected to various midgut membrane preparation and processing protocols. The method used to isolate proteins from the M. sexta larval midgut in no significant way affects the results of ligand binding and vacuum blotting experiments, and we have been unable to detect specific, high-affinity binding of any Cry1A toxin to Cry1Ac binding proteins other than BT-R1. Alterations in blot substrate and blocking, hybridization, and washing buffers support these conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate that in M. sexta the cadherin-like BT-R1 protein is a common high-affinity receptor protein for the Cry1A family of toxins. PMID:9603829

  8. Prediction of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor GluN1-Ligand Binding Affinity by a Novel SVM-Pose/SVM-Score Combinatorial Ensemble Docking Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Max K.; Syu, Ren-Guei; Ding, Yi-Lung; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is a potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disorders. A novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme using ligand and protein conformation ensembles and customized support vector machine (SVM)-based models to select the docked pose and to predict the docking score was generated for predicting the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity. The predicted root mean square deviation (RMSD) values in pose by SVM-Pose models were found to be in good agreement with the observed values (n = 30, r2 = 0.928–0.988,  = 0.894–0.954, RMSE = 0.002–0.412, s = 0.001–0.214), and the predicted pKi values by SVM-Score were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for the training samples (n = 24, r2 = 0.967,  = 0.899, RMSE = 0.295, s = 0.170) and test samples (n = 13, q2 = 0.894, RMSE = 0.437, s = 0.202). When subjected to various statistical validations, the developed SVM-Pose and SVM-Score models consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test asserted the predictivity of this novel docking scheme. Collectively, this accurate novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme can be used to predict the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity for facilitating drug discovery.

  9. Prediction of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor GluN1-Ligand Binding Affinity by a Novel SVM-Pose/SVM-Score Combinatorial Ensemble Docking Scheme.

    PubMed

    Leong, Max K; Syu, Ren-Guei; Ding, Yi-Lung; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-06

    The glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is a potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disorders. A novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme using ligand and protein conformation ensembles and customized support vector machine (SVM)-based models to select the docked pose and to predict the docking score was generated for predicting the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity. The predicted root mean square deviation (RMSD) values in pose by SVM-Pose models were found to be in good agreement with the observed values (n = 30, r(2) = 0.928-0.988,  = 0.894-0.954, RMSE = 0.002-0.412, s = 0.001-0.214), and the predicted pKi values by SVM-Score were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for the training samples (n = 24, r(2) = 0.967,  = 0.899, RMSE = 0.295, s = 0.170) and test samples (n = 13, q(2) = 0.894, RMSE = 0.437, s = 0.202). When subjected to various statistical validations, the developed SVM-Pose and SVM-Score models consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test asserted the predictivity of this novel docking scheme. Collectively, this accurate novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme can be used to predict the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity for facilitating drug discovery.

  10. Prediction of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor GluN1-Ligand Binding Affinity by a Novel SVM-Pose/SVM-Score Combinatorial Ensemble Docking Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Max K.; Syu, Ren-Guei; Ding, Yi-Lung; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is a potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disorders. A novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme using ligand and protein conformation ensembles and customized support vector machine (SVM)-based models to select the docked pose and to predict the docking score was generated for predicting the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity. The predicted root mean square deviation (RMSD) values in pose by SVM-Pose models were found to be in good agreement with the observed values (n = 30, r2 = 0.928–0.988,  = 0.894–0.954, RMSE = 0.002–0.412, s = 0.001–0.214), and the predicted pKi values by SVM-Score were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for the training samples (n = 24, r2 = 0.967,  = 0.899, RMSE = 0.295, s = 0.170) and test samples (n = 13, q2 = 0.894, RMSE = 0.437, s = 0.202). When subjected to various statistical validations, the developed SVM-Pose and SVM-Score models consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test asserted the predictivity of this novel docking scheme. Collectively, this accurate novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme can be used to predict the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity for facilitating drug discovery. PMID:28059133

  11. Ligand-Binding Affinity at the Insulin Receptor Isoform-A and Subsequent IR-A Tyrosine Phosphorylation Kinetics are Important Determinants of Mitogenic Biological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Harinda; Forbes, Briony E.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A) arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signaling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival, and migration by activating some unique signaling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signaling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signaling (MAPK and Akt) and receptor internalization rates (related to mitogenic signaling). We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic [(His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51) IGF-I, qIGF-I] or metabolic (S597 peptide) biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signaling through the IR-A. The threefold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316, and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide, it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I. PMID:26217307

  12. The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol and curcumin selectively bind human CB1 cannabinoid receptors with nanomolar affinities and function as antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Levi, Mark S; Prather, Paul L

    2009-07-01

    The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol [5-[(1E)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethenyl]-1,3-benzenediol; found in red wine] and curcumin [1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione] (found in curry powders) exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects via poorly defined mechanisms. It is interesting that cannabinoids, derived from the marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa), produce similar protective effects via CB1 and CB2 receptors. We examined whether trans-resveratrol, curcumin, and ASC-J9 [1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxy-1E,4E,6E-heptatriene-3-one] (a curcumin analog) act as ligands at cannabinoid receptors. All three bind to human (h) CB1 and mouse CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinities, displaying only micromolar affinities for hCB2 receptors. Characteristic of inverse agonists, the polyphenols inhibit basal G-protein activity in membranes prepared from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-hCB1 cells or mouse brain that is reversed by a neutral CB1 antagonist. Furthermore, they competitively antagonize G-protein activation produced by a CB1 agonist. In intact CHO-hCB1 cells, the polyphenols act as neutral antagonists, producing no effect when tested alone, whereas competitively antagonizing CB1 agonist mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Confirming their neutral antagonist profile in cells, the polyphenols similarly attenuate stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity produced by a CB1 inverse agonist. In mice, the polyphenols dose-dependently reverse acute hypothermia produced by a CB1 agonist. Upon repeated administration, the polyphenols also reduce body weight in mice similar to that produced by a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. Finally, trans-resveratrol and curcumin share common structural motifs with other known cannabinoid receptor ligands. Collectively, we suggest that trans-resveratrol and curcumin act as antagonists/inverse agonists at CB1 receptors at dietary relevant concentrations. Therefore, these polyphenols and their

  13. Regulation of RNA-binding proteins affinity to export receptors enables the nuclear basket proteins to distinguish and retain aberrant mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, M.; Mofrad, M. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Export of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) into the cytoplasm is a fundamental step in gene regulation processes, which is meticulously quality controlled by highly efficient mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Yet, it remains unclear how the aberrant mRNAs are recognized and retained inside the nucleus. Using a new modelling approach for complex systems, namely the agent-based modelling (ABM) approach, we develop a minimal model of the mRNA quality control (QC) mechanism. Our results demonstrate that regulation of the affinity of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) to export receptors along with the weak interaction between the nuclear basket protein (Mlp1 or Tpr) and RBPs are the minimum requirements to distinguish and retain aberrant mRNAs. Our results show that the affinity between Tpr and RBPs is optimized to maximize the retention of aberrant mRNAs. In addition, we demonstrate how the length of mRNA affects the QC process. Since longer mRNAs spend more time in the nuclear basket to form a compact conformation and initiate their export, nuclear basket proteins could more easily capture and retain them inside the nucleus. PMID:27805000

  14. Receptor crosstalk protein, calcyon, regulates affinity state of dopamine D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Roberts, A; Zhang, L; Koh, P O; Lezcano, N; Bergson, C

    2001-09-21

    The recently cloned protein, calcyon, potentiates crosstalk between G(s)-coupled dopamine D1 receptors and heterologous G(q/11)-coupled receptors allowing dopamine D1 receptors to stimulate intracellular Ca(2+) release, in addition to cAMP production. This crosstalk also requires the participating G(q/11)-coupled receptors to be primed by their agonists. We examined the ability of calcyon and priming to regulate the affinity of dopamine D1 receptors for its ligands. Receptor binding assays were performed on HEK293 cell membrane preparations expressing dopamine D1 receptors either alone or in combination with calcyon. Co-expression of dopamine D1 receptor and calcyon affected neither the affinity of this receptor for antagonists nor the affinity of agonist binding to this receptor high and low-affinity states. However, the presence of calcyon dramatically decreased the proportion of the high-affinity dopamine D1 receptor agonist binding sites. This decrease was reversed by carbachol, which primes the receptor crosstalk by stimulating endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic receptors. Our findings suggest that calcyon regulates the ability of dopamine D1 receptors to achieve the high-affinity state for agonists, in a manner that depends on priming of receptor crosstalk.

  15. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  16. Bean peptides have higher in silico binding affinities than ezetimibe for the N-terminal domain of cholesterol receptor Niemann-Pick C1 Like-1.

    PubMed

    Real Hernandez, Luis M; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2017-04-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 like-1 (NPC1L1) mediates cholesterol absorption at the apical membrane of enterocytes through a yet unknown mechanism. Bean, pea, and lentil proteins are naturally hydrolyzed during digestion to produce peptides. The potential for pulse peptides to have high binding affinities for NPC1L1 has not been determined. In this study , in silico binding affinities and interactions were determined between the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1 and 14 pulse peptides (5≥ amino acids) derived through pepsin-pancreatin digestion. Peptides were docked in triplicate to the N-terminal domain using docking program AutoDock Vina, and results were compared to those of ezetimibe, a prescribed NPC1L1 inhibitor. Three black bean peptides (-7.2 to -7.0kcal/mol) and the cowpea bean dipeptide Lys-Asp (-7.0kcal/mol) had higher binding affinities than ezetimibe (-6.6kcal/mol) for the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1. Lentil and pea peptides studied did not have high binding affinities. The common bean peptide Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Thr (-7.2kcal/mol), which can be produced from black or navy bean proteins, had the highest binding affinity. Ezetimibe and peptides with high binding affinities for the N-terminal domain are expected to interact at different locations of the N-terminal domain. All high affinity black bean peptides are expected to have van der Waals interactions with SER130, PHE136, and LEU236 and a conventional hydrogen bond with GLU238 of NPC1L1. Due to their high affinity for the N-terminal domain of NPC1L1, black and cowpea bean peptides produced in the digestive track have the potential to disrupt interactions between NPC1L1 and membrane proteins that lead to cholesterol absorption.

  17. In silico prediction of estrogen receptor subtype binding affinity and selectivity using statistical methods and molecular docking with 2-arylnaphthalenes and 2-arylquinolines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhizhong; Li, Yan; Ai, Chunzhi; Wang, Yonghua

    2010-09-20

    Over the years development of selective estrogen receptor (ER) ligands has been of great concern to researchers involved in the chemistry and pharmacology of anticancer drugs, resulting in numerous synthesized selective ER subtype inhibitors. In this work, a data set of 82 ER ligands with ERα and ERβ inhibitory activities was built, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods based on the two linear (multiple linear regression, MLR, partial least squares regression, PLSR) and a nonlinear statistical method (Bayesian regularized neural network, BRNN) were applied to investigate the potential relationship of molecular structural features related to the activity and selectivity of these ligands. For ERα and ERβ, the performances of the MLR and PLSR models are superior to the BRNN model, giving more reasonable statistical properties (ERα: for MLR, R(tr) (2) = 0.72, Q(te) (2) = 0.63; for PLSR, R(tr) (2) = 0.92, Q(te) (2) = 0.84. ERβ: for MLR, R(tr) (2) = 0.75, Q(te) (2) = 0.75; for PLSR, R(tr) (2) = 0.98, Q(te) (2) = 0.80). The MLR method is also more powerful than other two methods for generating the subtype selectivity models, resulting in R(tr) (2) = 0.74 and Q(te) (2) = 0.80. In addition, the molecular docking method was also used to explore the possible binding modes of the ligands and a relationship between the 3D-binding modes and the 2D-molecular structural features of ligands was further explored. The results show that the binding affinity strength for both ERα and ERβ is more correlated with the atom fragment type, polarity, electronegativites and hydrophobicity. The substitutent in position 8 of the naphthalene or the quinoline plane and the space orientation of these two planes contribute the most to the subtype selectivity on the basis of similar hydrogen bond interactions between binding ligands and both ER subtypes. The QSAR models built together with the docking procedure should be of great advantage for screening and

  18. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: MODEL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The training set used to derive a common reactivity pattern (COREPA) model for estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinity in Model I (see Abstract I in this series) was extended to include 47 rat estrogen receptor (rER) relative binding affinity (RBA) measurements in addition to the...

  19. Combining selectivity and affinity predictions using an integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach: An alternative tool to discriminate between the human adenosine A(2A) and A(3) receptor pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine antagonists binding sites.

    PubMed

    Michielan, Lisa; Bolcato, Chiara; Federico, Stephanie; Cacciari, Barbara; Bacilieri, Magdalena; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Kachler, Sonja; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cardin, Riccardo; Sperduti, Alessandro; Spalluto, Giampiero; Moro, Stefano

    2009-07-15

    G Protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) selectivity is an important aspect of drug discovery process, and distinguishing between related receptor subtypes is often the key to therapeutic success. Nowadays, very few valuable computational tools are available for the prediction of receptor subtypes selectivity. In the present study, we present an alternative application of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Support Vector Regression (SVR) methodologies to simultaneously describe both A(2A)R versus A(3)R subtypes selectivity profile and the corresponding receptor binding affinities. We have implemented an integrated application of SVM-SVR approach, based on the use of our recently reported autocorrelated molecular descriptors encoding for the Molecular Electrostatic Potential (autoMEP), to simultaneously discriminate A(2A)R versus A(3)R antagonists and to predict their binding affinity to the corresponding receptor subtype of a large dataset of known pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine analogs. To validate our approach, we have synthetized 51 new pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine derivatives anticipating both A(2A)R/A(3)R subtypes selectivity and receptor binding affinity profiles.

  20. Computer-aided structure-affinity relationships in a set of piperazine and 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane derivatives binding to the μ-opioid receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlocco, Daniela; Cignarella, Giorgio; Greco, Giovanni; Novellino, Ettore

    1993-10-01

    Molecular modeling studies were carried out on a set of piperazine and 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane derivatives with the aim to highlight the main factors modulating their affinity for the μ-opioid receptor. Structure-affinity relationships were developed with the aid of molecular mechanics and semiempirical quantum-mechanics methods. According to our proposed pharmacodynamic model, the binding to the μ-receptor is promoted by the following physico-chemical features: the presence of hydrocarbon fragments on the nitrogen ring frame capable of interacting with one of two hypothesized hydrophobic receptor pockets; a `correct' orientation of an N-propionyl side chain so as to avoid a sterically hindered region of the receptor; the possibility of accepting a hydrogen bond from a receptor site complementary to the morphine phenol oxygen.

  1. Site-specific conjugation of a lanthanide chelator and its effects on the chemical synthesis and receptor binding affinity of human relaxin-2 hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A.D.; Belgi, Alessia; Chan, Linda J.; Nair, Vinojini B.; Wade, John D.; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mono-Eu-DTPA conjugated peptide ligand, Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2, has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The choice of a site for incorporation of a chelator is critical. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeled peptide retains full activity at the RXFP1 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is markedly cheaper to produce and easier to use than radioactive probes. -- Abstract: Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) is a popular chelator agent for enabling the labeling of peptides for their use in structure-activity relationship study and biodistribution analysis. Solid phase peptide synthesis was employed to couple this commercially available chelator at the N-terminus of either the A-chain or B-chain of H2 relaxin. The coupling of the DTPA chelator at the N-terminus of the B-chain and subsequent loading of a lanthanide (europium) ion into the chelator led to a labeled peptide (Eu-DTPA-(B)-H2) in low yield and having very poor water solubility. On the other hand, coupling of the DTPA and loading of Eu at the N-terminus of the A-chain led to a water-soluble peptide (Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2) with a significantly improved final yield. The conjugation of the DTPA chelator at the N-terminus of the A-chain did not have any impact on the secondary structure of the peptide determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). On the other hand, it was not possible to determine the secondary structure of Eu-DTPA-(B)-H2 because of its insolubility in phosphate buffer. The B-chain labeled peptide Eu-DTPA-(B)-H2 required solubilization in DMSO prior to carrying out binding assays, and showed lower affinity for binding to H2 relaxin receptor, RXFP1, compared to the water-soluble A-chain labeled peptide Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2. The mono-Eu-DTPA labeled A-chain peptide, Eu-DTPA-(A)-H2, thus can be used as a valuable probe to study ligand-receptor interactions of therapeutically important H2 relaxin analogs. Our results show that it is critical to

  2. Chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of homogeneous glycoforms of antibody Fc domain. Presence of a bisecting sugar moiety enhances the affinity of Fc to FcγIIIa receptor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guozhang; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Qiang; Li, Cishan; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2011-11-23

    Structurally well-defined IgG-Fc glycoforms are highly demanded for understanding the effects of glycosylation on an antibody's effector functions. We report in this paper chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of an array of homogeneous IgG-Fc glycoforms. The chemoenzymatic approach consists of the chemical synthesis of defined N-glycan oxazolines as donor substrates, the expression of the Fc domain in a CHO cell line in the presence of an α-mannosidase inhibitor kifunensine, and an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the deglycosylated Fc domain (GlcNAc-Fc homodimer) with the synthetic glycan oxazolines. The enzyme from Arthrobacter protophormiae (Endo-A) was found to be remarkably efficient to take various modified N-glycan core oxazolines, including the bisecting sugar-containing derivatives, for Fc glycosylation remodeling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding homogeneous Fc glycoforms. Nevertheless, neither Endo-A nor the Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants (EndoM-N175A and EndoM-N175Q) were able to transfer full-length complex-type N-glycan to the Fc domain, implicating the limitations of these two enzymes in Fc glycosylation remodeling. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding studies with the synthetic IgG-Fc glycoforms unambiguously proved that the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc moiety could significantly enhance the binding of Fc to FcγRIIIa, the activating Fcγ receptor, independent of Fc core-fucosylation. Interestingly, the Fc glycoforms carrying an unusual bisecting sugar moiety such as a mannose or a LacNAc moiety also demonstrated enhanced affinity to FcγRIIIa. On the orther hand, the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc or core-fucosylation had little effect on the affinity of Fc to the inhibitory Fcγ receptor, FcγRIIb. Our experimental data also showed that the α-linked mannose residues in the pentasaccharide Man3GlcNAc2 core was essential to maintain a high affinity of Fc to both FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIb. The

  3. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis and Fcγ Receptor Binding of Homogeneous Glycoforms of Antibody Fc Domain. Presence of a Bisecting Sugar Moiety Enhances the Affinity of Fc to FcγIIIa Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guozhang; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Qiang; Li, Cishan; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2011-01-01

    Structurally well-defined IgG-Fc glycoforms are highly demanded for understanding the effects of glycosylation on antibody’s effector functions. We report in this paper chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of an array of homogeneous IgG-Fc glycoforms. The chemoenzymatic approach consists of the chemical synthesis of defined N-glycan oxazolines as donor substratess, the expression of the Fc domain in a CHO cell line in the presence of an α-mannosidase inhibitor kifunensine, and an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the deglycosylated Fc domain (GlcNAc-Fc homodimer) with the synthetic glycan oxazolines. The enzyme from Arthrobacter protophormiae (Endo-A) was found to be remarkably efficient to take various modified N-glycan core oxazolines, including the bisecting sugar-containing derivatives, for Fc glycosylation remodeling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding homogeneous Fc glycoforms. Nevertheless, neither Endo-A, nor the Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants (EndoM-N175A and EndoM-N175Q), was able to transfer full-length complex-type N-glycan to the Fc domain, implicating the limitations of these two enzymes in Fc glycosylation remodeling. SPR binding studies with the synthetic IgG-Fc glycoforms unambiguously proved that the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc moiety could significantly enhance the binding of Fc to FcγRIIIa, the activating Fcγ receptor, independent of Fc core-fucosylation. Interestingly, the Fc glycoforms carrying an unusual bisecting sugar moiety such as a mannose or a LacNAc moiety also demonstrated enhanced affinity to FcγRIIIa. On the orther hand, the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc or core fucosylation had little effect on the affinity of Fc to the inhibitory Fcγ receptor, FcγRIIb. Our experimental data also showed that the α-linked mannose residues in the pentasaccharide Man3GlcNAc2 core was essential to maintain a high-affinity of Fc to both FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIb. The synthetic homogeneous Fc

  4. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: A COMPARISON OF THREE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative analysis of how three COREPA models for ER binding affinity performed when used to predict potential estrogen receptor (ER) ligands is presented. Models I and II were developed based on training sets of 232 and 279 rat ER binding affinity measurements, respectively....

  5. High Affinity Heme Binding to a Heme Regulatory Motif on the Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbβ Leads to Its Degradation and Indirectly Regulates Its Interaction with Nuclear Receptor Corepressor.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Gupta, Nirupama; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2016-01-29

    Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ are heme-binding nuclear receptors (NR) that repress the transcription of genes involved in regulating metabolism, inflammation, and the circadian clock. Previous gene expression and co-immunoprecipitation studies led to a model in which heme binding to Rev-erbα recruits nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) into an active repressor complex. However, in contradiction, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that heme decreases the affinity of the ligand-binding domain of Rev-erb NRs for NCoR1 peptides. One explanation for this discrepancy is that the ligand-binding domain and NCoR1 peptides used for in vitro studies cannot replicate the key features of the full-length proteins used in cellular studies. However, the combined in vitro and cellular results described here demonstrate that heme does not directly promote interactions between full-length Rev-erbβ (FLRev-erbβ) and an NCoR1 construct encompassing all three NR interaction domains. NCoR1 tightly binds both apo- and heme-replete FLRev-erbβ·DNA complexes; furthermore, heme, at high concentrations, destabilizes the FLRev-erbβ·NCoR1 complex. The interaction between FLRev-erbβ and NCoR1 as well as Rev-erbβ repression at the Bmal1 promoter appear to be modulated by another cellular factor(s), at least one of which is related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our studies suggest that heme is involved in regulating the degradation of Rev-erbβ in a manner consistent with its role in circadian rhythm maintenance. Finally, the very slow rate constant (10(-6) s(-1)) of heme dissociation from Rev-erbβ rules out a prior proposal that Rev-erbβ acts as an intracellular heme sensor.

  6. High Affinity Heme Binding to a Heme Regulatory Motif on the Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbβ Leads to Its Degradation and Indirectly Regulates Its Interaction with Nuclear Receptor Corepressor*

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Gupta, Nirupama; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ are heme-binding nuclear receptors (NR) that repress the transcription of genes involved in regulating metabolism, inflammation, and the circadian clock. Previous gene expression and co-immunoprecipitation studies led to a model in which heme binding to Rev-erbα recruits nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) into an active repressor complex. However, in contradiction, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that heme decreases the affinity of the ligand-binding domain of Rev-erb NRs for NCoR1 peptides. One explanation for this discrepancy is that the ligand-binding domain and NCoR1 peptides used for in vitro studies cannot replicate the key features of the full-length proteins used in cellular studies. However, the combined in vitro and cellular results described here demonstrate that heme does not directly promote interactions between full-length Rev-erbβ (FLRev-erbβ) and an NCoR1 construct encompassing all three NR interaction domains. NCoR1 tightly binds both apo- and heme-replete FLRev-erbβ·DNA complexes; furthermore, heme, at high concentrations, destabilizes the FLRev-erbβ·NCoR1 complex. The interaction between FLRev-erbβ and NCoR1 as well as Rev-erbβ repression at the Bmal1 promoter appear to be modulated by another cellular factor(s), at least one of which is related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our studies suggest that heme is involved in regulating the degradation of Rev-erbβ in a manner consistent with its role in circadian rhythm maintenance. Finally, the very slow rate constant (10−6 s−1) of heme dissociation from Rev-erbβ rules out a prior proposal that Rev-erbβ acts as an intracellular heme sensor. PMID:26670607

  7. The most effective influence of 17-(3-ethoxypropyl) substituent on the binding affinity and the agonistic activity in KNT-127 derivatives, δ opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Toru; Ida, Yoshihiro; Iihara, Yusuke; Nakajima, Ryo; Hirayama, Shigeto; Iwai, Takashi; Fujii, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the structure-activity relationship of KNT-127 (opioid δ agonist) derivatives with various 17-substituents which are different in length and size. The 17-substituent in KNT-127 derivatives exerted a great influence on the affinity and agonistic activity for the δ receptor. While the compounds with electron-donating 17-substituents showed higher affinities for the δ receptor than those with electron-withdrawing groups, KNT-127 derivatives with 17-fluoroalkyl groups (the high electron-withdrawing groups) showed high selectivities for the δ receptor among evaluated compounds. In addition, the basicity of nitrogen as well as the structure of the 17-N substituent such as the length and configuration at an asymmetric carbon atom contributed to agonist properties for the δ receptor. Thus, the analog with a 17-(3-ethoxypropyl) group showed the best selectively and potent agonistic activity for the δ receptor among KNT-127 derivatives. These findings should be useful for designing novel δ selective agonists.

  8. High affinity specific (/sup 3/H)(/sup +/)PN 200-110 binding to dihydropyridine receptors associated with calcium channels in rat cerebral cortex and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.R.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1984-08-13

    The binding properties of the 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist, (/sup 3/H)(/sup +/)PN 200-110, were studied in rat cerebral cortical and cardiac homogenates (37/sup 0/C, Krebs phosphate buffer). Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)(/sup +/)PN 200-110 was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity (K/sub d/ values are 35 and 64 pM for the cerebral cortex and heart, respectively). In parallel studies with (/sup 3/H)(/sup +/)PN 200-110, the dissocation constant of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine was 10-12 times higher. Substituted dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists and agonists competively inhibited specific (/sup 3/H)(/sup +/)PN 200-110 binding, but d-cis diltiazem enhanced and verapamil incompletely inhibited (/sup 3/H)(/sup +/)PN 200-110 binding in both the cerebral cortex and the heart. The effects of diltiazem and verapamil on

  9. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  10. Affinity Labeling of Membrane Receptors Using Tissue-Penetrating Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Franklin C.; Boja, John; Ho, Beng; Kuhar, Michael J.; Wong, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling, a useful in vivo biochemical tool, is limited when applied in vivo because of the poor tissue penetration by ultraviolet (UV) photons. This study investigates affinity labeling using tissue-penetrating radiation to overcome the tissue attenuation and irreversibly label membrane receptor proteins. Using X-ray (115 kVp) at low doses (<50 cGy or Rad), specific and irreversible binding was found on striatal dopamine transporters with 3 photoaffinity ligands for dopamine transporters, to different extents. Upon X-ray exposure (115 kVp), RTI-38 and RTI-78 ligands showed irreversible and specific binding to the dopamine transporter similar to those seen with UV exposure under other conditions. Similarly, gamma rays at higher energy (662 keV) also affect irreversible binding of photoreactive ligands to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (by PK14105) and to the dopamine (D2) membrane receptors (by azidoclebopride), respectively. This study reports that X-ray and gamma rays induced affinity labeling of membrane receptors in a manner similar to UV with photoreactive ligands of the dopamine transporter, D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBDZR). It may provide specific noninvasive irreversible block or stimulation of a receptor using tissue-penetrating radiation targeting selected anatomic sites. PMID:23936811

  11. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  12. High-affinity carbamate analogues of morphinan at opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2007-03-15

    A series of carbamate analogues were synthesized from levorphanol (1a), cyclorphan (2a) or butorphan (3a) and evaluated in vitro for their binding affinity at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Functional activities of these compounds were measured in the [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay. Phenyl carbamate derivatives 2d and 3d showed the highest binding affinity for kappa receptor (K(i)=0.046 and 0.051 nM) and for mu receptor (K(i)=0.11 and 0.12 nM). Compound 1c showed the highest mu selectivity. The preliminary assay for agonist and antagonist properties of these ligands in stimulating [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding mediated by the kappa opioid receptor illustrated that all of these ligands were kappa agonists. At the mu receptor, compounds 1b, 1c, 2b, and 3b were agonists, while compounds 2c-e and 3c-e were mu agonists/antagonists.

  13. Ganglioside embedded in reconstituted lipoprotein binds cholera toxin with elevated affinity.

    PubMed

    Bricarello, Daniel A; Mills, Emily J; Petrlova, Jitka; Voss, John C; Parikh, Atul N

    2010-09-01

    The ability to exogenously present cell-surface receptors in high-affinity conformations in a synthetic system offers an opportunity to provide host cells with protection from pathogenic toxins. This strategy requires improvement of the synthetic receptor binding affinity against its native counterpart, particularly with polyvalent toxins where clustering of membrane receptors can hinder binding. Here we demonstrate that reconstituted lipoprotein, nanometer-sized discoidal lipid bilayers bounded by apolipoprotein and functionalized by incorporation of pathogen receptors, provides a means to enhance toxin-receptor binding through molecular-level control over the receptor microenvironment (specifically, its rigidity, composition, and heterogeneity). Using a Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based assay, we found that reconstituted lipoprotein incorporating low concentrations of ganglioside monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) binds polymeric cholera toxin with significantly higher affinity than liposomes or supported lipid bilayers, most likely a result of the enhanced control over receptor clustering provided by the lipoprotein platform. Using wide-area epifluorescence, we found that this enhanced binding capacity can be effectively utilized to divert cholera toxin away from populations of healthy mammalian cells. In summary, we found that reconstitutions of high-density lipoprotein can be engineered to include specific pathogen receptors; that their pathogen binding affinity is altered, presumably due to attenuation of receptor aggregation; and that these assemblies are effective at protecting cells from biological toxins.

  14. Sigma Receptor Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2015-12-08

    Sigma receptors, both Sigma-1(S1R) and Sigma-2 (S2R), are small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated sites. A number of drugs bind to sigma receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol and (+)-pentazocine, an opioid analgesic. Sigma receptors are implicated in many central nervous system disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease and conditions associated with motor control, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Described in this unit are radioligand binding assays used for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R. Methods detailed include a radioligand saturation binding assay for defining receptor densities and a competitive inhibition binding assay employing [³H]-(+)-pentazocine for identifying and characterizing novel ligands that interact with S1R. Procedures using [³H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([³H]-DTG), a nonselective sigma receptor ligand, are described for conducting a saturation binding and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R site. These protocols are of value in drug discovery in identifying new sigma ligands and in the characterization of these receptors.

  15. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  16. Comparative analysis of binding affinities to epidermal growth factor receptor of monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Ledón, N; Casacó, A; Casanova, E; Beausoleil, I

    2011-07-01

    Although pharmaco/toxicological studies have always been conducted in pharmacologically relevant species in which the test material is pharmacologically active, the very specificity of many biopharmaceuticals could present challenges in the identification of a relevant species for pharmaco/toxicological studies. Alternative approaches may improve the predictive value of preclinical assessments of species-specific biopharmaceuticals. This could lead to improved decision-making, reduce the number of experimental animals by eliminating non-relevant studies, and decrease the time and cost involved in the drug development process. As an alternative to utilizing traditional animal models, this study investigated the activity of human EGF and the anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using the placenta microsomal fraction of different experimental animals. Ligand-receptor binding curves were obtained from the different experimental animal models, and binding constants were calculated based on the Scatchard plots. The constants for human and monkey EGF receptor expressed on the placental extract showed a K(a)<10(-8)M, while rabbits, mice and rats showed a K(a)>10(-8)M. The K(a) values obtained from animal placentas show that Macaca fascicularis and Cercopitecus aethiops monkeys are relevant species for studying the pharmaco/toxicological properties of nimotuzumab and cetuximab.

  17. High affinity human IFN-gamma-binding capacity is encoded by a single receptor gene located in proximity to c-ros on human chromosome region 6q16 to 6q22.

    PubMed

    Pfizenmaier, K; Wiegmann, K; Scheurich, P; Krönke, M; Merlin, G; Aguet, M; Knowles, B B; Ucer, U

    1988-08-01

    We have used human-rodent somatic cell hybrids to investigate the regional localization of the IFN-gamma R gene on human chromosome 6 and studied functional and antigenic characteristics of the expressed IFN-gamma R by Scatchard analyses of 125I-IFN-gamma binding and binding of an anti-receptor mAb (A6C5). The data obtained revealed coordinate expression of IFN-gamma- and A6C5-binding capacity as well as competition in binding to chromosome 6-positive hybrids and normal cells, indicating that the A6C5-defined protein is by itself capable of high affinity IFN-gamma binding and, thus, is likely to constitute the major IFN-gamma R protein of distinct cell types. The receptor gene could be allocated to region 6q16 to 6q22, which also contains the c-ros oncogene. Genetic linkage of the IFN-gamma R gene to an oncogene located in a region of non-random chromosomal aberrations may have a causal relationship to the deregulated IFN-gamma R expression in several malignancies.

  18. In vitro binding affinities of a series of flavonoids for μ-opioid receptors. Antinociceptive effect of the synthetic flavonoid 3,3-dibromoflavanone in mice.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Josefina; Wasowski, Cristina; Loscalzo, Leonardo M; Marder, Mariel

    2013-09-01

    The pharmacotherapy for the treatment of pain is an active area of investigation. There are effective drugs to treat this problem, but there is also a need to find alternative treatments free of undesirable side effects. In the present work the capacity of a series of flavonoids to bind to the μ opioid receptor was evaluated. The most active compound, 3,3-dibromoflavanone (31), a synthetic flavonoid, presented a significant inhibition of the binding of the selective μ opioid ligand [(3)H]DAMGO, with a Ki of 0.846 ± 0.263 μM. Flavanone 31 was further synthesized using a simple and cheap procedure with good yield. Its in vivo effects in mice, after acute treatments, were studied using antinociceptive and behavioral assays. It showed no sedative, anxiolytic, motor incoordination effects or inhibition of the gastrointestinal transit in mice at the doses tested. It evidenced antinociceptive activity on the acetic acid-induced nociception, hot plate and formalin tests (at 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). The results showed that the 5-HT2 receptor and the adrenoceptors seem unlikely to be involved in its antinociceptive effects. Naltrexone, a nonselective opioid receptors antagonist, totally blocked compound 31 antinociceptive effects on the hot plate test, but naltrindole (δ opioid antagonist) and nor-binaltorphimine (κ opioid antagonist) did not. These findings demonstrated that 3,3-dibromoflavanone (31), at doses that did not interfere with the motor performance, exerted clear dose dependent antinociception when assessed in the chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice and it seems that its action is related to the activation of the μ opioid receptor.

  19. An evaluation of the role of antiestrogen-binding sites in mediating the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens: studies using t-butylphenoxyethyl diethylamine, a compound lacking affinity for the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Y Y; Simpson, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    1985-08-01

    Tert-butylphenoxyethyl diethylamine (BPEA), a compound synthesized by us, was designed to incorporate features important in binding to antiestrogen-binding sites (AEBS) while lacking features important in binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). With this compound, we have addressed the question of the role of AEBS in mediating the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens. BPEA has an affinity for AEBS 6% that of tamoxifen and an affinity for ER less than 0.0003% that of estradiol. BPEA (10(-11)-10(-6) M) had no effect on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and no effect on inhibition of the growth of MCF-7 cells by different concentrations of the antiestrogen tamoxifen. In addition, BPEA (even at doses of 1 mg/day X 50 g rat) exhibited no uterotropic or antiuterotropic activity in immature rats and had no influence on the agonistic or antagonistic activity of varying concentrations of tamoxifen on uterine weight. Hence, we conclude that occupancy of AEBS, at least by BPEA, does not modulate growth of the uterus or breast cancer cells and does not influence the potency of tamoxifen as an antiestrogen. These findings raise serious doubts about the role of the AEBS in mediating directly the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens.

  20. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  1. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenoids from Salvia splendens and evaluation of Opioid Receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianfranco; Savona, Giuseppe; Rodríguez, Benjamín; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2008-12-20

    Salvinorin A (1), a neoclerodane diterpene from the hallucinogenic mint Salvia divinorum, is the only known non-nitrogenous and specific kappa-opioid agonist. Several structural congeners of 1 isolated from Salvia splendens (2 - 8) together with a series of semisynthetic derivatives (9 - 24), some of which possess a pyrazoline structural moiety (9, 19 - 22), have been tested for affinity at human mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. None of these compounds showed high affinity binding to these receptors. However, 10 showed modest affinity for kappa receptors suggesting other naturally neoclerodanes from different Salvia species may possess opioid affinity.

  2. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  3. Binding Affinities Controlled by Shifting Conformational Equilibria: Opportunities and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Michielssens, Servaas; de Groot, Bert L.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Conformational selection is an established mechanism in molecular recognition. Despite its power to explain binding events, it is hardly used in protein/ligand design to modulate molecular recognition. Here, we explore the opportunities and limitations of design by conformational selection. Using appropriate thermodynamic cycles, our approach predicts the effects of a conformational shift on binding affinity and also allows one to disentangle the effects induced by a conformational shift from other effects influencing the binding affinity. The method is assessed and applied to explain the contribution of a conformational shift on the binding affinity of six ubiquitin mutants showing different conformational shifts in six different complexes. PMID:25992736

  4. Prolactin-binding components in rabbit mammary gland: characterization by partial purification and affinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, M.; Djiane, J.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-06-01

    The molecular characteristics of the PRL receptor isolated from rabbit mammary gland microsomes were investigated. Two approaches were employed: 1) affinity purification of PRL receptors and direct electrophoretic analysis, and 2) affinity cross-linking of microsomal receptors with (/sup 125/I)ovine PRL ((/sup 125/I)oPRL). PRL receptors were solubilized from mammary microsomes with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)1-propane sulfonate and purified using an oPRL agarose affinity column. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining of the gel revealed at least nine bands, including a 32,000 mol wt band which was most intensively labeled with /sup 125/I using the chloramine-T method. Covalent labeling of PRL receptors with (/sup 125/I)oPRL was performed using N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azido benzoate, disuccinimidyl suberate, or ethylene glycol bis (succinimidyl succinate). A single band of 59,000 mol wt was produced by all three cross-linkers when sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed under reducing conditions. Assuming 1:1 binding of hormone and binding subunit and by subtracting the mol wt of (/sup 125/I)oPRL, which was estimated from the migration distance on the gel, the mol wt of the binding subunit was calculated as 32,000. In the absence of dithiothreitol during electrophoresis, only one major hormone-receptor complex band was observed. The same mol wt binding components were also detected in microsomal fractions of rabbit kidney, ovary, and adrenal. A slightly higher mol wt binding subunit was observed in rat liver microsomes. Rabbit liver microsomes revealed five (/sup 125/I)oPRL-binding components, three of which were considered to be those of a GH receptor. Moreover, affinity labeling of detergent-solubilized and affinity purified mammary PRL receptors showed a similar major binding subunit.

  5. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  6. (/sup 3/H)leukotriene B/sub 4/ binding to the guinea pig spleen membranes: a rich tissue source for a high affinity leukotriene B/sub 4/ receptor site

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.B.; Kohi, F.; Townley, R.G.

    1986-03-05

    To select a tissue rich for the high affinity leukotriene (LT)B/sub 4/ receptor site, they compared binding of 1 nM (/sup 3/H)LTB/sub 4/ (180 Ci/mmol) to the crude membrane preparations of guinea pig spleen, thymus, lung, uterus, bladder, brain, adrenal gland, small intestine, liver, kidney and heart. They found that the membrane preparations from spleen contained the highest binding activity per mg protein. They characterized the LTB/sub 4/ binding to the spleen preparation in detail. LTB/sub 4/ binding was rapid, reversible, stereoselective and saturable. The data from equilibrium experiments showed a linear Scatchard plot with a K/sub d/ of 1.6 nM and a binding site density of 259 fmol/mg prot. The rank order of agents competing for spleen (/sup 3/H)LTB/sub 4/ binding at 25/sup 0/C was: LTB/sub 4/ (K/sub i/ = 2.8 nM) > 20-OH-LTB/sub 4/ (23 nM) > LTA/sub 4/ (48 nM) > LTA/sub 4/ methyl ester (0.13 ..mu..M) > 20-COOH-LTB/sub 4/ (> 6.6 ..mu..M) greater than or equal to arachidonic acid (0.15 mM) similarly ordered FPL-55,712 (0.11 mM). At 4/sup 0/C, LTB/sub 4/ (2.3 nM) competed at least 10x more effectively than 20-OH-LTB/sub 4/ (29 nM) and 20-COOH-LTB/sub 4/ (> 6.6 ..mu..M). HPLC analysis indicated that incubation of 84 ng LTB/sub 4/ with the spleen membrane at 25/sup 0/C did not result in the formation of 20-OH-LTB/sub 4/ (< 1 ng) in the filtrate. They conclude that guinea pig spleen contains a rich tissue source of high affinity (/sup 3/H)LTB/sub 4/ receptor binding sites.

  7. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  8. Leucine-rich Repeat 11 of Toll-like Receptor 9 Can Tightly Bind to CpG-containing Oligodeoxynucleotides, and the Positively Charged Residues Are Critical for the High Affinity*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xichun; Yue, Junjie; Ding, Guofu; Li, Bin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Xinchuan; Yu, Mengchen; Li, Jun; Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Chong; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2012-01-01

    TLR9 is a receptor for sensing bacterial DNA/CpG-containing oligonucleotides (CpG ODN). The extracellular domain (ECD) of human TLR9 (hTLR9) is composed of 25 leucine-rich repeats (LRR) contributing to the binding of CpG ODN. Herein, we showed that among LRR2, -5, -8, and -11, LRR11 of hTLR9 had the highest affinity for CpG ODN followed by LRR2 and -5, whereas LRR8 had almost no affinity. In vitro, preincubation with LRR11 more significantly decreased CpG ODN internalization, subsequent NF-κB activation, and cytokine release than with LRR2 and -5 in mouse peritoneal macrophages treated with CpG ODN. The LRR11 deletion mutant of hTLR9 conferred decreased cellular responses to CpG ODN. Single- or multiple-site mutants at five positively charged residues of LRR11 (LRR11m1–9), especially Arg-337 and Lys-367, were shown to contribute to hTLR9 binding of CpG ODN. LRR11m1–9 showed reduced inhibition of CpG ODN internalization and CpG ODN/TLR9 signaling, supporting the above findings. Prediction of whole hTLR9 ECD-CpG ODN interactions revealed that Arg-337 and Lys-338 directly contact CpG ODN through hydrogen bonding, whereas Lys-347, Arg-348, and His-353 contribute to stabilizing the shape of the ligand binding region. These findings suggested that although all five positively charged residues within LRR11 contributed to its high affinity, only Arg-337 and Lys-338 directly interacted with CpG ODN. In conclusion, the results suggested that LRR11 could strongly bind to CpG ODN, whereas mutations at the five positively charge residues reduced this high affinity. LRR11 may be further investigated as an antagonist of hTLR9. PMID:22822061

  9. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  10. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  11. Binding of rabies virus to purified Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Benson, R J; Klimowicz, D; Wilson, P T; Hawrot, E

    1986-12-01

    The binding of 125I- and 35S-labeled rabies virus (CVS strain) to affinity-purified acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo electric organ was demonstrated. The binding of rabies virus to the acetylcholine receptor increased with increasing receptor concentration, was dependent on the pH of the incubation medium, and was saturable with increasing virus concentration. Binding of radioactively labeled virus was effectively competed by unlabeled homologous virus particles. Binding of 35S-labeled rabies virus to the AChR was inhibited up to 50% by alpha-bungarotoxin and up to 30% by (+)-tubocurarine but was not affected by atropine. These results demonstrate direct binding of rabies virus to a well-defined neurotransmitter receptor, namely the acetylcholine receptor and indicate that at least a portion of the virus interaction occurs near the acetylcholine binding site on the receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that the acetylcholine receptor may serve as a rabies virus receptor in vivo.

  12. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  13. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Eng, W S; Robles, S; Vogt, R G; Wiśniewski, J R; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural 3H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated [125I]12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added 125I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of [125I]12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  14. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  15. Characterization of pulmonary sigma receptors by radioligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Lever, John R.; Litton, Tyler P.; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    This study establishes the expression of appreciable populations of sites on mouse lung membranes that exhibit radioligand binding properties and pharmacology consistent with assignment as sigma1 and sigma2 receptors. Specific binding of the sigma1 receptor radioligand [3H](+)-pentazocine reached steady state within 6 h at 37 °C. Saturation studies revealed high affinity binding to a single class of sites (Kd 1.36 ± 0.04 nM; Bmax 967 ± 11 fmol / mg protein). Inhibition studies showed appropriate sigma1 receptor pharmacology, including higher affinity for (+)-N-allylnormetazocine with respect to the (−)-enantiomer, and positive allosteric modulation of dextromethorphan binding by phenytoin. Using [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine in the presence of (+)-pentazocine to assess sigma2 receptor binding, steady state was achieved within 2 min at 25 °C. Cold saturation studies revealed one high affinity, low capacity binding site (Kd 31.8 ± 8.3 nM; Bmax 921 ± 228 fmol / mg protein) that displayed sigma2 receptor pharmacology. A very low affinity, high capacity interaction also was observed that represents saturable, but not sigma receptor specific, binding. A panel of ligands showed rank order inhibition of radioligand binding appropriate for the sigma2 receptor, with ifenprodil displaying the highest apparent affinity. In vivo, dextromethorphan inhibited the specific binding of a radioiodinated sigma1 receptor ligand in lung with an ED50 of 1.2 µmol / kg, a value near the recommended dosage for the drug as a cough suppressant. Overall, the present work provides a foundation for studies of drug interactions with pulmonary sigma1 and sigma2 receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26004528

  16. Effect of sodium ion on the affinity of naloxone for the kappa opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, B.V.; Lahti, R.A.

    1987-03-16

    Several investigators have observed that sodium ion enhances the binding of naloxone to opioid receptors. This effect has generally been attributed to allosteric modulation of the state of the mu receptor. However, a recent claim has been made that the enhancement does not involve a change in the mu receptor, but instead occurs because naloxone becomes a more kappa-specific drug when sodium ion is present in high concentration. Since the claim was not based on experimental evidence from binding studies involving known high-affinity kappa ligands, the authors have investigated the competition of naloxone for the kappa site using (/sup 3/H)U-69593 as the marker for receptor binding. Assays were carried out in the presence and absence of 100 mM NaCl. The results of the study indicate that sodium ion does not increase the affinity of naloxone or U-69593 for the kappa receptor. 9 references, 1 figure.

  17. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  18. Receptor binding domain based HIV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Bi, Wenwen; Wang, Qian; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main trend of the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccines in recent years. Designing an HIV-1 vaccine that provides robust protection from HIV-1 infection remains a challenge despite many years of effort. Therefore, we describe the receptor binding domain of gp120 as a target for developing AIDS vaccines. And we recommend some measures that could induce efficiently and produce cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies with high binding affinity. Those measures may offer a new way of the research and development of the potent and broad AIDS vaccines.

  19. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  20. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  1. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.

  2. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  3. Binding mode and affinity studies of DNA-binding agents using topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Ruel E; Gleason, Aaron B; Keyes, James A; Sahabi, Sadia

    2007-02-15

    A topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay has been used to determine the relative DNA-binding affinities of a model pair of homologous naphthalene diimides. Binding affinity data were corroborated using calorimetric (ITC) and spectrophotometric (titration and T(m)) studies, with substituent size playing a significant role in binding. The assay was also used to investigate the mode of binding adopted by several known DNA-binding agents, including SYBR Green and PicoGreen. Some of the compounds exhibited unexpected binding modes.

  4. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  5. Positron-labeled dopamine agonists for probing the high affinity states of dopamine subtype 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Narendran, Raj; Laruelle, Marc

    2005-01-01

    It is well documented that guanidine nucleotide-coupled dopamine subtype 2 receptors (D2) are configured in high and low affinity states for the dopamine agonist in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether these functional states exist in vivo. We hypothesized that positron-labeled D2 agonist and Positron Emission Tomography can be used to probe these functional states noninvasively. Recently, we demonstrated in nonhuman primates that N-[11C]propyl-norapomorphine (NPA), a full D2 agonist, is a suitable tracer for imaging the high affinity states of D2 receptors in vivo. We also developed kinetic modeling method to derive receptor parameters, such as binding potential (BP) and specific uptake ratios (V3''). When coupled with a dopamine releasing drug, amphetamine, NPA was found to be more sensitive than antagonist tracers, such as [11C]raclopride (RAC), to endogenous dopamine concentration changes (by about 42%). This finding suggests that NPA is a superior tracer for reporting endogenous DA concentration. In addition, the difference of the BP or V3'' of NPA and RAC under control and amphetamine challenge conditions could be used to estimate the functional states of D2 receptors in vivo. On the basis of our findings and the assumptions that NPA binds only to the high affinity states and RAC binds equally to both affinity states, we proposed that about 70% of the D2 receptors are configured in the high affinity states in vivo.

  6. Specific receptor binding of atrial natriuretic peptide to rat renal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Ogawa, N.; Ota, Z.

    1985-09-01

    Radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was studied in rat kidney membranes. Binding of ( SVI)-ANP to membrane preparations of rat whole kidney was saturated and show a high affinity. Furthermore, renal cortex membrane had a higher affinity for ANP binding site than renal medulla membrane. This high affinity ANP receptor site in renal cortex membrane indicated that ANP controlled the balance of water and sodium excretion due to this receptor site in the kidney.

  7. Quantitative in vivo receptor binding. III. Tracer kinetic modeling of muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.A.; Hichwa, R.D.; Ehrenkaufer, R.L.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1985-10-01

    A tracer kinetic method is developed for the in vivo estimation of high-affinity radioligand binding to central nervous system receptors. Ligand is considered to exist in three brain pools corresponding to free, nonspecifically bound, and specifically bound tracer. These environments, in addition to that of intravascular tracer, are interrelated by a compartmental model of in vivo ligand distribution. A mathematical description of the model is derived, which allows determination of regional blood-brain barrier permeability, nonspecific binding, the rate of receptor-ligand association, and the rate of dissociation of bound ligand, from the time courses of arterial blood and tissue tracer concentrations. The term ''free receptor density'' is introduced to describe the receptor population measured by this method. The technique is applied to the in vivo determination of regional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat, with the use of (TH)scopolamine. Kinetic estimates of free muscarinic receptor density are in general agreement with binding capacities obtained from previous in vivo and in vitro equilibrium binding studies. In the striatum, however, kinetic estimates of free receptor density are less than those in the neocortex--a reversal of the rank ordering of these regions derived from equilibrium determinations. A simplified model is presented that is applicable to tracers that do not readily dissociate from specific binding sites during the experimental period.

  8. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites.

  9. Ether modifications to 1-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (SA4503): effects on binding affinity and selectivity for sigma receptors and monoamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Lord, Sarah A; Peterson, Ryan M; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Lever, John R; Lever, Susan Z

    2015-01-01

    Two series of novel ether analogs of the sigma (σ) receptor ligand 1-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (SA4503) have been prepared. In one series, the alkyl portion of the 4-methoxy group was replaced with allyl, propyl, bromoethyl, benzyl, phenethyl, and phenylpropyl moieties. In the second series, the 3,4-dimethoxy was replaced with cyclic methylenedioxy, ethylenedioxy and propylenedioxy groups. These ligands, along with 4-O-des-methyl SA4503, were evaluated for σ1 and σ2 receptor affinity, and compared to SA4503 and several known ether analogs. SA4503 and a subset of ether analogs were also evaluated for dopamine transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT) affinity. The highest σ1 receptor affinities, Ki values of 1.75-4.63 nM, were observed for 4-O-des-methyl SA4503, SA4503 and the methylenedioxy analog. As steric bulk increased, σ1 receptor affinity decreased, but only to a point. Allyl, propyl and bromoethyl substitutions gave σ1 receptor Ki values in the 20-30 nM range, while bulkier analogs having phenylalkyl, and Z- and E-iodoallyl, ether substitutions showed higher σ1 affinities, with Ki values in the 13-21 nM range. Most ligands studied exhibited comparable σ1 and σ2 affinities, resulting in little to no subtype selectivity. SA4503, the fluoroethyl analog and the methylenedioxy congener showed modest six- to fourteen-fold selectivity for σ1 sites. DAT and SERT interactions proved much more sensitive than σ receptor interactions to these structural modifications. For example, the benzyl congener (σ1Ki=20.8 nM; σ2Ki=16.4 nM) showed over 100-fold higher DAT affinity (Ki=121 nM) and 6-fold higher SERT affinity (Ki=128nM) than the parent SA4503 (DAT Ki=12650 nM; SERT Ki=760 nM). Thus, ether modifications to the SA4503 scaffold can provide polyfunctional ligands having a broader spectrum of possible pharmacological actions.

  10. In silico optimization of pharmacokinetic properties and receptor binding affinity simultaneously: a 'parallel progression approach to drug design' applied to β-blockers.

    PubMed

    Advani, Poonam; Joseph, Blessy; Ambre, Premlata; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir; Khedkar, Vijay; Iyer, Krishna; Gabhe, Satish; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Coutinho, Evans

    2016-01-01

    The present work exploits the potential of in silico approaches for minimizing attrition of leads in the later stages of drug development. We propose a theoretical approach, wherein 'parallel' information is generated to simultaneously optimize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of lead candidates. β-blockers, though in use for many years, have suboptimal PKs; hence are an ideal test series for the 'parallel progression approach'. This approach utilizes molecular modeling tools viz. hologram quantitative structure activity relationships, homology modeling, docking, predictive metabolism, and toxicity models. Validated models have been developed for PK parameters such as volume of distribution (log Vd) and clearance (log Cl), which together influence the half-life (t1/2) of a drug. Simultaneously, models for PD in terms of inhibition constant pKi have been developed. Thus, PK and PD properties of β-blockers were concurrently analyzed and after iterative cycling, modifications were proposed that lead to compounds with optimized PK and PD. We report some of the resultant re-engineered β-blockers with improved half-lives and pKi values comparable with marketed β-blockers. These were further analyzed by the docking studies to evaluate their binding poses. Finally, metabolic and toxicological assessment of these molecules was done through in silico methods. The strategy proposed herein has potential universal applicability, and can be used in any drug discovery scenario; provided that the data used is consistent in terms of experimental conditions, endpoints, and methods employed. Thus the 'parallel progression approach' helps to simultaneously fine-tune various properties of the drug and would be an invaluable tool during the drug development process.

  11. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  12. Detection of multiple H3 receptor affinity states utilizing [3H]A-349821, a novel, selective, non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist radioligand.

    PubMed

    Witte, David G; Yao, Betty Bei; Miller, Thomas R; Carr, Tracy L; Cassar, Steven; Sharma, Rahul; Faghih, Ramin; Surber, Bruce W; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Hancock, Arthur A; Krueger, Kathleen M

    2006-07-01

    1. A-349821 is a selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Herein, binding of the novel non-imidazole H3 receptor radioligand [3H]A-349821 to membranes expressing native or recombinant H3 receptors from rat or human sources was characterized and compared with the binding of the agonist [3H]N--methylhistamine ([3H]NMH). 2. [3H]A-349821 bound with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of saturable sites and recognized human H3 receptors with 10-fold higher affinity compared to rat H3 receptors. [3H]A-349821 detected larger populations of receptors compared to [3H]NMH. 3. Displacement of [3H]A-349821 binding by H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists was monophasic, suggesting recognition of a single binding site, while that of H3 receptor agonists was biphasic, suggesting recognition of both high- and low-affinity H3 receptor sites. 4. pKi values of high-affinity binding sites for H3 receptor competitors utilizing [3H]A-349821 were highly correlated with pKi values obtained with [3H]NalphaMH, consistent with labelling of H3 receptors by [3H]A-349821. 5. Unlike assays utilizing [3H]NMH, addition of GDP had no effect on saturation parameters measured with [3H]A-349821, while displacement of [3H]A-349821 binding by the H3 receptor agonist histamine was sensitive to GDP. 6. In conclusion, [3H]A-349821 labels interconvertible high- and low-affinity states of the H3 receptor, and displays improved selectivity over imidazole-containing H3 receptor antagonist radioligands. [3H]A-349821 competition studies showed significant differences in the proportions and potencies of high- and low-affinity sites across species, providing new information about the fundamental pharmacological nature of H3 receptors.

  13. Binding characteristics of the muscarinic receptor subtype in rabbit pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwam, A.J.; Willems, P.H.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; de Pont, J.J.; van Ginneken, C.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The muscarinic receptor in the rabbit pancreas was characterized with the use of the labeled ligand ({sup 3}H)-(-)-quinuclidinyl-benzylate (({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB). Specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB to pancreatic acini was found to be reversible and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 68 pmol/l and a receptor density (RT) of 170 fmol/mg protein. Agonist binding behaviour was investigated by displacement of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by eight agonists like arecoline, arecadine-propargylester (APE) and carbachol, yielding only low affinity binding sites. The inhibition of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by the selective antagonists pirenzepine, hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD) and (11-(2-(diethyl-amino)-methyl-1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyr ido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116) confirmed the M3 nature of the rabbit pancreatic receptor.

  14. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  15. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  16. Characterization of the Staphylococcal enterotoxin A: Vβ receptor interaction using human receptor fragments engineered for high affinity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Postel, S; Sundberg, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disorder caused by the consumption of food containing Staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is the most common enterotoxin recovered from food poisoning outbreaks in the USA. In addition to its enteric activity, SEA also acts as a potent superantigen through stimulation of T cells, although less is known about its interactions than the superantigens SEB, SEC and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. To understand more about SEA:receptor interactions, and to develop toxin-detection systems for use in food testing, we engineered various SEA-binding receptor mutants. The extracellular domain of the receptor, a variable region of the beta chain (Vβ22) of the T-cell receptor, was engineered for stability as a soluble protein and for high affinity, using yeast-display technology. The highest affinity mutant was shown to bind SEA with a Kd value of 4 nM. This was a 25 000-fold improvement in affinity compared with the wild-type receptor, which bound to SEA with low affinity (Kd value of 100 µM), similar to other superantigen:Vβ interactions. The SEA:Vβ interface was centered around residues within the complementarity determining region 2 loop. The engineered receptor was specific for SEA, in that it did not bind to two other closely related enterotoxins SEE or SED, providing information on the SEA residues possibly involved in the interaction. The specificity and affinity of these high-affinity Vβ proteins also provide useful agents for the design of more sensitive and specific systems for SEA detection.

  17. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  18. The AVR4 elicitor protein of Cladosporium fulvum binds to fungal components with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Westerink, Nienke; Roth, Ronelle; Van den Burg, Harrold A; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2002-12-01

    The interaction between tomato and the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum complies with the gene-for-gene system. Strains of C. fulvum that produce race-specific elicitor AVR4 induce a hypersensitive response, leading to resistance, in tomato plants that carry the Cf-4 resistance gene. The mechanism of AVR4 perception was examined by performing binding studies with 125I-AVR4 on microsomal membranes of tomato plants. We identified an AVR4 high-affinity binding site (KD = 0.05 nM) which exhibited all the characteristics expected for ligand-receptor interactions, such as saturability, reversibility, and specificity. Surprisingly, the AVR4 high-affinity binding site appeared to originate from fungi present on infected tomato plants rather than from the tomato plants themselves. Detailed analysis showed that this fungus-derived, AVR4-specific binding site is heat- and proteinase K-resistant. Affinity crosslinking demonstrated that AVR4 specifically binds to a component of approximately 75 kDa that is of fungal origin. Our data suggest that binding of AVR4 to a fungal component or components is related to the intrinsic virulence function of AVR4 for C. fulvum.

  19. Agonist-receptor-arrestin, an alternative ternary complex with high agonist affinity.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V V; Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M; Onorato, J J

    1997-11-14

    The rapid decrease of a response to a persistent stimulus, often termed desensitization, is a widespread biological phenomenon. Signal transduction by numerous G protein-coupled receptors appears to be terminated by a strikingly uniform two-step mechanism, most extensively characterized for the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m2 mAChR), and rhodopsin. The model predicts that activated receptor is initially phosphorylated and then tightly binds an arrestin protein that effectively blocks further G protein interaction. Here we report that complexes of beta2AR-arrestin and m2 mAChR-arrestin have a higher affinity for agonists (but not antagonists) than do receptors not complexed with arrestin. The percentage of phosphorylated beta2AR in this high affinity state in the presence of full agonists varied with different arrestins and was enhanced by selective mutations in arrestins. The percentage of high affinity sites also was proportional to the intrinsic activity of an agonist, and the coefficient of proportionality varies for different arrestin proteins. Certain mutant arrestins can form these high affinity complexes with unphosphorylated receptors. Mutations that enhance formation of the agonist-receptor-arrestin complexes should provide useful tools for manipulating both the efficiency of signaling and rate and specificity of receptor internalization.

  20. Development of predictive models for predicting binding affinity of endocrine disrupting chemicals to fish sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; Yang, Xianhai; Yin, Cen; Wei, Mengbi; He, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Disturbing the transport process is a crucial pathway for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) exerting disrupting endocrine function. However, this mechanism has not received enough attention compared with that of hormones receptors and synthetase. Recently, we have explored the interaction between EDCs and sex hormone-binding globulin of human (hSHBG). In this study, interactions between EDCs and sex hormone-binding globulin of eight fish species (fSHBG) were investigated by employing classification methods and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). In the modeling, the relative binding affinity (RBA) of a chemical with 17β-estradiol binding to fSHBG was selected as the endpoint. Classification models were developed for two fish species, while QSAR models were established for the other six fish species. Statistical results indicated that the models had satisfactory goodness of fit, robustness and predictive ability, and that application domain covered a large number of endogenous and exogenous steroidal and non-steroidal chemicals. Additionally, by comparing the log RBA values, it was found that the same chemical may have different affinities for fSHBG from different fish species, thus species diversity should be taken into account. However, the affinity of fSHBG showed a high correlation for fishes within the same Order (i.e., Salmoniformes, Cypriniformes, Perciformes and Siluriformes), thus the fSHBG binding data for one fish species could be used to extrapolate other fish species in the same Order.

  1. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  2. 3-Chlorotyramine Acting as Ligand of the D2 Dopamine Receptor. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis and D2 Receptor Affinity.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio; Andujar, Sebastian; Moreno, Laura; Garibotto, Francisco; Párraga, Javier; Peruchena, Nelida; Cabedo, Nuria; Villecco, Margarita; Cortes, Diego; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine as a ligand of the D2 dopamine receptor. This compound displayed a similar affinity by this receptor to that previously reported for dopamine. In order to understand further the experimental results we performed a molecular modeling study of 3-chlorotyramine and structurally related compounds. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio and density functional theory calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of these ligands interacting with the D2 dopamine receptors is reported here. These results provided a clear picture of the binding interactions of these compounds from both structural and energetic view points. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allowed us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) technique. Molecular aspects of the binding interactions between ligands and the D2 dopamine receptor are discussed in detail. A good correlation between the relative binding energies obtained from theoretical calculations and experimental IC50 values was obtained. These results allowed us to predict that 3-chlorotyramine possesses a significant affinity by the D2 -DR. Our theoretical predictions were experimentally corroborated when we synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine which displayed a similar affinity by the D2 -DR to that reported for DA.

  3. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  4. Calculating protein-ligand binding affinities with MMPBSA: Method and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhao; Nguyen, Peter H; Pham, Kevin; Huynh, Danielle; Le, Thanh-Binh Nancy; Wang, Hongli; Ren, Pengyu; Luo, Ray

    2016-10-15

    Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MMPBSA) methods have become widely adopted in estimating protein-ligand binding affinities due to their efficiency and high correlation with experiment. Here different computational alternatives were investigated to assess their impact to the agreement of MMPBSA calculations with experiment. Seven receptor families with both high-quality crystal structures and binding affinities were selected. First the performance of nonpolar solvation models was studied and it was found that the modern approach that separately models hydrophobic and dispersion interactions dramatically reduces RMSD's of computed relative binding affinities. The numerical setup of the Poisson-Boltzmann methods was analyzed next. The data shows that the impact of grid spacing to the quality of MMPBSA calculations is small: the numerical error at the grid spacing of 0.5 Å is already small enough to be negligible. The impact of different atomic radius sets and different molecular surface definitions was further analyzed and weak influences were found on the agreement with experiment. The influence of solute dielectric constant was also analyzed: a higher dielectric constant generally improves the overall agreement with experiment, especially for highly charged binding pockets. The data also showed that the converged simulations caused slight reduction in the agreement with experiment. Finally the direction of estimating absolute binding free energies was briefly explored. Upon correction of the binding-induced rearrangement free energy and the binding entropy lost, the errors in absolute binding affinities were also reduced dramatically when the modern nonpolar solvent model was used, although further developments were apparently necessary to further improve the MMPBSA methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Two distinct functional high affinity receptors for mouse interleukin-3 (IL-3).

    PubMed Central

    Hara, T; Miyajima, A

    1992-01-01

    The human interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3R) is composed of an IL-3 specific alpha subunit (IL-3R alpha) and a common beta subunit (beta c) that is shared by IL-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 receptors. In contrast to the human, the mouse has two distinct but related genes, AIC2A and AIC2B, both of which are homologous to the human beta c gene. AIC2B has proved to encode a common beta subunit between mouse GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors. AIC2A is unique to the mouse and encodes a low affinity IL-3 binding protein. Based on the observation that the AIC2A protein is a component of a high affinity IL-3R, we searched for a cDNA encoding a protein which conferred high affinity IL-3 binding when coexpressed with the AIC2A protein in COS7 cells. We obtained such a cDNA (SUT-1) encoding a mature protein of 70 kDa that has weak homology to the human IL-3R alpha. The SUT-1 protein bound IL-3 with low affinity and formed high affinity receptors not only with the AIC2A protein but also with the AIC2B protein. Both high affinity IL-3Rs expressed on a mouse T cell line, CTLL-2, showed similar IL-3 binding properties and transmitted a growth signal in response to IL-3. Thus, the mouse has two distinct functional high affinity IL-3Rs, providing a molecular explanation for the differences observed between mouse and human IL-3Rs. Images PMID:1582416

  6. Interferon gamma rapidly induces in human monocytes a DNA-binding factor that recognizes the gamma response region within the promoter of the gene for the high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K C; Finbloom, D S

    1992-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) transcriptionally activates several early-response genes in monocytes that are important for the ultimate phenotype of the activated macrophage. One of these genes is the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Recently, Pearse et al. [Pearse, R.N., Feinman, R. & Ravetch, J. V. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 11305-11309] defined within the promoter region of the Fc gamma RI gene an element, the gamma response region, which was necessary for IFN-gamma-induced enhancement of Fc gamma RI. In this report we describe the induction by IFN-gamma of a DNA-binding factor, FcRF gamma (Fc gamma RI DNA-binding factor, IFN-gamma induced), that specifically recognizes the gamma response region element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the presence of FcRF gamma in human monocytes within 1 min after exposure to IFN-gamma. On EMSA, FcRF gamma consisted of two complexes termed FcRF gamma 1 and FcRF gamma 2. The nuclear concentration of FcRF gamma rapidly increased, peaked at 15 min, and then fell after 1-2 hr. Dose-response studies revealed (i) as little as 0.05 ng of IFN-gamma per ml induced FcRF gamma, (ii) maximum activation occurred at 1 ng/ml, and (iii) steady-state levels of Fc gamma RI mRNA closely paralleled that of FcRF gamma. Since FcRF gamma was activated in cells normally not expressing Fc gamma RI RNA, other regulatory mechanisms must control Fc gamma RI-restricted tissue expression. Activation of FcRF gamma by IFN-gamma was inhibited by pretreatment with 500 nM staurosporin and 25 microM phenyl arsine oxide. These data suggest that a kinase and possibly a phosphatase activity are required for IFN-gamma-induced signaling of FcRF gamma in monocytes. Images PMID:1334553

  7. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  8. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  9. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  10. HIGH AFFINITY, DSRNA BINDING BY DISCONNECTED INTERACTING PROTEIN 1†

    PubMed Central

    Catanese, Daniel J.; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2010-01-01

    Disconnected Interacting Protein 1 (DIP1) appears from sequence analysis and preliminary binding studies to be a member of the dsRNA-binding protein family. Of interest, DIP1 was shown previously to interact with and influence multiple proteins involved in transcription regulation in Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that the longest isoform of this protein, DIP1-c, exhibits a 500-fold preference for dsRNA over dsDNA of similar nucleotide sequence. Further, DIP1-c demonstrated very high affinity for a subset of dsRNA ligands, with binding in the picomolar range for VA1 RNA and miR-iab-4 precursor stem-loop, a potential physiological RNA target involved in regulating expression of its protein partner, Ultrabithorax. PMID:20643095

  11. Blind prediction of host-guest binding affinities: A new SAMPL3 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Muddana, Hari S.; Varnado, C. Daniel; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Urbach, Adam R.; Isaacs, Lyle; Geballe, Matthew T.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The computational prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities is of central interest in early-stage drug-discovery, and there is a widely recognized need for improved methods. Low molecular weight receptors and their ligands—i.e. host-guest systems – represent valuable test-beds for such affinity prediction methods, because their small size makes for fast calculations and relatively facile numerical convergence. The SAMPL3 community exercise included the first ever blind prediction challenge for host-guest binding affinities, through the incorporation of 11 new host-guest complexes. Ten participating research groups addressed this challenge with a variety of approaches. Statistical assessment indicates that, although most methods performed well at predicting some general trends in binding affinity, overall accuracy was not high, as all the methods suffered from either poor correlation or high RMS errors or both. There was no clear advantage in using explicit vs. implicit solvent models, any particular force field, or any particular approach to conformational sampling. In a few cases, predictions using very similar energy models but different sampling and/or free-energy methods resulted in significantly different results. The protonation states of one host and some guest molecules emerged as key uncertainties beyond the choice of computational approach. The present results have implications for methods development and future blind prediction exercises. PMID:22366955

  12. Arginine vasotocin receptor binding in the hen uterus (shell gland) before and after oviposition.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Kawashima, M; Kamiyoshi, M; Tanaka, K

    1994-04-01

    The binding affinity and capacity of arginine vasotocin (AVT) receptor in the hen uterus changed during a period before and after oviposition. Three hours before oviposition, the binding capacity of the AVT receptor increased. An injection of prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha caused an increase in the AVT receptor Bmax in the uterus, and indomethacin blocked the normal rise in the AVT receptor Bmax and PGF content prior to oviposition. However, just prior to oviposition, the binding affinity increased with a decrease in the binding capacity. A progesterone injection caused an increase in binding affinity and a decrease in binding capacity of the AVT receptor. The specific binding of the progesterone receptor in the uterus increased 2 h before oviposition and remained high until oviposition. Serum AVT levels increased at oviposition. An injection of AVT caused an increase in the affinity of the AVT receptor with a decrease in the capacity. The change in the affinity and capacity of AVT receptor at oviposition may result from the action of progesterone via increased progesterone receptor binding, and the action of AVT on its own receptors.

  13. Structural origins of high-affinity biotin binding to streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Weber, P C; Ohlendorf, D H; Wendoloski, J J; Salemme, F R

    1989-01-06

    The high affinity of the noncovalent interaction between biotin and streptavidin forms the basis for many diagnostic assays that require the formation of an irreversible and specific linkage between biological macromolecules. Comparison of the refined crystal structures of apo and a streptavidin:biotin complex shows that the high affinity results from several factors. These factors include the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions between biotin and the protein, together with the ordering of surface polypeptide loops that bury the biotin in the protein interior. Structural alterations at the biotin binding site produce quaternary changes in the streptavidin tetramer. These changes apparently propagate through cooperative deformations in the twisted beta sheets that link tetramer subunits.

  14. Optimizing molecular electrostatic interactions: Binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik

    The design of molecules that bind tightly and specifically to designated target molecules is an important goal in many fields of molecular science. While the shape of the molecule to be designed is a relatively well defined problem with an intuitive answer, determination of the distribution of electrostatic charge that it should have in order to possess high affinity and/or specificity for a target is a subtle problem involving a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred due to the removal of solvent from the interacting surfaces of the reactants, and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. In this thesis, a theoretical formalism based on a continuum electrostatic approximation is developed in which charge distributions leading to optimal affinity and/or high specificity may be obtained. Methods for obtaining these charge distributions are developed in detail and analytical solutions are obtained in several special cases (where the molecules are shaped as infinite membranes, spheres, and spheroids). Their existence and non-uniqueness are also shown, and it is proven that the resulting optimized electrostatic binding free energies are favorable (negative) in many cases of physical interest. Affinity and specificity optimization is then applied to the chorismate mutase family of enzymes, including the catalytic antibody 1F7. It is shown that affinity optimization can be used to suggest better molecular inhibitors and that specificity optimization can be used to help elucidate molecular function and possibly aid in the creation of improved haptens. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  15. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  16. Characterization of receptor proteins using affinity cross-linking with biotinylated ligands.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomonori; Osada, Tomohiko; Desaki, Yoshitake; Hatamoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Takai, Ryota; Che, Fang-Sik; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto

    2010-02-01

    The plant genome encodes a wide range of receptor-like proteins but the function of most of these proteins is unknown. We propose the use of affinity cross-linking of biotinylated ligands for a ligand-based survey of the corresponding receptor molecules. Biotinylated ligands not only enable the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions without the use of radioactive compounds but also the isolation and identification of receptor molecules by a simple affinity trapping method. We successfully applied this method for the characterization, isolation and identification of the chitin elicitor binding protein (CEBiP). A biocytin hydrazide conjugate of N-acetylchitooctaose (GN8-Bio) was synthesized and used for the detection of CEBiP in the plasma or microsomal membrane preparations from rice and carrot cells. Binding characteristics of CEBiP analyzed by inhibition studies were in good agreement with the previous results obtained with the use of a radiolabeled ligand. The biotin-tagged CEBiP could be purified by avidin affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MALDI-MS/MS after tryptic digestion. We also used this method to detect OsFLS2, a rice receptor-like kinase for the perception of the peptide elicitor flg22, in membrane preparations from rice cells overexpressing OsFLS2. This work demonstrates the applicability of this method to the purification and identification of plant receptor proteins.

  17. Binding Studies of TNF Receptor Superfamily (TNFRSF) Receptors on Intact Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Isabell; Füllsack, Simone; Wyzgol, Agnes; Fick, Andrea; Trebing, Johannes; Arana, José Antonio Carmona; Schäfer, Viktoria; Weisenberger, Daniela; Wajant, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Ligands of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) interact with members of the TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF). TNFSF ligand-TNFRSF receptor interactions have been intensively evaluated by many groups. The affinities of TNFSF ligand-TNFRSF receptor interactions are highly dependent on the oligomerization state of the receptor, and cellular factors (e.g. actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts) influence the assembly of ligand-receptor complexes, too. Binding studies on TNFSF ligand-TNFRSF receptor interactions were typically performed using cell-free assays with recombinant fusion proteins that contain varying numbers of TNFRSF ectodomains. It is therefore not surprising that affinities determined for an individual TNFSF ligand-TNFRSF interaction differ sometimes by several orders of magnitude and often do not reflect the ligand activity observed in cellular assays. To overcome the intrinsic limitations of cell-free binding studies and usage of recombinant receptor domains, we performed comprehensive binding studies with Gaussia princeps luciferase TNFSF ligand fusion proteins for cell-bound TNFRSF members on intact cells at 37 °C. The affinities of the TNFSF ligand G. princeps luciferase-fusion proteins ranged between 0.01 and 19 nm and offer the currently most comprehensive and best suited panel of affinities for in silico studies of ligand-receptor systems of the TNF family. PMID:26721880

  18. DOTA-Derivatives of Octreotide Dicarba-Analogs with High Affinity for Somatostatin sst2,5 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumors and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst's) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogs, which show interesting binding profiles at sst's. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogs could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogs of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogs exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  19. Oxytocin receptors: ligand binding, signalling and cholesterol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald; Reitz, Julian; Brauer, Sabine; Trossen, Conny

    2008-01-01

    The G protein coupled oxytocin receptor (OTR) reveals some specific molecular and physiological characteristics. Ligand-receptor interaction has been analysed by photoaffinity labelling, site-directed mutagenesis, the construction of receptor chimeras and molecular modelling. Major results of these studies will be summarized. The N-terminus of the OTR is mainly involved in agonist binding. Notably, antagonists that are derived from the ground structure of oxytocin, bind the receptor at distinct sites partly non-overlapping with the agonist binding site. OTRs are able to couple to different G proteins, with a subsequent stimulation of phospholipase C-beta isoforms. In dependence on G protein coupling, OTRs can transduce growth-inhibitory or proliferatory signals. Some evidence is provided that OTRs are also present in form of dimeric or oligomeric complexes at the cell surface. The affinity of the receptor for ligands is strongly dependent on the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) and cholesterol that both act like positive allosteric modulators. While the high-affinity state of the receptor for agonists requires divalent cations and cholesterol, the high-affinity state for antagonists is only dependent on a sufficient amount of cholesterol. Cholesterol affects ligand-binding affinity, receptor signalling and stability. Since the purification of the OTR has never been achieved, alternative methods to study the receptor in its native environment are necessary. Promising strategies for the site-specific labelling of the OTR will be presented. The employment of diverse reporter molecules introduced at different positions within the OTR might allow us in the near future to measure conformational changes of the receptor in its native lipid environment.

  20. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  1. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  2. Structure of the high-affinity binding site for noncompetitive blockers of the acetylcholine receptor: (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine labels homologous residues in the. beta. and delta chains

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudat, J.; Dennis, M.; Heidmann, T.; Haumont, P.Y.; Lederer, F.; Changeux, J.P.

    1987-05-05

    The membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata was photolabeled by the noncompetitive channel blocker (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine under equilibrium conditions in the presence of the agonist carbamoylcholine. The amount of radioactivity incorporated into all subunits was reduced by addition of phencyclidine, a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. The labeled ..beta.. chain was purified and digested with trypsin or CNBr, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Sequence analysis resulted in the identification of Ser-254 and Leu-257 as residues labeled by (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine in a phencyclidine-sensitive manner. These residues are located in the hydrophobic and potentially transmembrane segment M II of the ..beta.. chain, a region homologous to that containing the chlorpromazine-labeled Ser-262 in the delta chain. These results show that homologous regions of different receptor subunits contribute to the unique high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers, a finding consistent with the location of this site on the axis of symmetry of the receptor molecule.

  3. Cholera toxin binding affinity and specificity for gangliosides determined by surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kuziemko, G.M.; Stroh, M.; Stevens, R.C. |

    1996-05-21

    The present study determines the affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside series GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1A, GD1B, GT1B, asialo GM1, globotriosyl ceramide, and lactosyl ceramide using real time biospecific interaction analysis (surface plasmon resonance, SPR). SPR shows that cholera toxin preferably binds to gangliosides in the following sequence: GM1 > GM2 > GD1A > GM3 > GT1B > GD1B > asialo-GM1. The measured binding affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside sequence ranges from 4.61 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M for GM1 to 1.88 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M for asialo GM1. The picomolar values obtained by surface plasmon resonance are similar to K{sub d} values determined with whole-cell binding assays. Both whole-cell assays ans SPR measurements on synthetic membranes are higher than free solution measurements by several orders of magnitude. This difference may be caused by the effects of avidity and charged lipid head-groups, which may play a major role in the binding between cholera toxin, the receptor, and the membrane surface. The primary difference between free solution binding studies and surface plasmon resonance studies is that the latter technique is performed on surfaces resembling the cell membrane. Surface plasmon resonance has the further advantage of measuring apparent kinetic association and dissociation rates in real time, providing direct information about binding events at the membrane surface. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus following bilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean Ha; Zheng, Yiwen; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2011-01-10

    Numerous studies have shown that bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) results in spatial memory deficits and hippocampal dysfunction in rats and humans. Since cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are well known to regulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, we investigated whether BVD resulted in changes in CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus at 1, 3 and 7 days post-surgery, using a combination of Western blotting and radioligand binding. Using Western blotting, we found that CB(1) receptor expression was significantly lower in BVD animals compared to sham controls only in the CA3 area across the 3 time points (P=0.03). CB(1) receptor expression decreased significantly over time for both the BVD and sham animals (P=0.000). The radioligand binding assays showed no significant change in the IC(50) of the CB(1) receptor for the cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist, WIN55,212-2. These results suggest that the CB(1) receptor down-regulates in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following BVD, but with no changes in the affinity of the CB(1) receptor for WIN55,212-2.

  5. Human receptor kinetics and lung tissue retention of the enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid fluticasone furoate

    PubMed Central

    Valotis, Anagnostis; Högger, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Fluticasone furoate (FF) – USAN approved name, a new topically active glucocorticoid has been recently identified. The aim of this study was to characterise the binding affinity of this compound to the human lung glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other glucocorticoids. Additionally, we sought to determine the binding behaviour of fluticasone furoate to human lung tissue. The glucocorticoid receptor binding kinetics of fluticasone furoate revealed a remarkably fast association and a slow dissociation resulting in a relative receptor affinity (RRA) of 2989 ± 135 with reference to dexamethasone (RRA: 100 ± 5). Thus, the RRA of FF exceeds the RRAs of all currently clinically used corticosteroids such as mometasone furoate (MF; RRA 2244), fluticasone propionate (FP; RRA 1775), ciclesonide's active metabolite (RRA 1212 – rat receptor data) or budesonide (RRA 855). FP and FF displayed pronounced retention in human lung tissue in vitro. Lowest tissue binding was found for MF. There was no indication of instability or chemical modification of FF in human lung tissue. These advantageous binding attributes may contribute to a highly efficacious profile for FF as a topical treatment for inflammatory disorders of the respiratory tract. PMID:17650349

  6. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  7. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-(3H)cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and (3H)CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with (3H)CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the (3H)CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. (3H)CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of (3H)CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM (3H)CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting (3H)CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration.

  8. Compensating Enthalpic and Entropic Changes Hinder Binding Affinity Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafont,V.; Armstrong, A.; Ohtaka, H.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    A common strategy to improve the potency of drug candidates is to introduce chemical functionalities, like hydrogen bond donors or acceptors, at positions where they are able to establish strong interactions with the target. However, it is often observed that the added functionalities do not necessarily improve potency even if they form strong hydrogen bonds. Here, we explore the thermodynamic and structural basis for those observations. KNI-10033 is a potent experimental HIV-1 protease inhibitor with picomolar affinity against the wild-type enzyme (Kd = 13 pm). The potency of the inhibitor is the result of favorable enthalpic (?H = -8.2 kcal/mol) and entropic (-T?S = -6.7 kcal/mol) interactions. The replacement of the thioether group in KNI-10033 by a sulfonyl group (KNI-10075) results in a strong hydrogen bond with the amide of Asp 30B of the HIV-1 protease. This additional hydrogen bond improves the binding enthalpy by 3.9 kcal/mol; however, the enthalpy gain is completely compensated by an entropy loss, resulting in no affinity change. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis of the inhibitor/protease complexes indicates that the entropy losses are due to a combination of conformational and solvation effects. These results provide a set of practical guidelines aimed at overcoming enthalpy/entropy compensation and improve binding potency.

  9. Phytosphingosine 1-phosphate: a high affinity ligand for the S1P(4)/Edg-6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Candelore, Mari Rios; Wright, Michael J; Tota, Laurie M; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-ju; Bergstrom, James D; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2002-09-27

    It has been reported recently that the phosphorylated form of the immunomodulator FTY720 activates sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, understanding the biology of this new class of receptors will be important in clarifying the immunological function of bioactive lysosphingolipid ligands. The S1P(4) receptor has generated interest due to its lymphoid tissue distribution. While the S1P(4) receptor binds the prototypical ligand, S1P, a survey of other lysosphingolipids demonstrated that 4D-hydroxysphinganine 1-phosphate, more commonly known as phytosphingosine 1-phosphate (PhS1P), binds to S1P(4) with higher affinity. Using radiolabeled S1P (S133P), the affinity of PhS1P for the S1P(4) receptor is 1.6nM, while that of S1P is nearly 50-fold lower (119+/-20nM). Radiolabeled PhS1P proved to be superior to S133P in routine binding assays due to improved signal-to-noise ratio. The present study demonstrates the utility of a novel radiolabeled probe, PhS133P, for in vitro studies of the S1P(4) receptor pharmacology.

  10. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kwon; Jung, Kyung-Sik; Son, Cagdas D; Kim, Heejung; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  11. Relations between high-affinity binding sites of markers for binding regions on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1985-01-01

    Binding of warfarin, digitoxin, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red, individually or in different pair combinations, to defatted human serum albumin at ligand/protein molar ratios less than 1:1 was studied at pH 7.0. The binding was determined by ultrafiltration. Some of the experiments were repeated with the use of equilibrium dialysis in order to strengthen the results. Irrespective of the method used, all ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with an association constant in the range 10(4)-10(6) M-1. High-affinity binding of the following pair of ligands took place independently: warfarin-Phenol Red, warfarin-diazepam, warfarin-digitoxin and digitoxin-diazepam. Simultaneous binding of warfarin and salicylate led to a mutual decrease in binding of one another, as did simultaneous binding of digitoxin and Phenol Red. Both effects could be accounted for by a coupling constant. The coupling constant is the factor by which the primary association constants are affected; in these examples of anti-co-operativity the factor has a value between 0 and 1. In the first example it was calculated to be 0.8 and in the latter 0.5. Finally, digitoxin and salicylate were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site. The present findings support the proposal of four separate primary binding sites for warfarin, digitoxin (and salicylate), diazepam and Phenol Red. An attempt to correlate this partial binding model for serum albumin with other models in the literature is made. PMID:3977850

  12. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  13. Neurotensin decreases high affinity [3H]-ouabain binding to cerebral cortex membranes.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Carina; Ordieres, María Graciela López; Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez de Lores

    2011-12-10

    Previous work from this laboratory showed the ability of neurotensin to inhibit synaptosomal membrane Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, the effect being blocked by SR 48692, a non-peptidic antagonist for high affinity neurotensin receptor (NTS1) [López Ordieres and Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz 2000; 2001]. To further study neurotensin interaction with Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, peptide effect on high affinity [(3)H]-ouabain binding was studied in cerebral cortex membranes. It was observed that neurotensin modified binding in a dose-dependent manner, leading to 80% decrease with 1 × 10(-4)M concentration. On the other hand, the single addition of 1 × 10(-6)M, 1 × 10(-5)M and 1 × 10(-4)M SR 48692 (Sanofi-Aventis, U.S., Inc.) decreased [(3)H]-ouabain binding (in %) to 87 ± 16; 74 ± 16 and 34 ± 17, respectively. Simultaneous addition of neurotensin and SR 48692 led to additive or synergic effects. Partial NTS2 agonist levocabastine inhibited [(3)H]-ouabain binding likewise. Saturation assays followed by Scatchard analyses showed that neurotensin increased K(d) value whereas failed to modify B(max) value, indicating a competitive type interaction of the peptide at Na(+), K(+)-ATPase ouabain site. At variance, SR 48692 decreased B(max) value whereas it did not modify K(d) value. [(3)H]-ouabain binding was also studied in cerebral cortex membranes obtained from rats injected i. p. 30 min earlier with 100 μg and 250 μg/kg SR 48692. It was observed that the 250 μg/kg SR 48692 dose led to 19% decrease in basal [(3)H]-ouabain binding. After SR 48692 treatments, addition of 1 × 10(-6)M led to additive or synergic effect. Results suggested that [(3)H]-ouabain binding inhibition by neurotensin hardly involves NTS1 receptor.

  14. Identification of three muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat lung using binding studies with selective antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, A.D.; El-Fakahany, E.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Heterogeneity of the muscarinic receptor population in the rat central and peripheral lung was found in competition binding experiments against ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB) using the selective antagonists pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pirenzepine displaced ({sup 3}H)QNB with low affinity from preparations of central airways indicating the absence of M{sub 1} receptors in the trachea and bronchi. Muscarinic receptors in the central airways are comprised of both M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} receptors since AF-DX 116, an M{sub 2}-selective antagonist, bound with high affinity to 70% of the available sites while HHSiD, an M{sub 3}-selective antagonist bound with high affinity to the remaining binding sites. In the peripheral lung, pirenzepine bound with high affinity to 14% of the receptor population, AF-DX 116 bound with high affinity 79% of the binding sites while HHSiD bound with high affinity to 18% of the binding sites. The presence of M{sub 1} receptors in the peripheral airways but not in the central airways was confirmed using ({sup 3}H)telenzepine, an M{sub 1} receptor ligand. ({sup 3}H)Telenzepine showed specific saturable binding to 8% of ({sup 3}H)QNB labeled binding sites in homogenates of rat peripheral lung, while there was no detectable specific binding in homogenates of rat trachea or heart.

  15. High affinity receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide on a human glioma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, F.C.; Gammeltoft, S.; Westermark, B.; Fahrenkrug, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) bound with high affinity (Kd 0.13 nmol/l) to receptors on the human glioma cell line U-343 MG Cl 2:6. The receptors bound the related peptides helodermin, PHM and secretin with 10, 400 and 5000 times lower affinity, respectively. Deamidated VIP (VIP-COOH) and (des-His1)VIP bound with 10 and 100 times lower affinity. The fragment VIP(7-28) displaced 25% of the receptor-bound {sup 125}I-VIP whereas VIP(16-28) and VIP(1-22-NH2) were inactive. The binding of {sup 125}I-VIP could be completely inhibited by 10 mumol/l of the antagonists (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Phe2)GRF(1-29)-NH2, (pCl-D-Phe6,Leu17)VIP and VIP(10-28); in contrast, the antagonist L-8-K was inactive. Affinity labeling showed that VIP bound to proteins with Mr's of 75 kDa, 66 kDa and 50 kDa, respectively. Following binding, the peptide was rapidly internalized, and at steady-state only 20% of cell-associated {sup 125}I-VIP was bound to receptors on the cell surface. The internalized {sup 125}I-VIP was completely degraded to {sup 125}I-tyrosine which was released from the cells. Degradation of internalized {sup 125}I-VIP was significantly reduced by chloroquine phenanthroline and pepstatin-A. Surface binding and internalization of {sup 125}I-VIP was increased 3 times by phenanthroline, and pepstatin-A caused a 5 times increase in surface binding. Chloroquine reduced surface-bound {sup 125}I-VIP, but caused retention of internalized {sup 125}I-VIP.

  16. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Insulin and epidermal growth factor-urogastrone: Affinity crosslinking to specific binding sites in rat liver membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hock, R. A.; Hollenberg, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    Both insulin and human epidermal growth factor-urogastrone (EGF/URO) can be covalently linked to specific rat liver membrane binding sites by glutaraldehyde coupling followed by sodium borohydride reduction to yield affinity-labeled membrane constituents sufficiently stable for solubilization and further analysis by various techniques. Solubilization of membranes covalently labeled with 125I-labeled insulin yields a component with chromatographic properties identical to those of a soluble insulin receptor characterized in previous studies. A second soluble insulin-binding component that is not revealed by the affinity-labeling method and that has not yet been reported can also be detected. Membranes similarly labeled with 125I-labeled EGF/URO yield one major and two minor ligand-specific soluble (Triton X-100) affinity-labeled components, as detected by chromatography on Sepharose 6B. Further analysis of the EGF/URO-labeled components by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose, by disc gel electrophoresis, and by enzymatic digestion suggests that the major specific binding component for EGF/URO in liver membranes is a glycoprotein subunit of approximately 100,000 daltons that possesses a 20,000-dalton portion inaccessible to proteolytic cleavage when the subunit is anchored in the membrane. The affinity labeling approach described should prove of use for the study of other polypeptide receptors that, like the EGF/URO receptor, lose their ligand recognition property subsequent to membrane solubilization. PMID:205865

  18. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-08-31

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p < 0.001). Competition for (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-(..beta..-..gamma..-imino)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables.

  19. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  20. Development and characterization of small bispecific albumin-binding domains with high affinity for ErbB3.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Astrand, Mikael; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2013-10-01

    Affinity proteins based on small scaffolds are currently emerging as alternatives to antibodies for therapy. Similarly to antibodies, they can be engineered to have high affinity for specific proteins. A potential problem with small proteins and peptides is their short in vivo circulation time, which might limit the therapeutic efficacy. To circumvent this issue, we have engineered bispecificity into an albumin-binding domain (ABD) derived from streptococcal Protein G. The inherent albumin binding was preserved while the opposite side of the molecule was randomized for selection of high-affinity binders. Here we present novel ABD variants with the ability to bind to the epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (ErbB3). Isolated candidates were shown to have an extraordinary thermal stability and affinity for ErbB3 in the nanomolar range. Importantly, they were also shown to retain their affinity to albumin, hence demonstrating that the intended strategy to engineer bispecific single-domain proteins against a tumor-associated receptor was successful. Moreover, competition assays revealed that the new binders could block the natural ligand Neuregulin-1 from binding to ErbB3, indicating a potential anti-proliferative effect. These new binders thus represent promising candidates for further development into ErbB3-signaling inhibitors, where the albumin interaction could result in prolonged in vivo half-life.

  1. Carbohydrate-binding protein identification by coupling structural similarity searching with binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; von Itzstein, Mark; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-11-15

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) are potential biomarkers and drug targets. However, the interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are challenging to study experimentally and computationally because of their low binding affinity, high flexibility, and the lack of a linear sequence in carbohydrates as exists in RNA, DNA, and proteins. Here, we describe a structure-based function-prediction technique called SPOT-Struc that identifies carbohydrate-recognizing proteins and their binding amino acid residues by structural alignment program SPalign and binding affinity scoring according to a knowledge-based statistical potential based on the distance-scaled finite-ideal gas reference state (DFIRE). The leave-one-out cross-validation of the method on 113 carbohydrate-binding domains and 3442 noncarbohydrate binding proteins yields a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.56 for SPalign alone and 0.63 for SPOT-Struc (SPalign + binding affinity scoring) for CBP prediction. SPOT-Struc is a technique with high positive predictive value (79% correct predictions in all positive CBP predictions) with a reasonable sensitivity (52% positive predictions in all CBPs). The sensitivity of the method was changed slightly when applied to 31 APO (unbound) structures found in the protein databank (14/31 for APO versus 15/31 for HOLO). The result of SPOT-Struc will not change significantly if highly homologous templates were used. SPOT-Struc predicted 19 out of 2076 structural genome targets as CBPs. In particular, one uncharacterized protein in Bacillus subtilis (1oq1A) was matched to galectin-9 from Mus musculus. Thus, SPOT-Struc is useful for uncovering novel carbohydrate-binding proteins. SPOT-Struc is available at http://sparks-lab.org.

  2. High-affinity VEGF antagonists by oligomerization of a minimal sequence VEGF-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Stefano, James E; Bird, Julie; Kyazike, Josephine; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Dwyer, Markryan; Hou, Lihui; Qiu, Huawei; Matthews, Gloria; O'Callaghan, Michael; Pan, Clark Q

    2012-12-19

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) neutralizing antagonists including antibodies or receptor extracellular domain Fc fusions have been applied clinically to control angiogenesis in cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, and edema. We report here the generation of high-affinity VEGF-binding domains by chemical linkage of the second domain of the VEGF receptor Flt-1 (D2) in several configurations. Recombinant D2 was expressed with a 13 a.a. C-terminal tag, including a C-terminal cysteine to enable its dimerization by disulfide bond formation or by attachment to divalent PEGs and oligomerization by coupling to multivalent PEGs. Disulfide-linked dimers produced by Cu(2+) oxidation of the free-thiol form of the protein demonstrated picomolar affinity for VEGF in solution, comparable to that of a D2-Fc fusion (sFLT01) and ~50-fold higher than monomeric D2, suggesting the 26 a.a. tag length between the two D2 domains permits simultaneous interaction of both faces of the VEGF homodimer. Extending the separation between the D2 domains by short PEG spacers from 0.35 kD to 5 kD produced a modest ~2-fold increase in affinity over the disulfide, thus defining the optimal distance between the two D2 domains for maximum affinity. By surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a larger (~5-fold) increase in affinity was observed by conjugation of the D2 monomer to the termini of 4-arm PEG, and yielding a product with a larger hydrodynamic radius than sFLT01. The higher affinity displayed by these D2 PEG tetramers than either D2 dimer or sFLT01 was largely a consequence of a slower rate of dissociation, suggesting the simultaneous binding by these tetramers to neighboring surface-bound VEGF. Finally, disulfide-linked D2 dimers showed a greater resistance to autocatalytic fragmentation than sFLT01 under elevated temperature stress, indicating such minimum-sequence constructs may be better suited for sustained-release formulations. Therefore, these constructs represent novel Fc

  3. Imaging the high-affinity state of the dopamine D2 receptor in vivo: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Skinbjerg, Mette; Sibley, David R.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been used for more than three decades to image and quantify dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in vivo with antagonist radioligands but in the recent years agonist radioligands have also been employed. In vitro competition studies have demonstrated that agonists bind to both a high and a low-affinity state of the D2Rs, of which the high affinity state reflects receptors that are coupled to G-proteins and the low-affinity state reflects receptors uncoupled from G-proteins. In contrast, antagonists bind with uniform affinity to the total pool of receptors. Results of these studies led to the proposal that D2Rs exist in high and low-affinity states for agonists in vivo and sparked the development and use of agonist radioligands for PET imaging with the primary purpose of measuring the proportion of receptors in the high-affinity (activating) state. Although several lines of research support the presence of high and low-affinity states of D2Rs and their detection by in vivo imaging paradigms, a growing body of controversial data has now called this into question. These include both in vivo and ex vivo studies of anesthesia effects, rodent models with increased proportions of high-affinity state D2Rs as well as the molecular evidence for stable receptor–G-protein complexes. In this commentary we review these data and discuss the evidence for the in vivo existence of D2Rs configured in high and low-affinity states and whether or not the high-affinity state of the D2R can, in fact, be imaged in vivo with agonist radioligands. PMID:21945484

  4. Regulation of osteosarcoma EGF receptor affinity by phorbol ester and cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, S.E.; Catherwood, B.D. )

    1989-04-01

    We studied the binding and degradation of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) by UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells and the regulation of EGF receptor affinity for EGF by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and by treatments that raise intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Cell surface binding of (125I)EGF to A431 cells reached a plateau after a 30 minute incubation at 37 degrees C but was undetectable in UMR-106 cells. Degradation of (125I)EGF proceeded at a 50-fold higher rate in A431 cells on a per cell basis, but receptor-bound (125I)EGF was internalized and degraded at a 3.5-fold higher rate by UMR-106 cells on a per receptor basis. At 4 degrees C, (125I)EGF labeled a single class of surface binding sites in the UMR-106 cell. Treatment with TPA at 37 degrees C reduced subsequent cell surface binding of (125I)EGF at 4 degrees C a maximum of 80% with an IC50 of 1.25 ng/ml. Maximal TPA reduction of (125I)EGF binding was observed within 5-15 minutes and was due to a reduction in the affinity of cell surface receptors of (125I)EGF without a change in receptor density. Pretreatment of the cells for 4 h with 30 microM forskolin, 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) plus 30 microM forskolin, or 1 mM IBMX plus 100 ng/ml parathyroid hormone (PTH) attenuated the loss in (125I)EGF binding caused by a subsequent dose of 10 ng/ml of TPA by 17% (p less than 0.0005), 39% (p less than 0.0002), and 35% (p less than 0.002), respectively.

  5. Path integral method for predicting relative binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mulakala, Chandrika; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel approach for computing biomolecular interaction binding affinities based on a simple path integral solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. Computing the free energy of protein-ligand interactions can expedite structure-based drug design. Traditionally, the problem is seen through the lens of statistical thermodynamics. The computations can become, however, prohibitively long for the change in the free energy upon binding to be determined accurately. In this work we present a different approach based on a stochastic kinetic formalism. Inspired by Feynman's path integral formulation, we extend the theory to classical interacting systems. The ligand is modeled as a Brownian particle subjected to the effective non-bonding interaction potential of the receptor. This allows the calculation of the relative binding affinities of interacting biomolecules in water to be computed as a function of the ligand's diffusivity and the curvature of the potential surface in the vicinity of the binding minimum. The calculation is thus exceedingly rapid. In test cases, the correlation coefficient between actual and computed free energies is >0.93 for accurate data-sets. PMID:19275144

  6. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  7. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  8. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction.

  9. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  10. Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. 5. Opioid receptor binding properties of N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl) analogues of 8-CAC.

    PubMed

    VanAlstine, Melissa A; Wentland, Mark P; Cohen, Dana J; Bidlack, Jean M

    2007-12-01

    A series of aryl-containing N-monosubstituted analogues of the lead compound 8-[N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl)]-carboxamidocyclazocine were synthesized and evaluated to probe a putative hydrophobic binding pocket of opioid receptors. Very high binding affinity to the mu opioid receptor was achieved though the N-(2-(4'-methoxybiphenyl-4-yl)ethyl) analogue of 8-CAC. High binding affinity to mu and very high binding affinity to kappa opioid receptors was observed for the N-(3-bromophenethyl) analogue of 8-CAC. High binding affinity to all three opioid receptors were observed for the N-(2-naphthylethyl) analogue of 8-CAC.

  11. Dextran as a generally applicable multivalent scaffold for improving immunoglobulin-binding affinities of peptide and peptidomimetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kenrick, Sophia; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-08-20

    Molecules able to bind the antigen-binding sites of antibodies are of interest in medicine and immunology. Since most antibodies are bivalent, higher affinity recognition can be achieved through avidity effects in which a construct containing two or more copies of the ligand engages both arms of the immunoglobulin simultaneously. This can be achieved routinely by immobilizing antibody ligands at high density on solid surfaces, such as ELISA plates, but there is surprisingly little literature on scaffolds that routinely support bivalent binding of antibody ligands in solution, particularly for the important case of human IgG antibodies. Here we show that the simple strategy of linking two antigens with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer long enough to span the two arms of an antibody results in higher affinity binding in some, but not all, cases. However, we found that the creation of multimeric constructs in which several antibody ligands are displayed on a dextran polymer reliably provides much higher affinity binding than is observed with the monomer in all cases tested. Since these dextran conjugates are simple to construct, they provide a general and convenient strategy to transform modest affinity antibody ligands into high affinity probes. An additional advantage is that the antibody ligands occupy only a small number of the reactive sites on the dextran, so that molecular cargo can be attached easily, creating molecules capable of delivering this cargo to cells displaying antigen-specific receptors.

  12. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  13. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors regulate voltage-sensitive calcium channels in nerve terminal preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Taft, W C; DeLorenzo, R J

    1984-01-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance. PMID:6328498

  14. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  15. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  16. Conformational features and binding affinities to Cripto, ALK7 and ALK4 of Nodal synthetic fragments.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Caporale, Andrea; Focà, Annalia; Focà, Giuseppina; D'Auria, Gabriella; Falcigno, Lucia; Ruvo, Menotti

    2015-04-01

    Nodal, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is a potent embryonic morphogen also implicated in tumor progression. As for other TGF-βs, it triggers the signaling functions through the interaction with the extracellular domains of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and with the co-receptor Cripto. Recently, we reported the molecular models of Nodal in complex with its type I receptors (ALK4 and ALK7) as well as with Cripto, as obtained by homology modeling and docking simulations. From such models, potential binding epitopes have been identified. To validate such hypotheses, a series of mutated Nodal fragments have been synthesized. These peptide analogs encompass residues 44-67 of the Nodal protein, corresponding to the pre-helix loop and the H3 helix, and reproduce the wild-type sequence or bear some modifications to evaluate the hot-spot role of modified residues in the receptor binding. Here, we show the structural characterization in solution by CD and NMR of the Nodal peptides and the measurement of binding affinity toward Cripto by surface plasmon resonance. Data collected by both conformational analyses and binding measurements suggest a role for Y58 of Nodal in the recognition with Cripto and confirm that previously reported for E49 and E50. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays with recombinant proteins show that Nodal interacts in vitro also with ALK7 and ALK4 and preliminary data, generated using the Nodal synthetic fragments, suggest that Y58 of Nodal may also be involved in the recognition with these protein partners.

  17. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  18. Subcutaneous bioavailability of therapeutic antibodies as a function of FcRn binding affinity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Y Gloria; Hoyte, Kwame; Lutman, Jeff; Lu, Yanmei; Iyer, Suhasini; DeForge, Laura E; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta

    2012-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in immunoglobulin G (IgG) catabolism; however, its role in the disposition of IgG after subcutaneous (SC) administration, including bioavailability, is relatively unknown. To examine the potential effect of FcRn on IgG SC bioavailability, we engineered three anti-amyloid β monoclonal antibody (mAb) reverse chimeric mouse IgG2a (mIgG2a) Fc variants (I253A.H435A, N434H and N434Y) with different binding affinities to mouse FcRn (mFcRn) and compared their SC bioavailability to that of the wild-type (WT) mAb in mice. Our results indicated that the SC bioavailability of mIgG2a was affected by mFcRn-binding affinity. Variant I253A.H435A, which did not bind to mFcRn at either pH 6.0 or pH 7.4, had the lowest bioavailability (41.8%). Variant N434Y, which had the greatest increase in binding affinity at both pH 6.0 and pH 7.4, had comparable bioavailability to the WT antibody (86.1% vs. 76.3%), whereas Variant N434H, which had modestly increased binding affinity at pH 6.0 to mFcRn and affinity comparable to the WT antibody at pH 7.4, had the highest bioavailability (94.7%). A semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic model, which described well the observed data with the WT antibody and variant I253A.H435A, is consistent with the hypothesis that the decreased bioavailability of variant I253A.H435A was due to loss of the FcRn-mediated protection from catabolism at the absorption site. Together, these data demonstrate that FcRn plays an important role in SC bioavailability of therapeutic IgG antibodies. PMID:22327433

  19. Sugar-binding proteins from fish: selection of high affinity "lambodies" that recognize biomedically relevant glycans.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xia; Ma, Mark Z; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Barchi, Joseph J; Mariuzza, Roy A; Murphy, Michael B; Mao, Li; Pancer, Zeev

    2013-01-18

    Glycan-binding proteins are important for a wide variety of basic research and clinical applications, but proteins with high affinity and selectivity for carbohydrates are difficult to obtain. Here we describe a facile and cost-effective strategy to generate monoclonal lamprey antibodies, called lambodies, that target glycan determinants. We screened a library of yeast surface-displayed (YSD) lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for clones that can selectively bind various biomedically important glycotopes. These glycoconjugates included tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (Tn and TFα), Lewis antigens (LeA and LeX), N-glycolylneuraminic acid, targets of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (poly-Man9 and the HIV gp120), and the glycoproteins asialo-ovine submaxillary mucin (aOSM) and asialo-human glycophorin A (aGPA). We isolated clones that bind each of these targets in a glycan-dependent manner and with very strong binding constants, for example, 6.2 nM for Man9 and 44.7 nM for gp120, determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). One particular lambody, VLRB.aGPA.23, was shown by glycan array analysis to be selective for the blood group H type 3 trisaccharide (BG-H3, Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAcα), aGPA, and TFα (Galβ1-3GalNAcα), with affinity constants of 0.2, 1, and 8 nM, respectively. In human tissue microarrays this lambody selectively detected cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens in 14 different types of cancers. It stained 27% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples in a pattern that correlated with poor patient survival. Lambodies with exquisite affinity and selectivity for glycans may find myriad uses in glycobiology and biomedical research.

  20. Novel neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column for Drosophila and Musca nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, M; Latli, B; Casida, J E

    1996-10-01

    Neonicotinoids such as the insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) act as agonists at the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Head membranes of Drosophila melanogaster and Musca domestica have a single high-affinity binding site for [3H]IMI with KD values of 1-2 nM and Bmax values of 560-850 fmol/mg of protein. Locusta and Periplaneta nAChRs isolated with an alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT)-agarose affinity column are known to be alpha-subunit homooligomers. This study uses 1-[N-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-ethyl]amino-1-amino-2-nitroethene++ + (which inhibits [3H]IMI binding to Drosophila and Musca head membranes at 2-3 nM) to develop a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column. The procedure-introduction of Triton-solubilized Drosophila or Musca head membranes into this neonicotinoid-based column, elution with IMI, and analysis by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamicle gel electrophoresis-gives only three proteins (69, 66, and 61 kDa) tentatively assigned as putative subunits of the nAChR; the same three proteins are obtained with Musca using the alpha-BGT-agarose affinity column. Photoaffinity labeling of the Drosophila and Musca putative subunits from the neonicotinoid column with 125I-alpha-BGT-4-azidosalicylic acid gives a labeled derivative of 66-69 kDa. The yield is 2-5 micrograms of receptor protein from 1 g of Drosophila or Musca heads. Neonicotinoid affinity chromatography to isolate native Drosophila and Musca receptors will facilitate studies on the structure and function of insect nAChRs.

  1. Increased Peptide Contacts Govern High Affinity Binding of a Modified TCR Whilst Maintaining a Native pMHC Docking Mode.

    PubMed

    Cole, David K; Sami, Malkit; Scott, Daniel R; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Todorov, Penio T; Moysey, Ruth K; Jakobsen, Bent K; Boulter, Jonathan M; Baker, Brian M; Yi Li

    2013-01-01

    Natural T cell receptors (TCRs) generally bind to their cognate pMHC molecules with weak affinity and fast kinetics, limiting their use as therapeutic agents. Using phage display, we have engineered a high affinity version of the A6 wild-type TCR (A6wt), specific for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A(∗)0201) complexed with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 111-19 peptide (A2-Tax). Mutations in just 4 residues in the CDR3β loop region of the A6wt TCR were selected that improved binding to A2-Tax by nearly 1000-fold. Biophysical measurements of this mutant TCR (A6c134) demonstrated that the enhanced binding was derived through favorable enthalpy and a slower off-rate. The structure of the free A6c134 TCR and the A6c134/A2-Tax complex revealed a native binding mode, similar to the A6wt/A2-Tax complex. However, concordant with the more favorable binding enthalpy, the A6c134 TCR made increased contacts with the Tax peptide compared with the A6wt/A2-Tax complex, demonstrating a peptide-focused mechanism for the enhanced affinity that directly involved the mutated residues in the A6c134 TCR CDR3β loop. This peptide-focused enhanced TCR binding may represent an important approach for developing antigen specific high affinity TCR reagents for use in T cell based therapies.

  2. Relative binding affinity does not predict biological response to xenoestrogens in rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strunck, E; Stemmann, N; Hopert, A; Wünsche, W; Frank, K; Vollmer, G

    2000-10-01

    The possible adverse effects of the so-called environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern. Developmental, endocrine and reproductive disorders in wildlife animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with estrogen-like activity (xenoestrogens); yet, the potential impact of environmental estrogens on human health is currently under debate also due to lack of data. A battery of in vitro assays exist for identifying compounds with estrogenic activity, but only a few models are available to assess estrogenic potency in a multiparametric analysis. We have recently established the endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line RUCA-I; it enables us to compare estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo as these cells are estrogen responsive in vitro and grow estrogen sensitive tumors if inoculated in syngeneic animals in vivo. Here we report in vitro data concerning (a) the relative binding affinity of the selected synthetic chemicals Bisphenol A, nonylphenol, p-tert-octylphenol, and o,p-DDT to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells and (b) the relative potency of these compounds in inducing increased production of complement C3, an endogenous estrogen-responsive gene. Competitive Scatchard analysis revealed that xenoestrogens bound with an at least 1000-fold lower affinity to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells than estradiol itself, thereby exhibiting the following affinity ranking, estradiol>nonylphenol>bisphenol A approximately p-tert-octylphenol>o,p-DDT. Despite these low binding affinities, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and p-tert-octylphenol increased production of complement C3 in a dose dependent manner. Compared with estradiol, only 100-fold higher concentrations were needed for all the compounds to achieve similar levels of induction, except o,p-DDT which was by far less potent. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the increased production of complement C3 was mediated by an increased transcription. In summary, cultured

  3. The binding specificity and affinity determinants of family 1 and family 3 cellulose binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Lehtiö, Janne; Sugiyama, Junji; Gustavsson, Malin; Fransson, Linda; Linder, Markus; Teeri, Tuula T.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulose binding modules (CBMs) potentiate the action of cellulolytic enzymes on insoluble substrates. Numerous studies have established that three aromatic residues on a CBM surface are needed for binding onto cellulose crystals and that tryptophans contribute to higher binding affinity than tyrosines. However, studies addressing the nature of CBM–cellulose interactions have so far failed to establish the binding site on cellulose crystals targeted by CBMs. In this study, the binding sites of CBMs on Valonia cellulose crystals have been visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Fusion of the CBMs with a modified staphylococcal protein A (ZZ-domain) allowed direct immuno-gold labeling at close proximity of the actual CBM binding site. The transmission electron microscopy images provide unequivocal evidence that the fungal family 1 CBMs as well as the family 3 CBM from Clostridium thermocellum CipA have defined binding sites on two opposite corners of Valonia cellulose crystals. In most samples these corners are worn to display significant area of the hydrophobic (110) plane, which thus constitutes the binding site for these CBMs. PMID:12522267

  4. Benzodiazepines: electron affinity, receptors and cell signaling - a multifaceted approach.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Ott, Nadia; Cooksy, Andrew L

    2013-12-01

    This report entails a multifaceted approach to benzodiazepine (BZ) action, involving electron affinity, receptors, cell signaling and other aspects. Computations of the electron affinities (EAs) of different BZs have been carried out to establish the effect of various substituents on their EA. These computations were undertaken to serve as a first step in determining what role electron transfer (ET) plays in BZ activity. The calculations were conducted on the premise that the nature of the substituent will either decrease or increase the electron density of the benzene ring, thus altering the ability of the molecule to accept an electron. Investigations were performed on the effect of drug protonation on EA. Similarities involving substituent effects in prior electrochemical studies are also discussed. As part of the multifaceted approach, EA is linked to ET, which appears to play a role in therapeutic activity and toxicity. There is extensive literature dealing with the role of receptors in BZ activity. Significant information on receptor involvement was reported more than 40 years ago. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is known to be importantly involved. GABA is a probable mediator of BZ effects. BZ and GABA receptors, although not identical, are physiologically linked. Cell signaling is known to play a part in the biochemistry of BZ action. Various factors participated, such as gene expression, allosteric influence, toxic effects and therapeutic action. Evidence points to involvement of EA and ET in the mode of action in cell signaling. Oxidative stress and antioxidant effects are also addressed.

  5. Insights into the structural determinants required for high-affinity binding of chiral cyclopropane-containing ligands to α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: an integrated approach to behaviorally active nicotinic ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-Kun; Eaton, J Brek; Yu, Li-Fang; Nys, Mieke; Mazzolari, Angelica; van Elk, René; Smit, August B; Alexandrov, Vadim; Hanania, Taleen; Sabath, Emily; Fedolak, Allison; Brunner, Daniela; Lukas, Ronald J; Vistoli, Giulio; Ulens, Chris; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-09-27

    Structure-based drug design can potentially accelerate the development of new therapeutics. In this study, a cocrystal structure of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) from Capitella teleta (Ct) in complex with a cyclopropane-containing selective α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist (compound 5) was acquired. The structural determinants required for ligand binding obtained from this AChBP X-ray structure were used to refine a previous model of the human α4β2-nAChR, thus possibly providing a better understanding of the structure of the human receptor. To validate the potential application of the structure of the Ct-AChBP in the engineering of new α4β2-nAChR ligands, homology modeling methods, combined with in silico ADME calculations, were used to design analogues of compound 5. The most promising compound, 12, exhibited an improved metabolic stability in comparison to the parent compound 5 while retaining favorable pharmacological parameters together with appropriate behavioral end points in the rodent studies.

  6. Insights into the Structural Determinants Required for High Affinity Binding of Chiral Cyclopropane-Containing Ligands to α4β2-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors; An Integrated Approach to Behaviorally Active Nicotinic Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han-Kun; Eaton, J. Brek; Yu, Li-Fang; Nys, Mieke; Mazzolari, Angelica; van Elk, René; Smit, August B.; Alexandrov, Vadim; Hanania, Taleen; Sabath, Emily; Fedolak, Allison; Brunner, Daniela; Lukas, Ronald J.; Vistoli, Giulio; Ulens, Chris; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based drug design can potentially accelerate the development of new therapeutics. In this study, a co-crystal structure of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) from Capitella teleta (Ct) in complex with a cyclopropane-containing, selective α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist (compound 5) was acquired. The structural determinants required for ligand binding obtained from this AChBP X-ray structure were used to refine our previous model of the human α4β2-nAChR, thus possibly providing a better understanding of the structure of the human receptor. In order to validate the potential application of the structure of the Ct-AChBP in the engineering of new α4β2-nAChR ligands, homology modeling methods, combined with in silico ADME calculations, were used to design analogs of compound 5. The most promising compound 12, exhibited an improved metabolic stability in comparison to the parent compound 5 while retaining favorable pharmacological parameters together with appropriate behavioral endpoints in the rodent studies. PMID:22928944

  7. High affinity binding of 125I-angiotensin II to rat glomerular basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Sraer, J; Baud, L; Cosyns, J P; Verroust, P; Nivez, M P; Ardaillou, R

    1977-01-01

    125I-angiotensin II (AII) specifically bound to rat glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The kinetics of binding were similar to those obtained with the total glomeruli. The apparent dissociation constant was close to 50 pM with both preparations. The number of sites related to the amount of protein was two times greater with GBM than with total glomeruli. Since the amount of GBM protein extracted from a given amount of glomerular protein was about 10%, it was possible to estimate the share of the GBM binding sites for AII as representing 20% of the total number present in the entire glomerulus. Binding studies at equilibrium as a function of 125I-AII concentration and competitive binding experiments suggested either multiplicity of the binding sites or cooperativity in the binding reaction. Degradation of 125I-AII in the presence of GBM was slight and did not increase with time. The difference in the degrees of degradation of 125I-AII was too small to account for the observed difference in binding when the results obtained with GBM and isolated glomeruli preparations were compared. 125I-AII binding to GBM was increased after treatment of these membranes with collagenase, slightly diminished with neuraminidase, and almost completely abolished with trypsin suggesting the proteic nature of the receptor. 125I-AII binding to GBM was diminished after incubation of GBM with anti-GBM antibodies as a result of a decrease in the number of binding sites. 125I-AII binding was even more diminished in preparations of glomeruli isolated from rats passively immunized with anti-GBM antibodies when compared with glomeruli from control animals. This resulted from both smaller affinity for AII and decrease in the number of the binding sites. The present data provides evidence for specific binding sites for AII localized on GBM. This is noteworthy since receptors for polypeptide hormones are currently observed on the surface of cell membranes. These findings also suggest a new

  8. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  9. Structure-activity relationships for hallucinogenic N,N-dialkyltryptamines: photoelectron spectra and serotonin receptor affinities of methylthio and methylenedioxy derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, T.B.; Benington, F.; Morin, R.D.; Beaton, J.M.; Glennon, R.A.; Domelsmith, L.N.; Houk, K.N.; Rozeboom, M.D.

    1982-11-01

    Serotonin receptor affinity and photelectron spectral data were obtained on a number of substituted N,N-dimethyltryptamines. Evidence is presented that electron-donating substituents in the 5-position lead to enhanced behavioral disruption activity and serotonin receptor affinity as compared to unsubstituted N,N-dimethyltryptamine and analogues substituted in the 4- or 6-position. Some correlation was found between ionization potentials and behavioral activity, which may have implications concerning the mechanism of receptor binding.

  10. Effect of desipramine on dopamine receptor binding in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Suhara, Tetsuya Jikei Univ., Tokyo ); Inoue, Osamu; Kobayasi, Kaoru )

    1990-01-01

    Effect of desipramine on the in vivo binding of {sup 3}H-SCH23390 and {sup 3}H-N-methylspiperone ({sup 3}H-NMSP) in mouse striatum was studied. The ratio of radioactivity in the striatum to that in the cerebellum at 15 min after i.v. injection of {sup 3}H-SCH23390 or 45 min after injection of {sup 3}H-NMSP were used as indices of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor binding in vivo, respectively. In vivo binding of D1 and D2 receptors was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by acute treatment with desipramine (DMI). A saturation experiment suggested that the DMI-induced reduction in the binding was mainly due to the decrease in the affinity of both receptors. No direct interactions between the dopamine receptors and DMI were observed in vitro by the addition of 1 mM of DMI into striatal homogenate. Other antidepressants such as imipramine, clomipramine, maprotiline and mianserin also decreased the binding of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. The results indicated an important role of dopamine receptors in the pharmacological effect of antidepressants.

  11. Synthetic Receptors for the High‐Affinity Recognition of O‐GlcNAc Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Pablo; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Lisbjerg, Micke; Pittelkow, Michael; Supekar, Nitin T.; Boons, Geert‐Jan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The combination of a pyrenyl tetraamine with an isophthaloyl spacer has led to two new water‐soluble carbohydrate receptors (“synthetic lectins”). Both systems show outstanding affinities for derivatives of N‐acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in aqueous solution. One receptor binds the methyl glycoside GlcNAc‐β‐OMe with K a≈20 000 m −1, whereas the other one binds an O‐GlcNAcylated peptide with K a≈70 000 m −1. These values substantially exceed those usually measured for GlcNAc‐binding lectins. Slow exchange on the NMR timescale enabled structural determinations for several complexes. As expected, the carbohydrate units are sandwiched between the pyrenes, with the alkoxy and NHAc groups emerging at the sides. The high affinity of the GlcNAcyl–peptide complex can be explained by extra‐cavity interactions, raising the possibility of a family of complementary receptors for O‐GlcNAc in different contexts. PMID:26822115

  12. Purification and affinity labeling of dihydropyridine receptor from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanngiesser, U.; Nalik, P.; Pongs, O.

    1988-05-01

    Undegraded dihydropyridine (DHP)-receptor (putatively a voltage-gated Ca/sup 2 +/ channel) has been purified as a 340-kDa protein complex to approx.80% homogeneity (2.4 nmol of DHP-receptor per mg of protein) from rabbit skeletal muscle by a rapid purification protocol. Transverse-tubule membranes were prepared in high yield by Ribi-press treatment. The DHP-receptor complex was solubilized in 1% digitonin followed by a two step-chromatographic purification procedure. The equilibrium dissociation constant of (/sup 3/H) (+) -PN200-110 binding (K/sub d/; 0.9 nM) was not significantly changed by solubilization or purification. The purified DHP-receptor is composed of two subunits with apparent molecular masses of 148 kDa and 195 kDa migrating in polyacrylamide gels under nonreducing conditions as a single moiety of approx.300 kDa. The 195-kDa subunit was affinity-labeled with (/sup 3/H)azidopine in both transverse-tubule membranes and purified DHP-receptor preparations. The subunit can be degraded by high-energy irradiation to a 26-kDa peptide and by proteolysis to a 32-kDa peptide. Thus, it is probably due to proteolytic cleavage and/or photolysis that neither purification nor affinity-labeling studies have previously identified a DHP-receptor subunit of comparable molecular mass (195 kDa).

  13. Estradiol Binds to Insulin and Insulin Receptor Decreasing Insulin Binding in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Podufaly, Abigail; Dillon, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Insulin (INS) resistance associated with hyperestrogenemias occurs in gestational diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, estrogen therapies, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanism by which INS and estrogen interact is unknown. We hypothesize that estrogen binds directly to INS and the insulin receptor (IR) producing INS resistance. Objectives: To determine the binding constants of steroid hormones to INS, the IR, and INS-like peptides derived from the IR; and to investigate the effect of estrogens on the binding of INS to its receptor. Methods: Ultraviolet spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and NMR demonstrated estrogen binding to INS and its receptor. Horse-radish peroxidase-linked INS was used in an ELISA-like procedure to measure the effect of estradiol on binding of INS to its receptor. Measurements: Binding constants for estrogens to INS and the IR were determined by concentration-dependent spectral shifts. The effect of estradiol on INS binding to its receptor was determined by shifts in the INS binding curve. Main Results: Estradiol bound to INS with a Kd of 12 × 10−9 M and to the IR with a Kd of 24 × 10−9 M, while other hormones had significantly less affinity. Twenty-two nanomolars of estradiol shifted the binding curve of INS to its receptor 0.8 log units to the right. Conclusion: Estradiol concentrations in hyperestrogenemic syndromes may interfere with INS binding to its receptor producing significant INS resistance. PMID:25101056

  14. Modulation of Opioid Receptor Ligand Affinity and Efficacy Using Active and Inactive State Receptor Models

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Jessica P.; Purington, Lauren C.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2012-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists are widely used for the treatment of pain; however chronic use results in the development of tolerance and dependence. It has been demonstrated that co-administration of a MOR agonist with a delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist maintains the analgesia associated with MOR agonists, but with reduced negative side effects. Using our newly refined opioid receptor models for structure-based ligand design, we have synthesized several pentapeptides with tailored affinity and efficacy profiles. In particular, we have obtained pentapeptides 8, Tyr-c(S-S)[DCys-1Nal-Nle-Cys]NH2, and 12, Tyr-c(S-S)[DCys-1Nal-Nle-Cys]OH, which demonstrates high affinity and full agonist behavior at MOR, high affinity but very low efficacy for DOR, and minimal affinity for the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). Functional properties of these peptides as MOR agonists/DOR antagonists lacking undesired KOR activity make them promising candidates for future in vivo studies of MOR/DOR interactions. Subtle structural variation of 12, by substituting D-Cys5 for L-Cys5, generated analog 13 which maintains low nanomolar MOR and DOR affinity, but which displays no efficacy at either receptor. These results demonstrate the power and utility of accurate receptor models for structure-based ligand design, as well as the profound sensitivity of ligand function on its structure. PMID:22882801

  15. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs does not change the affinity of its SH3 domains for Sos proline-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Cussac, D; Frech, M; Chardin, P

    1994-09-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptide binding to Grb2 induces tryptophan fluorescence changes in the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. Affinities are in the nanomolar range, the Shc peptide having the highest affinity, followed by peptides mimicking Grb2 binding sites on EGF and HGF receptors, the putative sites on insulin and IGF-1 receptors having much lower affinities. Proline-rich peptide binding to the SH3 domains induces fluorescence changes mainly in the C-terminal SH3. Affinities are in the micromolar range, the highest affinity peptides mimicking the first proline-rich motif of the Sos C-terminus. Additional residues before this PVPPPVPP motif provide a minor contribution to the binding, but the two residues after this motif are important and may contribute to specificity. The affinity of each SH3 for each proline-rich motif is too low to account for the high stability of the Grb2-Sos complex, suggesting that Grb2 recognizes other structural features in the Sos C-terminus. Binding of a phosphotyrosine peptide to the SH2 has no effect on the SH3s. Thus the binding of Grb2 to a receptor or to an associated protein phosphorylated on tyrosines is unlikely to activate the exchange factor activity of Sos through a conformational change transmitted from the SH2 to the SH3 domains.

  16. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Zaczek, R.; Pearsall, D.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1989-12-01

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of (125I)Tyro-ovine CRF ((125I)oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for (125I) oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, (125I)oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex.

  17. Muscarinic cholinergic and histamine H1 receptor binding of phenothiazine drug metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hals, P.A.; Hall, H.; Dahl, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro binding affinities of chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, levomepromazine, perphenazine and some of their metabolites for dopamine D2 receptors, ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sup 2/ adrenoceptors in rat brain were previously reported from out laboratories. The present study reports the in vitro binding affinities of the same compounds for muscarinic cholinergic receptors and for histamine H1 receptors in rat brain, using /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and /sup 3/H-mepyramine as radioligands. Chlorpromazine, levomepromazine, and their metabolites had 5-30 times higher binding affinities for muscarinic cholinergic receptors than fluphenazine, perphenazine and their metabolites. Levomepromazine was the most potent and fluphenazine the least potent of the four drugs in histamine H1 receptor binding. 7-Hydroxy levomepromazine, 3-hydroxy levomepromazine and 7-hydroxy fluphenazine had only 10% of the potency of the parent drug in histamine H1 receptor binding, while the 7-hydroxy-metabolites of chlorpromazine and perphenazine had about 75% of the potency of the parent drug in this binding system. This histamine H1 receptor binding affinities indicate that metabolites may contribute to the sedative effects of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine.

  18. Characterization of high affinity (/sup 3/H)triazolam binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O/sup 0/C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37/sup 0/C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0/sup 0/C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37/sup 0/C). Inhibition studies showed that (/sup 3/H)TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0/sup 0/C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37/sup 0/C. In Ro 15-1788/(/sup 3/H)TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion (/sup 3/H)TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists.

  19. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Wang, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Tsai, Jing-Shin; Wu, Chien-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang; and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  20. Transmembrane-truncated alphavbeta3 integrin retains high affinity for ligand binding: evidence for an 'inside-out' suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R J; Diefenbach, B; Brown, A; Cullen, E; Jonczyk, A; Güssow, D; Luckenbach, G A; Goodman, S L

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of alphavbeta3 integrin affinity regulation have important biological implications in tumour development, wound repair and angiogenesis. We expressed, purified and characterized recombinant forms of human alphavbeta3 (r-alphavbeta3) and compared the activation state of these with alphavbeta3 in its cellular environment. The ligand specificity and selectivity of recombinant full-length and double transmembrane truncations of r-alphavbeta3 cloned in BacPAK6 vectors and expressed in Sf9 and High Five insect cells were compared with those of native placental alphavbeta3 and the receptor in situ on the cell surface. r-alphavbeta3 integrins were purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of cells (full-length), and from the culture medium of cells expressing double-truncated r-alphavbeta3. r-alphavbeta3 had the same epitopes, ligand-binding specificities, bivalent cation requirements and susceptibility to RGD-containing peptides as native alphavbeta3. On M21-L4 melanoma cells, alphavbeta3 mediated binding to vitronectin, but not to fibrinogen unless activated with Mn2+. Non-activated alphaIIbbeta3 integrin as control in M21-L-IIb cells had the opposite profile, mediating binding to fibrinogen, but not to vitronectin unless activated with Mn2+. Thus these receptors had moderate to low ligand affinity. In marked contrast, purified alphavbeta3 receptors, with or without transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, were constitutively of high affinity and able to bind strongly to vitronectin, fibronectin and fibrinogen under physiological conditions. Our data suggest that, in contrast with the positive regulation of alphaIIbbeta3 in situ, intracellular controls lower the affinity of alphavbeta3, and the cytoplasmic domains may act as a target for negative regulators of alphavbeta3 activity. PMID:9480902

  1. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  2. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  3. Network-of-queues approach to B-cell-receptor affinity discrimination.

    PubMed

    Felizzi, Federico; Comoglio, Federico

    2012-06-01

    The immune system is one of the most complex signal processing machineries in biology. The adaptive immune system, consisting of B and T lymphocytes, is activated in response to a large spectrum of pathogen antigens. B cells recognize and bind the antigen through B-cell receptors (BCRs) and this is fundamental for B-cell activation. However, the system response is dependent on BCR-antigen affinity values that span several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the ability of the BCR to discriminate between affinities at the high end (e.g., 10^{9}M^{-1}-10^{10}M^{-1}) challenges the formulation of a mathematical model able to robustly separate these affinity-dependent responses. Queuing theory enables the analysis of many related processes, such as those resulting from the stochasticity of protein binding and unbinding events. Here we define a network of queues, consisting of BCR early signaling states and transition rates related to the propensity of molecular aggregates to form or disassemble. By considering the family of marginal distributions of BCRs in a given signaling state, we report a significant separation (measured as Jensen-Shannon divergence) that arises from a broad spectrum of antigen affinities.

  4. Network-of-queues approach to B-cell-receptor affinity discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizzi, Federico; Comoglio, Federico

    2012-06-01

    The immune system is one of the most complex signal processing machineries in biology. The adaptive immune system, consisting of B and T lymphocytes, is activated in response to a large spectrum of pathogen antigens. B cells recognize and bind the antigen through B-cell receptors (BCRs) and this is fundamental for B-cell activation. However, the system response is dependent on BCR-antigen affinity values that span several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the ability of the BCR to discriminate between affinities at the high end (e.g., 109M-1-1010M-1) challenges the formulation of a mathematical model able to robustly separate these affinity-dependent responses. Queuing theory enables the analysis of many related processes, such as those resulting from the stochasticity of protein binding and unbinding events. Here we define a network of queues, consisting of BCR early signaling states and transition rates related to the propensity of molecular aggregates to form or disassemble. By considering the family of marginal distributions of BCRs in a given signaling state, we report a significant separation (measured as Jensen-Shannon divergence) that arises from a broad spectrum of antigen affinities.

  5. Synthesis, opioid receptor affinity, and enzymatic hydrolysis of sterically hindered morphine 3-esters.

    PubMed

    Mignat, C; Heber, D; Schlicht, H; Ziegler, A

    1996-07-01

    With the intention of preparing prodrugs, 10 morphine 3-esters were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for opioid receptor binding and enzymatic hydrolysis. The results of binding assays performed on homogenates of guinea pig brain demonstrate a loss in affinity of morphine to mu-, delta-, and kappa-receptors by esterification at the 3-position. The conversion of the esters to morphine was determined in human plasma by HPLC analysis. The half-lives of hydrolysis ranged from 0.5 to > 300 h. The investigations indicate that esterification at the 3-position results in morphine prodrugs with variable hydrolytic stability. Sterically hindered morphine 3-esters may be a promising approach to manipulate the rate of release of morphine.

  6. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  7. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  8. Relative affinity of angiotensin peptides and novel ligands at AT1 and AT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Bosnyak, Sanja; Jones, Emma S; Christopoulos, Arthur; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Thomas, Walter G; Widdop, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    AT1R (angiotensin type 1 receptor) and AT2R (angiotensin type 2 receptor) are well known to be involved in the complex cardiovascular actions of AngII (angiotensin II). However, shorter peptide fragments of AngII are thought to have biological activity in their own right and elicit effects that oppose those mediated by AngII. In the present study, we have used HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells stably transfected with either AT1R or AT2R to perform a systematic analysis of binding affinities of all the major angiotensin peptides. Additionally, we tested the novel AT2R agonist Compound 21, as well as the MasR (Mas receptor) agonist and antagonist AVE0991 and A-779 respectively, for their ability to bind to AT1R or AT2R. Candesartan, CGP42214 and PD123319 were used as reference compounds. Binding studies using 125I-[Sar1Ile8]AngII on the AT1R-transfected HEK-293 cells revealed only AngII, AngIII [angiotensin III; angiotensin-(2-8)] and candesartan to have high affinity for AT1R. In the AT2R-transfected HEK-293 cells, competition for 125I-[Sar1Ile8]AngII binding was observed for all ligands except candesartan, AVE0991 and A-779, the latter two compounds having negligible affinity at either AT1R or AT2R. The rank order of affinity of ligands at AT2R was CGP42112>AngII≥AngIII>Compound 21≥PD123319≫AngIV [angiotensin IV; angiotensin-(3-8)]>Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)]. Of note, although AngIV and Ang-(1-7) exhibited only modest affinity at AT2R compared with AngII, these two angiotensin peptides, together with AngIII, had substantial AT2R selectivity over AT1R. Collectively, our results suggest that shorter angiotensin peptides can act as endogenous ligands at AT2R.

  9. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  10. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  11. Azapeptide analogues of the growth hormone releasing peptide 6 as cluster of differentiation 36 receptor ligands with reduced affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Caroline; Picard, Émilie; Boeglin, Damien; Pohankova, Petra; Chemtob, Sylvain; Ong, Huy; Lubell, William D

    2012-07-26

    The synthetic hexapeptide growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) exhibits dual affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) and the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) receptor. Azapeptide GHRP-6 analogues have been synthesized, exhibiting micromolar affinity to the CD36 receptor with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a. A combinatorial split-and-mix approach furnished aza-GHRP-6 leads, which were further examined by alanine scanning. Incorporation of an aza-amino acid residue respectively at the D-Trp(2), Ala(3), or Trp(4) position gave aza-GHRP-6 analogues with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a by at least a factor of 100 and in certain cases retained affinity for the CD36 receptor. In the latter cases, the D-Trp(2) residue proved important for CD36 receptor affinity; however, His(1) could be replaced by Ala(1) without considerable loss of binding. In a microvascular sprouting assay using a choroid explant, [azaTyr(4)]-GHRP-6 (15), [Ala(1), azaPhe(2)]-GHRP-6 (16), and [azaLeu(3), Ala(6)]-GHRP-6 (33) all exhibited antiangiogenic activity.

  12. Regulator of insulin receptor affinity in rat skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, R.H.; Barnard, K.J.; Kaplan, S.A.; Itakura, K.

    1986-05-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity purification of detergent solubilized insulin receptors (IR) from rat skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles resulted in an apparent increase in total insulin binding activity of greater than 5-fold, suggesting that an inhibitory component had been removed. This was verified when the flow-through fraction from the WGA column was dialyzed and added back to the partially purified receptor. The addition of a 100-fold dilution of the inhibitor preparation caused a 50% reduction in binding to trace amounts of /sup 125/I-insulin. Scatchard analysis revealed that the effect of the inhibitor was to decrease the affinity of the muscle IR. The inhibitor appeared to be tissue specific, inasmuch as the I/sub 50/'s for WGA-purified IR from rat fat and liver were 10 times the I/sub 50/ for muscle IR. The I/sub 50/ for insulin binding to intact IM-9 cells was 30 times the value for muscle IR. The inhibitor eluted in the void volume of Sephadex G-50 columns. Its activity was not destroyed by heating at 90/sup 0/C for 10 minutes, or by prolonged incubation with trypsin or dithiothreitol. The inhibitor described here may have a role in modulating insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

  13. α4βδ GABA(A) receptors are high-affinity targets for γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB).

    PubMed

    Absalom, Nathan; Eghorn, Laura F; Villumsen, Inge S; Karim, Nasiara; Bay, Tina; Olsen, Jesper V; Knudsen, Gitte M; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P; Chebib, Mary; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2012-08-14

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) binding to brain-specific high-affinity sites is well-established and proposed to explain both physiological and pharmacological actions. However, the mechanistic links between these lines of data are unknown. To identify molecular targets for specific GHB high-affinity binding, we undertook photolinking studies combined with proteomic analyses and identified several GABA(A) receptor subunits as possible candidates. A subsequent functional screening of various recombinant GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique showed GHB to be a partial agonist at αβδ- but not αβγ-receptors, proving that the δ-subunit is essential for potency and efficacy. GHB showed preference for α4 over α(1,2,6)-subunits and preferably activated α4β1δ (EC(50) = 140 nM) over α4β(2/3)δ (EC(50) = 8.41/1.03 mM). Introduction of a mutation, α4F71L, in α4β1(δ)-receptors completely abolished GHB but not GABA function, indicating nonidentical binding sites. Radioligand binding studies using the specific GHB radioligand [(3)H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid showed a 39% reduction (P = 0.0056) in the number of binding sites in α4 KO brain tissue compared with WT controls, corroborating the direct involvement of the α4-subunit in high-affinity GHB binding. Our data link specific GHB forebrain binding sites with α4-containing GABA(A) receptors and postulate a role for extrasynaptic α4δ-containing GABA(A) receptors in GHB pharmacology and physiology. This finding will aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the proposed function of GHB as a neurotransmitter and its unique therapeutic effects in narcolepsy and alcoholism.

  14. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  15. Quantitative in vivo receptor binding. I. Theory and application to the muscarinic cholinergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.A.; Ehrenkaufer, R.L.; Beaucage, S.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1985-02-01

    A novel approach to in vivo receptor binding experiments is presented which allows direct quantitation of binding site densities. The method is based on an equilibrium model of tracer uptake and is designed to produce a static distribution proportional to receptor density and to minimize possible confounding influences of regional blood flow, blood-brain barrier permeability, and nonspecific binding. This technique was applied to the measurement of regional muscarinic cholinergic receptor densities in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)scopolamine. Specific in vivo binding of scopolamine demonstrated saturability, a pharmacologic profile, and regional densities which are consistent with interaction of the tracer with the muscarinic receptor. Estimates of receptor density obtained with the in vivo method and in vitro measurements in homogenates were highly correlated. Furthermore, reduction in striatal muscarinic receptors following ibotenic acid lesions resulted in a significant decrease in tracer uptake in vivo, indicating that the correlation between scopolamine distribution and receptor density may be used to demonstrate pathologic conditions. We propose that the general method presented here is directly applicable to investigation of high affinity binding sites for a variety of radioligands.

  16. Selective anxiolytics: are the actions related to partial "agonist" activity or a preferential affinity for benzodiazepine receptor subtypes?

    PubMed

    Gee, K W; Yamamura, H I

    1983-01-01

    Both pharmacological and biochemical evidence support the existence of BZ receptor subtypes. Determination of the molecular basis of BZ receptor heterogeneity requires additional research. The physiological significance of BZ receptor subtypes is not currently understood. One hypothesis presented to explain the unique pharmacological effects of CL 218872 suggests that CL 218872 has preferential affinity for a BZ receptor subtype (i.e., type I sites) that mediates the anxiolytic effects of the clinically active BZs. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed to account for these observations and is based upon the possibility that CL 218872 may act as a partial agonist at the BZ receptor. The partial agonist theory is supported by behavioral evidence and the relatively small differences in affinity of the BZ receptor subtypes discriminated by CL 218872 at physiological temperatures. In addition, in vivo binding studies suggest that occupancy of type II BZ receptor subtypes (i.e., those with low affinity for CL 218872) is necessary for CL 218872 to produce minimal anticonflict activity (4). Unlike certain other neurotransmitter systems, it is difficult to correlate the heterogeneous binding properties of BZ receptor ligands with their agonist/antagonist potential at BZ receptor. For example, CL 218872 discriminates BZ receptor subtypes and acts as an agonist at the BZ receptor. Beta-carbolines such as PCC also discriminate receptor subtypes, yet they act as antagonists at the BZ receptor. Compounding the complexity, neither the nature nor the existence of an endogenous ligand is known. So, the designation of agonist or antagonist effects is made on a purely functional basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. The glycocalyx promotes cooperative binding and clustering of adhesion receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Qian, Jin; Hu, Jinglei

    2016-05-18

    Cell adhesion plays a pivotal role in various biological processes, e.g., immune responses, cancer metastasis, and stem cell differentiation. The adhesion behaviors depend subtly on the binding kinetics of receptors and ligands restricted at the cell-substrate interfaces. Although much effort has been directed toward investigating the kinetics of adhesion molecules, the role of the glycocalyx, anchored on cell surfaces as an exterior layer, is still unclear. In this paper, we propose a theoretical approach to study the collective binding kinetics of a few and a large number of binders in the presence of the glycocalyx, representing the cases of initial and mature adhesions of cells, respectively. The analytical results are validated by finding good agreement with our Monte Carlo simulations. In the force loading case, the on-rate and affinity increase as more bonds form, whereas this cooperative effect is not observed in the displacement loading case. The increased thickness and stiffness of the glycocalyx tend to decrease the affinity for a few bonds, while they have less influence on the affinity for a large number of bonds. Moreover, for a flexible membrane with thermally-excited shape fluctuations, the glycocalyx is exhibited to promote the formation of bond clusters, mainly due to the cooperative binding of binders. This study helps to understand the cooperative kinetics of adhesion receptors under physiologically relevant loading conditions and sheds light on the novel role of the glycocalyx in cell adhesion.

  18. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  19. Molecular determinants of affinity for aminoglycoside binding to the aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Serpersu, Engin H

    2006-08-29

    One of the most commonly occurring aminoglycoside resistance enzymes is aminoglycoside 2''-O-nucleotidyltransferase [ANT(2'')]. In the present study molecular determinants of affinity and specificity for aminoglycoside binding to this enzyme are investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Binding of aminoglycosides is enthalpically driven accompanied by negative entropy changes. The presence of metal-nucleotide increases the affinity for all but one of the aminoglycosides studied but has no effect on specificity. The substituents at positions 1, 2', and 6' are important determinants of substrate specificity. An amino group at these positions leads to greater affinity. No correlation is observed between the change in affinity and enthalpy. At the 2' position greater affinity results from a more negative enthalpy for an aminoglycoside containing an amino rather than a hydroxyl at that position. At the 6' position the greater affinity for an aminoglycoside containing an amino substituent results from a less disfavorable entropic contribution. The thermodynamic basis for the change in affinity at position 1 could not be determined because of the weak binding of one of the aminoglycoside substrates, amikacin. The effect of increasing osmotic stress on affinity was used to determine that a net release of approximately four water molecules occurs when tobramycin binds to ANT(2''). No measurable net change in the number of bound water molecules is observed when neomycin binds the enzyme. Data acquired in this work provide the rationale for the ability of ANT(2'') to confer resistance against kanamycins but not neomycins.

  20. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  1. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  2. Ouabain receptor binding of hydroxyprogesterone derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, E.; Kim, R. S.; Labella, F. S.; Queen, G.

    1979-01-01

    1 A specific and sensitive radioreceptor assay ahs been devised which is based on high affinity, saturable binding of 9 nM [3H]-ouabain to the total particulate fraction isolated from dog heart. Ouabain and other cardiac glycosides, including the aglycones, were about equipotent in their ability to displace [3H]-ouabain from its receptor, the IC50s ranging from 10 to 30 nM. 2 The only other substances found to compete significantly in the assay were derivatives of hydroxyprogesterone having a 17 alpha-acetate substituent: chlormadinone acetate, megestrol acetate, cyproterone acetate and medroxyprogesterone acetate, with IC50s of 2, 7.4, 9 and 21 microM, respectively. Prednisolone-3,20-bisguanyl-hydrazone, reported to have inotropic activity, gave an IC50 of 6.4 microM. Cyproterone-17 alpha-OH was less active (IC50 90 microM) than cyproterone-17 alpha-acetate. 3 A large number of peptide and protein hormones, steroid hormones and their metabolites, amines, and drugs were inactive. PMID:497535

  3. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II )

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  4. Inhibition of oxytocin receptor function by direct binding of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, E; Guillon, G; Mouillac, B; Zingg, H H

    1998-04-02

    The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is essential for establishing and maintaining pregnancy in mammals. One of its functions includes maintenance of uterine quiescence by decreasing uterine sensitivity to the uterotonic peptide hormone oxytocin. Although it is generally held that steroid hormones such as P4 act at a genomic level by binding to nuclear receptors and modulating the expression of specific target genes, we show here that the effect of P4 on uterine sensitivity to oxytocin involves direct, non-genomic action of P4 on the uterine oxytocin receptor (OTR), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. P4 inhibits oxytocin binding to OTR-containing membranes in vitro, binds with high affinity to recombinant rat OTR expressed in CHO cells, and suppresses oxytocin-induced inositol phosphate production and calcium mobilization. These effects are highly steroid- and receptor-specific, because binding and signalling functions of the closely related human OTR are not affected by P4 itself but by the P4 metabolite 5beta-dihydroprogesterone. Our findings provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between a steroid hormone and a G-protein-coupled receptor and define a new level of crosstalk between the peptide- and steroid-hormone signalling pathways.

  5. Presence in neuroblastoma cells of a mu 3 receptor with selectivity for opiate alkaloids but without affinity for opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, R A; Dvorkin, B; Klinger, H P; Makman, M H

    1994-12-26

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of a unique opiate alkaloid-selective, opioid peptide-insensitive binding site in N18TG2 mouse neuroblastoma cells and in late passage hybrid F-11 cells, derived from N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells and rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Those cells lacked classical opioid peptide-sensitive receptor subtypes, but contained [3H]morphine and [3H]diprenorphine binding sites with affinity for certain opiate alkaloids but not for any endogenously occurring opioid peptide or peptide analog tested, including D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin (DADLE), D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol (DAGO) and dynorphin A(1-17). The binding site differed from hitherto described mu, delta and kappa neuronal opioid receptors not only on the basis of peptide insensitivity, but also on the basis of selectivity and affinities of alkaloids. Saturation experiments with [3H]morphine indicated the presence of a single site with Kd = 49 nM and Bmax = 1510 fmol/mg protein. This novel binding site was not present in F-11 hybrid cells at early passage. Instead the hybrid cells contained conventional opioid receptors (predominantly delta and also mu) capable of binding DADLE and other peptides as well as opiate alkaloids. With additional passage (cell divisions) of the hybrid cells, during which a limited change occurred in mouse chromosome number, the peptide-insensitive binding appeared and the opioid peptide-binding (delta and mu) receptors were lost reciprocally. Thus, expression of the peptide-insensitive binding normally may be repressed when conventional opioid receptors are expressed. The peptide-insensitive opiate binding site described here appears to correspond to the mu 3 receptor subtype, recently identified pharmacologically and functionally in several cell types of the immune system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Divergence of allosteric effects of rapacuronium on binding and function of muscarinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many neuromuscular blockers act as negative allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by decreasing affinity and potency of acetylcholine. The neuromuscular blocker rapacuronium has been shown to have facilitatory effects at muscarinic receptors leading to bronchospasm. We examined the influence of rapacuronium on acetylcholine (ACh) binding to and activation of individual subtypes of muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells to determine its receptor selectivity. Results At equilibrium rapacuronium bound to all subtypes of muscarinic receptors with micromolar affinity (2.7-17 μM) and displayed negative cooperativity with both high- and low-affinity ACh binding states. Rapacuronium accelerated [3H]ACh association with and dissociation from odd-numbered receptor subtypes. With respect to [35S]GTPγS binding rapacuronium alone behaved as an inverse agonist at all subtypes. Rapacuronium concentration-dependently decreased the potency of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding at M2 and M4 receptors. In contrast, 0.1 μM rapacuronium significantly increased ACh potency at M1, M3, and M5 receptors. Kinetic measurements at M3 receptors showed acceleration of the rate of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding by rapacuronium. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a novel dichotomy in rapacuronium effects at odd-numbered muscarinic receptors. Rapacuronium accelerates the rate of ACh binding but decreases its affinity under equilibrium conditions. This results in potentiation of receptor activation at low concentrations of rapacuronium (1 μM) but not at high concentrations (10 μM). These observations highlight the relevance and necessity of performing physiological tests under non-equilibrium conditions in evaluating the functional effects of allosteric modulators at muscarinic receptors. They also provide molecular basis for potentiating M3 receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction. PMID:20038295

  7. DOTA-Derivatives of Octreotide Dicarba-Analogs with High Affinity for Somatostatin sst2,5 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M.; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumors and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst's) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogs, which show interesting binding profiles at sst's. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogs could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogs of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogs exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes. PMID:28286746

  8. Rabies virus binding to an acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit peptide.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1990-04-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled rabies virus to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated. Binding of rabies virus to the receptor peptide was dependent on pH, could be competed with by unlabeled homologous virus particles, and was saturable. Synthetic peptides of snake venom, curaremimetic neurotoxins and of the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein, were effective in competing with labeled virus binding to the receptor peptide at micromolar concentrations. Similarly, synthetic peptides of the binding domain on the acetylcholine receptor competed for binding. These findings suggest that both rabies virus and neurotoxins bind to residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Competition studies with shorter alpha-subunit peptides within this region indicate that the highest affinity virus binding determinants are located within residues 179-192. A rat nerve alpha 3-subunit peptide, that does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin, inhibited binding of virus to the alpha 1 peptide, suggesting that rabies binds to neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These studies indicate that synthetic peptides of the glycoprotein binding domain and of the receptor binding domain may represent useful antiviral agents by targeting the recognition event between the viral attachment protein and the host cell receptor, and inhibiting attachment of virus to the receptor.

  9. Binding modes of noncompetitive GABA-channel blockers revisited using engineered affinity-labeling reactions combined with new docking studies.

    PubMed

    Charon, Sébastien; Taly, Antoine; Rodrigo, Jordi; Perret, Philippe; Goeldner, Maurice

    2011-04-13

    The binding modes of noncompetitive GABA(A)-channel blockers were re-examined taking into account the recent description of the 3D structure of prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which provided access to new mammalian or insect GABA receptor models, emphasizing their transmembrane portion. Two putative binding modes were deciphered for this class of compounds, including the insecticide fipronil, located nearby either the intra- or the extracellular part of the membrane, respectively. These results are in full agreement with previously described affinity-labeling reactions performed with GABA(A) noncompetitive blockers (Perret et al. J. Biol. Chem.1999, 274, 25350-25354).

  10. Rat α-Fetoprotein binding affinities of a large set of structurally diverse chemicals elucidated the relationships between structures and binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Dial, Stacey L; Moland, Carrie L; Fang, Hong; Shen, Jie; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2012-11-19

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system in animals, including humans, to exert adverse effects. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through the binding of receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of any chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors. α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind with estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability for entrance into the target cell. Sequestration of an estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical's potential for disrupting estrogen receptor-mediated responses. To better understand endocrine disruption, we developed a competitive binding assay using rat amniotic fluid, which contains very high levels of AFP, and measured the binding to the rat AFP for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which are known to bind ER. Fifty-three chemicals were able to bind the rat AFP in the assay, while 72 chemicals were determined to be nonbinders. Observations from closely examining the relationship between the binding data and structures of the tested chemicals are rationally explained in a manner consistent with proposed binding regions of rat AFP in the literature. The data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for rat AFP binding. The data assist in elucidating binding interactions and mechanisms between chemicals and rat AFP and, in turn, assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals.

  11. In Vitro Opioid Receptor Affinity and in Vivo Behavioral Studies of Nelumbo nucifera Flower

    PubMed Central

    Kumarihamy, Mallika; León, Francisco; Pettaway, Sara; Wilson, Lisa; Lambert, Janet A.; Wang, Mei; Hill, Christopher; McCurdy, Christopher R.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Cutler, Stephen J.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Nelumbo nucifera Geartn., known as sacred lotus, has been used traditionally in South East Asia as a traditional medicine for various CNS disorders including stress, fever, depression, insomnia, and cognitive conditions. Aim of the study To investigate the in vitro cannabinoid and opioid receptor binding affinities, and in vivo behavioral actions of Nelumbo flower extracts and to isolate the potential compounds to treat CNS associated disorders. Materials and methods The white and pink flowers of N. nucifera were extracted with 95% EtOH, followed by acid-base partitioning using CHCl3 to give acidic and basic partitions. These partitions were subjected to Centrifugal Preparative TLC (CPTLC) to yield benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline (BTIQ) alkaloids and long chain fatty acids, identified by physical and spectroscopic methods. In addition, EtOH extracts and partitions were analyzed for chemical markers by UHPLC/MS and GC/MS. In vitro neuropharmacological effects were evaluated by cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) and opioid [delta (δ), kappa (κ), and mu (μ)] competitive radioligand binding and GTPγS functional assays. The in vivo behavioral effect was studied through the use of the mouse tetrad assay at 10, 30, 75 and 100 mg/kg/ip doses that revealed the effect on locomotion, catalepsy, body temperature, and nociception of acidic and basic CHCl3 partitions, fractions, and compounds. Results Three aporphines, nuciferine (1), N-nor-nuciferine (2), asimilobine (3), and five BTIQs, armepavine (4), O-methylcoclaurine (5), N-methylcoclaurine (6), coclaurine (7), neferine (10), and a mixture of linoleic and palmitic acids (LA and PA), were identified and evaluated for cannabinoid and opioid receptor displacement activities. Compounds 5–7 showed binding affinities for the κ opioid receptor with equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) values of 3.5±0.3, 0.9±0.1, 2.2±0.2 µM, respectively. Compound 10 displayed affinities for δ-and μ- opioid

  12. Androgen-induced sexual dimorphism in high affinity dopamine binding in the brain transcends the hypothalamic-limbic region.

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian-Tehrani, M. H.; Karakiulakis, G.; Le Blond, C. B.; Powell, R.; Thomas, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 High affinity binding of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT) was measured in membrane fractions prepared from cerebral cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, thalamus and brain stem of rats of either sex and of rats which had been either neonatally castrated or androgenized. 2 Binding was measured in rats of 8, 20 and 30 days old as well as in adults. 3 [3H]-dopamine bound with approximately 30 nM affinity ahd [3H]-5-HT with approximately 10 nM affinity to all areas of the brain tested. The relative inhibitory effects of haloperidol, apomorphine, cis-flupenthixol, unlabelled dopamine, noradrenaline, spiroperone, (+)-butaclamol, fluphenazine, pimozide and 5-HT on [3H]-dopamine binding in the cerebral cortex was consistent with receptor status for the binding components there as were the relative inhibitory effects of methysergide, dopamine, fluoxetine and ouabain on [3H]-5-HT binding in the fore brain. 4 Neither [3H]-dopamine nor [3H]-5-HT binding varied with the state of the sexual cycle in females. 5 There were no sexual differences in [3H]-5-HT binding in any of the brain areas tested nor was it affected by neonatal androgenization or neonatal castration. 6 [3H]-dopamine binding was greater in the cerebral cortex and amygdala of male than of female rats. These differences could be mimicked artificially by neonatal castration of males (female type development) or neonatal androgenization of females (male type development). Sexual dimorphism did not become overt until 20 days of age and did not extend to hypothalamus, thalamus or brain stem. 7 It is concluded that neonatal sex differences in exposure to steroid hormones has permanent effects on the number of dopamine binding sites in the cerebral cortex and is suggested that this sexual dimorphism extends to the amygdala. PMID:7074286

  13. ATLAS: A database linking binding affinities with structures for wild-type and mutant TCR-pMHC complexes.

    PubMed

    Borrman, Tyler; Cimons, Jennifer; Cosiano, Michael; Purcaro, Michael; Pierce, Brian G; Baker, Brian M; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-02-03

    The ATLAS (Altered TCR Ligand Affinities and Structures) database (https://zlab.umassmed.edu/atlas/web/) is a manually curated repository containing the binding affinities for wild-type and mutant T cell receptors (TCRs) and their antigens, peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC). The database links experimentally measured binding affinities with the corresponding three dimensional (3D) structures for TCR-pMHC complexes. The user can browse and search affinities, structures, and experimental details for TCRs, peptides, and MHCs of interest. We expect this database to facilitate the development of next-generation protein design algorithms targeting TCR-pMHC interactions. ATLAS can be easily parsed using modeling software that builds protein structures for training and testing. As an example, we provide structural models for all mutant TCRs in ATLAS, built using the Rosetta program. Utilizing these structures, we report a correlation of 0.63 between experimentally measured changes in binding energies and our predicted changes. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Experimental and theoretical binding affinity between polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and selected phenolic compounds from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; López-Cortés, Xaviera A; Castro, Ricardo I; Avila-Salas, Fabián; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Laurie, V Felipe; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-02-01

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent, widely used in winemaking and brewing, whose mode of action in removing phenolic compounds has not been fully characterised. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental and theoretical binding affinity of PVPP towards six phenolic compounds representing different types of phenolic species. The interaction between PVPP and phenolics was evaluated in model solutions, where hydroxyl groups, hydrophobic bonding and steric hindrance were characterised. The results of the study indicated that PVPP exhibits high affinity for quercetin and catechin, moderate affinity for epicatechin, gallic acid and lower affinity for 4-methylcatechol and caffeic acid. The affinity has a direct correlation with the hydroxylation degree of each compound. The results show that the affinity of PVPP towards phenols is related with frontier orbitals. This work demonstrates a direct correlation between the experimental affinity and the interaction energy calculations obtained through computational chemistry methods.

  15. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  16. Protein engineering of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin: Mutations at domain II of CryIAb enhance receptor affinity and toxicity toward gypsy moth larvae

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Francis; Alzate, Oscar; Cotrill, Jeffrey A.; Curtiss, April; Dean, Donald H.

    1996-01-01

    Substitutions or deletions of domain II loop residues of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin CryIAb were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis techniques to investigate their functional roles in receptor binding and toxicity toward gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). Substitution of loop 2 residue N372 with Ala or Gly (N372A, N372G) increased the toxicity against gypsy moth larvae 8-fold and enhanced binding affinity to gypsy moth midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) ≈4-fold. Deletion of N372 (D3), however, substantially reduced toxicity (>21 times) as well as binding affinity, suggesting that residue N372 is involved in receptor binding. Interestingly, a triple mutant, DF-1 (N372A, A282G and L283S), has a 36-fold increase in toxicity to gypsy moth neonates compared with wild-type toxin. The enhanced activity of DF-1 was correlated with higher binding affinity (18-fold) and binding site concentrations. Dissociation binding assays suggested that the off-rate of the BBMV-bound mutant toxins was similar to that of the wild type. However, DF-1 toxin bound 4 times more than the wild-type and N372A toxins, and it was directly correlated with binding affinity and potency. Protein blots of gypsy moth BBMV probed with labeled N372A, DF-1, and CryIAb toxins recognized a common 210-kDa protein, indicating that the increased activity of the mutants was not caused by binding to additional receptor(s). The improved binding affinity of N372A and DF-1 suggest that a shorter side chain at these loops may fit the toxin more efficiently to the binding pockets. These results offer an excellent model system for engineering δ-endotoxins with higher potency and wider spectra of target pests by improving receptor binding interactions. PMID:8962052

  17. The presence of high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β binding in rainbow trout scale indicates a possible endocrine route for the regulation of scale resorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persson, Petra; Shrimpton, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2000-01-01

    High-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β (E2) binding is present in rainbow trout scale. The Kd and Bmax of the scale E2 binding are similar to those of the liver E2 receptor (Kd is 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.4 ± 0.1 nM, and Bmax is 9.1 ± 1.2 and 23.1 ± 2.2 fmol x mg protein-1, for scale and liver, respectively), but different from those of the high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding in plasma (Kd is 4.0 ± 0.4 nM and Bmax is 625.4 ± 63.1 fmol x mg protein-1). The E2 binding in scale was displaced by testosterone, but not by diethylstilbestrol. Hence, the ligand binding specificity is different from that of the previously characterized liver E2 receptor, where E2 is displaced by diethylstilbestrol, but not by testosterone. The putative scale E2 receptor thus appears to bind both E2 and testosterone, and it is proposed that the increased scale resorption observed during sexual maturation in both sexes of several salmonid species may be mediated by this receptor. No high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding could be detected in rainbow trout gill or skin.

  18. (/sup 125/I)diiodoinsulins. Binding affinities, biologic potencies, and properties of their decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Maceda, B.; Linde, S.; Sonne, O.; Gliemann, J.

    1982-07-01

    Insulin was iodinated with 0.3-0.4 mol /sup 125/I/mol insulin using the lactoperoxidase method. About one-third of the radioactivity incorporated into insulin was in diiodoinsulins and about 40% of these molecules contained diiodotyrosine in residue 14 of the A chain. Most of the remaining molecules contained one A14-monoiodotyrosine and one monoiodotyrosine in either position A19, B16, or B26. The binding affinity and biologic potency of this heterogeneous diiodoinsulin preparation was not significantly different from that of A14-(/sup 125/I)monoiodoinsulin in rat adipocytes, whereas it was slightly reduced in hepatocytes and IM-9 lymphocytes. From the iodine distribution and previous data on the binding affinity of each of the four monoiodoinsulin isomers it was calculated that A14-diiodotyrosine-insulin possesses full binding affinity and biologic potency in adipocytes. Diiodoinsulins isolated from another iodoinsulin preparation (iodate method) contained 58% A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin, and most remaining molecules contained one A19-monoiodotyrosine. The binding affinity of this mixed diiodoinsulin preparation was approximately one-fourth of that of A14-monoiodoinsulin in adipocytes, IM-9 lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. It was calculated that A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin is nearly devoid of binding affinity. The diiodoinsulins (lactoperoxidase method) decayed to iodide (probably from diiodotyrosine-insulin) or to polymers with little specific but a markedly increased nonspecific binding. In addition, the polymers had a marked tendency to adsorb to cellulose acetate filters. Conclusions: 1. The binding affinities of diiodoinsulins range from very low values to values at least as high as that of insulin depending on the positions of the iodine moieties. 2. The relative binding affinities vary among tissues. 3. Polymeric decay products give high nonspecific binding.

  19. Cloning and expression of two distinct high-affinity receptors cross-reacting with acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, C A; Crumley, G; Bellot, F; Kaplow, J M; Searfoss, G; Ruta, M; Burgess, W H; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family consists of at least seven closely related polypeptide mitogens which exert their activities by binding and activation of specific cell surface receptors. Unanswered questions have been whether there are multiple FGF receptors and what factors determine binding specificity and biological response. We report the complete cDNA cloning of two human genes previously designated flg and bek. These genes encode two similar but distinct cell surface receptors comprised of an extracellular domain with three immunoglobulin-like regions, a single transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic portion containing a tyrosine kinase domain with a typical kinase insert. The expression of these two cDNAs in transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to the biosynthesis of proteins of 150 kd and 135 kd for flg and bek, respectively. Direct binding experiments with radiolabeled acidic FGF (aFGF) or basic FGF (bFGF), inhibition of binding with native growth factors, and Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated that bek and flg bind either aFGF or bFGF with dissociation constants of (2-15) x 10(-11) M. The high affinity binding of two distinct growth factors to each of two different receptors represents a unique double redundancy without precedence among polypeptide growth factor-receptor interactions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697263

  20. Redesigning Protein Cavities as a Strategy for Increasing Affinity in Protein-Protein Interaction: Interferon-γ Receptor 1 as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Combining computational and experimental tools, we present a new strategy for designing high affinity variants of a binding protein. The affinity is increased by mutating residues not at the interface, but at positions lining internal cavities of one of the interacting molecules. Filling the cavities lowers flexibility of the binding protein, possibly reducing entropic penalty of binding. The approach was tested using the interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNγR1) complex with IFNγ as a model. Mutations were selected from 52 amino acid positions lining the IFNγR1 internal cavities by using a protocol based on FoldX prediction of free energy changes. The final four mutations filling the IFNγR1 cavities and potentially improving the affinity to IFNγ were expressed, purified, and refolded, and their affinity towards IFNγ was measured by SPR. While individual cavity mutations yielded receptor constructs exhibiting only slight increase of affinity compared to WT, combinations of these mutations with previously characterized variant N96W led to a significant sevenfold increase. The affinity increase in the high affinity receptor variant N96W+V35L is linked to the restriction of its molecular fluctuations in the unbound state. The results demonstrate that mutating cavity residues is a viable strategy for designing protein variants with increased affinity. PMID:26060819

  1. Density-dependent cooperative non-specific binding in solid-phase SELEX affinity selection.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Abdullah; White, Brian S; Lis, John T; Shalloway, David

    2013-08-01

    The non-specific binding of undesired ligands to a target is the primary factor limiting the enrichment of tight-binding ligands in affinity selection. Solution-phase non-specific affinity is determined by the free-energy of ligand binding to a single target. However, the solid-phase affinity might be higher if a ligand bound concurrently to multiple adjacent immobilized targets in a cooperative manner. Cooperativity could emerge in this case as a simple consequence of the relationship between the free energy of binding, localization entropy and the spatial distribution of the immobilized targets. We tested this hypothesis using a SELEX experimental design and found that non-specific RNA aptamer ligands can concurrently bind up to four bead-immobilized peptide targets, and that this can increase their effective binding affinity by two orders-of-magnitude. Binding curves were quantitatively explained by a new statistical mechanical model of density-dependent cooperative binding, which relates cooperative binding to both the target concentration and the target surface density on the immobilizing substrate. Target immobilization plays a key role in SELEX and other ligand enrichment methods, particularly in new multiplexed microfluidic purification devices, and these results have strong implications for optimizing their performance.

  2. Identification of a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran in the nerve cord of the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Satoshi; Komaki, Iori; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2006-04-01

    The binding of the neonicotinoid insecticide dinotefuran to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was examined by a centrifugation method using the nerve cord membranes of American cockroaches and [3H]dinotefuran (78 Ci mmol-1). The Kd and Bmax values of [3H]dinotefuran binding were estimated to be 13.7 nM and 14.8 fmol 40 microg-1 protein respectively by Scatchard analysis. Epibatidine, an nAChR agonist, showed a rather lower affinity to the dinotefuran binding site (IC50=991 nM) than dinotefuran (IC50=5.02 nM). Imidacloprid and nereistoxin displayed lower potencies than dinotefuran but higher potencies than epibatidine. The potencies of five dinotefuran analogues in inhibiting the specific binding of [3H]dinotefuran to nerve cord membranes were determined. A good correlation (r2=0.970) was observed between the -log IC50 values of the tested compounds and their piperonyl butoxide-synergised insecticidal activities (-log LD50 values) against German cockroaches. The results indicate that a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran is present in the nerve cord of the American cockroach and that the binding of ligands to the site leads to the manifestation of insecticidal activity.

  3. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  4. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities.

  5. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  6. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo. In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein–DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein–DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein–DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein–DNA binding. PMID:26635393

  7. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-07

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  8. Characterization of the novel progestin gestodene by receptor binding studies and transactivation assays.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, U; Slater, E P; Fritzemeier, K H

    1995-01-01

    Gestodene is a novel progestin used in oral contraceptives with an increased separation of progestogenic versus androgenic activity and a distinct antimineralocorticoid activity. This specific pharmacological profile of gestodene is defined by its pattern of binding affinities to a variety of steroid hormone receptors. In the present study the affinity of gestodene to the progesterone receptor (PR), the androgen receptor (AR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) was re-evaluated by steroid binding assays and compared to those obtained for 3-keto-desogestrel and progesterone. The two synthetic progestins displayed identical high affinity to rabbit PR and similar marked binding to rat AR and GR, while progesterone showed high affinity to PR but only low binding to AR and GR. Furthermore, 3-keto-desogestrel exhibited almost no binding to MR, whereas gestodene, similar to progesterone, showed marked affinity to this receptor. In addition to receptor binding studies, transactivation assays were carried out to investigate the effects of gestodene on AR-, GR- and MR-mediated induction of transcription. In contrast to progesterone, which showed antiandrogenic activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel both exhibited androgenic activity. Furthermore, all three progestins exhibited weak GR-mediated antagonistic activity. In contrast to progesterone, which showed almost no glucocorticoid activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel showed weak glucocorticoid action. In addition, gestodene inhibited the aldosterone-induced reporter gene transcription, similar to progesterone, whereas unlike progesterone, gestodene did not induce reporter gene transcription. 3-Keto-desogestrel showed neither antimineralocorticoid nor mineralocorticoid action.

  9. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1989-12-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a high affinity radioiodinated probe for the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, S.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Graham, R.M.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-03-01

    The availability of radioiodinated probes has facilitated the localization and molecular characterization of cell membrane receptors for hormones and neurotransmitters. However, such probes are not available for the study of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of functionalized derivatives of the selective alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, rauwolscine and yohimbine, which can be radiolabeled to high specific activity with 125I. Following demethylation of rauwolscine or yohimbine, the resultant carboxylic acid derivatives were reacted with 4-aminophenethylamine to yield the respective 4-aminophenethyl carboxamides, 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-phenethyl)carboxamide (rau-pAPC) and 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 beta-yohimban-16 alpha-(N-4-aminophenethyl)carboxamide. In competitive inhibition studies using rat renal membranes and the radioligand (3H)rauwolscine, rau-pAPC (Ki = 11 +/- 1 nM) exhibited a 14-fold greater affinity than the corresponding yohimbine derivative (Ki = 136 +/- 45 nM). The higher affinity compound, rau-pAPC, was radioiodinated by the chloramine T method, and the product, 125I-rau-pAPC (17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-3 -(125I)iodophenethyl)carboxamide), was purified by reverse phase HPLC to high specific activity (2175 Ci/mmol) and its binding characteristics were investigated in rat kidney membranes. Specific binding of 125I-rau-pAPC was saturable and of high affinity as determined by Scatchard analysis (KD = 1.8 +/- 0.3 nM) or from kinetic studies (KD = k2/k1 = 0.056 +/- 0.013 min-1)/4.3 +/- 0.2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM).

  11. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands. PMID:28091608

  12. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  13. Binding and activity of the prostacyclin receptor (IP) agonists, treprostinil and iloprost, at human prostanoid receptors: treprostinil is a potent DP1 and EP2 agonist.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Brendan J; Silverstein, Adam M; Mottola, David M; Clapp, Lucie H

    2012-07-01

    The prostacyclin analogues, iloprost and treprostinil are extensively used in treating pulmonary hypertension. Their binding profile and corresponding biochemical cellular responses on human prostanoid receptors expressed in cell lines, have now been compared. Iloprost had high binding affinity for EP1 and IP receptors (Ki 1.1 and 3.9 nM, respectively), low affinity for FP, EP3 or EP4 receptors, and very low affinity for EP2, DP1 or TP receptors. By contrast, treprostinil had high affinity for the DP1, EP2 and IP receptors (Ki 4.4, 3.6 and 32 nM, respectively), low affinity for EP1 and EP4 receptors and even lower affinity for EP3, FP and TP receptors. In functional assays, iloprost had similar high activity in elevating cyclic AMP levels in cells expressing the human IP receptor and stimulating calcium influx in cells expressing EP1 receptors (EC50 0.37 and 0.3 nM, respectively) with the rank order of activity on the other receptors comparable to the binding assays. As with binding studies, treprostinil elevated cyclic AMP with a similar high potency in cells expressing DP1, IP and EP2 receptors (EC50 0.6, 1.9 and 6.2 nM, respectively), but had low activity at the other receptors. Activation of IP, DP1 and EP2 receptors, as with treprostinil, can all result in vasodilatation of human pulmonary arteries. However, activation of EP1 receptors can provoke vasoconstriction, and hence may offset the IP-receptor mediated vasodilator effects of iloprost. Treprostinil may therefore differ from iloprost in its overall beneficial pulmonary vasorelaxant profile and other pharmacological actions, especially in diseases where the IP receptor is down-regulated.

  14. ABP: a novel AMPA receptor binding protein.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Ziff, E B

    1999-04-30

    We review the cloning of a novel AMPA receptor binding protein (ABP) that interacts with GluR2/3 and is homologous to GRIP. ABP is enriched in the PSD with GluR2 and is localized to the PSD by EM. ABP binds GluR2 via the C-terminal VXI motif through a Class I PDZ interaction. ABP and GRIP can also homo- and heteromultimerize. Thus, ABP and GRIP may be involved in AMPA receptor regulation and localization, by linking it to other cytoskeletal or signaling molecules. We suggest that the ABP/GRIP and PSD-95 families form distinct scaffolds that anchor, respectively, AMPA and NMDA receptors. We are currently investigating proteins that bind ABP and that may regulate the AMPA receptor.

  15. A simple, high-resolution method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Fink, B E; Brunette, S R; Tse, W C; Hedrick, M P

    2001-06-27

    Full details of the development of a simple, nondestructive, and high-throughput method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are described. The method is based on the loss of fluorescence derived from the displacement of ethidium bromide or thiazole orange from the DNA of interest or, in selected instances, the change in intrinsic fluorescence of a DNA binding agent itself and is applicable for assessing relative or absolute DNA binding affinities. Enlisting a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all five base pair (512 hairpins) or four base pair (136 hairpins) sequences displayed in a 96-well format, a compound's rank order binding to all possible sequences is generated, resulting in a high-resolution definition of its sequence selectivity using this fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay. As such, the technique complements the use of footprinting or affinity cleavage for the establishment of DNA binding selectivity and provides the information at a higher resolution. The merged bar graphs generated by this rank order binding provide a qualitative way to compare, or profile, DNA binding affinity and selectivity. The 96-well format assay (512 hairpins) can be conducted at a minimal cost (presently ca. $100 for hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides/assay with ethiduim bromide or less with thiazole orange), with a rapid readout using a fluorescent plate reader (15 min), and is adaptable to automation (Tecan Genesis Workstation 100 robotic system). Its use in generating a profile of DNA binding selectivity for several agents including distamycin A, netropsin, DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and berenil is described. Techniques for establishing binding constants from quantitative titrations are compared, and recommendations are made for use of a Scatchard or curve fitting analysis of the titration binding curves as a reliable means to quantitate the binding affinity.

  16. Agonist and antagonist protect sulfhydrals in the binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kebabian, J.W.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    An iodinated compound (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982 (8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-ol) has been characterized as a specific, high affinity (Kd = 0.7 nM) ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. The ligand binding site of the D-1 receptor in rat striatum was inactivated by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) in a time and concentration dependent manner. The inactivation was rapid and irreversible with a 70% net loss of binding sites. Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue showed a decrease both in receptor number and in radioligand affinity. The remaining receptors retained their selectivity for stereoisomers of both agonist and antagonist. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected in a dose dependent manner the binding sites from inactivation by NEM; the agonist was more effective than the antagonist. The agonist high affinity site, however, was abolished in the absence or presence of protective compound, presumably because of inactivation of the GTP-binding component of adenylate cyclase. In this regard, there was a total loss of agonist- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity after NEM treatment. The authors conclude that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydral group(s) at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding site.

  17. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins.

  18. Circular permutation of the starch-binding domain: inversion of ligand selectivity with increased affinity.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Preyesh; Tseng, Kai-Li; Liu, Yu-Nan; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2012-03-07

    Proteins containing starch-binding domains (SBDs) are used in a variety of scientific and technological applications. A circularly permutated SBD (CP90) with improved affinity and selectivity toward longer-chain carbohydrates was synthesized, suggesting that a new starch-binding protein may be developed for specific scientific and industrial applications.

  19. The membrane proximal region of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 N-terminus can allosterically modulate ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2013-11-19

    The human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), contains a relatively long (∼110 a.a.) amino terminus, whose function is still not defined. Here we explore a potential role for the CB1 N-terminus in modulating ligand binding to the receptor. Although most of the CB1 N-terminus is not necessary for ligand binding, previous studies have found that mutations introduced into its conserved membrane proximal region (MPR) do impair the receptors ability to bind ligand. Moreover, within the highly conserved MPR (∼ residues 90-110) lie two cysteine residues that are invariant in all CB1 receptors. We find these two cysteines (C98 and C107) form a disulfide in heterologously expressed human CB1, and this C98-C107 disulfide is much more accessible to reducing agents than the previously known disulfide in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Interestingly, the presence of the C98-C107 disulfide modulates ligand binding to the receptor in a way that can be quantitatively analyzed by an allosteric model. The C98-C107 disulfide also alters the effects of allosteric ligands for CB1, Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Together, these results provide new insights into how the N-terminal MPR and EL2 act together to influence the high-affinity orthosteric ligand binding site in CB1 and suggest that the CB1 N-terminal MPR may be an area through which allosteric modulators can act.

  20. Definition of the affinity of binding between human von Willebrand factor and coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Ganz, P R; Atkins, J S; Palmer, D S; Dudani, A K; Hashemi, S; Luison, F

    1991-10-15

    Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor are two plasma proteins essential for effective hemostasis. In vivo, they form a non-covalent complex whose association appears to be metal ion dependent. However, a precise definition of the nature of the molecular forces governing their association remains to be defined, as does their binding affinity. In this paper we have determined the dissociation constant and stoichiometry for Factor VIII binding to immobilized von Willebrand factor. The data demonstrate that these proteins interact saturably and with relatively high affinity. Computer assisted analyses of the Scatchard data favour a two site binding model. The higher affinity site was found to have a Kd of 62 (+/- 13) x 10(-12) M while that of the lower affinity site was 380 (+/- 92) x 10(-12) M. The density of Factor VIII binding sites (Bmax) present on von Willebrand factor was 31 (+/- 3) pM for the high affinity binding site and 46 (+/- 6) pM for the lower site, corresponding to a calculated Factor VIII: von Willebrand factor binding ratio of 1:33 and 1:23, respectively.

  1. Identification of common ligand binding determinants of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors. Insights into mechanisms of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Mynarcik, D C; Williams, P F; Schaffer, L; Yu, G Q; Whittaker, J

    1997-07-25

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are peptides that share nearly 50% sequence homology. However, although their cognate receptors also exhibit significant overall sequence homology, the affinity of each peptide for the non-cognate receptor is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than for the cognate receptor. The molecular basis for this discrimination is unclear, as are the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand binding. We have recently identified a major ligand binding site of the insulin receptor by alanine scannning mutagenesis. These studies revealed that a number of amino acids critical for insulin binding are conserved in the IGF-1 receptor, suggesting that they may play a role in ligand binding. We therefore performed alanine mutagenesis of these amino acids to determine whether this is the case. cDNAs encoding alanine-substituted secreted recombinant IGF-1 receptors were expressed in 293 EBNA cells, and the ligand binding properties of the expressed proteins were evaluated. Mutation of Phe701 resulted in a receptor with undetectable IGF-1 binding; alanine substitution of the corresponding amino acid of the insulin receptor, Phe714, produces a 140-fold reduction in affinity for insulin. Mutation of Asp8, Asn11, Phe58, Phe692, Glu693, His697, and Asn698 produces a 3.5-6-fold reduction in affinity for IGF-1. In contrast, alanine mutation of the corresponding amino acids of the insulin receptor with the exception of Asp12 produces reductions in affinity that are 50-fold or greater. The affinity of insulin for these mutants relative to wild type receptor was similar to that of their relative affinity for IGF-1 with two exceptions; the IC50 values for insulin binding to the mutants of Arg10, which has normal affinity for IGF-1, and His697, which has a 6-fold reduction in affinity for IGF-1, were both at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than for wild type receptor. The Kd values for insulin of the corresponding alanine mutants of the insulin receptor

  2. Increasing the affinity of selective bZIP-binding peptides through surface residue redesign

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jenifer B; Reinke, Aaron W; Keating, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    The coiled-coil dimer is a prevalent protein interaction motif that is important for many cellular processes. The basic leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are one family of proteins for which coiled-coil mediated dimerization is essential for function, and misregulation of bZIPs can lead to disease states including cancer. This makes coiled coils attractive protein–protein interaction targets to disrupt using engineered molecules. Previous work designing peptides to compete with native coiled-coil interactions focused primarily on designing the core residues of the interface to achieve affinity and specificity. However, folding studies on the model bZIP GCN4 show that coiled-coil surface residues also contribute to binding affinity. Here we extend a prior study in which peptides were designed to bind tightly and specifically to representative members of each of 20 human bZIP families. These “anti-bZIP” peptides were designed with an emphasis on target-binding specificity, with contributions to design-target specificity and affinity engineered considering only the coiled-coil core residues. High-throughput testing using peptide arrays indicated many successes. We have now measured the binding affinities and specificities of anti-bZIPs that bind to FOS, XBP1, ATF6, and CREBZF in solution and tested whether redesigning the surface residues can increase design–target affinity. Incorporating residues that favor helix formation into the designs increased binding affinities in all cases, providing low-nanomolar binders of each target. However, changes in surface electrostatic interactions sometimes changed the binding specificity of the designed peptides. Impact Statement Designing molecules to bind native proteins is a fundamental objective in protein engineering. Ideally, designs should bind their targets both tightly and selectively. This paper reports binding affinities and specificities for computationally designed peptides that interact with human b

  3. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    PubMed Central

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.P.; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens. PMID:27472381

  4. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C; Van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens.

  5. De Novo Identification and Biophysical Characterization of Transcription Factor Binding Sites with Microfluidic Affinity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, Polly M.; Gerber, Doron; Tran, Danh; Zheng, Jiashun; Li, Hao; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated in part by protein transcription factors (TFs) that bind target regulatory DNA sequences. Predicting DNA binding sites and affinities from transcription factor sequence or structure is difficult; therefore, experimental data are required to link TFs to target sequences. We present a microfluidics-based approach for de novo discovery and quantitative biophysical characterization of DNA target sequences. We validated our technique by measuring sequence preferences for 28 S. cerevisiae TFs with a variety of DNA binding domains, including several that have proven difficult to study via other techniques. For each TF, we measured relative binding affinities to oligonucleotides covering all possible 8-bp DNA sequences to create a comprehensive map of sequence preferences; for 4 TFs, we also determined absolute affinities. We anticipate that these data and future use of this technique will provide information essential for understanding TF specificity, improving identification of regulatory sites, and reconstructing regulatory interactions. PMID:20802496

  6. A comparison of progestin and androgen receptor binding using the CoMFA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughney, Deborah A.; Schwender, Charles F.

    1992-12-01

    A series of 48 steroids has been studied with the SYBYL QSAR module using Relative Binding Affinities (RBAs) to progesterone and androgen receptors obtained from the literature. Models for the progesterone and androgen data were developed. Both models show regions where sterics and electrostatics correlate to binding affinity but are different for androgen and progesterone which suggests differences possibly important for receptor selectivity. The progesterone model is more predictive than the androgen (predictive r2 of 0.725 vs. 0.545 for progesterone and androgen, respectively).

  7. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  8. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  9. Collective binding properties of receptor arrays.

    PubMed

    Agmon, N; Edelstein, A L

    1997-04-01

    Binding kinetics of receptor arrays can differ dramatically from that of the isolated receptor. We simulate synaptic transmission using a microscopically accurate Brownian dynamics routine. We study the factors governing the rise and decay of the activation probability as a function of the number of transmitter molecules released. Using a realistic receptor array geometry, the simulation reproduces the time course of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. A consistent interpretation of experimentally observed synaptic currents in terms of rebinding and spatial correlations is discussed.

  10. Thiophene bioisosteres of spirocyclic σ receptor ligands: relationships between substitution pattern and σ receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schepmann, Dirk; Vela, Jose Miguel; Buschmann, Helmut; Holenz, Jörg; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2012-06-14

    On the basis of the 6',7'-dihydrospiro[piperidine-4,4'-thieno[3,2-c]pyran] framework, a series of more than 30 σ ligands with versatile substituents in 1-, 2'-, and 6'-position has been synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated in order to find novel structure-affinity relationships. It was found that a cyclohexylmethyl residue at the piperidine N-atom instead of a benzyl moiety led to increased σ(2) affinity and therefore to decreased σ(1)/σ(2) selectivity. Small substituents (e.g., OH, OCH(3), CN, CH(2)OH) in 6'-position adjacent to the O-atom were well tolerated by the σ(1) receptor. Removal of the substituent in 6'-position resulted in very potent but unselective σ ligands (13). A broad range of substituents with various lipophilic and H-bond forming properties was introduced in 2'-position adjacent to the S-atom without loss of σ(1) affinity. However, very polar and basic substituents in both 2'- and 6'-position decreased the σ(1) affinity considerably. It is postulated that the electron density of the thiophene moiety has a big impact on the σ(1) affinity.

  11. Heterogeneity of the chondroitin sulfate portion of phosphacan/6B4 proteoglycan regulates its binding affinity for pleiotrophin/heparin binding growth-associated molecule.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Nobuaki; He, Jue; Yajima, Yuki; Mikami, Tadahisa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Yabe, Tomio

    2003-09-12

    PTP zeta is a receptor-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is synthesized as a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and uses pleiotrophin as a ligand. The chondroitin sulfate portion of this receptor is essential for high affinity binding to pleiotrophin. Here, we purified phosphacan, which corresponds to the extracellular domain of PTP zeta, from postnatal day 7 (P7) and P12 rat cerebral cortex (PG-P7 and PG-P12, respectively) and from P20 rat whole brain (PG-P20). The chondroitin sulfate of these preparations displayed immunologically and compositionally different structures. In particular, only PG-P20 reacted with the monoclonal antibody MO-225, which recognizes chondroitin sulfate containing the GlcA(2S)beta 1-3GalNAc(6S) disaccharide unit (D unit). Analysis of the chondroitinase digestion products revealed that GlcA beta 1-3GalNAc(4S) disaccharide unit (A unit) was the major component in these preparations and that PG-P20 contained 1.3% D unit, which was not detected in PG-P7 and PG-P12. Interaction analysis using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that PG-P20 had approximately 5-fold stronger affinity for pleiotrophin (dissociation constant (KD) = 0.14 nM) than PG-P7 and PG-P12, although all these preparations showed similar low affinity binding to pleiotrophin after chondroitinase ABC digestion (KD = 1.4 approximately 1.6 nM). We also found that shark cartilage chondroitin sulfate D containing approximately 20% D unit bound to pleiotrophin with moderate affinity (KD = 2.7 nM), whereas whale cartilage chondroitin sulfate A showed no binding to this growth factor. These results suggest that variation of chondroitin sulfate plays important roles in the regulation of signal transduction in the brain.

  12. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  13. Prediction of SAMPL4 host-guest binding affinities using funnel metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Ya-Wen; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2014-04-01

    Accurately predicting binding affinities between ligands and macromolecules has been a much sought-after goal. A tremendous amount of resources can be saved in the pharmaceutical industry through accurate binding-affinity prediction and hence correct decision-making for the drug discovery processes. Owing to the structural complexity of macromolecules, one of the issues in binding affinity prediction using molecular dynamics is the adequate sampling of the conformational space. Recently, the funnel metadynamics method (Limongelli et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110:6358, 2013) was developed to enhance the sampling of the ligand at the binding site as well as in the solvated state, and offer the possibility to predict the absolute binding free energy. We apply funnel metadynamics to predict host-guest binding affinities for the cucurbit[7]uril host as part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge. Using total simulation times of 300-400 ns per ligand, we show that the errors due to inadequate sampling are below 1 kcal/mol. However, despite the large investment in terms of computational time, the results compared to experiment are not better than a random guess. As we obtain differences of up to 11 kcal/mol when switching between two commonly used force fields (with automatically generated parameters), we strongly believe that in the pursuit of accurate binding free energies a more careful force-field parametrization is needed to address this type of system.

  14. Binding affinity of five PBPs to Ostrinia sex pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) of Lepidoptera function in chemical communication, mate attraction and recognition, and may be involved in reinforcement of sexual isolation between recently diverged species. Directional selection was previously predicted between PBP3 orthologs of the corn borer si...

  15. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  16. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  17. Mu receptor binding of some commonly used opioids and their metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhaorong; Irvine, R.J. ); Somogyi, A.A.; Bochner, F. Royal Adelaide Hospital )

    1991-01-01

    The binding affinity to the {mu} receptor of some opioids chemically related to morphine and some of their metabolites was examined in rat brain homogenates with {sup 3}H-DAMGO. The chemical group at position 6 of the molecule had little effect on binding. Decreasing the length of the alkyl group at position 3 decreased the K{sub i} values (morphine < codeine < ethylmorphine < pholcodine). Analgesics with high clinical potency containing a methoxyl group at position 3 had relatively weak receptor binding, while their O-demethylated metabolites had much stronger binding. Many opioids may exert their pharmacological actions predominantly through metabolites.

  18. Kosmotropes enhance the yield of antibody purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngo, That T; Narinesingh, Dyer

    2008-01-01

    The yield of antibody purified using affinity chromatography on immobilized Protein A or Protein G was increased up to 5-fold (500%) by including kosmotropic salts in the binding buffer. The binding buffer is used to equilibrate the affinity column before applying a sample to the column and also to dilute the sample prior to loading onto the affinity column to optimize conditions for a maximal binding of antibodies to affinity gels. In this study, the kosmotropic salts that were effective in greatly increasing antibody binding to Protein A included both inorganic and organic salts of ammonium; sodium; or potassium sulfate, phosphate, polycarboxylates; for example, succinate, citrate, isocitrate, N-(2-hydroxyethylene diamine triacetate (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and ethylene glycol-O,O'-bis(2-aminoethyl)-N,N,N'N'-tetra acetate(EGTA). On an equal-molar basis, the greater the number of carboxylic groups within the polycarboxylate molecule, the greater the increase in the yield of the purified antibody that was observed. The data show that kosmotropes can be used as effective additives to enhance the binding of immunoglobulins to Protein A or Protein G gels with a resultant increase in the yield of the purified antibodies. Thus, it appears that strongly hydrated anions (citrate, sulfate, and phosphate) and weakly hydrated cations (ammonium, potassium) increase the yield of antibody purified on either Protein A or Protein G affinity gels.

  19. Probing the binding affinity of plasma proteins adsorbed on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Shaoning

    2017-04-06

    Nanoparticle (NP) surfaces are modified immediately by the adsorption of proteins when exposed to human blood, leading to the formation of a protein corona. The adsorption of serum proteins is the key process for exploring the bioapplication and biosafety of NPs. In this study, NP-protein binding affinity (Ka) was investigated. Some serum proteins, such as human serum albumin (HSA), trypsin (TRP), hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (MB), immunoglobulin G (IgG), carbonic anhydrase (CA), fibrinogen (FIB), chymotrypsin and r-globulin, were used with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to address binding affinity according to isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence quenching. The NP protein binding affinities determined by the two methods were in agreement, and depended on the protein properties and size of the NPs. The two methods are convenient, and the results are highly comparable. These methods can be extended to determine the binding affinity of NP protein interactions. The adsorption of proteins upon the AuNP surface is a complex process and depends on several factors, but the binding affinities are higher for proteins with more cysteine residues located on the surface.

  20. Neuroprotective Effects of a Structurally New Family of High Affinity Imidazoline I2 Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Abás, Sònia; Erdozain, Amaia M; Keller, Benjamin; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Sergio; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; Escolano, Carmen

    2017-01-04

    The imidazoline I2 receptors (I2-IRs) are widely distributed in the brain, and I2-IR ligands may have therapeutic potential as neuroprotective agents. Since structural data for I2-IR remains unknown, the discovery of selective I2-IR ligands devoid of α2-adrenoceptor (α2-AR) affinity is likely to provide valuable tools in defining the pharmacological characterization of these receptors. We report the pharmacological characterization of a new family of (2-imidazolin-4-yl)phosphonates. Radioligand binding studies showed that they displayed a higher affinity for I2-IRs than idazoxan, and high I2/α2 selectivity. In vivo studies in mice showed that acute treatments with 1b and 2c significantly increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (an index of cell survival) in the hippocampus when compared with vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, acute and repeated treatments with 2c, but not with 1b, markedly reduced hippocampal p35 cleavage into neurotoxic p25. The present results indicate a neuroprotective potential of (2-imidazolin-4-yl)phosphonates acting at I2-IRs.

  1. Structure-dependent binding and activation of perfluorinated compounds on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lianying; Ren, Xiao-Min; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2014-09-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt lipid metabolism and even induce cancer in rodents through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Lines of evidence showed that PPARα was activated by PFCs. However, the information on the binding interactions between PPARγ and PFCs and subsequent alteration of PPARγ activity is still limited and sometimes inconsistent. In the present study, in vitro binding of 16 PFCs to human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγ-LBD) and their activity on the receptor in cells were investigated. The results showed that the binding affinity was strongly dependent on their carbon number and functional group. For the eleven perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), the binding affinity increased with their carbon number from 4 to 11, and then decreased slightly. The binding affinity of the three perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) was stronger than their PFCA counterparts. No binding was detected for the two fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs). Circular dichroim spectroscopy showed that PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. In dual luciferase reporter assays using transiently transfected Hep G2 cells, PFCs acted as hPPARγ agonists, and their potency correlated with their binding affinity with hPPARγ-LBD. Molecular docking showed that PFCs with different chain length bind with the receptor in different geometry, which may contribute to their differences in binding affinity and transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Binding affinity between PFCs and PPARγ was evaluated for the first time. • The binding strength was dependent on fluorinated carbon chain and functional group. • PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. • PFCs could act as hPPARγ agonists in Hep G2 cells.

  2. The in vitro invasiveness and interactions with laminin of K-1735 melanoma cells. Evidence for different laminin-binding affinities in high and low metastatic variants.

    PubMed

    Albini, A; Aukerman, S L; Ogle, R C; Noonan, D M; Fridman, R; Martin, G R; Fidler, I J

    1989-01-01

    The invasive and metastatic characteristics of cloned cells derived from the K-1735 murine melanoma were investigated. Cell lines which are highly metastatic in mice were found to be invasive in vitro, and to show an enhanced attachment to, spreading on and migration toward laminin. As attachment, spreading and directional migration are thought to be receptor-mediated events, the binding of laminin to these cells was studied. Biotinylated laminin was used to evaluate receptor binding by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and this method was compared with that in which the binding of radioactive laminin is measured. Both studies revealed that metastatic K-1735 cells (a) have more receptors for laminin compared with non-metastatic cells and (b) exhibit a second population of low-affinity binding sites not present on the non-metastatic cells. The differences in receptor number and type may account for the greater interaction of metastatic cells with laminin and their invasive phenotype.

  3. Structure of FcγRI in complex with Fc reveals the importance of glycan recognition for high-affinity IgG binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinghua; Chu, Jonathan; Zou, Zhongcheng; Hamacher, Nels B.; Rixon, Mark W.; Sun, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Fc gamma receptor I (FcγRI) contributes to protective immunity against bacterial infections, but exacerbates certain autoimmune diseases. The sole high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI plays a significant role in immunotherapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of its high-affinity IgG binding, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domains of human FcγRI in complex with the Fc domain of human IgG1. FcγRI binds to the Fc in a similar mode as the low-affinity FcγRII and FcγRIII receptors. In addition to many conserved contacts, FcγRI forms additional hydrogen bonds and salt bridges with the lower hinge region of Fc. Unique to the high-affinity receptor-Fc complex, however, is the conformation of the receptor D2 domain FG loop, which enables a charged KHR motif to interact with proximal carbohydrate units of the Fc glycans. Both the length and the charge of the FcγRI FG loop are well conserved among mammalian species. Ala and Glu mutations of the FG loop KHR residues showed significant contributions of His-174 and Arg-175 to antibody binding, and the loss of the FG loop–glycan interaction resulted in an ∼20- to 30-fold decrease in FcγRI affinity to all three subclasses of IgGs. Furthermore, deglycosylation of IgG1 resulted in a 40-fold loss in FcγRI binding, demonstrating involvement of the receptor FG loop in glycan recognition. These results highlight a unique glycan recognition in FcγRI function and open potential therapeutic avenues based on antibody glycan engineering or small molecular glycan mimics to target FcγRI for certain autoimmune diseases. PMID:25561553

  4. Different antagonist binding properties of rat pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Winand, J.; Christophe, J.

    1987-11-09

    The antagonist binding properties of rat pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptors were compared. In both tissues pirenzepine (PZ) had a low affinity for muscarinic receptors labelled by (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine ((/sup 3/)NMS) (K/sub D/ values of 140 and 280nM, respectively, in pancreatic and cardiac homogenates). The binding properties of pancreatic and cardiac receptors were, however, markedly different. This was indicated by different affinities for dicyclomine, (11-(/(2-((diethylamino)-methyl)-1-piperidinyl/acetyl)-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4) benzodiazepin-6-on)(AFDX-116), 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methobromide (4-DAMP) and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptros also showed different (/sup 3/H)NMS association and dissociation rates. These results support the concept of M2 receptor subtypes have different binding kinetic properties. 20 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. In vitro toxicological evaluation of NCS-382, a high-affinity antagonist of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) binding.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K R; Ainslie, G R; Roullet, J-B; McConnell, A; Gibson, K M

    2017-01-22

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a minor metabolite of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, can accumulate to significant concentrations in the heritable disorder of GABA degradation, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (SSADHD). Moreover, GHB may be employed in therapeutic settings (treatment of narcolepsy), as well as instances of illicit activity, including acquaintance sexual assault and the induction of euphoria. High-affinity binding sites for GHB in the brain have been identified, although the absolute identity of these receptors remains unclear. Pharmacological antagonism of GHB binding may have multiple instances of therapeutic relevance. The high affinity GHB receptor antagonist, NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzo-cyclohept-6-ylideneacetic acid) has not been piloted in humans. To address the potential clinical utility of NCS-382, we have piloted initial studies of its toxicology in HepG2 and primary hepatocyte cells. At high dose (0.5mM), NCS-382 showed no capacity for inhibition of microsomal CYPs (CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) and minimal potential for activation of xenobiotic nuclear receptors. Additional cellular integrity and functional assays (viability, oxidative stress, apoptosis, ATP production) revealed little evidence for cytotoxicity, and a low degree of dysregulation of >370 genes actively engaged in the mediation of cellular toxicity. In vitro testing indicates a low probability of cellular toxicity associated with NCS-382.

  6. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  7. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic dynein microtubule binding domain (MTBD) in a weak affinity conformation was published, containing a covalently constrained β+ registry for the coiled-coil stalk segment (Carter, A. P., Garbarino, J. E., Wilson-Kubalek, E. M., Shipley, W. E., Cho, C., Milligan, R. A., Vale, R. D., and Gibbons, I. R. (2008) Science 322, 1691–1695). We here present an NMR analysis of the isolated MTBD from Dictyostelium discoideum that demonstrates the coiled-coil β+ registry corresponds to the low energy conformation for this functional region of dynein. Addition of sequence encoding roughly half of the coiled-coil stalk proximal to the binding tip results in a decreased affinity of the MTBD for microtubules. In contrast, addition of the complete coiled-coil sequence drives the MTBD to the conformationally unstable, high affinity binding state. These results suggest a thermodynamic coupling between conformational free energy differences in the α and β+ registries of the coiled-coil stalk that acts as a switch between high and low affinity conformations of the MTBD. A balancing of opposing conformations in the stalk and MTBD enables potentially modest long-range interactions arising from ATP binding in the motor core to induce a relaxation of the MTBD into the stable low affinity state. PMID:20351100

  8. Calcium-independent inhibition of PCSK9 by affinity-improved variants of the LDL receptor EGF(A) domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingnan; Zhou, Lijuan; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Li, Wei; Moran, Paul; Wang, Jianyong; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Kolumam, Ganesh; Elliott, J Michael; Skelton, Nicholas J; Peterson, Andrew S; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2012-10-05

    LDL (low-density lipoprotein) receptor (LDLR) binds to its negative regulator proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) through the first EGF (epidermal growth factor-like) domain [EGF(A)]. The isolated EGF(A) domain is a poor antagonist due to its low affinity for PCSK9. To improve binding affinity, we used a phage display approach by randomizing seven PCSK9 contact residues of EGF(A), including the Ca(2+)-coordinating Asp310. The library was panned in Ca(2+)-free solution, and 26 unique clones that bind to PCSK9 were identified. Four selected variants demonstrated improved inhibitory activities in a PCSK9-LDLR competition binding ELISA. The Fc fusion protein of variant EGF66 bound to PCSK9 with a K(d) value of 71 nM versus 935 nM of wild type [EGF(A)-Fc] and showed significantly improved potency in inhibiting LDLR degradation in vitro and in vivo. The five mutations in EGF66 could be modeled in the EGF(A) structure without perturbation of the EGF domain fold, and their contribution to affinity improvement could be rationalized. The most intriguing change was the substitution of the Ca(2+)-coordinating Asp310 by a Lys residue, whose side-chain amine may have functionally replaced Ca(2+). EGF66-Fc and other EGF variants having the Asp310Lys change bound to PCSK9 in a Ca(2+)-independent fashion. The findings indicate that randomization of an important Ca(2+)-chelating residue in conjunction with "selection pressure" applied by Ca(2+)-free phage selection conditions can yield variants with an alternatively stabilized Ca(2+) loop and with increased binding affinities. This approach may provide a new paradigm for the use of diversity libraries to improve affinities of members of the Ca(2+)-binding EGF domain subfamily.

  9. Development of Gamma-Emitting Receptor Binding Radiopharmace

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, Richard

    2003-02-20

    The long-term objective is to develop blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeable m2-selective (relative to m1, m3, and m4) receptor-binding radiotracers and utilize these radiotracers for quantifying receptor concentrations obtained from PET or SPECT images of human brain. In initial studies, we concluded that the lipophilicity and high affinity prevented (R,S)-I-QNB from reaching a flow-independent and receptor-dependent state in a reasonable time. Thus, it was clear that (R,S)-I-QNB should be modified. Therefore, during the last portion of this funded research, we proposed that more polar heterocycles should help accomplish that. Since reports of others concluded that radiobromination and radiofluorination of the unactivated phenyl ring is not feasible (Newkome et al,,1982), we, therefore, explored during this grant period a series of analogues of (R)-QNB in which one or both of the six-membered phenyl rings is replaced by a five-membered thienyl (Boulay et al., 1995), or furyl ring. The chemistry specific aims were to synthesize novel compounds designed to be m2-selective mAChR ligands capable of penetrating into the CNS, and develop methods for efficient radiolabeling of promising m2-selective muscarinic ligands. The pharmacology specific aims were to determine the affinity and subtype-selectivity of the novel compounds using competition binding studies with membranes from cells that express each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes, to determine the ability of the promising non-radioactive compounds and radiolabeled novel compounds to cross the BBB, to determine the biodistribution, in-vivo pharmacokinetics, and in-vitm kinetics of promising m2-selective radioligands and to determine the distribution of receptors for the novel m2-selective radioligands using quantitative autoradiography of rat brain, and compare this distribution to the distribution of known m2-selective compounds.

  10. Sedative-Hypnotic and Receptor Binding Studies of Fermented Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Hye-Young; Kang, Young Mi; Lee, Bae-Jin; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the sedative-hypnotic activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-enriched fermented marine organisms (FMO), including sea tangle (FST) and oyster (FO) by Lactobacillus brevis BJ20 (L. brevis BJ20). FST and FO were tested for their binding activity of the GABAA-benzodiazepine and 5-HT2C receptors, which are well-known molecular targets for sleep aids. We also measured the sleep latency and sleep duration during pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice after oral administration of FST and FO. In GABAA and 5-HT2C receptor binding assays, FST displayed an effective concentration-dependent binding affinity to GABAA receptor, similar to the binding affinity to 5-HT2C receptor. FO exhibited higher affinity to 5-HT2C receptor, compared with the GABAA receptor. The oral administration of FST and FO produced a dose-dependent decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced hypnosis. The data demonstrate that FST and FO possess sedative-hypnotic activity possibly by modulating GABAA and 5-HT2C receptors. We propose that FST and FO might be effective agents for treatment of insomnia. PMID:26336589

  11. Targeted protein engineering provides insights into binding mechanism and affinities of bacterial collagen adhesins.

    PubMed

    Ross, Caná L; Liang, Xiaowen; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E; Höök, Magnus; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K

    2012-10-05

    The collagen-binding bacterial proteins, Ace and Cna, are well characterized on the biochemical and structural level. Despite overall structural similarity, recombinant forms of the Ace and Cna ligand-binding domains exhibit significantly different affinities and binding kinetics for collagen type I (CI) in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand, in submolecular detail, the bases for these differences. Using a structure-based approach, we engineered Cna and Ace variants by altering specific structural elements within the ligand-binding domains. Surface plasmon resonance-based binding analysis demonstrated that mutations that are predicted to alter the orientation of the Ace and Cna N(1) and N(2) subdomains significantly affect the interaction between the MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule) and CI in vitro, including affinity, association/dissociation rates and binding ratio. Moreover, we utilized this information to engineer an Ace variant with an 11,000-fold higher CI affinity than the parent protein. Finally, we noted that several engineered proteins that exhibited a weak interaction with CI recognized more sites on CI, suggesting an inverse correlation between affinity and specificity.

  12. Binding and functional properties of hexocyclium and sila-hexocyclium derivatives to muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Feifel, R.; Mutschler, E.; Tacke, R.; Strohmann, C.; Rafeiner, K.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J. F.; Lambrecht, G.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have compared the binding properties of several hexocyclium and sila-hexocyclium derivatives to muscarinic M1 receptors (in rat brain, human neuroblastoma (NB-OK 1) cells and calf superior cervical ganglia), rat heart M2 receptors, rat pancreas M3 receptors and M4 receptors in rat striatum, with their functional antimuscarinic properties in rabbit vas deferens (M1/M4-like), guinea-pig atria (M2), and guinea-pig ileum (M3) muscarinic receptors. 2. Sila-substitution (C/Si exchange) of hexocyclium (-->sila-hexocyclium) and demethyl-hexocyclium (-->demethyl-sila-hexocyclium) did not significantly affect their affinities for muscarinic receptors. By contrast, sila-substitution of o-methoxy-hexocyclium increased its affinity 2 to 3 fold for all the muscarinic receptor subtypes studied. 3. The p-fluoro- and p-chloro-derivatives of sila-hexocyclium had lower affinities than the parent compound at the four receptor subtypes, in binding and pharmacological studies. 4. In binding studies, o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium (M1 = M4 > or = M3 > or = M2) had a much lower affinity than sila-hexocyclium for the four receptor subtypes, and discriminated the receptor subtypes more poorly than sila-hexocyclium (M1 = M3 > M4 > M2). This is in marked contrast with the very clear selectivity of o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium for the prejunctional M1/M4-like heteroreceptors in rabbit vas deferens. 5. The tertiary amines demethyl-hexocyclium, demethyl-sila-hexocyclium and demethyl-o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium had 10 to 30 fold lower affinities than the corresponding quaternary ammonium derivatives. PMID:8075869

  13. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  14. Influence of the galloyl moiety in tea catechins on binding affinity for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Kanako; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Katsumata, Tomoharu; Onobori, Ken-ichi; Mori, Taiki; Suzuki, Yukiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    The major catechins of green tea extract are (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). Recent research has indicated that catechins form complexes with human serum albumin (HSA) in blood, and differences in their binding affinity toward HSA are believed to modulate their bioavailability. In this study, we kinetically investigated the interaction between the catechins and HSA immobilized on a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The association constants obtained from the frequency changes of QCM revealed interactions of ECg and EGCg with HSA that are 100 times stronger than those of EC and EGC. Furthermore, comparisons of these catechins by native-gel electrophoresis/blotting with redox-cycling staining revealed that, in a phosphate buffer, ECg and EGCg have a higher binding affinity toward HSA than EC and EGC. These observations indicate that catechins with a galloyl moiety have higher binding affinities toward HSA than catechins lacking a galloyl moiety.

  15. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water.

  16. [Cell-ELA-based determination of binding affinity of DNA aptamer against U87-EGFRvIII cell].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Liang, Huiyu; Wu, Xidong; Gao, Yubo; Zhang, Xingmei

    2013-05-01

    A15, a DNA aptamer with binding specificity for U87 glioma cells stably overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (U87-EGFRvIII), was generated by cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) using a random nucleotide library. Subsequently, we established a cell enzyme-linked assay (cell-ELA) to detect the affinity of A15 compared to an EGFR antibody. We used A15 as a detection probe and cultured U87-EGFRvIII cells as targets. Our data indicate that the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) for A15 were below 100 nmol/L and had similar affinity compared to an EGFR antibody for U87-EGFRvIII. We demonstrated that the cell-ELA was a useful method to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) of aptamers generated by cell-SELEX.

  17. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  18. Tyrosine sulfation influences the chemokine binding selectivity of peptides derived from chemokine receptor CCR3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, John Z; Millard, Christopher J; Ludeman, Justin P; Simpson, Levi S; Clayton, Daniel J; Payne, Richard J; Widlanski, Theodore S; Stone, Martin J

    2011-03-08

    The interactions of chemokines with their G protein-coupled receptors play critical roles in the control of leukocyte trafficking in normal homeostasis and in inflammatory responses. Tyrosine sulfation is a common post-translational modification in the amino-terminal regions of chemokine receptors. However, tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptors is commonly incomplete or heterogeneous. To investigate the possibility that differential sulfation of two adjacent tyrosine residues could bias the responses of chemokine receptor CCR3 to different chemokines, we have studied the binding of three chemokines (eotaxin-1/CCL11, eotaxin-2/CCL24, and eotaxin-3/CCL26) to an N-terminal CCR3-derived peptide in each of its four possible sulfation states. Whereas the nonsulfated peptide binds to the three chemokines with approximately equal affinity, sulfation of Tyr-16 gives rise to 9-16-fold selectivity for eotaxin-1 over the other two chemokines. Subsequent sulfation of Tyr-17 contributes additively to the affinity for eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2 but cooperatively to the affinity for eotaxin-3. The doubly sulfated peptide selectively binds to both eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-3 approximately 10-fold more tightly than to eotaxin-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift mapping indicates that these variations in affinity probably result from only subtle differences in the chemokine surfaces interacting with these receptor peptides. These data support the proposal that variations in sulfation states or levels may regulate the responsiveness of chemokine receptors to their cognate chemokines.

  19. The Roles of Hemagglutinin Phe-95 in Receptor Binding and Pathogenicity of Influenza B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Fengyun; Mbawuike, Innocent Nnadi; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Diverged ~4,000 years ago, influenza B virus has several important differences from influenza A virus, including lower receptor-binding affinity and highly restricted host range. Based on our prior structural studies, we hypothesized that a single-residue difference in the receptor-binding site of hemagglutinin (HA), Phe-95 in influenza B virus versus Tyr-98 in influenza A/H1~H15, is possibly a key determinant for the low receptor-binding affinity. Here we demonstrate that the mutation Phe95→Tyr in influenza B virus HA restores all three hydrogen bonds made by Tyr-98 in influenza A/H3 HA and has the potential to enhance receptor binding. However, the full realization of this potential is influenced by the local environment into which the mutation is introduced. The binding and replication of the recombinant viruses correlate well with the receptor-binding capabilities of HA. These results are discussed in relation to the roles of Phe-95 in receptor binding and pathogenicity of influenza B virus. PMID:24503069

  20. The roles of hemagglutinin Phe-95 in receptor binding and pathogenicity of influenza B virus.

    PubMed

    Ni, Fengyun; Mbawuike, Innocent Nnadi; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-02-01

    Diverged ~4000 years ago, influenza B virus has several important differences from influenza A virus, including lower receptor-binding affinity and highly restricted host range. Based on our prior structural studies, we hypothesized that a single-residue difference in the receptor-binding site of hemagglutinin (HA), Phe-95 in influenza B virus versus Tyr-98 in influenza A/H1-H15, is possibly a key determinant for the low receptor-binding affinity. Here we demonstrate that the mutation Phe95→Tyr in influenza B virus HA restores all three hydrogen bonds made by Tyr-98 in influenza A/H1-15 HA and has the potential to enhance receptor binding. However, the full realization of this potential is influenced by the local environment into which the mutation is introduced. The binding and replication of the recombinant viruses correlate well with the receptor-binding capabilities of HA. These results are discussed in relation to the roles of Phe-95 in receptor binding and pathogenicity of influenza B virus.

  1. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  2. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-09-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression.

  3. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  4. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  5. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  6. Glutamate Binding and Conformational Flexibility of Ligand-binding Domains Are Critical Early Determinants of Efficient Kainate Receptor Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Martin B.; Vivithanaporn, Pornpun; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular glutamate binding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is thought to be necessary for plasma membrane expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Here we determined the importance of glutamate binding to folding and assembly of soluble ligand-binding domains (LBDs), as well as full-length receptors, by comparing the secretion of a soluble GluR6-S1S2 protein versus the plasma membrane localization of GluR6 kainate receptors following mutagenesis of the LBD. The mutations were designed to either eliminate glutamate binding, thereby trapping the bilobate LBD in an “open” conformation, or “lock” the LBD in a closed conformation with an engineered interdomain disulfide bridge. Analysis of plasma membrane localization, medium secretion of soluble LBD proteins, and measures of folding efficiency suggested that loss of glutamate binding affinity significantly impacted subunit protein folding and assembly. In contrast, receptors with conformationally restricted LBDs also exhibited decreased PM expression and altered oligomeric receptor assembly but did not exhibit any deficits in subunit folding. Secretion of the closed LBD protein was enhanced compared with wild-type GluR6-S1S2. Our results suggest that glutamate acts as a chaperone molecule for appropriate folding of nascent receptors and that relaxation of LBDs from fully closed states during oligomerization represents a critical transition that necessarily engages other determinants within receptor dimers. Glutamate receptor LBDs therefore must access multiple conformations for efficient biogenesis. PMID:19342380

  7. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  8. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  9. Glycan-based high-affinity ligands for toxins and pathogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Weiss, Alison A; Iyer, Suri S

    2010-03-01

    Glycans decorate over 95% of the mammalian cell surface in the form of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Several toxins and pathogens bind to these glycans to enter the cells. Understanding the fundamentals of the complex interplay between microbial pathogens and their glycan receptors at the molecular level could lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Using Shiga toxin and influenza virus as examples, we describe the complex biological interface between host glycans and these infectious agents, and recent strategies to develop glycan-based high-affinity ligands. These molecules are expected to ultimately be incorporated into diagnostics and therapeutics, and can be used as probes to study important biological processes. Additionally, by focusing on the specific glycans that microbial pathogens target, we can begin to decipher the "glycocode" and how these glycans participate in normal and aberrant cellular communication.

  10. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered.

  11. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  12. A luminescent affinity tag for proteins based on the terbium(III)-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Shinji; Tanaka, Shogo; Inoue, Sayomi; Komatsu, Hideyuki

    2012-03-01

    Genetically encoded tags attached to proteins of interest are widely exploited for proteome analysis. Here, we present Tb(3+)-binding peptides (TBPs) which can be used for both luminescent measurements and affinity purification of proteins. TBPs consist of acidic amino acid residues and tryptophan residues which serve as Tb(3+)-binding sites and sensitizers for Tb(3+) luminescence, respectively. The Tb(3+) complexes of TBPs fused to a target protein exhibited luminescence characteristic of Tb(3+) by excitation of the tryptophan residue, and fusion proteins fused to one of the TPBs were successfully isolated from Escherichia coli cell lysate by affinity chromatography with a Tb(3+)-immobilized solid support.

  13. Pirenzepine binding to membrane-bound, solubilized and purified muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgold, J.

    1986-05-01

    Muscarinic receptors were purified to near-homogeneity from bovine cortex, an area rich in the putative M1 subtype, and from bovine pons/medulla, an area rich in the putative M2 subtype. In both cases, the receptors were solubilized in digitonin and purified over an affinity column. Both the cortical and pons/medulla preparations yielded receptor proteins of 70,000 daltons. Pirenzepine binding was deduced from its competition with /sup 3/H-N-methyl scopolamine. The binding of pirenzepine to membrane-bound receptors from cortex was best described by a two site model, with approximately half the sites having a Ki of 6.4 x 10/sup -9/ M and the remaining sites having a Ki of 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M. Membrane-bound receptors from pons/medulla bound pirenzepine according to a one-site model with a Ki of 1.1 x 10/sup -7/ M. After solubilization the two-site binding of cortical receptors became a one-site binding, Ki = 1.1 x 10/sup -7/M. This value was still five-fold lower than that of soluble receptors from pons/medulla. After purification however the affinity of pirenzepine for the pons/medulla receptor increased so that the two putative subtypes bound pirenzepine with approximately the same affinity. These findings suggest that the different pirenzepine binding characteristics used to define muscarinic receptor subtypes are not inherent in the receptor protein itself but may be due to coupling factors associated with the receptor.

  14. Estrogen receptors colocalize with low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors in cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Toran-Allerand, C D; Miranda, R C; Bentham, W D; Sohrabji, F; Brown, T J; Hochberg, R B; MacLusky, N J

    1992-01-01

    The rodent and primate basal forebrain is a target of a family of endogenous peptide signaling molecules, the neurotrophins--nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin 3--and of the gonadal steroid hormone estrogen, both of which have been implicated in cholinergic function. To investigate whether or not these ligands may act on the same neurons in the developing and adult rodent basal forebrain, we combined autoradiography with 125I-labeled estrogen and either nonisotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry or immunohistochemistry. We now report colocalization of intranuclear estrogen binding sites with the mRNA and immunoreactive protein for the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor, which binds all three neurotrophins, and for the cholinergic marker enzyme choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). Colocalization of estrogen and low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors implies that their ligands may act on the same neuron, perhaps synergistically, to regulate the expression of specific genes or gene networks that may influence neuronal survival, differentiation, regeneration, and plasticity. That cholinergic neurons in brain regions subserving cognitive functions may be regulated not only by the neurotrophins but also by estrogen may have considerable relevance for the development and maintenance of neural substrates of cognition. If estrogen-neurotrophin interactions are important for survival of target neurons, then clinical conditions associated with estrogen deficiency could contribute to the atrophy or death of these neurons. These findings have implications for the subsequent decline in those differentiated neural functions associated with aging and Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:1316615

  15. Synthesis of imidacloprid derivatives with a chiral alkylated imidazolidine ring and evaluation of their insecticidal activity and affinity to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Kuriyama, Mituhiro; Nagaoka, Hikaru; Kato, Akira; Akamatsu, Miki; Yamauchi, Satoshi; Shuto, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    A series of imidacloprid (IMI) derivatives with an alkylated imidazolidine ring were asymmetrically synthesized to evaluate their insecticidal activity against adult female housefly, Musca domestica, and affinity to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of the flies. The bulkier the alkyl group, the lower was the receptor affinity, but the derivatives methylated and ethylated at the R-5-position of the imidazolidine ring were equipotent to the unsubstituted compound. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of the receptor affinity demonstrated that the introduction of a substituent into the imidazolidine ring was fundamentally disadvantageous, but the introduction of a substituent at the R-5-position was permissible in the case of its small size. The binding model of the synthesized derivatives with the receptor supported the QSAR analysis, indicating the existence of space for a short alkyl group around the R-5-position in the ligand-binding site. In addition, positive correlation was observed between the insecticidal activity and receptor affinity, suggesting that the receptor affinity was the primary factor in influencing the insecticidal activity even if the imidazolidine ring was modified.

  16. Allosteric binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology, Tränkle et al. (p. 1597) present new findings regarding the existence of a second allosteric site on the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR). The M2 mAChR is a prototypic class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has proven to be a very useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the binding of allosteric GPCR ligands. Previous studies have identified several allosteric muscarinic ligands, including the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine and the bis-pyridinium derivative 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3), which, in contrast to conventional allosteric muscarinic ligands, display concentration-effect curves with slope factors >1. By analyzing the interactions of tacrine and Duo3 with other allosteric muscarinic agents predicted to bind to the previously identified ;common' allosteric binding site, Tränkle et al. provide evidence suggesting that two allosteric agents and one orthosteric ligand may be able to bind to the M2 mAChR simultaneously. Moreover, studies with mutant mAChRs indicated that the M2 receptor epitopes involved in the binding of tacrine and Duo3 may not be identical. Molecular modeling and ligand docking studies suggested that the additional allosteric site probably represents a subdomain of the receptor's allosteric binding cleft. Because allosteric binding sites have been found on many other GPCRs and drugs interacting with these sites are thought to have great therapeutic potential, the study by Tränkle et al. should be of considerable general interest.

  17. Determinants of the Differential Antizyme-Binding Affinity of Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Hsu, Den-Hua; Huang, Chi-Liang; Liu, Yi-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is conserved in all species from bacteria to humans. Mammalian ODC is degraded by the proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner by direct binding to the antizyme (AZ). In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei ODC has a low binding affinity toward AZ. In this study, we identified key amino acid residues that govern the differential AZ binding affinity of human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC. Multiple sequence alignments of the ODC putative AZ-binding site highlights several key amino acid residues that are different between the human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequences, including residue 119, 124,125, 129, 136, 137 and 140 (the numbers is for human ODC). We generated a septuple human ODC mutant protein where these seven bases were mutated to match the Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequence. The septuple mutant protein was much less sensitive to AZ inhibition compared to the WT protein, suggesting that these amino acid residues play a role in human ODC-AZ binding. Additional experiments with sextuple mutants suggest that residue 137 plays a direct role in AZ binding, and residues 119 and 140 play secondary roles in AZ binding. The dissociation constants were also calculated to quantify the affinity of the ODC-AZ binding interaction. The Kd value for the wild type ODC protein-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_WT]-AZ) is approximately 0.22 μM, while the Kd value for the septuple mutant-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_7M]-AZ) is approximately 12.4 μM. The greater than 50-fold increase in [ODC_7M]-AZ binding affinity shows that the ODC-7M enzyme has a much lower binding affinity toward AZ. For the mutant proteins ODC_7M(-Q119H) and ODC_7M(-V137D), the Kd was 1.4 and 1.2 μM, respectively. These affinities are 6-fold higher than the WT_ODC Kd, which suggests that residues 119 and 137 play a role in AZ binding. PMID:22073206

  18. Structural Basis of Species-Dependent Differential Affinity of 6-Alkoxy-5-Aryl-3-Pyridinecarboxamide Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Malliga R; Cinar, Resat; Liu, Jie; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Szanda, Gergö; Puhl, Henry; Ikeda, Stephen R; Deschamps, Jeffrey; Lee, Yong-Sok; Steinbach, Peter J; Kunos, George

    2015-08-01

    6-Alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridincarboxamides, including the brain-penetrant compound 14G: [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-6-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxy-cyclohexyl]-3-pyridinecarboxamide] and its peripherally restricted analog 14H: [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxycyclohexyl]-6-(2-methoxyethoxy)-3-pyridinecarboxamide], have been recently introduced as selective, high-affinity antagonists of the human cannabinoid-1 receptor (hCB1R). Binding analyses revealed two orders of magnitude lower affinity of these compounds for mouse and rat versus human CB1R, whereas the affinity of rimonabant is comparable for all three CB1Rs. Modeling of ligand binding to CB1R and binding assays with native and mutant (Ile105Met) hCB1Rs indicate that the Ile105 to Met mutation in rodent CB1Rs accounts for the species-dependent affinity of 14G: and 14H: . Our work identifies Ile105 as a new pharmacophore component for developing better hCB1R antagonists and invalidates rodent models for assessing the antiobesity efficacy of 14G: and 14H: .

  19. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  20. Identification of a subdomain in the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein involved in receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, A J; Soong, N W; Curtis, C M; Anderson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have mutated amino acids within the receptor-binding domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope in order to identify residues involved in receptor binding. Analysis of mutations in the region of amino acids 81 to 88 indicates that this region is important for specific envelope-receptor interactions. None of the aspartate 84 (D-84) mutants studied bind measurably, although they are efficiently incorporated into particles. D-84 mutants have titers that correspond to the severity of the substitution. This observation suggests that D-84 may provide a direct receptor contact. Mutations in the other charged amino acids in this domain (R-83, E-86, and E-87) yield titers similar to those of wild-type envelope, but the affinity of the mutant envelope in the binding assay is decreased by nonconservative substitutions in parallel to the severity of the change. These other amino acids may either provide secondary receptor contacts or assist in maintaining a structure in the domain that favors efficient binding. We also studied other regions of high hydrophilicity. Our initial characterization indicates that amino acids 106 to 111 and 170 to 188 do not play a major role in receptor binding. Measurements of relative binding affinity and titer indicate that most mutations in the region of amino acids 120 to 131 did not significantly affect receptor binding. However, SU encoded by mutants H123V, R124L, and C131A as well as C81A could not be detected in particles and therefore did not bind measurably. Therefore, the region encompassed by amino acids 81 to 88 appears to be directly involved in receptor binding. PMID:8627699

  1. Nicotine binding to brain receptors requires a strong cation-pi interaction.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Xinan; Puskar, Nyssa L; Shanata, Jai A P; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2009-03-26

    Nicotine addiction begins with high-affinity binding of nicotine to acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the brain. The end result is over 4,000,000 smoking-related deaths annually worldwide and the largest source of preventable mortality in developed countries. Stress reduction, pleasure, improved cognition and other central nervous system effects are strongly associated with smoking. However, if nicotine activated ACh receptors found in muscle as potently as it does brain ACh receptors, smoking would cause intolerable and perhaps fatal muscle contractions. Despite extensive pharmacological, functional and structural studies of ACh receptors, the basis for the differential action of nicotine on brain compared with muscle ACh receptors has not been determined. Here we show that at the alpha4beta2 brain receptors thought to underlie nicotine addiction, the high affinity for nicotine is the result of a strong cation-pi interaction to a specific aromatic amino acid of the receptor, TrpB. In contrast, the low affinity for nicotine at the muscle-type ACh receptor is largely due to the fact that this key interaction is absent, even though the immediate binding site residues, including the key amino acid TrpB, are identical in the brain and muscle receptors. At the same time a hydrogen bond from nicotine to the backbone carbonyl of TrpB is enhanced in the neuronal receptor relative to the muscle type. A point mutation near TrpB that differentiates alpha4beta2 and muscle-type receptors seems to influence the shape of the binding site, allowing nicotine to interact more strongly with TrpB in the neuronal receptor. ACh receptors are established therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, smoking cessation, pain, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, autism and depression. Along with solving a chemical mystery in nicotine addiction, our results provide guidance for efforts to develop drugs that target specific types of nicotinic

  2. Assignment of the gene (EPLG2) encoding a high-affinity binding protein for the receptor tyrosine kinase elk to a 200-kilobasepair region in human chromosome Xq12

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, F.A.; Beckmann, M.P.; Lyman, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Elk is a member of the eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Elk is expressed only in the brain and testes of the developing and adult rat, and the interaction of elk with its ligand(s) has been suggested to play a role in the development or maintenance of the nervous system. The mouse gene Eplg2 encodes a potential elk ligand that is highly conserved among rat, mouse, and human. Eplg2 has been mapped to the central portion of the mouse X chromosome, tightly linked to the androgen receptor (Ar) locus. Linkage conservation between the mouse and the human X chromosomes suggested that the human homologue (EPLG2) would map near human AR, in the interval Xq11-q12. In the present study, we have confirmed this prediction and have localized EPLG2 to a 200-kb interval in Xq12 by somatic cell hybrid analysis, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) hybridization. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  3. A bambusuril macrocycle that binds anions in water with high affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Yawer, Mirza Arfan; Havel, Vaclav; Sindelar, Vladimir

    2015-01-02

    Synthetic receptors that function in water are important for the qualitative and quantitative detection of anions, which may act as pollutants in the environment or play important roles in biological processes. Neutral receptors are particularly appealing because they are often more selective than positively charged receptors; however, their affinity towards anions in pure water is only in range of 1-10(3)  L mol(-1) . The anion-templated synthesis of a water-soluble bambusuril derivative is shown to be an outstanding receptor for various inorganic anions in pure water, with association constants of up to 10(7)  L mol(-1) . Furthermore, the macrocycle discriminates between anions with unprecedented selectivity (up to 500 000-fold). We anticipate that the combination of remarkable affinity and selectivity of this macrocycle will enable the efficient detection and isolation of diverse anions in aqueous solutions, which is not possible with current supramolecular systems.

  4. Four-body atomic potential for modeling protein-ligand binding affinity: application to enzyme-inhibitor binding energy prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Models that are capable of reliably predicting binding affinities for protein-ligand complexes play an important role the field of structure-guided drug design. Methods Here, we begin by applying the computational geometry technique of Delaunay tessellation to each set of atomic coordinates for over 1400 diverse macromolecular structures, for the purpose of deriving a four-body statistical potential that serves as a topological scoring function. Next, we identify a second, independent set of three hundred protein-ligand complexes, having both high-resolution structures and known dissociation constants. Two-thirds of these complexes are randomly selected to train a predictive model of binding affinity as follows: two tessellations are generated in each case, one for the entire complex and another strictly for the isolated protein without its bound ligand, and a topological score is computed for each tessellation with the four-body potential. Predicted protein-ligand binding affinity is then based on an empirically derived linear function of the difference between both topological scores, one that appropriately scales the value of this difference. Results A comparison between experimental and calculated binding affinity values over the two hundred complexes reveals a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with a standard error of SE = 1.98 kcal/mol. To validate the method, we similarly generated two tessellations for each of the remaining protein-ligand complexes, computed their topological scores and the difference between the two scores for each complex, and applied the previously derived linear transformation of this topological score difference to predict binding affinities. For these one hundred complexes, we again observe a correlation of r = 0.79 (SE = 1.93 kcal/mol) between known and calculated binding affinities. Applying our model to an independent test set of high-resolution structures for three hundred diverse enzyme-inhibitor complexes

  5. Rapid and Reliable Binding Affinity Prediction of Bromodomain Inhibitors: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Binding free energies of bromodomain inhibitors are calculated with recently formulated approaches, namely ESMACS (enhanced sampling of molecular dynamics with approximation of continuum solvent) and TIES (thermodynamic integration with enhanced sampling). A set of compounds is provided by GlaxoSmithKline, which represents a range of chemical functionality and binding affinities. The predicted binding free energies exhibit a good Spearman correlation of 0.78 with the experimental data from the 3-trajectory ESMACS, and an excellent correlation of 0.92 from the TIES approach where applicable. Given access to suitable high end computing resources and a high degree of automation, we can compute individual binding affinities in a few hours with precisions no greater than 0.2 kcal/mol for TIES, and no larger than 0.34 and 1.71 kcal/mol for the 1- and 3-trajectory ESMACS approaches. PMID:28005370

  6. Pinealectomy increases ouabain high-affinity binding sites and dissociation constant in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Acuña Castroviejo, D; del Aguila, C M; Fernández, B; Gomar, M D; Castillo, J L

    1991-06-24

    The effect of the pineal gland on the ouabain high-affinity binding sites (Kd = 3.1 +/- 0.4 nM, Bmax = 246.4 +/- 18.4 fmol/mg protein) in rat cerebral cortex was studied. Pinealectomy increased Bmax (940.7 +/- 42.8 fmol/mg protein) and Kd (7.6 +/- 1.5 nM) while melatonin injection (100 micrograms/kg b.wt.) counteracted these effects, restoring kinetic parameters (Kd = 1.9 +/- 0.05 nM; Bmax = 262.2 +/- 29.6 fmol/mg prot) to control values. Melatonin activity on ouabain binding in vitro did not depend upon a direct effect on the binding sites themselves. However, in competition experiments, melatonin increased binding affinity of ouabain as shown by the decreased IC50 values.

  7. Nature of the binding interaction for 50 structurally diverse chemicals with rat estrogen receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to characterize the estrogen receptor (ER)-binding affinities of 50 chemicals selected from among the high production volume chemicals under the U.S. EPA's (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's) Toxic Substances Control Act inventory. The chemicals were...

  8. Folding and stability of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Jackson, Sophie E.

    2002-01-01

    A complex pathway involving many molecular chaperones has been proposed for the folding, assembly, and maintenance of a high-affinity ligand-binding form of steroid receptors in vivo, including the glucocorticoid receptor. To better understand this intricate folding and assembly process, we studied the folding of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in vitro. We found that this domain can be refolded into a compact, highly structured state in vitro in the absence of chaperones. However, the presence of zwitterionic detergent is required to maintain the domain in a soluble form. In this state, the protein is dimeric and has considerable helical structure as shown by far-UV circular dichroism. Further investigation of the properties of this in vitro refolded state show that it is stable and resistant to denaturation by heat or low concentrations of chemical denaturants. A detailed analysis of the unfolding equilibria using three different structural probes demonstrated that this state unfolds via a highly populated dimeric intermediate state. Together, these data clearly show that the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor does not require chaperones for folding per se. However, this in vitro refolded state binds the ligand dexamethasone only weakly (Kd = 45 μM) compared to the in vivo assembled receptor (Kd = 3.4 nM). We suggest that the role of Hsp90 and associated chaperones is to bind to, and stabilize, a specific conformational state of the receptor which binds ligand with high affinity. PMID:12142447

  9. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  10. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  11. The statistical-thermodynamic basis for computation of binding affinities: a critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, M K; Given, J A; Bush, B L; McCammon, J A

    1997-01-01

    Although the statistical thermodynamics of noncovalent binding has been considered in a number of theoretical papers, few methods of computing binding affinities are derived explicitly from this underlying theory. This has contributed to uncertainty and controversy in certain areas. This article therefore reviews and extends the connections of some important computational methods with the underlying statistical thermodynamics. A derivation of the standard free energy of binding forms the basis of this review. This derivation should be useful in formulating novel computational methods for predicting binding affinities. It also permits several important points to be established. For example, it is found that the double-annihilation method of computing binding energy does not yield the standard free energy of binding, but can be modified to yield this quantity. The derivation also makes it possible to define clearly the changes in translational, rotational, configurational, and solvent entropy upon binding. It is argued that molecular mass has a negligible effect upon the standard free energy of binding for biomolecular systems, and that the cratic entropy defined by Gurney is not a useful concept. In addition, the use of continuum models of the solvent in binding calculations is reviewed, and a formalism is presented for incorporating a limited number of solvent molecules explicitly. PMID:9138555

  12. Discovery of the first small-molecule opioid pan antagonist with nanomolar affinity at mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Nurulain T; Journigan, V Blair; Polgar, Willma E

    2015-04-15

    The trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine scaffold is a known pharmacophore for mu opioid (MOP), kappa opioid (KOP), and delta opioid (DOP) receptor antagonists; however, it has not been explored in nociceptin opioid (NOP/ORL-1) receptor ligands. We recently found that the selective KOP antagonist JDTic, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-((1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide, containing this opioid antagonist pharmacophore, has significant binding affinity at the NOP receptor (Ki 16.67 ± 0.76 nM), with no intrinsic activity in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay. Since this is the first ligand containing the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonist pharmacophore to have affinity for the NOP receptor, we explored the structural determinants of its NOP binding affinity. When rational chemical modifications of JDTic were carried out, based on our previously established NOP pharmacophoric structure-activity relationship (SAR) model, most modifications led to a significant decrease in NOP and opioid binding affinity compared to JDTic. Interestingly, however, removal of the 3,4-dimethyl groups of the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine antagonist scaffold of JDTic increased the binding affinity at NOP by 10-fold (Ki 1.75 ± 0.74 nM) while maintaining comparable affinity for KOP, MOP, and DOP receptors (Ki 1.14 ± 0.63, 1.67 ± 0.6, and 19.6 ± 1.3 nM, respectively). In vitro functional efficacy studies using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay showed that this compound AT-076 functions as an antagonist at all four opioid receptors. Detailed characterization of the antagonist activity of AT-076 shows that it has a noncompetitive antagonist profile at the NOP and KOP receptors (insurmountable antagonism), but is a potent competitive antagonist at the MOP and DOP receptors, with Ke values 3-6-fold more potent than those of JDTic. AT-076 is the

  13. Docking simulations suggest that all- trans retinoic acid could bind to retinoid X receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are ligand-controlled transcription factors which heterodimerize with other nuclear receptors to regulate gene transcriptions associated with crucial biological events. 9- cis retinoic acid (9cRA), which transactivates RXRs, is believed to be an endogenous RXR ligand. All- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a natural ligand for retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which heterodimerize with RXRs. Although the concentration of 9cRA in tissues is very low, ATRA is relatively abundant and some reports show that ATRA activates RXRs. We computationally studied the possibility of ATRA binding to RXRs using two different docking methods with our developed programs to assess the binding affinities of naturally occurring retinoids. The simulations showed good correlations to the reported binding affinities of these molecules for RXRs and RARs.

  14. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected.

  15. Soybean. beta. -glucan binding sites display maximal affinity for a heptaglucoside phytoalexin-elicitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cosio, E.G.; Waldmueller, T.; Frey, T.; Ebel, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The affinity of soybean {beta}-glucan-binding sites for a synthetic heptaglucan elicitor was tested in a ligand-competition assay against a {sup 125}I-labeled 1,3-1,6-{beta}-glucan preparation (avg. DP=20). Half-maximal displacement of label (IC{sub 50}) was obtained at 9nM heptaglucan, the highest affinity of all fractions tested to date. Displacement followed a uniform sigmoidal pattern and was complete at 1{mu}M indicating access of heptaglucan to all sites available to the labeled elicitor. A mathematical model was used to predict IC{sub 50} values according to the DP of glucan fragments obtained from fungal cell walls. The lowest IC{sub 50} predicted by this model is 3nM. Binding affinity of the glucans was compared with their elicitor activity in a bioassay.

  16. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1985-07-25

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization of the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.

  17. [125I]2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), a high-affinity radioligand selective for I1 imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed

    Greney, Hugues; Urosevic, Dragan; Schann, Stephan; Dupuy, Laurence; Bruban, Véronique; Ehrhardt, Jean-Daniel; Bousquet, Pascal; Dontenwill, Monique

    2002-07-01

    The I1 subtype of imidazoline receptors (I1R) is a plasma membrane protein that is involved in diverse physiological functions. Available radioligands used so far to characterize the I(1)R were able to bind with similar affinities to alpha2-adrenergic receptors (alpha2-ARs) and to I1R. This feature was a major drawback for an adequate characterization of this receptor subtype. New imidazoline analogs were therefore synthesized and the present study describes one of these compounds, 2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), which was of high affinity and selectivity for the I1R. LNP 911 was radioiodinated and its binding properties characterized in different membrane preparations. Saturation experiments with [125I]LNP 911 revealed a single high affinity binding site in PC-12 cell membranes (K(D) = 1.4 nM; B(max) = 398 fmol/mg protein) with low nonspecific binding. [125I]LNP 911 specific binding was inhibited by various imidazolines and analogs but was insensitive to guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate. The rank order of potency of some competing ligands [LNP 911, PIC, rilmenidine, 4-chloro-2-(imidazolin-2-ylamino)-isoindoline (BDF 6143), lofexidine, and clonidine] was consistent with the definition of [125I]LNP 911 binding sites as I1R. However, other high-affinity I1R ligands (moxonidine, efaroxan, and benazoline) exhibited low affinities for these binding sites in standard binding assays. In contrast, when [125I]LNP 911 was preincubated at 4 degrees C, competition curves of moxonidine became biphasic. In this case, moxonidine exhibited similar high affinities on [125I]LNP 911 binding sites as on I1R defined with [125I]PIC. Moxonidine proved also able to accelerate the dissociation of [125I]LNP 911 from its binding sites. These results suggest the existence of an allosteric modulation at the level of the I1R, which seems to be corroborated by the dose-dependent enhancement by LNP 911 of the agonist effects on the adenylate cyclase pathway

  18. Identifying Affinity Classes of Inorganic Materials Binding Sequences via a Graph-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Knecht, Marc R; Swihart, Mark T; Tang, Zhenghua; Walsh, Tiffany R; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in bionanotechnology have recently generated growing interest in identifying peptides that bind to inorganic materials and classifying them based on their inorganic material affinities. However, there are some distinct characteristics of inorganic materials binding sequence data that limit the performance of many widely-used classification methods when applied to this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to predict the affinity classes of peptide sequences with respect to an associated inorganic material. We first generate a large set of simulated peptide sequences based on an amino acid transition matrix tailored for the specific inorganic material. Then the probability of test sequences belonging to a specific affinity class is calculated by minimizing an objective function. In addition, the objective function is minimized through iterative propagation of probability estimates among sequences and sequence clusters. Results of computational experiments on two real inorganic material binding sequence data sets show that the proposed framework is highly effective for identifying the affinity classes of inorganic material binding sequences. Moreover, the experiments on the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) data set shows that the proposed framework is general and can be applied to traditional protein sequences.

  19. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    solvent method (35) using an explicit solvent layer width of 10 Å. The hybrid solvent model (35) involves encapsulating a biological solute by a layer of...Gilson. 2004. Calculation of cyclodextrin binding affinities: energy, entropy, and implications for drug design. Biophys. J. 87:3035–3049. 42. Janezic, D

  20. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    an explicit solvent layer width of 10 Å. The hybrid solvent model (35) involves encapsulating a biological solute by a layer of water molecules...of cyclodextrin binding affinities: energy, entropy, and implications for drug design. Biophys. J. 87:3035–3049. 42. Janezic, D., R. M. Venable, and

  1. Characterisation of the specific binding of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist radioligand [3H]GR168320.

    PubMed

    Brown, J D; O'Shaughnessy, C T; Kilpatrick, G J; Scopes, D I; Beswick, P; Clitherow, J W; Barnes, J C

    1996-09-12

    We have examined the specific binding of the tritiated derivative of the potent histamine H3 receptor antagonist, [3,4-3H2]-cyclohex-yl-¿[4-(3H-imidazol-4-yl)-piperidin-l-yl] iminomethyl¿- amine ([3H]GR168320), to homogenates of rat cerebral cortex. Specific binding of [3H]GR168320 at 37 degrees C associated and dissociated rapidly. Binding was saturable (Bmax 412 +/- 89 fmol/mg protein) and of high affinity (Kd 0.12 +/- 0.11 nM). Saturation studies suggested the involvement of a single site. Histamine H3 receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited [3H]GR168320 binding with high affinity. Agonist and antagonist affinities correlated when compared with affinities obtained using the tritiated histamine H3 agonist radioligand N alpha-methylhistamine.

  2. Competitive MS binding assays for dopamine D2 receptors employing spiperone as a native marker.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Karin V; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2005-10-01

    A competitive MS binding assay employing spiperone as a native marker and a porcine striatal membrane fraction as a source for dopamine D2 receptors in a nonvolatile buffer has been established. Binding of the test compounds to the target was monitored by mass-spectrometric quantification of the nonbound marker, spiperone, in the supernatant of the binding samples obtained by centrifugation. A solid-phase extraction procedure was used for separating spiperone from ESI-MS-incompatible supernatant matrix components. Subsequently, the marker was reliably quantified by LC-ESI-MS-MS by using haloperidol as an internal standard. The affinities of the test compounds, the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, chlorpromazine and (S)-sulpiride obtained from the competitive MS binding assay were verified by corresponding radioligand binding experiments with [3H]spiperone. The results of this study demonstrate that competitive MS binding assays represent a universally applicable alternative to conventional radioligand binding assays.

  3. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  4. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  5. Multiple benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine brain: ontogenesis, properties, and distribution of /sup 3/H-diazepam binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villiger, J.W.; Taylor, K.M.; Gluckman, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine frontal cortex were present at 56 days gestation and developed slowly until 96 days when the number increased rapidly, reaching adult levels by 120 days gestation. Scatchard analysis of 3H-diazepam specifically bound to cortical membranes suggested high (KD approximately equal to 2.0 nM) and low (KD approximately equal to 20.0 nM) affinity benzodiazepine receptors at all stages of development. Whereas the affinity of these receptors for 3H-diazepam did not alter during development, the number of both high and low affinity receptors increased significantly between 56 and 120 days gestation. The number of low affinity receptors were higher in late gestation and early neonatal life than in adulthood. The functional state of these receptors as determined by sensitivity to GABA did not alter during development. However, in the adult, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, midazolam, and 1-methylisoguanosine were more potent in displacing 3H-diazepam at the low affinity than the high affinity receptor, whereas chlordiazepoxide and diazepam had greater potency at the high affinity binding site. Development of the benzodiazepine receptor in the majority of other brain regions studied occurred primarily after 68 days gestation, as was the case in frontal cortex. In contrast, hindbrain and midbrain benzodiazepine receptors had reached adult levels by 68 days gestation.

  6. Photoaffinity labeling of high affinity nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-binding proteins in sea urchin egg.

    PubMed

    Walseth, Timothy F; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Jain, Pooja; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony; Marchant, Jonathan S; Slama, James T

    2012-01-20

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a messenger that regulates calcium release from intracellular acidic stores. Recent studies have identified two-pore channels (TPCs) as endolysosomal channels that are regulated by NAADP; however, the nature of the NAADP receptor binding site is unknown. To further study NAADP binding sites, we have synthesized and characterized [(32)P-5-azido]nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate ([(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP) as a photoaffinity probe. Photolysis of sea urchin egg homogenates preincubated with [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP resulted in specific labeling of 45-, 40-, and 30-kDa proteins, which was prevented by inclusion of nanomolar concentrations of unlabeled NAADP or 5N(3)-NAADP, but not by micromolar concentrations of structurally related nucleotides such as NAD, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP binding was saturable and displayed high affinity (K(d) ∼10 nM) in both binding and photolabeling experiments. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP photolabeling was irreversible in a high K(+) buffer, a hallmark feature of NAADP binding in the egg system. The proteins photolabeled by [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP have molecular masses smaller than the sea urchin TPCs, and antibodies to TPCs do not detect any immunoreactivity that comigrates with either the 45-kDa or the 40-kDa photolabeled proteins. Interestingly, antibodies to TPC1 and TPC3 were able to immunoprecipitate a small fraction of the 45- and 40-kDa photolabeled proteins, suggesting that these proteins associate with TPCs. These data suggest that high affinity NAADP binding sites are distinct from TPCs.

  7. Ligand binding by recombinant domains from insect ecdysone receptors.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Johnson, W M; Pawlak-Skrzecz, A; Eaton, R E; Bliese, M; Howell, L; Hannan, G N; Hill, R J

    2007-06-01

    The ligand binding domains (LBDs) from the EcR and USP proteins of four insect pests (Lucilia cuprina, Myzus persicae, Bemisia tabaci, Helicoverpa armigera) were purified as recombinant heterodimers. The K(d) values for [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding by LBD heterodimers that included the hinge regions (i.e., DE/F heterodimers) ranged 0.7-2.5 nM, with K(i) values for ecdysteroid and dibenzoylhydrazine ligands ranging from 0.1 nM to >448 microM. The K(d) and K(i) values for a recombinant H. armigera LBD heterodimer that lacked D-regions (i.e., an E/F heterodimer) were approximately 4 times higher than those for its DE/F counterpart. Rate constants were estimated for the L. cuprina LBD heterodimer. A fluorescein-inokosterone conjugate (K(i)~40 nM) was used to develop a novel binding assay based on fluorescence polarization. This assay, which ranked the affinity of competitor ecdysteroids in the same order as the [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding assay, is well suited to high-throughput screening. Ponasterone A had a higher affinity than muristerone A for the recombinant hemipteran LBD heterodimers, whereas the reverse was true for the recombinant dipteran one. The same preference was observed when these ligands were tested as inducers of ecdysone receptor-controlled gene expression in transfected mammalian cells. The binding data obtained in vitro using recombinant LBD heterodimers reflects the ability of agonists to induce transgene expression in recombinant mammalian cells, and can also reflect their efficacy as larvicides.

  8. Insulin and epidermal growth factor receptors in rat liver after administration of the hepatocarcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene: ligand binding and autophosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.L.; Roitman, A.; Carr, B.I.; Barseghian, G.; Lev-Ran, A.

    1986-04-01

    The livers of male F344 rats which were fed 0.02% 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) for two days or more had decreased binding of insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) to their hepatic receptors in microsomal and Golgi fractions. Hepatic receptors which were partially purified from carcinogen-fed rats by Triton X-100 solubilization and wheat germ agglutinin affinity column chromatography also had decreased binding activity compared to receptors from normal rats. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in insulin receptor binding was due to decreased receptor number whereas the change in EGF receptor binding was attributed to decreased receptor affinity. Insulin receptor phosphokinase activity was also decreased in 2-AAF-fed rats and correlated with the decrease in receptor binding. EGF receptor phosphokinase activity was unchanged in 2-AAF-fed rats when stimulated with a high concentration (1 microM) of EGF but was decreased when stimulated with low concentrations (0.01-0.1 microM) of EGF. No EGF or insulin competing activity for receptor binding was found using acid-ethanol extracts of 2-AAF-altered liver. These results suggest that 2-AAF causes different alterations in the insulin and EGF receptors of the rat liver.

  9. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  10. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively.

  11. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K.; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G.; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. PMID:27899623

  12. Identification of high affinity bioactive Salbutamol conformer directed against mutated (Thr164Ile) beta 2 adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Srinivas; Tiwari, Geet; Akka, Jyothy; Marri, Vijaya Kumar; Alvala, Mallika; Gutlapalli, Venkata Ravi; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Mundluru, Hema Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Salbutamol forms an important and widely administered β2 agonist prescribed in the symptomatic treatment of bronchial asthma. Unfortunately, a subset of patients show refractoriness to it owing to ADRB2 gene variant (rs 1800888). The variant substitutes Thr to Ile at the position 164 in the β2 adrenergic receptor leading to sub-optimal binding of agonists. The present study aims to associate the Salbutamol response with the variant and select the bioactive conformer of Sabutamol with optimal binding affinity against mutated receptor by in silico approaches. To assess bronchodilator response spirometry was performed before and 15 min after Salbutamol (200 mcg) inhalation. Responders to Salbutamol were categorized if percentage reversibility was greater than or equal to 12%, while those showing FEV₁ reversibility less than 12% were classified as non-responders. Among the 344 subjects screened, 238 were responders and 106 were non-responders. The frequency of mutant allele "T" was significantly higher in case of non-responders (p < 0.05). In silico process involved generation of Salbutamol conformer ensembles supported by systematic search algorithm. 4369 conformers were generated of which only 1882 were considered bioactive conformers (threshold RMSD≤1 in reference to normalized structure of salbutamol). All the bioactive conformers were evaluated for the binding affinity against (Thr164 Ile) receptor through MolDock aided docking algorithm. One of the bioactive conformer (P.E. = -57.0038, RMSD = 0.6) demonstrated 1.54 folds greater affinity than the normal Salbutamol in the mutated receptor. The conformer identified in the present study may be put to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies in future ahead.

  13. Application of Binding Free Energy Calculations to Prediction of Binding Modes and Affinities of MDM2 and MDMX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    Molecular docking is widely used to obtain binding modes and binding affinities of a molecule to a given target protein. Despite considerable efforts, however, prediction of both properties by docking remains challenging mainly due to protein’s structural flexibility and inaccuracy of scoring functions. Here, an integrated approach has been developed to improve the accuracy of binding mode and affinity prediction, and tested for small molecule MDM2 and MDMX antagonists. In this approach, initial candidate models selected from docking are subjected to equilibration MD simulations to further filter the models. Free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations are then applied to the filtered ligand models to enhance the ability in predicting the near-native ligand conformation. The calculated binding free energies for MDM2 complexes are overestimated compared to experimental measurements mainly due to the difficulties in sampling highly flexible apo-MDM2. Nonetheless, the FEP/MD binding free energy calculations are more promising for discriminating binders from nonbinders than docking scores. In particular, the comparison between the MDM2 and MDMX results suggests that apo-MDMX has lower flexibility than apo-MDM2. In addition, the FEP/MD calculations provide detailed information on the different energetic contributions to ligand binding, leading to a better understanding of the sensitivity and specificity of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:22731511

  14. Partitioning of fish and insect antifreeze proteins into ice suggests they bind with comparable affinity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher B; Tomczak, Melanie M; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Kuiper, Michael J; Lankin, Christopher; Walker, Virginia K; Davies, Peter L

    2004-01-13

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of ice by binding to the surface of ice crystals, preventing the addition of water molecules to cause a local depression of the freezing point. AFPs from insects are much more effective at depressing the freezing point than fish AFPs. Here, we have investigated the possibility that insect AFPs bind more avidly to ice than fish AFPs. Because it is not possible to directly measure the affinity of an AFP for ice, we have assessed binding indirectly by examining the partitioning of proteins into a slowly growing ice hemisphere. AFP molecules adsorbed to the surface and became incorporated into the ice as they were overgrown. Solutes, including non-AFPs, were very efficiently excluded from ice, whereas AFPs became incorporated into ice at a concentration roughly equal to that of the original solution, and this was independent of the AFP concentration in the range (submillimolar) tested. Despite their >10-fold difference in antifreeze activity, fish and insect AFPs partitioned into ice to a similar degree, suggesting that insect AFPs do not bind to ice with appreciably higher affinity. Additionally, we have demonstrated that steric mutations on the ice binding surface that decrease the antifreeze activity of an AFP also reduce its inclusion into ice, supporting the validity of using partitioning measurements to assess a protein's affinity for ice.

  15. False positive RNA binding activities after Ni-affinity purification from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Milojevic, Tetyana; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Romeo, Alessandra; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2013-06-01

    A His-tag is often added by means of recombinant DNA technology to a heterologous protein of interest, which is then over-produced in Escherchia coli and purified by one-step immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Owing to the presence of 24 histidines at the C-termini of the hexameric E. coli RNA chaperone Hfq, the protein co-purifies with His-tagged proteins of interest. As Hfq can bind to distinct RNA substrates with high affinity, its presence can obscure studies performed with (putative) RNA binding activities purified by IMAC. Here, we present results for a seemingly positive RNA-binding activity, exemplifying that false-positive results can be avoided if the protein of interest is either subjected to further purification step(s) or produced in an E. coli hfq- strain.

  16. Studies on the binding affinity of anticancer drug mitoxantrone to chromatin, DNA and histone proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hajihassan, Zahra; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra

    2009-01-01

    Mitoxantrone is a potent antitumor drug, widely used in the treatment of various cancers. In the present study, we have investigated and compared the affinity of anticancer drug, mitoxantrone, to EDTA-soluble chromatin (SE-chromatin), DNA and histones employing UV/Vis, fluorescence, CD spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that the interaction of mitoxantrone with SE-chromatin proceeds into compaction/aggregation as revealed by reduction in the absorbencies at 608 and 260 nm (hypochromicity) and disappearance of both histones and DNA on the gels. Mitoxantrone interacts strongly with histone proteins in solution making structural changes in the molecule as shown by CD and fluorescence analysis. The binding isotherms demonstrate a positive cooperative binding pattern for the chromatin- mitoxantrone interaction. It is suggested higher binding affinity of mitoxantrone to chromatin compared to DNA implying that the histone proteins may play an important role in the chromatin- mitoxantrone interaction process. PMID:19284573

  17. Engineering Streptavidin and a Streptavidin-Binding Peptide with Infinite Binding Affinity and Reversible Binding Capability: Purification of a Tagged Recombinant Protein to High Purity via Affinity-Driven Thiol Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Fogen, Dawson; Wu, Sau-Ching; Ng, Kenneth Kai-Sing; Wong, Sui-Lam

    2015-01-01

    To extend and improve the utility of the streptavidin-binding peptide tag (SBP-tag) in applications ranging from affinity purification to the reversible immobilization of recombinant proteins, a cysteine residue was introduced to the streptavidin mutein SAVSBPM18 and the SBP-tag to generate SAVSBPM32 and SBP(A18C), respectively. This pair of derivatives is capable of forming a disulfide bond through the newly introduced cysteine residues. SAVSBPM32 binds SBP-tag and biotin with binding affinities (Kd ~ 10-8M) that are similar to SAVSBPM18. Although SBP(A18C) binds to SAVSBPM32 more weakly than SBP-tag, the binding affinity is sufficient to bring the two binding partners together efficiently before they are locked together via disulfide bond formation–a phenomenon we have named affinity-driven thiol coupling. Under the condition with SBP(A18C) tags in excess, two SBP(A18C) tags can be captured by a tetrameric SAVSBPM32. The stoichiometry of the disulfide-bonded SAVSBPM32-SBP(A18C) complex was determined using a novel two-dimensional electrophoresis method which has general applications for analyzing the composition of disulfide-bonded protein complexes. To illustrate the application of this reversible immobilization technology, optimized conditions were established to use the SAVSBPM32-affinity matrix for the purification of a SBP(A18C)-tagged reporter protein to high purity. Furthermore, we show that the SAVSBPM32-affinity matrix can also be applied to purify a biotinylated protein and a reporter protein tagged with the unmodified SBP-tag. The dual (covalent and non-covalent) binding modes possible in this system offer great flexibility to many different applications which need reversible immobilization capability. PMID:26406477

  18. Metal binding sites of the estradiol receptor from calf uterus and their possible role in the regulation of receptor function

    SciTech Connect

    Medici, N.; Minucci, S.; Nigro, V.; Abbondanza, C.; Armetta, I.; Molinari, A.M.; Puca, G.A. )

    1989-01-10

    The existence of putative metal binding sites on the estradiol receptor (ER) molecule from calf uterus was evaluated by immobilizing various divalent metals to iminodiacetate-Sepharose. ER from both crude and highly purified preparations binds to metal-containing adsorbents complexed with Zn(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Cu(II), but not to those complexed with Fe(II) and Cd(II). Analysis of affinity-labeled ER by ({sup 3}H)tamoxifen aziridine after elution from a column of Zn(II)-charged iminodiacetate-Sepharose showed that ER fragments obtained by extensive trypsinization were also bound. Zn(II) and the same other metals able to bind ER, when immobilized on resins, inhibit the binding of estradiol to the receptor at micromolar concentration. This inhibition is noncompetitive and can be reversed by EDTA. The inhibition of the hormone binding was still present after trypsin treatment of the cytosol, and it was abolished by preincubation with the hormone. Micromolar concentrations of these metals were able to block those chemical-physical changes occurring during the process of ER transformation in vitro. The presence of metal binding sites that modulate the ER activity in the hormone binding domain of ER is speculated. Since progesterone receptor showed the same pattern of binding and elution from metal-containing adsorbents, the presence of metal binding regulatory sites could be a property of all steroid receptors.

  19. The intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, is a high-affinity apolipoprotein A-I receptor facilitating endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Kristiansen, M; Gerdes, C; Jacobsen, C; Cui, S; Christensen, E I; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Krahe, R; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-06-01

    Cubilin is the intestinal receptor for the endocytosis of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. However, several lines of evidence, including a high expression in kidney and yolk sac, indicate it may have additional functions. We isolated apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the main protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), using cubilin affinity chromatography. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated a high-affinity binding of apoA-I and HDL to cubilin, and cubilin-expressing yolk sac cells showed efficient 125I-HDL endocytosis that could be inhibited by IgG antibodies against apoA-I and cubilin. The physiological relevance of the cubilin-apoA-I interaction was further emphasized by urinary apoA-I loss in some known cases of functional cubilin deficiency. Therefore, cubilin is a receptor in epithelial apoA-I/HDL metabolism.

  20. The presence of high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β binding in rainbow trout scale indicates a possible endocrine route for the regulation of scale resorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persson, Petra; Shrimpton, J. Mark; McCormick, Stephen D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2000-01-01

    High-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-17β (E2) binding is present in rainbow trout scale. The Kd and Bmax of the scale E2 binding are similar to those of the liver E2 receptor (Kd is 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.4 ± 0.1 nM, and Bmax is 9.1 ± 1.2 and 23.1 ± 2.2 fmol × mg protein-1, for scale and liver, respectively), but different from those of the high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding in plasma (Kd is 4.0 ± 0.4 nM and Bmax is 625.4 ± 63.1 fmol × mg protein−1). The E2 binding in scale was displaced by testosterone, but not by diethylstilbestrol. Hence, the ligand binding specificity is different from that of the previously characterized liver E2 receptor, where E2 is displaced by diethylstilbestrol, but not by testosterone. The putative scale E2 receptor thus appears to bind both E2 and testosterone, and it is proposed that the increased scale resorption observed during sexual maturation in both sexes of several salmonid species may be mediated by this receptor. No high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding could be detected in rainbow trout gill or skin.

  1. Novel affinity membranes with macrocyclic spacer arms synthesized via click chemistry for lysozyme binding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligang; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhong, Yonghui; Cheng, Qi; Bian, Xihui; Xin, Qingping; Cheng, Bowen; Feng, Xianshe; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2017-04-05

    Affinity membrane has great potential for applications in bioseparation and purification. Disclosed herein is the design of a novel affinity membrane with macrocyclic spacer arms for lysozyme binding. The clickable azide-cyclodextrin (CD) arms and clickable alkyne ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVAL) chains are designed and prepared. By the azide-alkyne click reaction, the EVAL-CD-ligands affinity membranes with CD spacer arms in three-dimensional micro channels have been successfully fabricated. The FT-IR, XPS, NMR, SEM and SEM-EDS results give detailed information of structure evolution. The abundant pores in membrane matrix provide efficient working channels, and the introduced CD arms with ligands (affinity sites) provide supramolecular atmosphere. Compared with that of raw EVAL membrane, the adsorption capacity of EVAL-CD-ligands membrane (26.24mg/g) show a triple increase. The study indicates that three effects (inducing effect, arm effect, site effect) from CD arms render the enhanced performance. The click reaction happened in membrane matrix in bulk. The effective lysozyme binding and higher adsorption performance of affinity membranes described herein compared with other reported membranes are markedly related with the proposed strategy involving macrocyclic spacer arms and supramolecular working channels.

  2. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase.

  3. Iron uptake and increased intracellular enzyme activity follow host lactoferrin binding by Trichomonas vaginalis receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.M.; Alderete, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Lactoferrin acquisition and iron uptake by pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Saturation binding kinetics were obtained for trichomonads using increasing amounts of radioiodinated lactoferrin, while no significant binding by transferrin under similar conditions was achieved. Only unlabeled lactoferrin successfully and stoichiometrically competed with 125I-labeled lactoferrin binding. Time course studies showed maximal lactoferrin binding by 30 min at 37 degrees C. Data suggest no internalization of bound lactoferrin. The accumulation of radioactivity in supernatants after incubation of T. vaginalis with 125I-labeled lactoferrin and washing in PBS suggested the presence of low affinity sites for this host macromolecule. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of 90,000 receptors per trichomonad with an apparent Kd of 1.0 microM. Two trichomonad lactoferrin binding proteins were identified by affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation of receptor-ligand complexes. A 30-fold accumulation of iron was achieved using 59Fe-lactoferrin when compared to the steady state concentration of bound lactoferrin. The activity of pyruvate/ferrodoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme involved in trichomonal energy metabolism, increased more than sixfold following exposure of the parasites to lactoferrin, demonstrating a biologic response to the receptor-mediated binding of lactoferrin. These data suggest that T. vaginalis possesses specific receptors for biologically relevant host proteins and that these receptors contribute to the metabolic processes of the parasites.

  4. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.whittaker@case.edu

    2006-08-18

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the {alpha} subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K {sub d} of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site.

  5. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  6. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M.J.; Bladen, C. )

    1991-06-11

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 {mu}M for the agonist ({plus minus})-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, ({plus minus})-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since ({minus})-PN200-110 (1-200 {mu}M) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP{gamma}S) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP{beta}S) on binding parameters. GTP{gamma}S did increase the ability of ({plus minus})-({sup 3}H)PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites.

  7. Intermediate affinity and potency of clozapine and low affinity of other neuroleptics and of antidepressants at H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    1994-12-01

    It was the aim of the present study to determine the affinities of four neuroleptics and five antidepressants for histamine H3 receptors. In rat brain cortex membranes, the specifically bound [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine was monophasically displaced by clozapine (pKi 6.15). The other drugs did not completely displace the radioligand even at 100 microM; the pKi values were: haloperidol (4.91); sulpiride (4.73); amitriptyline (4.56); desipramine (4.15); levomepromazine (4.14); fluovoxamine (4.13); maprotiline (4.09); moclobemide (< 4.0). The effect of clozapine was further examined in a functional H3 receptor model, i.e., in superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. The electrically evoked tritium overflow was not affected by clozapine 0.5-32 microM. However, clozapine shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow to the right, but did not affect the maximum effect of histamine. The Schild plot yielded a pA2 value of 6.33. In conclusion, clozapine shows an intermediate affinity and potency (as a competitive antagonist) at H3 receptors. The Ki value of clozapine at H3 receptors resembles its Ki value at D2 receptors (the target of the classical neuroleptics), but is higher than its Ki values at D4, 5-HT2 or muscarinic acetylc