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Sample records for affinity transport system

  1. Mathematical modeling of the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in E. coli. The model is a system of three ordinary differential equations and takes the dynamics of mRNAs for the araE and araFGH proteins and the internal arabinose into account. Special attention was paid to estimate the model parameters from the literature. Our analysis and simulations suggest that the high affinity transport system helps the low affinity transport system to respond to high concentration of extracellular arabinose faster, whereas the high affinity transport system responds to a small amount of extracellular arabinose. Steady state analysis of the model also predicts that there is a regime for the extracellular concentration of arabinose where the arabinose system can show bistable behavior.

  2. Genetic evidence of a high-affinity cyanuric acid transport system in Pseudomonas sp. ADP.

    PubMed

    Platero, Ana I; Santero, Eduardo; Govantes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. ADP plasmid pADP-1 encodes the activities involved in the hydrolytic degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. Here, we explore the presence of a specific transport system for the central intermediate of the atrazine utilization pathway, cyanuric acid, in Pseudomonas sp. ADP. Growth in fed-batch cultures containing limiting cyanuric acid concentrations is consistent with high-affinity transport of this substrate. Acquisition of the ability to grow at low cyanuric acid concentrations upon conjugal transfer of pADP1 to the nondegrading host Pseudomonas putida KT2442 suggests that all activities required for this phenotype are encoded in this plasmid. Co-expression of the pADP1-borne atzDEF and atzTUVW genes, encoding the cyanuric acid utilization pathway and the subunits of an ABC-type solute transport system, in P. putida KT2442 was sufficient to promote growth at cyanuric acid concentrations as low as 50 μM in batch culture. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the atzTUVW gene products are involved in high-affinity transport of cyanuric acid.

  3. Regulation of a high-affinity diamine transport system in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Le Quesne, S A; Fairlamb, A H

    1996-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes take up exogenous [3H]putrescine and [3H]cadaverine by a rapid, high-affinity, transport system that exhibits saturable kinetics (putrescine K(m) 2.0 microM, V(max) 3.3 nmol/min per 10(8) cells; cadaverine K(m) 13.4 microM, V(max) 3.9 nmol/min per 10(8) cells). Putrescine transport is temperature dependent and requires the presence of a membrane potential and thiol groups for activity. Its activity is altered in response to extracellular putrescine levels and as the cells proceed through the growth cycle. This transporter shows high specificity for the diamines putrescine and cadaverine, but low specificity for the polyamines spermidine and spermine. The existence of rapid diamine/polyamine transport systems whose activity can be adjusted in response to the growth conditions is of particular importance, as they seem unable to synthesize their own putrescine [Hunter, Le Quesne and Fairlamb (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 226, 1019-1027]. PMID:8687391

  4. Identification of a PutP proline permease gene homolog from Staphylococcus aureus by expression cloning of the high-affinity proline transport system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wengender, P A; Miller, K J

    1995-01-01

    The important food-borne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is distinguished by its ability to grow at low water activity values. Previous work in our laboratory and by others has revealed that proline accumulation via transport is an important osmoregulatory strategy employed by this bacterium. Furthermore, proline uptake by this bacterium has been shown to be mediated by two distinct transport systems: a high-affinity system and a low-affinity system (J.-H. Bae, and K. J. Miller, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:471-475, 1992; D. E. Townsend and B. J. Wilkinson, J. Bacteriol. 174:2702-2710, 1992). In the present study, we report the cloning of the high-affinity proline transport system of S. aureus by functional expression in an Escherichia coli host. The sequence of the staphylococcal proline permease gene was predicted to encode a protein of 497 amino acids which shares 49% identity with the PutP high-affinity proline permease of E. coli. Analysis of hydropathy also indicated a common overall structure for these proteins. PMID:7887605

  5. The yeast Aft2 transcription factor determines selenite toxicity by controlling the low affinity phosphate transport system

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sampietro, María; Serra-Cardona, Albert; Canadell, David; Casas, Celia; Ariño, Joaquín; Herrero, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is employed as a model to study the cellular mechanisms of toxicity and defense against selenite, the most frequent environmental selenium form. We show that yeast cells lacking Aft2, a transcription factor that together with Aft1 regulates iron homeostasis, are highly sensitive to selenite but, in contrast to aft1 mutants, this is not rescued by iron supplementation. The absence of Aft2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional responses to selenite, particularly for DNA damage- and oxidative stress-responsive genes, and results in intracellular hyperaccumulation of selenium. Overexpression of PHO4, the transcriptional activator of the PHO regulon under low phosphate conditions, partially reverses sensitivity and hyperaccumulation of selenite in a way that requires the presence of Spl2, a Pho4-controlled protein responsible for post-transcriptional downregulation of the low-affinity phosphate transporters Pho87 and Pho90. SPL2 expression is strongly downregulated in aft2 cells, especially upon selenite treatment. Selenite hypersensitivity of aft2 cells is fully rescued by deletion of PHO90, suggesting a major role for Pho90 in selenite uptake. We propose that the absence of Aft2 leads to enhanced Pho90 function, involving both Spl2-dependent and independent events and resulting in selenite hyperaccumulation and toxicity. PMID:27618952

  6. The yeast Aft2 transcription factor determines selenite toxicity by controlling the low affinity phosphate transport system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sampietro, María; Serra-Cardona, Albert; Canadell, David; Casas, Celia; Ariño, Joaquín; Herrero, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is employed as a model to study the cellular mechanisms of toxicity and defense against selenite, the most frequent environmental selenium form. We show that yeast cells lacking Aft2, a transcription factor that together with Aft1 regulates iron homeostasis, are highly sensitive to selenite but, in contrast to aft1 mutants, this is not rescued by iron supplementation. The absence of Aft2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional responses to selenite, particularly for DNA damage- and oxidative stress-responsive genes, and results in intracellular hyperaccumulation of selenium. Overexpression of PHO4, the transcriptional activator of the PHO regulon under low phosphate conditions, partially reverses sensitivity and hyperaccumulation of selenite in a way that requires the presence of Spl2, a Pho4-controlled protein responsible for post-transcriptional downregulation of the low-affinity phosphate transporters Pho87 and Pho90. SPL2 expression is strongly downregulated in aft2 cells, especially upon selenite treatment. Selenite hypersensitivity of aft2 cells is fully rescued by deletion of PHO90, suggesting a major role for Pho90 in selenite uptake. We propose that the absence of Aft2 leads to enhanced Pho90 function, involving both Spl2-dependent and independent events and resulting in selenite hyperaccumulation and toxicity. PMID:27618952

  7. Chlorophenylpiperazine analogues as high affinity dopamine transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Motel, William C; Healy, Jason R; Viard, Eddy; Pouw, Buddy; Martin, Kelly E; Matsumoto, Rae R; Coop, Andrew

    2013-12-15

    Selective σ2 ligands continue to be an active target for medications to attenuate the effects of psychostimulants. In the course of our studies to determine the optimal substituents in the σ2-selective phenyl piperazines analogues with reduced activity at other neurotransmitter systems, we discovered that 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-phenethylpiperazine actually had preferentially increased affinity for dopamine transporters (DAT), yielding a highly selective DAT ligand. PMID:24211020

  8. System A amino acid transporter SNAT2 shows subtype-specific affinity for betaine and hyperosmotic inducibility in placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomohiro; Yagi, Risa; Usuda, Mariko; Oda, Kenji; Yamazaki, Mai; Suda, Sayaka; Takahashi, Yu; Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Sai, Yoshimichi; Higuchi, Kei; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Tomi, Masatoshi; Nakashima, Emi

    2014-05-01

    Betaine uptake is induced by hypertonic stress in a placental trophoblast cell line, and involvement of amino acid transport system A was proposed. Here, we aimed to identify the subtype(s) of system A that mediates hypertonicity-induced betaine uptake. Measurement of [(14)C]betaine uptake by HEK293 cells transiently transfected with human or rat sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs), SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4 revealed that only human and rat SNAT2 have betaine uptake activity. The Michaelis constants (Km) of betaine uptake by human and rat SNAT2 were estimated to be 5.3 mM and 4.6 mM, respectively. Betaine exclusively inhibited the uptake activity of SNAT2 among the rat system A subtypes. We found that rat SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4 were expressed at the mRNA level under isotonic conditions, while expression of SNAT2 and SNAT4 was induced by hypertonicity in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells. Western blot analyses revealed that SNAT2 expression on plasma membrane of TR-TBT 18d-1 cells was more potently induced by hypertonicity than that in total cell lysate. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the induction of SNAT2 expression in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells exposed to hypertonic conditions and indicated that SNAT2 was localized on the plasma membrane in these cells. Our results indicate that SNAT2 transports betaine, and that tonicity-sensitive SNAT2 expression may be involved in regulation of betaine concentration in placental trophoblasts. PMID:24434061

  9. System A amino acid transporter SNAT2 shows subtype-specific affinity for betaine and hyperosmotic inducibility in placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomohiro; Yagi, Risa; Usuda, Mariko; Oda, Kenji; Yamazaki, Mai; Suda, Sayaka; Takahashi, Yu; Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Sai, Yoshimichi; Higuchi, Kei; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Tomi, Masatoshi; Nakashima, Emi

    2014-05-01

    Betaine uptake is induced by hypertonic stress in a placental trophoblast cell line, and involvement of amino acid transport system A was proposed. Here, we aimed to identify the subtype(s) of system A that mediates hypertonicity-induced betaine uptake. Measurement of [(14)C]betaine uptake by HEK293 cells transiently transfected with human or rat sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs), SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4 revealed that only human and rat SNAT2 have betaine uptake activity. The Michaelis constants (Km) of betaine uptake by human and rat SNAT2 were estimated to be 5.3 mM and 4.6 mM, respectively. Betaine exclusively inhibited the uptake activity of SNAT2 among the rat system A subtypes. We found that rat SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4 were expressed at the mRNA level under isotonic conditions, while expression of SNAT2 and SNAT4 was induced by hypertonicity in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells. Western blot analyses revealed that SNAT2 expression on plasma membrane of TR-TBT 18d-1 cells was more potently induced by hypertonicity than that in total cell lysate. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the induction of SNAT2 expression in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells exposed to hypertonic conditions and indicated that SNAT2 was localized on the plasma membrane in these cells. Our results indicate that SNAT2 transports betaine, and that tonicity-sensitive SNAT2 expression may be involved in regulation of betaine concentration in placental trophoblasts.

  10. Designing Chaotic Systems by Piecewise Affine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Li, Qingdu; Yang, Xiao-Song

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of homoclinic orbits in a class of three-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, two chaotic generators are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  11. The SPX domain of the yeast low-affinity phosphate transporter Pho90 regulates transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Pinson, Benoît; Stadler-Waibel, Martha; Zeeman, Samuel C; Freimoser, Florian M

    2009-01-01

    Yeast has two phosphate-uptake systems that complement each other: the high-affinity transporters (Pho84 and Pho89) are active under phosphate starvation, whereas Pho87 and Pho90 are low-affinity transporters that function when phosphate is abundant. Here, we report new regulatory functions of the amino-terminal SPX domain of Pho87 and Pho90. By studying truncated versions of Pho87 and Pho90, we show that the SPX domain limits the phosphate-uptake velocity, suppresses phosphate efflux and affects the regulation of the phosphate signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, split-ubiquitin assays and co-immunoprecipitation suggest that the SPX domain of both Pho90 and Pho87 interacts physically with the regulatory protein Spl2. This work suggests that the SPX domain inhibits low-affinity phosphate transport through a physical interaction with Spl2. PMID:19590579

  12. Jen1p: A High Affinity Selenite Transporter in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Joseph R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2010-01-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient in most eukaryotes, including humans, which is well known for having an extremely thin border between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Soluble tetravalent selenite is the predominant environmental form and also the form that is applied in the treatment of human diseases. To acquire this nutrient from low environmental concentrations as well as to avoid toxicity, a well-controlled transport system is required. Here we report that Jen1p, a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter in S. cerevisiae, catalyzes high-affinity uptake of selenite. Disruption of JEN1 resulted in selenite resistance, and overexpression resulted in selenite hypersensitivity. Transport assay showed that overexpression of Jen1p enables selenite accumulation in yeast compared with a JEN1 knock out strain, indicating the Jen1p transporter facilitates selenite accumulation inside cells. Selenite uptake by Jen1p had a Km of 0.91 mM, which is comparable to the Km for lactate. Jen1p transported selenite in a proton-dependent manner which resembles the transport mechanism for lactate. In addition, selenite and lactate can inhibit the transport of each other competitively. Therefore, we postulate selenite is a molecular mimic of monocarboxylates which allows selenite to be transported by Jen1p. PMID:20861301

  13. Differential regulation of high-affinity phosphate transport systems of Mycobacterium smegmatis: identification of PhnF, a repressor of the phnDCE operon.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Susanne; Cook, Gregory M

    2008-02-01

    The uptake of phosphate into the cell via high-affinity, phosphate-specific transport systems has been studied with several species of mycobacteria. All of these species have been shown to contain several copies of such transport systems, which are synthesized in response to phosphate limitation. However, the mechanisms leading to the expression of the genes encoding these transporters have not been studied. This study reports on the investigation of the regulation of the pstSCAB and the phnDCE operons of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The phn locus contains an additional gene, phnF, encoding a GntR-like transcriptional regulator. Expression analyses of a phnF deletion mutant demonstrated that PhnF acts as a repressor of the phnDCE operon but does not affect the expression of pstSCAB. The deletion of pstS, which is thought to cause the constitutive expression of genes regulated by the two-component system SenX3-RegX3, led to the constitutive expression of the transcriptional fusions pstS-lacZ, phnD-lacZ, and phnF-lacZ, suggesting that phnDCE and phnF are conceivably new members of the SenX3-RegX3 regulon of M. smegmatis. Two presumptive binding sites for PhnF in the intergenic region between phnD and phnF were identified and shown to be required for the repression of phnD and phnF, respectively. We propose a model in which the transcription of pstSCAB is controlled by the two-component SenX3-RegX3 system, while phnDCE and phnF are subject to dual control by SenX3-RegX3 and PhnF. PMID:18083811

  14. Crystal Structure of A Plant Dual-Affinity Nitrate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ji; Bankston, John R.; Payandeh, Jian; Hinds, Thomas R.; Zagotta, William N.; Zheng, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is a primary nutrient for plant growth, but its levels in soil can fluctuate by several orders of magnitude. Previous studies have identified Arabidopsis NRT1.1 as a dual-affinity nitrate transporter, which can take up nitrate over a wide range of concentrations. The mode of action of NRT1.1 is controlled by phosphorylation of a key residue, Thr101. Yet how this posttranslational modification switches the transporter between two affinity states remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of unphosphorylated NRT1.1, which reveals an unexpected homodimer in the inward-facing conformation. In this low-affinity state, the Thr101 phosphorylation site is embedded in a pocket immediately adjacent to the dimer interface, linking the phosphorylation status of the transporter to its oligomeric state. Using a cell-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, we show that functional NRT1.1 indeed dimerizes in the cell membrane and the phosphomimetic mutation of Thr101 converts the protein into a monophasic high affinity transporter by structurally decoupling the dimer. Together with analyses of the substrate transport tunnel, our results establish a phosphorylation-controlled dimerization switch that allows NRT1.1 to uptake nitrate with two distinct affinity modes. PMID:24572362

  15. Properties of an affine transport equation and its holonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Justin; Nichols, David A.

    2016-10-01

    An affine transport equation was used recently to study properties of angular momentum and gravitational-wave memory effects in general relativity. In this paper, we investigate local properties of this transport equation in greater detail. Associated with this transport equation is a map between the tangent spaces at two points on a curve. This map consists of a homogeneous (linear) part given by the parallel transport map along the curve plus an inhomogeneous part, which is related to the development of a curve in a manifold into an affine tangent space. For closed curves, the affine transport equation defines a "generalized holonomy" that takes the form of an affine map on the tangent space. We explore the local properties of this generalized holonomy by using covariant bitensor methods to compute the generalized holonomy around geodesic polygon loops. We focus on triangles and "parallelogramoids" with sides formed from geodesic segments. For small loops, we recover the well-known result for the leading-order linear holonomy (˜ Riemann × area), and we derive the leading-order inhomogeneous part of the generalized holonomy (˜ Riemann × area^{3/2}). Our bitensor methods let us naturally compute higher-order corrections to these leading results. These corrections reveal the form of the finite-size effects that enter into the holonomy for larger loops; they could also provide quantitative errors on the leading-order results for finite loops.

  16. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  17. Evaluation system of negative electron affinity photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongguo; Chang, Benkang; Qian, Yunsheng; Wang, Guihua; Zong, Zhiyuan

    2001-10-01

    This article first describes the background of the research and manufacture of evaluation system of Negative Electron Affinity photocathode. This article designs a set of super high vacuum system for activating NEA photocathode on the base of activation theory, the process of design and debugging is given. The system is composed of three parts: super high vacuum system for GaAs material activation, multi-meter testing system, surface analysis system. The system is used for on-line evaluation of activating of NEA photocathode. The technical parameters and structure of the evaluation system of NEA photocathode are given in the paper. The system is finished and experiments are made. At last the picture of the system is given.

  18. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  19. Proton affinity changes driving unidirectional proton transport in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    PubMed

    Onufriev, Alexey; Smondyrev, Alexander; Bashford, Donald

    2003-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin is the smallest autonomous light-driven proton pump. Proposals as to how it achieves the directionality of its trans-membrane proton transport fall into two categories: accessibility-switch models in which proton transfer pathways in different parts of the molecule are opened and closed during the photocycle, and affinity-switch models, which focus on changes in proton affinity of groups along the transport chain during the photocycle. Using newly available structural data, and adapting current methods of protein protonation-state prediction to the non-equilibrium case, we have calculated the relative free energies of protonation microstates of groups on the transport chain during key conformational states of the photocycle. Proton flow is modeled using accessibility limitations that do not change during the photocycle. The results show that changes in affinity (microstate energy) calculable from the structural models are sufficient to drive unidirectional proton transport without invoking an accessibility switch. Modeling studies for the N state relative to late M suggest that small structural re-arrangements in the cytoplasmic side may be enough to produce the crucial affinity change of Asp96 during N that allows it to participate in the reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side. Methodologically, the work represents a conceptual advance compared to the usual calculations of pK(a) using macroscopic electrostatic models. We operate with collective states of protonation involving all key groups, rather than the individual-group pK(a) values traditionally used. When combined with state-to-state transition rules based on accessibility considerations, a model for non-equilibrium proton flow is obtained. Such methods should also be applicable to other active proton-transport systems. PMID:14499620

  20. High-affinity transport of L-glutamine by a plasma membrane preparation from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Roon, R J; Shofner, S A; Koerner, J F

    1989-10-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles prepared from rat brain contain a saturable, high-affinity transport system for L-glutamine that exhibits the following characteristics: (1) The rate of L-glutamine transport is linear up to 200 micrograms/mL membrane protein. (2) Transport of [3H]-L-glutamine is linear with time for at least 10 min, is significantly reduced by lowering the assay temperature to 4 degrees C, and is essentially abolished by the addition of excess unlabeled L-glutamine. (3) The transport rate is optimal in the range of pH 7.4-8.2. (4) The system exhibits a Km for L-glutamine of approximately 1.7 microM and a Vmax of approximately 46 pmol/(min.mg of protein). (5) The system is not highly dependent upon the addition of monovalent or divalent cations. (6) Inhibitor studies reveal that the amino acid amides exhibit the highest affinity for the system and that there is a high specificity for the L-isomers.

  1. Coordinated transporter activity shapes high-affinity iron acquisition in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Finkel, Omri M; Schmetterer, Georg; Shaked, Yeala; Keren, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Iron bioavailability limits biological activity in many aquatic and terrestrial environments. Broad scale genomic meta-analyses indicated that within a single organism, multiple iron transporters may contribute to iron acquisition. Here, we present a functional characterization of a cyanobacterial iron transport pathway that utilizes concerted transporter activities. Cyanobacteria are significant contributors to global primary productivity with high iron demands. Certain cyanobacterial species employ a siderophore-mediated uptake strategy; however, many strains possess neither siderophore biosynthesis nor siderophore transport genes. The unicellular, planktonic, freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, employs an alternative to siderophore-based uptake-reduction of Fe(III) species before transport through the plasma membrane. In this study, we combine short-term radioactive iron uptake and reduction assays with a range of disruption mutants to generate a working model for iron reduction and uptake in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We found that the Fe(II) transporter, FeoB, is the major iron transporter in this organism. In addition, we uncovered a link between a respiratory terminal oxidase (Alternate Respiratory Terminal Oxidase) and iron reduction - suggesting a coupling between these two electron transfer reactions. Furthermore, quantitative RNA transcript analysis identified a function for subunits of the Fe(III) transporter, FutABC, in modulating reductive iron uptake. Collectively, our results provide a molecular basis for a tightly coordinated, high-affinity iron transport system. PMID:24088625

  2. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P.; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G.; Hubbard, Roderick E.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  3. Phosphate utilization efficiency correlates with expression of low-affinity phosphate transporters and noncoding RNA, IPS1, in barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun Y; Shirley, Neil; Genc, Yusuf; Shi, Bujun; Langridge, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Genetic variation in phosphorus (P) efficiency exists among wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes, but the underlying mechanisms for the variation remain elusive. High- and low-affinity phosphate (Pi) PHT1 transporters play an indispensable role in P acquisition and remobilization. However, little is known about genetic variation in PHT1 gene expression and association with P acquisition efficiency (PAE) and P utilization efficiency (PUE). Here, we present quantitative analyses of transcript levels of high- and low-affinity PHT1 Pi transporters in four barley genotypes differing in PAE. The results showed that there was no clear pattern in the expression of four paralogs of the high-affinity Pi transporter HvPHT1;1 among the four barley genotypes, but the expression of a low-affinity Pi transporter, HvPHT1;6, and its close homolog HvHPT1;3 was correlated with the genotypes differing in PUE. Interestingly, the expression of HvPHT1;6 and HvPHT1;3 was correlated with the expression of HvIPS1 (for P starvation inducible; noncoding RNA) but not with HvIPS2, suggesting that HvIPS1 plays a distinct role in the regulation of the low-affinity Pi transporters. In addition, high PUE was found to be associated with high root-shoot ratios in low-P conditions, indicating that high carbohydrate partitioning into roots occurs simultaneously with high PUE. However, high PUE accompanying high carbon partitioning into roots could result in low PAE. Therefore, the optimization of PUE through the modification of low-affinity Pi transporter expression may assist further improvement of PAE for low-input agriculture systems.

  4. High-Affinity Glucose Transport in Aspergillus nidulans Is Mediated by the Products of Two Related but Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Luisa; González, Ramón; Ramón, Daniel; MacCabe, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation. PMID:24751997

  5. High-affinity glucose transport in Aspergillus nidulans is mediated by the products of two related but differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Forment, Josep V; Flipphi, Michel; Ventura, Luisa; González, Ramón; Ramón, Daniel; Maccabe, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation. PMID:24751997

  6. Development of 3-Phenyltropane Analogs with High Affinity for the Dopamine and Serotonin Transporters and Low Affinity for the Norepinephrine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunyang; Navarro, Hernán A.; Carroll, F. Ivy

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that the mixed monoamine transporter inhibitor (6, RTI-112) reduced cocaine self-administration at a high level of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) occupancy with no detectable dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy. In this study, a series of 3β-(substituted phenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid methyl esters 7a-g, 3β-(4-methoxyphenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid esters 8a-j, and 3β-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2β-[3-(4′-methylphenyl)isoxazol-5-yl]tropane (9) were synthesized and evaluated for their monoamine transporter binding affinities to identify potent and selective compounds for both the DAT and 5-HTT relative to the norepinephrine transporter (NET). A number of compounds showed high binding affinities for both the DAT and 5-HTT and low affinity for the NET. 3β-(4-Methoxyphenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid 2-(3-iodo-4-aminophenyl)ethyl ester (8i) with an IC50 value of 2.5 nM for the DAT and Ki values of 3.5 nM and 2040 nM for the 5-HTT and NET, respectively, is the most potent and selective compound for the DAT and 5-HTT relative to the NET in this study. PMID:19053748

  7. Expression cloning and functional characterization of the kidney cortex high-affinity proton-coupled peptide transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Boll, M; Herget, M; Wagener, M; Weber, W M; Markovich, D; Biber, J; Clauss, W; Murer, H; Daniel, H

    1996-01-01

    The presence of a proton-coupled electrogenic high-affinity peptide transporter in the apical membrane of tubular cells has been demonstrated by microperfusion studies and by use of brush border membrane vesicles. The transporter mediates tubular uptake of filtered di- and tripeptides and aminocephalosporin antibiotics. We have used expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes for identification and characterization of the renal high-affinity peptide transporter. Injection of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from rabbit kidney cortex into oocytes resulted in expression of a pH-dependent transport activity for the aminocephalosporin antibiotic cefadroxil. After size fractionation of poly(A)+ RNA the transport activity was identified in the 3.0- to 5.0-kb fractions, which were used for construction of a cDNA library. The library was screened for expression of cefadroxil transport after injection of complementary RNA synthesized in vitro from different pools of clones. A single clone (rPepT2) was isolated that stimulated cefadroxil uptake into oocytes approximately 70-fold at a pH of 6.0. Kinetic analysis of cefadroxil uptake expressed by the transporter's complementary RNA showed a single saturable high-affinity transport system shared by dipeptides, tripeptides, and selected amino-beta-lactam antibiotics. Electrophysiological studies established that the transport activity is electrogenic and affected by membrane potential. Sequencing of the cDNA predicts a protein of 729 amino acids with 12 membrane-spanning domains. Although there is a significant amino acid sequence identity (47%) to the recently cloned peptide transporters from rabbit and human small intestine, the renal transporter shows distinct structural and functional differences. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8552623

  8. Apple Sucrose Transporter SUT1 and Sorbitol Transporter SOT6 Interact with Cytochrome b5 to Regulate Their Affinity for Substrate Sugars1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ren-Chun; Peng, Chang-Cao; Xu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Li, Yan; Shang, Yi; Du, Shu-Yuan; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Sugar transporters are central machineries to mediate cross-membrane transport of sugars into the cells, and sugar availability may serve as a signal to regulate the sugar transporters. However, the mechanisms of sugar transport regulation by signal sugar availability remain unclear in plant and animal cells. Here, we report that a sucrose transporter, MdSUT1, and a sorbitol transporter, MdSOT6, both localized to plasma membrane, were identified from apple (Malus domestica) fruit. Using a combination of the split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid, immunocoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, the two distinct sugar transporters were shown to interact physically with an apple endoplasmic reticulum-anchored cytochrome b5 MdCYB5 in vitro and in vivo. In the yeast systems, the two different interaction complexes function to up-regulate the affinity of the sugar transporters, allowing cells to adapt to sugar starvation. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of MdCYB5, AtCYB5-A, also interacts with the two sugar transporters and functions similarly. The point mutations leucine-73 → proline in MdSUT1 and leucine-117 → proline in MdSOT6, disrupting the bimolecular interactions but without significantly affecting the transporter activities, abolish the stimulating effects of the sugar transporter-cytochrome b5 complex on the affinity of the sugar transporters. However, the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cytochrome b5 ScCYB5, an additional interacting partner of the two plant sugar transporters, has no function in the regulation of the sugar transporters, indicating that the observed biological functions in the yeast systems are specific to plant cytochrome b5s. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which the plant cells tailor sugar uptake to the surrounding sugar availability. PMID:19502355

  9. Dynamic output feedback H ∞ control for affine fuzzy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the problem of designing H ∞ dynamic output feedback controllers for nonlinear systems, which are described by affine fuzzy models. The system outputs have been chosen as premise variables, which can guarantee that the plant and the controller always switch to the same region. By using a piecewise Lyapunov function and adding slack matrix variables, a piecewise-affine dynamic output feedback controller design method is obtained in the formulation of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be efficiently solved numerically. In contrast to the existing work, the proposed approach needs less LMI constraints and leads to less conservatism. Finally, numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the new result.

  10. 77 FR 28411 - Adrenalina, Affinity Technology Group, Inc., Braintech, Inc., Builders Transport, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... COMMISSION Adrenalina, Affinity Technology Group, Inc., Braintech, Inc., Builders Transport, Incorporated... Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of... appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate...

  11. A variational solution to the transport equation subject to an affine constraint.

    SciTech Connect

    Pousin, Jerome G.; Najm, Habib N.; Picq, Martine; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2004-02-01

    We establish an existence and uniqueness theorem for the transport equation subject to an inequality affine constraint, viewed as a constrained optimization problem. Then we derive a Space-Time Integrated Least Squares (STILS) scheme for its numerical approximation. Furthermore, we discuss some L{sup 2}-projection strategies and with numerical examples we show that there are not relevant for that problem.

  12. Focused pseudostatic hydrazone libraries screened by mass spectrometry binding assay: optimizing affinities toward γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Miriam; Lutz, Toni A; Petrera, Marilena; Wanner, Klaus T

    2013-02-14

    Mass spectrometric (MS) binding assays, a powerful tool to determine affinities of single drug candidates toward chosen targets, were recently demonstrated to be suitable for the screening of compound libraries generated with reactions of dynamic combinatorial chemistry when rendering libraries pseudostatic. Screening of small hydrazone libraries targeting γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1), the most abundant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter in the central nervous system, revealed two nipecotic acid derived binders with submicromolar affinities. Starting from the biphenyl carrying hit as lead structure, the objective of the present study was to discover novel high affinity GAT1 binders by screening of biphenyl focused pseudostatic hydrazone libraries formed from hydrazine 10 and 36 biphenylcarbaldehydes 11c-al. Hydrazone 12z that carried a 2',4'-dichlorobiphenyl residue was found to be the most potent binder with low nanomolar affinity (pK(i) = 8.094 ± 0.098). When stable carba analogues of representative hydrazones were synthesized and evaluated, the best binder 13z was again displaying the 2',4'-dichlorobiphenyl moiety (pK(i) = 6.930 ± 0.021).

  13. Mechanism of high affinity inhibition of the human urate transporter URAT1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Philip K.; Ostertag, Traci M.; Miner, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Gout is caused by elevated serum urate levels, which can be treated using inhibitors of the uric acid transporter, URAT1. We exploited affinity differences between the human and rat transporters to map inhibitor binding sites in URAT1. Human-rat transporter chimeras revealed that human URAT1 serine-35, phenylalanine-365 and isoleucine-481 are necessary and sufficient to provide up to a 100-fold increase in affinity for inhibitors. Moreover, serine-35 and phenylalanine-365 are important for high-affinity interaction with the substrate urate. A novel URAT1 binding assay provides support for direct interaction with these amino acids; thus, current clinically important URAT1 inhibitors likely bind the same site in URAT1. A structural model suggests that these three URAT1 residues are in close proximity potentially projecting within the channel. Our results indicate that amino acids from several transmembrane segments functionally cooperate to form a high-affinity URAT1 inhibitor binding site that, when occupied, prevents substrate interactions. PMID:27713539

  14. Substrate specificity and mapping of residues critical for transport in the high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Mohammad; Yadav, Shambhu; Thakur, Anil; Singla, Shiffalli; Sharma, Monika; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to a relatively new and structurally uncharacterized oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family. To understand the structural features required for interaction with Hgt1p, a quantitative investigation of substrate specificity of Hgt1p was carried out. Hgt1p showed a higher affinity for reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas it transported oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and other glutathione conjugates with lower affinity. To identify the residues of Hgt1p critical for substrate binding and translocation, all amino acid residues of the 13 predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) have been subjected to mutagenesis. Functional evaluation of these 269 mutants by growth and biochemical assay followed by kinetic analysis of the severely defective mutants including previous mutagenic studies on this transporter have led to the identification of N124 (TMD1), V185 (TMD3), Q222, G225 and Y226 (TMD4), P292 (TMD5), Y374 (TMD6), L429 (TMD7) and F523 and Q526 (TMD9) as critical for substrate binding with at least 3-fold increase in Km upon mutagenesis to alanine. In addition residues Y226 and Y374 appeared to be important for differential substrate specificity. An ab initio model of Hgt1p was built and refined using these mutagenic data that yielded a helical arrangement that includes TMD3, TMD4, TMD5, TMD6, TMD7, TMD9 and TMD13 as pore-lining helices with the functionally important residues in a channel-facing orientation. Taken together the results of this study provides the first mechanistic insights into glutathione transport by a eukaryotic high-affinity glutathione transporter. PMID:27252386

  15. Affinity labeling of the folate-methotrexate transporter from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.T.; Ullman, B. )

    1989-08-22

    An affinity labeling technique has been developed to identify the folate-methotrexate transporter of Leishmania donovani promastigotes using activated derivatives of the ligands. These activated derivatives were synthesized by incubating folate and methotrexate with a 10-fold excess of 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide (EDC) for 10 min at ambient temperature in dimethyl sulfoxide. When intact wild-type (DI700) Leishmania donovani or preparations of their membranes were incubated with a 0.4 {mu}M concentration of either activated ({sup 3}H)folate or activated ({sup 3}H)methotrexate, the radiolabeled ligands were covalently incorporated into a polypeptide with a molecular weight of approximately 46,000, as demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. No affinity labeling of a 46,000-dalton protein was observed when equimolar concentrations of activated radiolabeled ligands were incubated with intact cells or membranes prepared from a methotrexate-resistant mutant clone of Leishmania donovani, MTXA5, that is genetically defective in folate-methotrexate transport capability. Time course studies indicated that maximal labeling of the 46,000-dalton protein occurred within 5-10 min of incubation of intact cells with activated ligand. These studies provide biochemical evidence that the folate-methotrexate transporter of Leishmania donovani can be identified in crude extracts by an affinity labeling technique and serve as a prerequisite to further analysis of the transport protein by providing a vehicle for subsequent purification of this membrane carrier. Moreover, these investigations suggest that the affinity labeling technique using EDC-activated ligands may be exploitable to analyze other cell surface binding proteins in Leishmania donovani, as well as in other organisms.

  16. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  17. PtAAP11, a high affinity amino acid transporter specifically expressed in differentiating xylem cells of poplar.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Jérémy; de Faÿ, Elisabeth; Fitz, Michael; Wipf, Daniel; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2010-06-01

    Amino acids are the currency of nitrogen exchange between source and sink tissues in plants and constitute a major source of the components used for cellular growth and differentiation. The characterization of a new amino acid transporter belonging to the amino acid permease (AAP) family, AAP11, expressed in the perennial species Populus trichocarpa is reported here. PtAAP11 expression analysis was performed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and GUS activity after poplar transformation. PtAAP11 function was studied in detail by heterologous expression in yeast. The poplar genome contains 14 putative AAPs which is quite similar to other species analysed except Arabidopsis. PtAAP11 was mostly expressed in differentiating xylem cells in different organs. Functional characterization demonstrated that PtAAP11 was a high affinity amino acid transporter, more particularly for proline. Compared with other plant amino acid transporters, PtAAP11 represents a novel high-affinity system for proline. Thus, the functional characterization and expression studies suggest that PtAAP11 may play a major role in xylogenesis by providing proline required for xylem cell wall proteins. The present study provides important information highlighting the role of a specific amino acid transporter in xylogenesis in poplar.

  18. Method for determining the temporal response of microbial phosphate transport affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Molot, L A; Brown, E J

    1986-01-01

    Nutrient transport affinities of nutrient-starved microbial populations were measured as initial slopes of plots of limiting-nutrient transport rates versus extracellular limiting-nutrient concentrations. A method was devised for the determination of soluble reactive phosphate (Pi) affinity in Pi-limited continuous culture (aT), which was then used as an indicator of the effects of light/dark cycle (LD) perturbations on the temporal Pi transport abilities of three species of freshwater algae. Cell division was asynchronous for the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum grown in continuous cultures exposed to LD cycles. An apparent rhythm in aT for Pi was greatly affected by the population size parameter. Cell division was phased for the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda grown in LD continuous culture. A rhythm in aT for Pi was not greatly affected by the biomass parameter. Cell division was also phased in LD continuous culture for the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Synechococcus Nägeli, but rhythms in other parameters could not be detected. Synechococcus Nägeli was an extremely efficient Pi transporter at low Pi concentrations in LD continuous culture, and so aT could not be calculated. The results demonstrate that aT is well suited to describing the temporal response of Pi transport in LD-perturbed, Pi-limited continuous culture. PMID:3083772

  19. GintAMT3 - a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a V max of 240 nmol(-1) min(-1) 10(8) cells(-1), which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply.

  20. GintAMT3 - a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a V max of 240 nmol(-1) min(-1) 10(8) cells(-1), which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply. PMID:27252708

  1. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  2. The human organic cation transporter OCT1 mediates high affinity uptake of the anticancer drug daunorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Emil; Brosseau, Nicolas; Carmona, Euridice; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines such as daunorubicin are anticancer agents that are transported into cells, and exert cytotoxicity by blocking DNA metabolism. Although there is evidence for active uptake of anthracyclines into cells, the specific transporter involved in this process has not been identified. Using the high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell line TOV2223G, we show that OCT1 mediated the high affinity (Km ~ 5 μM) uptake of daunorubicin into the cells, and that micromolar amounts of choline completely abolished the drug entry. OCT1 downregulation by shRNA impaired daunorubicin uptake into the TOV2223G cells, and these cells were significantly more resistant to the drug in comparison to the control shRNA. Transfection of HEK293T cells, which accommodated the ectopic expression of OCT1, with a plasmid expressing OCT1-EYFP showed that the transporter was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. These transfected cells exhibited an increase in the uptake of daunorubicin in comparison to control cells transfected with an empty EYFP vector. Furthermore, a variant of OCT1, OCT1-D474C-EYFP, failed to enhance daunorubicin uptake. This is the first report demonstrating that human OCT1 is involved in the high affinity transport of anthracyclines. We postulate that OCT1 defects may contribute to the resistance of cancer cells treated with anthracyclines. PMID:26861753

  3. Transportation System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  4. Subseabed disposal transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jr., G. C.; Vernon, M. E.; Anderson, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Transportation requirements and interfaces are being considered in the evaluation of the seabed disposal option. Technical direction and planning are on-going to ensure the development of major transportation systems in support of the seabed disposal option. Factors which affect the risk and effectiveness of transportation are being included in site selection criteria. However, detailed development of port facilities and transport/emplacement equipment is still several years into the future. (DMC)

  5. The High-Affinity E. Coli Methionine ABC Transporter: Structure And Allosteric Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaba, N.S.; Kaiser, J.T.; Johnson, E.; Lee, A.; Rees, D.C.

    2009-05-18

    The crystal structure of the high-affinity Escherichia coli MetNI methionine uptake transporter, a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been solved to 3.7 angstrom resolution. The overall architecture of MetNI reveals two copies of the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) MetN in complex with two copies of the transmembrane domain MetI, with the transporter adopting an inward-facing conformation exhibiting widely separated nucleotide binding domains. Each MetI subunit is organized around a core of five transmembrane helices that correspond to a subset of the helices observed in the larger membrane-spanning subunits of the molybdate (ModBC) and maltose (MalFGK) ABC transporters. In addition to the conserved nucleotide binding domain of the ABC family, MetN contains a carboxyl-terminal extension with a ferredoxin-like fold previously assigned to a conserved family of regulatory ligand-binding domains. These domains separate the nucleotide binding domains and would interfere with their association required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. Methionine binds to the dimerized carboxyl-terminal domain and is shown to inhibit ATPase activity. These observations are consistent with an allosteric regulatory mechanism operating at the level of transport activity, where increased intracellular levels of the transported ligand stabilize an inward-facing, ATPase-inactive state of MetNI to inhibit further ligand translocation into the cell.

  6. Payload transportation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A standard size set of shuttle payload transportation equipment was defined that will substantially reduce the cost of payload transportation and accommodate a wide range of payloads with minimum impact on payload design. The system was designed to accommodate payload shipments between the level 4 payload integration sites and the launch site during the calendar years 1979-1982. In addition to defining transportation multi-use mission support equipment (T-MMSE) the mode of travel, prime movers, and ancillary equipment required in the transportation process were also considered. Consistent with the STS goals of low cost and the use of standardized interfaces, the transportation system was designed to commercial grade standards and uses the payload flight mounting interfaces for transportation. The technical, cost, and programmatic data required to permit selection of a baseline system of MMSE for intersite movement of shuttle payloads were developed.

  7. Influence of affinity on antibody determination in microtiter ELISA systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, J.H.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Butler, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Theoretically, all immunoassays are affinity (Ka) dependent when the product of the antibody (Ab) Ka and the free epitope concentration is less than 10. Thus, the degree of dependence on Ka depends on the concentration of available antigen in the system. The authors examined the binding of /sup 125/I-anti-fluorescein (a-FLU) monoclonal antibodies of different affinities to FLU-gelatin adsorbed on Immunlon 2 microtiter plates. Data obtained were in general agreement with our theoretical predictions; the percent of /sup 125/I-a-FLU which bound correlated with Ka, as did the shape of the titration curves. Measurement of 5 a-FLU monoclonals by the ELISA showed that the determination of Ab concentrations depends on the FLU-gelatin concentration, epitope density, and on the relationship between the Kas of test samples and the reference standard Ab preparation. Thus the ELISA is Ka dependent and should not be used routinely to estimate the absolute amount to Ab in unknown samples. However, the Ka dependency of the ELISA might provide a convenient assay for the estimation of the relative functional Ka (rfKa) of antibody preparations.

  8. Regulation of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1) expression by cisplatin and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng Dong; Long, Yan; Chen, Helen H W; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay in cancer chemotherapy for many human malignancies. Drug resistance is an important obstacle to achieving the maximal therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Understanding how platinum drugs enter cells is of great importance in improving therapeutic efficacy. It has been demonstrated that human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is involved in transporting cisplatin into cells to elicit cytotoxic effects, although other mechanisms may exist. In this communication, we demonstrate that cisplatin transcriptionally induces the expression of hCtr1 in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Cisplatin functions as a competitor for hCtr1-mediated copper transport, resulting in reduced cellular copper levels and leading to upregulated expression of Sp1, which is a positive regulator for hCtr1 expression. Thus, regulation of hCtr1 expression by cisplatin is an integral part of the copper homeostasis regulation system. We also demonstrate that Ag(I) and Zn(II), which are known to suppress hCtr1-mediated copper transport, can also induce hCtr1/Sp1 expression. In contrast, Cd(II), another inhibitor of copper transport, downregulates hCtr1 expression by suppressing Sp1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate diverse mechanisms of regulating copper metabolism by these heavy metals.

  9. Space Transportation Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Stewart, Mark E.; Suresh, Ambady; Owen, A. Karl

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the Space Transportation Propulsion Systems for the NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) program. Topics include: 1) a review of Engine/Inlet Coupling Work; 2) Background/Organization of Space Transportation Initiative; 3) Synergy between High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) and Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP); 4) Status of Space Transportation Effort, including planned deliverables for FY01-FY06, FY00 accomplishments (HPCCP Funded) and FY01 Major Milestones (HPCCP and ASTP); and 5) a review current technical efforts, including a review of the Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC), Scope of Work, RBCC Concept Aerodynamic Analysis and RBCC Concept Multidisciplinary Analysis.

  10. A catecholamine transporter from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni with low affinity for psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mads B; Fontana, Andréia C K; Magalhães, Lizandra G; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Mortensen, Ole V

    2011-05-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is the primary cause of schistosomiasis, a devastating neglected tropical disease that affects 200 million individuals. Identifying novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of schistosomiasis is therefore of great public interest. The catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) are essential for the survival of the parasite as they cause muscular relaxation and a lengthening in the parasite and thereby control movement. Here we characterize a novel dopamine/norepinephrine transporter (SmDAT) gene transcript, from S. mansoni. The SmDAT is expressed in the adult form and in the sporocyst form (infected snails) of the parasite, and also in the egg and miracidium stage. It is absent in the cercariae stage but curiously a transcript missing the exon encoding transmembrane domain 8 was identified in this stage. Heterologous expression of the cDNA in mammalian cells resulted in saturable, dopamine transport activity with an apparent affinity for dopamine comparable to that of the human dopamine transporter. Efflux experiments reveal notably higher substrate selectivity compared with its mammalian counterparts as amphetamine is a much less potent efflux elicitor against SmDAT compared to the human DAT. Pharmacological characterization of the SmDAT revealed that most human DAT inhibitors including psychostimulants such as cocaine were significantly less potent in inhibiting SmDAT. Like DATs from other simpler organisms the pharmacology for SmDAT was more similar to the human norepinephrine transporter. We were not able to identify other dopamine transporting carriers within the completed parasite genome and we hypothesize that the SmDAT is the only catecholamine transporter in the parasite and could be responsible for not only clearing DA but also NE. PMID:21251927

  11. A catecholamine transporter from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni with low affinity for psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Mads B.; Fontana, Andréia C. K.; Magalhães, Lizandra G.; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Mortensen, Ole V.

    2011-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is the primary cause of schistosomiasis, a devastating neglected tropical disease that affects 200 million individuals. Identifying novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of schistosomiasis is therefore of great public interest. The catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) are essential for the survival of the parasite as they cause muscular relaxation and a lengthening in the parasite and thereby control movement. Here we characterize a novel dopamine/norepinephrine transporter (SmDAT) gene transcript, from Schistosoma mansoni. The SmDAT is expressed in the adult form and in the sporocyst form (infected snails) of the parasite, and also in the egg and miracidium stage. It is absent in the cercaria stage but curiously a transcript missing the exon encoding transmembrane domain 8 was identified in this stage. Heterologous expression of the cDNA in mammalian cells resulted in saturable, dopamine transport activity with an apparent affinity for dopamine comparable to that of the human dopamine transporter. Efflux experiments reveal notably higher substrate selectivity compared with its mammalian counterparts as amphetamine is a much less potent efflux elicitor against SmDAT compared to the human DAT. Pharmacological characterization of the SmDAT revealed that most human DAT inhibitors including psychostimulants such as cocaine were significantly less potent in inhibiting SmDAT. Like DATs from other simpler organisms the pharmacology for SmDAT was more similar to the human norepinephrine transporter. We were not able to identify other dopamine transporting carriers within the completed parasite genome and we hypothesize that the SmDAT is the only catecholamine transporter in the parasite and could be responsible for not only clearing DA but also NE. PMID:21251927

  12. Stoichiometry and Substrate Affinity of the Mannitol Transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert; Scheek, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    Uptake and consecutive phosphorylation of mannitol in Escherichia coli is catalyzed by the mannitol permease EnzymeIImtl. The substrate is bound at an extracellular-oriented binding site, translocated to an inward-facing site, from where it is phosphorylated, and subsequently released into the cell. Previous studies have shown the presence of both a high- and a low-affinity binding site with KD-values in the nano- and micromolar range, respectively. However, reported KD-values in literature are highly variable, which casts doubts about the reliability of the measurements and data analysis. Using an optimized binding measurement system, we investigated the discrepancies reported in literature, regarding both the variability in KD-values and the binding stoichiometry. By comparing the binding capacity obtained with flow dialysis with different methods to determine the protein concentration (UV-protein absorption, Bradford protein detection, and a LDH-linked protein assay to quantify the number of phosphorylation sites), we proved the existence of only one mannitol binding site per dimeric species of unphosphorylated EnzymeIImtl. Furthermore, the affinity of EnzymeIImtl for mannitol appeared to be dependent on the protein concentration and seemed to reflect the presence of an endogenous ligand. The dependency could be simulated assuming that >50% of the binding sites were occupied with a ligand that shows an affinity for EnzymeIImtl in the same range as mannitol. PMID:15879478

  13. Dopamine transporter oligomerization: Impact of combining protomers with differential cocaine analog binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Ali, Solav; Jones, Kymry T.; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies point to quaternary assembly of dopamine transporters (DATs) in oligomers. However, it is not clear whether the protomers function independently in the oligomer. Is each protomer an entirely separate unit that takes up dopamine and is inhibited by drugs known to block DAT function? In this work, human embryonic kidney 293 cells were co-transfected with DAT constructs possessing differential binding affinities for the phenyltropane cocaine analog, [3H]WIN35,428. It was assessed whether the binding properties in co-expressing cells capable of forming hetero-oligomers differ from those in preparations obtained from mixed singly transfected cells where such oligomers cannot occur. A method is described that replaces laborious “mixing” experiments with an in silico method predicting binding parameters from those observed for the singly expressed constructs. Among 5 pairs of constructs tested, statistically significant interactions were found between protomers of wild-type (WT) and D313N, WT and D345N, and WT and D436N. Compared with predicted Kd values of [3H]WIN35,428 binding to the non-interacting pairs, the observed affinity of the former pair was increased 1.7 fold while the latter two were reduced 2.2 and 4.1 fold, respectively. This is the first report of an influence of protomer composition on the properties of a DAT inhibitor, indicating cooperativity within the oligomer. PMID:25580950

  14. Robust adaptive control for a class of uncertain non-affine nonlinear systems using affine-type neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shitie; Gao, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    A robust adaptive control is proposed for a class of single-input single-output non-affine nonlinear systems. In order to approximate the unknown nonlinear function, a novel affine-type neural network is used, and then to compensate the approximation error and external disturbance a robust control term is employed. By Lyapunov stability analysis for the closed-loop system, it is proved that tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero. Moreover, an observer is designed to estimate the system states because all the states may not be available for measurements. Furthermore, the adaptation laws of neural networks and the robust controller are given out based on the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  15. Cloning of chrysanthemum high-affinity nitrate transporter family (CmNRT2) and characterization of CmNRT2.1.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunsun; Song, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Wang, Haibin; Li, Ting; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi; Chen, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    The family of NITRATE TRANSPORTER 2 (NRT2) proteins belongs to the high affinity transport system (HATS) proteins which acts at low nitrate concentrations. The relevant gene content of the chrysanthemum genome was explored here by isolating the full length sequences of six distinct CmNRT2 genes. One of these (CmNRT2.1) was investigated at the functional level. Its transcription level was inducible by low concentrations of both nitrate and ammonium. A yeast two hybrid assay showed that CmNRT2.1 interacts with CmNAR2, while a BiFC assay demonstrated that the interaction occurs at the plasma membrane. Arabidopsis thaliana plants heterologously expressing CmNRT2.1 displayed an enhanced rate of labeled nitrogen uptake, suggesting that CmNRT2.1 represents a high affinity root nitrate transporter. PMID:27004464

  16. Smart vehicular transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-05-01

    This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

  17. Characterization of the Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti high- and low-affinity phosphate uptake systems.

    PubMed Central

    Voegele, R T; Bardin, S; Finan, T M

    1997-01-01

    Genetic studies have suggested that Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti contains two distinct phosphate (Pi) transport systems, encoded by the phoCDET genes and the orfA-pit genes, respectively. Here we present data which show that the ABC-type PhoCDET system has a high affinity for Pi (Km, 0.2 microM) and that Pi uptake by this system is severely inhibited by phosphonates. This high-affinity uptake system was induced under Pi-limiting conditions and was repressed in the presence of excess Pi. Uptake via the OrfA-Pit system was examined in (i) a phoC mutant which showed increased expression of the orfA-pit genes as a result of a promoter-up mutation and (ii) a phoB mutant (PhoB is required for phoCDET expression). Pi uptake in both strains exhibited saturation kinetics (Km, 1 to 2 microM) and was not inhibited by phosphonates. This uptake system was active in wild-type cells grown with excess Pi and appeared to be repressed when the cells were starved for Pi. Thus, our biochemical data show that the OrfA-Pit and PhoCDET uptake systems are differentially expressed depending on the state of the cell with respect to phosphate availability. PMID:9393684

  18. Dopamine transporter oligomerization: impact of combining protomers with differential cocaine analog binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Ali, Solav; Jones, Kymry T; Reith, Maarten E A

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies point to quaternary assembly of dopamine transporters (DATs) in oligomers. However, it is not clear whether the protomers function independently in the oligomer. Is each protomer an entirely separate unit that takes up dopamine and is inhibited by drugs known to block DAT function? In this work, human embryonic kidney 293 cells were co-transfected with DAT constructs possessing differential binding affinities for the phenyltropane cocaine analog, [³H]WIN35,428. It was assessed whether the binding properties in co-expressing cells capable of forming hetero-oligomers differ from those in preparations obtained from mixed singly transfected cells where such oligomers cannot occur. A method is described that replaces laborious 'mixing' experiments with an in silico method predicting binding parameters from those observed for the singly expressed constructs. Among five pairs of constructs tested, statistically significant interactions were found between protomers of wild-type (WT) and D313N, WT and D345N, and WT and D436N. Compared with predicted Kd values of [³H]WIN35,428 binding to the non-interacting pairs, the observed affinity of the former pair was increased 1.7 fold while the latter two were reduced 2.2 and 4.1 fold, respectively. This is the first report of an influence of protomer composition on the properties of a DAT inhibitor, indicating cooperativity within the oligomer. The dopamine transporter (DAT) can exist as an oligomer but it is unknown whether the protomers function independently. The present results indicate that protomers that are superpotent or deficient in cocaine analog binding can confer enhanced or reduced potency to the oligomer, respectively. In this respect, positive or negative cooperativity is revealed in the DAT oligomer. PMID:25580950

  19. An affinity-directed protein missile system for targeted proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Luke J.; Macartney, Thomas; Bozatzi, Polyxeni; Hornberger, Annika; Rojas-Fernandez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) protein serves to recruit the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF1α) protein under normoxia to the CUL2 E3 ubiquitin ligase for its ubiquitylation and degradation through the proteasome. In this report, we modify VHL to engineer an affinity-directed protein missile (AdPROM) system to direct specific endogenous target proteins for proteolysis in mammalian cells. The proteolytic AdPROM construct harbours a cameloid anti-green fluorescence protein (aGFP) nanobody that is fused to VHL for either constitutive or tetracycline-inducible expression. For target proteins, we exploit CRISPR/Cas9 to rapidly generate human kidney HEK293 and U2OS osteosarcoma homozygous knock-in cells harbouring GFP tags at the VPS34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34) and protein associated with SMAD1 (PAWS1, aka FAM83G) loci, respectively. Using these cells, we demonstrate that the expression of the VHL-aGFP AdPROM system results in near-complete degradation of the endogenous GFP-VPS34 and PAWS1-GFP proteins through the proteasome. Additionally, we show that Tet-inducible destruction of GFP-VPS34 results in the degradation of its associated partner, UVRAG, and reduction in levels of cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. PMID:27784791

  20. Coupled transport protein systems.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This set of animated lessons provides examples of how transport proteins interact in coupled systems to produce physiologic effects. The gastric pumps animation depicts the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the gastric lumen. The animation called glucose absorption depicts glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells. The CFTR animation explains how the cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) functions as a key component of a coupled system of transport proteins that clears the pulmonary system of mucus and inhaled particulates. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  1. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-07-15

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins.

  2. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-01-01

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins. PMID:27525850

  3. Enhancement of binding kinetics on affinity substrates by laser point heating induced transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the time response and detection limit of affinity-binding based biosensors is an area of active research. For diffusion limited reactions, introducing active mass transport is an effective strategy to reduce the equilibration time and improve surface binding. Here, a laser is focused on the ceiling of a microchamber to generate point heating, which introduces natural advection and thermophoresis to promote mass transport to the reactive floor. We first used the COMSOL simulation to study how the kinetics of ligand binding is influenced by the optothermal effect. Afterwards, binding of biotinylated nanoparticles to NeutrAvidin-treated substrates is quantitatively measured with and without laser heating. It is discovered that laser induced point heating reduces the reaction half-life locally, and the reduction improves with the natural advection velocity. In addition, non-uniform ligand binding on the substrate is induced by the laser with predictable binding patterns. This optothermal strategy holds promise to improve the time-response and sensitivity of biosensors and microarrays. PMID:26898559

  4. Mathematical model accurately predicts protein release from an affinity-based delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vulic, Katarina; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Sonthalia, Rohit; Ramachandran, Arun; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-01-10

    Affinity-based controlled release modulates the delivery of protein or small molecule therapeutics through transient dissociation/association. To understand which parameters can be used to tune release, we used a mathematical model based on simple binding kinetics. A comprehensive asymptotic analysis revealed three characteristic regimes for therapeutic release from affinity-based systems. These regimes can be controlled by diffusion or unbinding kinetics, and can exhibit release over either a single stage or two stages. This analysis fundamentally changes the way we think of controlling release from affinity-based systems and thereby explains some of the discrepancies in the literature on which parameters influence affinity-based release. The rate of protein release from affinity-based systems is determined by the balance of diffusion of the therapeutic agent through the hydrogel and the dissociation kinetics of the affinity pair. Equations for tuning protein release rate by altering the strength (KD) of the affinity interaction, the concentration of binding ligand in the system, the rate of dissociation (koff) of the complex, and the hydrogel size and geometry, are provided. We validated our model by collapsing the model simulations and the experimental data from a recently described affinity release system, to a single master curve. Importantly, this mathematical analysis can be applied to any single species affinity-based system to determine the parameters required for a desired release profile. PMID:25449806

  5. Pht2;1 encodes a low-affinity phosphate transporter from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Daram, P; Brunner, S; Rausch, C; Steiner, C; Amrhein, N; Bucher, M

    1999-01-01

    An Arabidopsis genomic sequence was recently shown to share similarity with bacterial and eukaryotic phosphate (Pi) transporters. We have cloned the corresponding cDNA, which we named Pht2;1, and subsequently performed gene expression studies and functional analysis of the protein product. The cDNA encodes a 61-kD protein with a putative topology of 12 transmembrane (TM) domains interrupted by a large hydrophilic loop between TM8 and TM9. Two boxes of eight and nine amino acids, located in the N- and C-terminal domains, respectively, are highly conserved among species across all kingdoms (eubacteria, archea, fungi, plants, and animals). The Pht2;1 gene is predominantly expressed in green tissue, the amount of transcript staying constant in leaves irrespective of the Pi status of the shoot; in roots, however, there is a marginal increase in mRNA amounts in response to Pi deprivation. Although the protein is highly similar to eukaryotic sodium-dependent Pi transporters, functional analysis of the Pht2;1 protein in mutant yeast cells indicates that it is a proton/Pi symporter dependent on the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. Its fairly high apparent K(m) for Pi (0.4 mM) and high mRNA content in the shoot, especially in leaves, suggest a role for shoot organs in Pi loading. Pht2;1 thus differs from members of the recently described plant Pi transporter family in primary structure, affinity for Pi, and presumed function. PMID:10559441

  6. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  7. Transportation Systems Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanning, M. L.; Michelson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A methodology for the analysis of transportation systems consisting of five major interacting elements is reported. The analysis begins with the causes of travel demand: geographic, economic, and demographic characteristics as well as attitudes toward travel. Through the analysis, the interaction of these factors with the physical and economic characteristics of the transportation system is determined. The result is an evaluation of the system from the point of view of both passenger and operator. The methodology is applicable to the intraurban transit systems as well as major airlines. Applications of the technique to analysis of a PRT system and a study of intraurban air travel are given. In the discussion several unique models or techniques are mentioned: i.e., passenger preference modeling, an integrated intraurban transit model, and a series of models to perform airline analysis.

  8. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at the level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account

  9. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at themore » level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not

  10. A lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Due to large amounts of oxygen required for space travel, a method of mining, transporting, and storing this oxygen in space would facilitate further space exploration. The following project deals specifically with the methods for transporting liquid oxygen from the lunar surface to the Lunar Orbit (LO) space station, and then to the Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) space station. Two vehicles were designed for operation between the LEO and LO space stations. The first of these vehicles is an aerobraked design vehicle. The Aerobrake Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is capable of transporting 5000 lbm of payload to LO while returning to LEO with 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen, and thus meet mission requirements. The second vehicle can deliver 18,000 lbm of payload to LO and is capable of bringing 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen back to LEO. A lunar landing vehicle was also designed for operation between LO and the established moon base. The use of an electromagnetic railgun as a method for launching the lunar lander was also investigated. The feasibility of the railgun is doubtful at this time. A system of spheres was also designed for proper storing and transporting of the liquid oxygen. The system assumes a safe means for transferring the liquid oxygen from tank to tank is operational. A sophisticated life support system was developed for both the OTV and the lunar lander. This system focuses on such factors as the vehicle environment, waste management, water requirements, food requirements, and oxygen requirements.

  11. Lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The University Space Research Association (USRA) requested the University of Minnesota Spacecraft Design Team to design a lunar transportation infrastructure. This task was a year long design effort culminating in a complete conceptual design and presentation at Johnson Space Center. The mission objective of the design group was to design a system of vehicles to bring a habitation module, cargo, and crew to the lunar surface from LEO and return either or both crew and cargo safely to LEO while emphasizing component commonality, reusability, and cost effectiveness. During the course of the design, the lunar transportation system (LTS) has taken on many forms. The final design of the system is composed of two vehicles, a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) and a lunar excursion vehicle (LEV). The LTV serves as an efficient orbital transfer vehicle between the earth and the moon while the LEV carries crew and cargo to the lunar surface. Presented in the report are the mission analysis, systems layout, orbital mechanics, propulsion systems, structural and thermal analysis, and crew systems, avionics, and power systems for this lunar transportation concept.

  12. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  13. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  14. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  15. Calculation of antibody affinity in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

    PubMed

    Chalquest, R R

    1988-12-01

    Antibody affinity is an important determinant of all antibody-antigen reactions. A new computer program, AFCRV, was developed to calculate binding constants with data from a radioimmunoassay on most microcomputers in the laboratory by using constant-ratio dilution curves. Evaluation of a homogeneous or heterogeneous antibody in the presence of a single antigen can be accomplished.

  16. Capacity and Plasticity of Potassium Channels and High-Affinity Transporters in Roots of Barley and Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T.; Li, Mingyuan; Oh, Saehong; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    The role of potassium (K+) transporters in high- and low-affinity K+ uptake was examined in roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants by use of 42K radiotracing, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and mutant analysis. Comparisons were made between results from barley and five genotypes of Arabidopsis, including single and double knockout mutants for the high-affinity transporter, AtHAK5, and the Shaker-type channel, AtAKT1. In Arabidopsis, steady-state K+ influx at low external K+ concentration ([K+]ext = 22.5 µm) was predominantly mediated by AtAKT1 when high-affinity transport was inhibited by ammonium, whereas in barley, by contrast, K+ channels could not operate below 100 µm. Withdrawal of ammonium resulted in an immediate and dramatic stimulation of K+ influx in barley, indicating a shift from active to passive K+ uptake at low [K+]ext and yielding fluxes as high as 36 µmol g (root fresh weight)−1 h−1 at 5 mm [K+]ext, among the highest transporter-mediated K+ fluxes hitherto reported. This ammonium-withdrawal effect was also established in all Arabidopsis lines (the wild types, atakt1, athak5, and athak5 atakt1) at low [K+]ext, revealing the concerted involvement of several transport systems. The ammonium-withdrawal effect coincided with a suppression of K+ efflux and a significant hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane in all genotypes except athak5 atakt1, could be sustained over 24 h, and resulted in increased tissue K+ accumulation. We discuss key differences and similarities in K+ acquisition between two important model systems and reveal novel aspects of K+ transport in planta. PMID:23553635

  17. A pharmacological analysis of high-affinity sodium transport in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.): a 24Na+/42K+ study

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Lasse M.; Britto, Dev T.; Li, Mingyuan; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2012-01-01

    Soil sodium, while toxic to most plants at high concentrations, can be beneficial at low concentrations, particularly when potassium is limiting. However, little is known about Na+ uptake in this ‘high-affinity’ range. New information is provided here with an insight into the transport characteristics, mechanism, and ecological significance of this phenomenon. High-affinity Na+ and K+ fluxes were investigated using the short-lived radiotracers 24Na and 42K, under an extensive range of measuring conditions (variations in external sodium, and in nutritional and pharmacological agents). This work was supported by electrophysiological, compartmental, and growth analyses. Na+ uptake was extremely sensitive to all treatments, displaying properties of high-affinity K+ transporters, K+ channels, animal Na+ channels, and non-selective cation channels. K+, NH4+NH4+, and Ca2+ suppressed Na+ transport biphasically, yielding IC50 values of 30, 10, and <5 μM, respectively. Reciprocal experiments showed that K+ influx is neither inhibited nor stimulated by Na+. Sodium efflux constituted 65% of influx, indicating a futile cycle. The thermodynamic feasibility of passive channel mediation is supported by compartmentation and electrophysiological data. Our study complements recent advances in the molecular biology of high-affinity Na+ transport by uncovering new physiological foundations for this transport phenomenon, while questioning its ecological relevance. PMID:22268152

  18. Insights from the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Point to High Affinity Glucose Transporters as Targets for Enhancing Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahin S.; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km(glucose) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing. PMID:23382943

  19. Insights from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum point to high affinity glucose transporters as targets for enhancing ethanol production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shahin S; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km((glucose)) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing.

  20. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson; R. Novotny

    1999-11-22

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

  1. High-affinity K(+) transport in Arabidopsis: AtHAK5 and AKT1 are vital for seedling establishment and postgermination growth under low-potassium conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Young Jae; Gierth, Markus; Schroeder, Julian I; Cho, Myeon Haeng

    2010-06-01

    Potassium (K(+)) is a major plant nutrient required for growth and development. It is generally accepted that plant roots absorb K(+) through uptake systems operating at low concentrations (high-affinity transport) and/or high external concentrations (low-affinity transport). To understand the molecular basis of high-affinity K(+) uptake in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we analyzed loss-of-function mutants in AtHAK5 and AKT1, two transmembrane proteins active in roots. Compared with the wild type under NH(4)(+)-free growth conditions, athak5 mutant plants exhibited growth defects at 10 mum K(+), but at K(+) concentrations of 20 mum and above, athak5 mutants were visibly indistinguishable from the wild type. While germination, scored as radicle emergence, was only slightly decreased in athak5 akt1 double mutants on low-K(+) medium, double mutants failed to grow on medium containing up to 100 mum K(+) and growth was impaired at concentrations up to 450 mum K(+). Moreover, transfer of 3-d-old plants from high to low K(+) concentrations led to growth defects and leaf chlorosis at 10 mum K(+) in athak5 akt1 double mutant plants. Determination of Rb(+)(K(+)) uptake kinetics in wild-type and mutant roots using rubidium ((86)Rb(+)) as a tracer for K(+) revealed that high-affinity Rb(+)(K(+)) uptake into roots is almost completely abolished in double mutants and impaired in single mutants. These results strongly indicate that AtHAK5 and AKT1 are the two major, physiologically relevant molecular entities mediating high-affinity K(+) uptake into roots during seedling establishment and postgermination growth and that residual Rb(+)(K(+)) uptake measured in athak5 akt1 double mutant roots is insufficient to enable plant growth. PMID:20413648

  2. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  3. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-12-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  4. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  5. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse.

  6. Space Transportation Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Jay H.

    2001-01-01

    This document is the final report by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on contracted support provided to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Contract NAS8-99060, 'Space Transportation Systems Technologies'. This contract, initiated by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on February 8, 1999, was focused on space systems technologies that directly support NASA's space flight goals. It was awarded as a Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (CPIF) contract to SAIC, following a competitive procurement via NASA Research Announcement, NRA 8-21. This NRA was specifically focused on tasks related to Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). Through Task Area 3 (TA-3), "Other Related Technology" of this NRA contract, SAIC extensively supported the Space Transportation Directorate of MSFC in effectively directing, integrating, and setting its mission, operations, and safety priorities for future RLV-focused space flight. Following an initially contracted Base Year (February 8, 1999 through September 30, 1999), two option years were added to the contract. These were Option Year 1 (October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000) and Option Year 2 (October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001). This report overviews SAIC's accomplishments for the Base Year, Option Year 1, and Option Year 2, and summarizes the support provided by SAIC to the Space Transportation Directorate, NASA/MSFC.

  7. A high affinity kidney targeting by chitobionic acid-conjugated polysorbitol gene transporter alleviates unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kim, Sanghwa; Firdous, Jannatul; Lee, Ah-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Seo, Min Kyeong; Park, Tae-Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-01

    Aside from kidney transplantation - a procedure which is exceedingly dependent on donor-match and availability leading to excessive costs - there are currently no permanent treatments available which reverse kidney injury and failure. However, kidney-specific targeted gene therapy has outstanding potential to treat kidney-related dysfunction. Herein we report a novel kidney-specific targeted gene delivery system developed through the conjugation of chitobionic acid (CBA) to a polysorbitol gene transporter (PSGT) synthesized from sorbitol diacrylate and low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene to alleviate unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. CBA-PSGT performed exceptionally well for targeted delivery of HGF to kidney tissues compared to its non-targeted counterparts (P < 0.001) after systemic tail-vein injection and significantly reduced the UUO symptoms, returning the UUO rats to a normal health status. The kidney-targeted CBA-PSGT-delivered HGF also strikingly reduced various pathologic and molecular markers in vivo such as the level of collagens (type I and II), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and the expressions of ICAM-1, TIMP-1 and α-SMA which play a critical role in obstructive kidney functions. Therefore, CBA-PSGT should be further investigated because of its potential to alleviate UUO and kidney-related diseases using high affinity kidney targeting. PMID:27318934

  8. Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William; Vano, Andrew; Rutherford, Dave

    1992-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Advanced Space Design Program has developed a sample Mars exploration scenario. The purpose of the design project is to enhance NASA and university interaction, to provide fresh ideas to NASA, and to provide real world design problems to engineering students. The Mars Transportation System in this paper is designed to transport a crew of six astronauts to the Martian surface and return them to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) starting in the year 2016. The proposed vehicle features such advanced technologies as nuclear propulsion, nuclear power generation, and aerobraking. Three missions are planned. Orbital trajectories are of the conjunction class with an inbound Venus swingby providing a 60-day surface stay at Mars and an average total trip time of 520 days.

  9. Alternate transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zertuche, Tony; Mckinnie, James

    1988-01-01

    Three missions have been identified by NASA for a Space Shuttle-supplementing Alternate Transportation System (ATS) encompassing combinations of booster vehicles, crew modules, and service modules: (1) to achieve manned access to orbit for Space Station crew rotation every 90 days, (2) the lofting of a logistics module resupplying the Space Station every 180 days, and (3) the simultaneous launch of both crews and logistics to the Space Station. A reentry glider is considered, in conjunction with the Space Shuttle's unmanned cargo version and the Apollo manned capsule, as an important ATS element. The Titan IV/NUS is used as a booster.

  10. Synthesis of nonlinear discrete control systems via time-delay affine Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Jer; Chang, Wei

    2005-04-01

    The affine Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy model played a more important role in nonlinear control because it can be used to approximate the nonlinear systems more than the homogeneous TS fuzzy models. Besides, it is known that the time delays exist in physical systems and the previous works did not consider the time delay effects in the analysis of affine TS fuzzy models. Hence a parallel distributed compensation based fuzzy controller design issue for discrete time-delay affine TS fuzzy models is considered in this paper. The time-delay effect is considered in the discrete affine TS fuzzy models and the stabilization issue is developed for the nonlinear time-delay systems. Finally, a numerical simulation for a time-delayed nonlinear truck-trailer system is given to show the applications of the present approach.

  11. Construction of a Class of Four-Dimensional Piecewise Affine Systems with Homoclinic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2016-06-01

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of homoclinic orbits in a class of four-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, an example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  12. GintAMT3 – a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a Vmax of 240 nmol-1 min-1 108 cells-1, which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply. PMID:27252708

  13. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level

  14. Biochemical characterization of ThiT from Lactococcus lactis: a thiamin transporter with picomolar substrate binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Erkens, Guus B; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2010-04-13

    The putative thiamin transporter ThiT from Lactococcus lactis was overproduced in the membrane of lactococcal cells. In vivo transport assays using radiolabeled thiamin demonstrated that ThiT indeed was involved in thiamin transport. The protein was solubilized from the membranes and purified in detergent solution. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to static light scattering, refractive index, and UV absorbance measurements (SEC-MALLS) showed that ThiT is a monomer of 22.7 kDa in detergent solution. When the cells overexpressing ThiT had been cultivated in complex growth medium, all binding sites of the purified protein were occupied with substrate, which had copurified with the protein. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that the copurified substance was thiamin. Substrate-depleted ThiT was obtained by expressing the protein in cells that were cultivated in chemically defined growth medium without thiamin. The intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of substrate-depleted ThiT was strongly quenched upon thiamin binding. The quenching of the fluorescence was used to determine dissociation constants for thiamin and related compounds. ThiT had an unusually high affinity for thiamin (K(D) = 122 +/- 13 pM) and bound the substrate with a 1:1 (protein:ligand) stoichiometry. TPP, TMP, and pyrithiamin bound to ThiT with nanomolar affinity. A multiple sequence alignment of ThiT homologues revealed that well-conserved residues were clustered in a tryptophan-rich stretch comprising the loop between the predicted membrane spanning segments 5 and 6. Mutational analysis of the conserved residues in this region combined with binding assays of thiamin and related compounds was used to build a model of the high-affinity binding site. The model was compared with thiamin binding sites of other proteins and interpreted in terms of the transport mechanism.

  15. Best approximation of functions in L{sub p} by polynomials on affine system

    SciTech Connect

    Terekhin, Pavel A

    2011-02-28

    Estimates of the best L{sub p}-approximation of functions by polynomials in an affine system (system of dilations and translations), which are similar to well-known estimates due to Ul'yanov and Golubov for approximations in the Haar system, are obtained. An analogue of A.F. Timan and M.F. Timan's inequality is shown to hold under certain conditions on the generating function of the affine system; this analogue fails for the Haar system for 1

  16. Enrichment of circulating tumor cells using a centrifugal affinity plate system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Hyun, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung-Il; Kang, Ji-Yoon; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2014-12-19

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are defined as cells that have detached from a primary tumor and are circulating in the bloodstream. Their isolation and quantification is of great value for cancer prognoses and drug testing. Here, the development of a centrifugal affinity plate (CAP) system is described, in which centrifugal force and antibody-based capture are exploited to enrich CTCs on one plate and hematological cells on the other. The CAP is rotated to exert centrifugal force on the cells in a blood sample, quickly transporting them to the anti-epithelial adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-coated and anti-CD45-coated surface of the CAP to shorten the reaction time and increase the adhesion force between the tumor and blood cells and each antibody. The effect of a rotating process on cell capture was investigated, and the capture efficiency was demonstrated using blood samples from healthy donors spiked with human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H1650) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. The CAP system was capable of rapid isolation and identification of CTCs without the requirement for pretreatment of blood samples. Finally, the CAP system was tested to evaluate the detection efficiency of CTCs in the blood samples of breast cancer patients. The number of captured CTCs in only 1ml of blood varied from 6 to 10.

  17. Dual-tagging system for the affinity purification of mammalian protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Huang, Ying; Wu, Jun; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Although affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful tool to study protein-protein interactions, this strategy has encountered numerous difficulties when adapted to mammalian cells. Here we describe a Gateway{reg_sign}-compatible dual-tag affinity purification system that integrates regulatable expression, tetracysteine motifs, and various combinations of affinity tags to facilitate the cloning, detection, and purification of bait proteins and their interacting partners. Utilizing the human telomere binding protein TRF2 as a benchmark, we demonstrate bait protein recoveries upwards of approximately 16% from as little as 1-7 x 10{sup 7} cells and successfully identify known TRF2 interacting proteins, suggesting that our dual-tag affinity purification approach is a capable new tool for expanding the capacity to explore mammalian proteomic networks.

  18. Immunocytochemical localization of the high-affinity glutamate transporter, EAAC1, in the retina of representative vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Schultz, K; Stell, W K

    1996-06-28

    The glutamate transporter, EAAC1, was localized immunocytochemically in goldfish, salamander, turtle, chicken, and rat retinas, using affinity-purified oligopeptide antibodies. Immunoreactive (IR) EAAC1 was present in the inner plexiform layer of all species, and in cell bodies of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells of most species, but absent from photoreceptors and Müller's glial cells. Western blots revealed an IR-EAAC1 band at 70 kDa. Staining was abolished by preabsorption with EAAC1 peptide. PMID:8817573

  19. YehZYXW of Escherichia coli Is a Low-Affinity, Non-Osmoregulatory Betaine-Specific ABC Transporter.

    PubMed

    Lang, Shenhui; Cressatti, Marisa; Mendoza, Kris E; Coumoundouros, Chelsea N; Plater, Samantha M; Culham, Doreen E; Kimber, Matthew S; Wood, Janet M

    2015-09-22

    Transporter-mediated osmolyte accumulation stimulates the growth of Escherichia coli in high-osmolality environments. YehZYXW was predicted to be an osmoregulatory transporter because (1) osmotic and stationary phase induction of yehZYXW is mediated by RpoS, (2) the Yeh proteins are homologous to the components of known osmoregulatory ABC transporters (e.g., ProU of E. coli), and (3) YehZ models based on the structures of periplasmic betaine-binding proteins suggested that YehZ retains key betaine-binding residues. The betaines choline-O-sulfate, glycine betaine, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate bound YehZ and ProX with millimolar and micromolar affinities, respectively, as determined by equilibrium dialysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The crystal structure of the YehZ apoprotein, determined at 1.5 Å resolution (PDB ID: 4WEP ), confirmed its similarity to other betaine-binding proteins. Small and nonpolar residues in the hinge region of YehZ (e.g., Gly223) pack more closely than the corresponding residues in ProX, stabilizing the apoprotein. Betaines bound YehZ-Gly223Ser an order of magnitude more tightly than YehZ, suggesting that weak substrate binding in YehZ is at least partially due to apo state stabilization. Neither ProX nor YehZ bound proline. Assays based on osmoprotection or proline auxotrophy failed to detect YehZYXW-mediated uptake of proline, betaines, or other osmolytes. However, transport assays revealed low-affinity glycine betaine uptake, mediated by YehZYXW, that was inhibited at high salinity. Thus, YehZYXW is a betaine transporter that shares substrate specificity, but not an osmoregulatory function, with homologues like E. coli ProU. Other work suggests that yehZYXW may be an antivirulence locus whose expression promotes persistent, asymptomatic bacterial infection.

  20. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Khadeer, M A; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2014-04-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN-229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN-229)) and (CMAC(LN-229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns were characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs. 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs. 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs. 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of eight compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN-229) column and decreased it (-5%) on the NMAC(LN-229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences.

  1. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  2. Hemoglobin-based O2 carrier O2 affinity and capillary inlet pO2 are important factors that influence O2 transport in a capillary.

    PubMed

    Dimino, Michael L; Palmer, Andre F

    2007-01-01

    Hemopure (Biopure; Cambridge, MA) and PolyHeme (Northfield Laboratories; Evanston, IL) are two acellular hemoglobin-based O2 carriers (HBOCs) currently in phase III clinical trials for use as red blood cell substitutes. The most common adverse side effect that these HBOCs exhibit is increased vasoconstriction. Autoregulatory theory has been presented as a possible explanation for this physiological effect, where it is hypothesized that low-affinity HBOCs over-deliver O2 to tissues surrounding arterioles, thereby eliciting vasoconstriction. In this paper, we wanted to investigate HBOC oxygenation of tissue surrounding a capillary, which is the smallest element of the circulatory system. An a priori model has been developed in which the performance of mixtures of acellular HBOCs (synthesized by our group and others) and human red blood cells (hRBCs) has been simulated using a Krogh tissue cylinder model (KTCM) comprising a capillary surrounded by a capillary membrane and skeletal muscle tissue in cylindrical coordinates with specified tissue O2 consumption rates and Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In this study, the total hemoglobin (hRBCs and HBOCs) concentration was kept constant. The HBOCs studied possessed O2 affinities that were higher and lower compared to hRBCs (P50's spanned 5-55 mmHg), and the equilibrium binding/release of oxygen to/from the HBOCs was modeled using the Adair equation. At normoxic inlet pO2's, there was no correlation between O2 flux out of the capillary and the O2 affinity of the HBOC. However, a correlation was found between the average pO2 tension in the capillary and the O2 affinity of the HBOC. Additionally, we studied the change in the O2 equilibrium curve of HBOCs with different O2 affinities over a wide range of inlet pO2's and found that changing the inlet pO2 greatly affected which HBOC, having a unique O2 affinity, best delivered O2 to the surrounding tissue. The analysis of oxygen transport presented could lead to a better prediction

  3. Identification of a novel system L amino acid transporter structurally distinct from heterodimeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Kim, Do Kyung; Iribe, Yuji; Tangtrongsup, Sahatchai; Jutabha, Promsuk; Li, Yuewei; Ahmed, Nesar; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Anzai, Naohiko; Nagamori, Seishi; Endou, Hitoshi

    2003-10-31

    A cDNA that encodes a novel Na+-independent neutral amino acid transporter was isolated from FLC4 human hepatocarcinoma cells by expression cloning. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the encoded protein designated LAT3 (L-type amino acid transporter 3) transported neutral amino acids such as l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-valine, and l-phenylalanine. The LAT3-mediated transport was Na+-independent and inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, consistent with the properties of system L. Distinct from already known system L transporters LAT1 and LAT2, which form heterodimeric complex with 4F2 heavy chain, LAT3 was functional by itself in Xenopus oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of LAT3 was identical to the gene product of POV1 reported as a prostate cancer-up-regulated gene whose function was not determined, whereas it did not exhibit significant similarity to already identified transporters. The Eadie-Hofstee plots of LAT3-mediated transport were curvilinear, whereas the low affinity component is predominant at physiological plasma amino acid concentration. In addition to amino acid substrates, LAT3 recognized amino acid alcohols. The transport of l-leucine was electroneutral and mediated by a facilitated diffusion. In contrast, l-leucinol, l-valinol, and l-phenylalaninol, which have a net positive charge induced inward currents under voltage clamp, suggesting these compounds are transported by LAT3. LAT3-mediated transport was inhibited by the pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide, consistent with the property of system L2 originally characterized in hepatocyte primary culture. Based on the substrate selectivity, affinity, and N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity, LAT3 is proposed to be a transporter subserving system L2. LAT3 should denote a new family of organic solute transporters. PMID:12930836

  4. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Sørensen, Lena; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Park, Minyoung; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslinking unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into 75 different positions in hSERT. UAAs are incorporated with high specificity, and functionally active transporters have similar transport properties and pharmacological profiles compared with wild-type transporters. We employ ultraviolet-induced crosslinking with p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) at selected positions in hSERT to map the binding site of imipramine, a prototypical tricyclic antidepressant, and vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant. We find that the two antidepressants crosslink with azF incorporated at different positions within the central substrate-binding site of hSERT, while no crosslinking is observed at the vestibular-binding site. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for defining the high-affinity antidepressant binding site in hSERT. PMID:27089947

  5. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Sørensen, Lena; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Park, Minyoung; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslinking unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into 75 different positions in hSERT. UAAs are incorporated with high specificity, and functionally active transporters have similar transport properties and pharmacological profiles compared with wild-type transporters. We employ ultraviolet-induced crosslinking with p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) at selected positions in hSERT to map the binding site of imipramine, a prototypical tricyclic antidepressant, and vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant. We find that the two antidepressants crosslink with azF incorporated at different positions within the central substrate-binding site of hSERT, while no crosslinking is observed at the vestibular-binding site. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for defining the high-affinity antidepressant binding site in hSERT. PMID:27089947

  6. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  7. The ZnuABC high-affinity zinc uptake system and its regulator Zur in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patzer, S I; Hantke, K

    1998-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, lacZ operon fusions were isolated that were derepressed under iron repletion and repressed under iron depletion. Two fusions were localized in genes that formed an operon whose gene products had characteristics of a binding protein-dependent transport system. The growth defect of these mutants on TY medium containing 5mM EGTA was compensated for by the addition of Zn2+. In the presence of 0.5mM EGTA, only the parental strain was able to take up 65Zn2+. This high-affinity transport was energized by ATP. The genes were named znuACB (for zinc uptake; former name yebLMI) and localized at 42 min on the genetic map of E. coli. At high Zn2+ concentrations, the znu mutants took up more 65Zn2+ than the parental strain. The high-affinity 65Zn2+ uptake was repressed by growth in the presence of 10 microM Zn2+. A znuA-lacZ operon fusion was repressed by 5 microM Zn2+ and showed a more than 20-fold increase in beta-galactosidase activity when Zn2+ was bound to 1.5 microM TPEN [tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine]. To identify the Zn2+-dependent regulator, constitutive mutants were isolated and tested for complementation by a gene bank of E. coli. A complementing gene, yjbK of the E. coli genome, was identified and named zur (for zinc uptake regulation). The Zur protein showed 27% sequence identity with the iron regulator Fur. High-affinity 65Zn2+ transport of the constitutive zur mutant was 10-fold higher than that of the uninduced parental strain. An in vivo titration assay suggested that Zur binds to the bidirectional promoter region of znuA and znuCB. PMID:9680209

  8. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    During the initial project period, we have pursued several activities with the overall goal of characterizing the roles of colloid in groundwater. First, we have collected soil cores from a site where we have previously found large quantities of kaolinite colloids in the groundwater. We have intensely investigated these cores to test our hypothesis that the colloids have been mobilized as a result of iron oxide dissolution. Next, we have constructed a soil core system in our laboratory with which we are attempting to mimic the factors that we think are governing colloid transport in the subsurface. Finally, we have pursued the issue of how well organic chemicals bind to the kinds of colloids that we are seeing at field sites. Together, with our knowledge of colloid mobility, we anticipate that this sorption data will enable us to predict the influence of groundwater colloids on contaminant fates in the subsurface. Our progress in each of these activities is described in this report. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Engineering higher affinity T cell receptors using a T cell display system

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Raseman, John M.; Kranz, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) determines the cellular response to antigens, which are presented on the surface of target cells in the form of a peptide bound to a product of the major histocompatibility complex (pepMHC). The response of the T cell depends on the affinity of the TCR for the pepMHC, yet many TCRs have been shown to be of low affinity, and some naturally occurring T cell responses are poor due to low affinities. Accordingly, engineering the TCR for increased affinity for pepMHC, particularly tumor-associated antigens, has become an increasingly desirable goal, especially with the advent of adoptive T cell therapies. For largely technical reasons, to date there have been only a handful of TCRs engineered in vitro for higher affinity using well established methods of protein engineering. Here we report the use of a T cell display system, using a retroviral vector, for generating a high affinity TCR from the mouse T cell clone 2C. The method relies on the display of the TCR, in its normal, signaling competent state, as a CD3 complex on the T cell surface. A library in the CDR3α of the 2C TCR was generated in the MSCV retroviral vector and transduced into a TCR-negative hybridoma. Selection of a high affinity, CD8-independent TCR was accomplished after only two rounds of flow cytometric sorting using the pepMHC SIYRYYGL/Kb (SIY/Kb). The selected TCR contained a sequence motif in the CDR3α with characteristics of several other TCRs previously selected by yeast display. In addition, it was possible to directly use the selected T cell hybridoma in functional assays without the need for sub-cloning, revealing that the selected TCR was capable of mediating CD8-independent activity. The method may be useful in the direct isolation and characterization of TCRs that could be used in therapies with adoptive transferred T cells. PMID:18854190

  10. Mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport is mediated by a low-affinity form of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Montesino, Carola; Roa, Francisco J; Peña, Eduardo; González, Mauricio; Sotomayor, Kirsty; Inostroza, Eveling; Muñoz, Carolina A; González, Iván; Maldonado, Mafalda; Soliz, Carlos; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2014-05-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of the redox metabolism of mitochondria under normal and pathological conditions, our knowledge regarding the transport of vitamin C across mitochondrial membranes remains far from complete. We report here that human HEK-293 cells express a mitochondrial low-affinity ascorbic acid transporter that molecularly corresponds to SVCT2, a member of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter family 2. The transporter SVCT1 is absent from HEK-293 cells. Confocal colocalization experiments with anti-SVCT2 and anti-organelle protein markers revealed that most of the SVCT2 immunoreactivity was associated with mitochondria, with minor colocalization at the endoplasmic reticulum and very low immunoreactivity at the plasma membrane. Immunoblotting of proteins extracted from highly purified mitochondrial fractions confirmed that SVCT2 protein was associated with mitochondria, and transport analysis revealed a sigmoidal ascorbic acid concentration curve with an apparent ascorbic acid transport Km of 0.6mM. Use of SVCT2 siRNA for silencing SVCT2 expression produced a major decrease in mitochondrial SVCT2 immunoreactivity, and immunoblotting revealed decreased SVCT2 protein expression by approximately 75%. Most importantly, the decreased protein expression was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport rate. Further studies using HEK-293 cells overexpressing SVCT2 at the plasma membrane revealed that the altered kinetic properties of mitochondrial SVCT2 are due to the ionic intracellular microenvironment (low in sodium and high in potassium), with potassium acting as a concentration-dependent inhibitor of SVCT2. We discarded the participation of two glucose transporters previously described as mitochondrial dehydroascorbic acid transporters; GLUT1 is absent from mitochondria and GLUT10 is not expressed in HEK-293 cells. Overall, our data indicate that intracellular SVCT2 is localized in mitochondria, is

  11. Interaction of nicotinic receptor affinity reagents with central nervous system. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin-binding entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, R.J.; Bennett, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane-bound ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin-binding entities derived from rat brain are found to interact specifically with the affinity reagents maleimidobenzyltrimethylammonium (MBTA) and bromoacetylcholine (BAC), originally designed to label nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from electroplax and skeletal muscle. Following treatment of membranes with dithiothreitol, all specific toxin binding sites are irreversibly blocked by reaction with MBTA or BAC. Affinity reagent labeling of dithiothreitol-reduced membranes is prevented (toxin binding sites are not blocked) by prior alkylaction with N-ethylmaleimide, by prior oxidation with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), or by incubation with neurotoxin. Reversibly associating cholinergic agonists and antagonists retard the rate of affinity reagent interaction with toxin receptors. The apparent rates of affinity reagent alkylation of toxin receptors, and the influences of other sulfhydryl/disulfide reagents on affinity labeling are comparable to those observed for reaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the periphery. The results provide further evidence that central nervous system ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin receptors share a remarkable number of biochemical properties with nicotinic receptors from the periphery.

  12. Two perfectly conserved arginine residues are required for substrate binding in a high-affinity nitrate transporter.

    PubMed

    Unkles, Shiela E; Rouch, Duncan A; Wang, Ye; Siddiqi, M Yaeesh; Glass, Anthony D M; Kinghorn, James R

    2004-12-14

    This study represents the first attempt to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which nitrate, an anion of significant ecological, agricultural, and medical importance, is transported into cells by high-affinity nitrate transporters. Two charged residues, R87 and R368, located within hydrophobic transmembrane domains 2 and 8, respectively, are conserved in all 52 high-affinity nitrate transporters sequenced thus far. Site-directed replacements of either of R87 or R368 residues by lysine were found to be tolerated, but such residue changes increased the K(m) for nitrate influx from micromolar to millimolar values. Seven other amino acid substitutions of R87 or R368 all led to loss of function and lack of growth on nitrate. No evidence was obtained of R87 or R368 forming a salt-bridge with conserved acidic residues. Remarkably, the phenotype of loss-of-function mutant R87T was found to be alleviated by an alteration to lysine of N459, present in the second copy of the nitrate signature (transmembrane domain 11), suggesting a structural or functional interplay between residues R87 and N459 in the three-dimensional NrtA protein structure. Failure of the potential reciprocal second site suppressor N168K (in the first nitrate signature copy of transmembrane domain 5) to revert R368T was observed. Taken with recent structural studies of other major facilitator superfamily proteins, the results suggest that R87 and R368 are involved in substrate binding and probably located in a region of the protein close to N459. PMID:15576512

  13. Multispecific Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1) from Bos taurus Has High Affinity and Slow Binding Kinetics towards Prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Garza, Denisse; Nigam, Sanjay K; Chang, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, SLC22A1), like many solute carrier 22 (SLC22) family members, is important for the disposition of clinically important drugs, metabolites and signaling molecules. Several studies suggest that SLC22 family (eg. organic anion transporters or OATs and OCTs) bind and possibly transport prostaglandins with relatively high affinity (submicromolar). The affinities of OCT1 and OATs toward PGE2 and PGF2a reported in these cell-based transport studies are considerably greater than for xenobiotics and natural metabolite substrates--in many cases over 100-fold higher. This raises the possibility that prostaglandins are key endogenous substrates and/or that they act on the transporter in a manner different from other substrates such as xenobiotics and lower affinity metabolites. To further investigate OCT1-prostaglandin interactions, we designed biophysical studies using purified bovine OCT1 (Bos taurus, btOCT1/SLC22A1) with PGE2 analogs, in fluorescently labeled and label-free formats. Using fluorescence polarization (FP), we detected a binding of btOCT1 to the PGE2-Rhodamine conjugate at submicromolar affinity, consistent with affinity data for PGE2 from cells over-expressing the related human OCT1. Using purified native btOCT1 as analyte and biotinylated PGE2 analog as ligand, our data from surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that btOCT1 specifically interacts to PGE2 with KD values in the hundred nanomolar range. BtOCT1 also demonstrated a slow association (ka) in the range of 103 M(-1) s(-1) and an even slower dissociation rate (kd) in the range of 10-4 s(-1) for PGE2, suggesting the possibility of a different mode of binding compared to other structurally unrelated transported substrates of low-affinity (eg. drugs, metabolites). Our results complement in vitro transport studies and provide direct evidence that OCT1--which is normally expressed in liver and other tissues--interacts with prostaglandin analogs. While it is not

  14. Droplet transport system and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. Paul (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments of droplet transport systems and methods are disclosed for levitating and transporting single or encapsulated droplets using thermocapillary convection. One method embodiment, among others comprises providing a droplet of a first liquid; and applying thermocapillary convection to the droplet to levitate and move the droplet.

  15. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  16. OusB, a Broad-Specificity ABC-Type Transporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, Mediates Uptake of Glycine Betaine and Choline with a High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Gwénaëlle; Jehan, Nathalie; Pissavin, Christine; Blanco, Carlos; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    The ability of Erwinia chrysanthemi to cope with environments of elevated osmolality is due in part to the transport and accumulation of osmoprotectants. In this study we have identified a high-affinity glycine betaine and choline transport system in E. chrysanthemi. By using a pool of Tn5-B21 ousA mutants, we isolated a mutant that could grow in the presence of a toxic analogue of glycine betaine (benzyl-glycine betaine) at high osmolalities. This mutant was impaired in its ability to transport all effective osmoprotectants in E. chrysanthemi. The DNA sequence of the regions flanking the transposon insertion site revealed three chromosomal genes (ousVWX) that encode components of an ABC-type transporter (OusB): OusV (ATPase), OusW (permease), and OusX (periplasmic binding protein). The OusB components showed a significant degree of sequence identity to components of ProU from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. OusB was found to restore the uptake of glycine betaine and choline through functional complementation of an E. coli mutant defective in both ProU and ProP osmoprotectant uptake systems. Competition experiments demonstrated that choline, dimethylsulfoniacetate, dimethylsulfoniopropionate, and ectoine were effective competitors for OusB-mediated betaine transport but that carnitine, pipecolate, and proline were not effective. In addition, the analysis of single and double mutants showed that OusA and OusB were the only osmoprotectant transporters operating in E. chrysanthemi. PMID:16000740

  17. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase.

  18. Biological Electron Transport Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Pasternak, Gavril; Kaufman, Frank

    1970-01-01

    The solid-state electrical conductivities of a number of ferredoxin model compounds are reported. For one of these compounds, (KFeS2)n, an electron transfer rate for a 25 Å unit is shown to be at least 1 × 108 electrons sec-1. The rate becomes proportionally larger for smaller molecular units. This rapid rate is consistant with a short pipe model for electron transport between two reaction sites. Some of the factors leading to this rapid transfer rate are considered. PMID:5269247

  19. Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporter AtSUC9. High-Affinity Transport Activity, Intragenic Control of Expression, and Early Flowering Mutant Phenotype1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Sivitz, Alicia B.; Reinders, Anke; Johnson, Meghan E.; Krentz, Anthony D.; Grof, Christopher P.L.; Perroux, Jai M.; Ward, John M.

    2007-01-01

    AtSUC9 (At5g06170), a sucrose (Suc) transporter from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh., was expressed in Xenopus (Xenopus laevis) oocytes, and transport activity was analyzed. Compared to all other Suc transporters, AtSUC9 had an ultrahigh affinity for Suc (K0.5 = 0.066 ± 0.025 mm). AtSUC9 showed low substrate specificity, similar to AtSUC2 (At1g22710), and transported a wide range of glucosides, including helicin, salicin, arbutin, maltose, fraxin, esculin, turanose, and α-methyl-d-glucose. The ability of AtSUC9 to transport 10 glucosides was compared directly with that of AtSUC2, HvSUT1 (from barley [Hordeum vulgare]), and ShSUT1 (from sugarcane [Saccharum hybrid]), and results indicate that type I and type II Suc transporters have different substrate specificities. AtSUC9 protein was localized to the plasma membrane by transient expression in onion (Allium cepa) epidermis. Using a whole-gene translational fusion to β-glucuronidase, AtSUC9 expression was found in sink tissues throughout the shoots and in flowers. AtSUC9 expression in Arabidopsis was dependent on intragenic sequence, and this was found to also be true for AtSUC1 (At1g71880) but not AtSUC2. Plants containing mutations in Suc transporter gene AtSUC9 were found to have an early flowering phenotype under short-day conditions. The transport properties of AtSUC9 indicate that it is uniquely suited to provide cellular uptake of Suc at very low extracellular Suc concentrations. The mutant phenotype of atsuc9 alleles indicates that AtSUC9 activity leads to a delay in floral transition. PMID:17098854

  20. Arabidopsis sucrose transporter AtSUC9. High-affinity transport activity, intragenic control of expression, and early flowering mutant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia B; Reinders, Anke; Johnson, Meghan E; Krentz, Anthony D; Grof, Christopher P L; Perroux, Jai M; Ward, John M

    2007-01-01

    AtSUC9 (At5g06170), a sucrose (Suc) transporter from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh., was expressed in Xenopus (Xenopus laevis) oocytes, and transport activity was analyzed. Compared to all other Suc transporters, AtSUC9 had an ultrahigh affinity for Suc (K(0.5) = 0.066 +/- 0.025 mm). AtSUC9 showed low substrate specificity, similar to AtSUC2 (At1g22710), and transported a wide range of glucosides, including helicin, salicin, arbutin, maltose, fraxin, esculin, turanose, and alpha-methyl-d-glucose. The ability of AtSUC9 to transport 10 glucosides was compared directly with that of AtSUC2, HvSUT1 (from barley [Hordeum vulgare]), and ShSUT1 (from sugarcane [Saccharum hybrid]), and results indicate that type I and type II Suc transporters have different substrate specificities. AtSUC9 protein was localized to the plasma membrane by transient expression in onion (Allium cepa) epidermis. Using a whole-gene translational fusion to beta-glucuronidase, AtSUC9 expression was found in sink tissues throughout the shoots and in flowers. AtSUC9 expression in Arabidopsis was dependent on intragenic sequence, and this was found to also be true for AtSUC1 (At1g71880) but not AtSUC2. Plants containing mutations in Suc transporter gene AtSUC9 were found to have an early flowering phenotype under short-day conditions. The transport properties of AtSUC9 indicate that it is uniquely suited to provide cellular uptake of Suc at very low extracellular Suc concentrations. The mutant phenotype of atsuc9 alleles indicates that AtSUC9 activity leads to a delay in floral transition.

  1. STP10 encodes a high-affinity monosaccharide transporter and is induced under low-glucose conditions in pollen tubes of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Rottmann, Theresa; Zierer, Wolfgang; Subert, Christa; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Pollen tubes are fast growing, photosynthetically inactive cells. Their energy demand is covered by specific transport proteins in the plasma membrane that mediate the uptake of sugars. Here we report on the functional characterization of AtSTP10, a previously uncharacterized member of the SUGAR TRANSPORT PROTEIN family. Heterologous expression of STP10 cDNA in yeast revealed that the encoded protein catalyses the high-affinity uptake of glucose, galactose and mannose. The transporter is sensitive to uncouplers of transmembrane proton gradients, indicating that the protein acts as a hexose–H+ symporter. Analyses of STP10 mRNA and STP10 promoter–reporter gene studies revealed a sink-specific expression pattern of STP10 in primordia of lateral roots and in pollen tubes. This restriction to sink organs is mediated by intragenic regions of STP10. qPCR analyses with cDNA of in vitro grown pollen tubes showed that STP10 expression was down-regulated in the presence of 50mM glucose. However, in pollen tubes of glucose-insensitive plants, which lack the glucose sensor hexokinase1 (HXK1), no glucose-induced down-regulation of STP10 expression was detected. A stp10 T-DNA insertion line developed normally, which may point towards functional redundancy. The data presented in this paper indicate that a high-affinity glucose uptake system is induced in growing pollen tubes under low glucose conditions and that this regulation may occur through the hexokinase pathway. PMID:26893494

  2. STP10 encodes a high-affinity monosaccharide transporter and is induced under low-glucose conditions in pollen tubes of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rottmann, Theresa; Zierer, Wolfgang; Subert, Christa; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    Pollen tubes are fast growing, photosynthetically inactive cells. Their energy demand is covered by specific transport proteins in the plasma membrane that mediate the uptake of sugars. Here we report on the functional characterization of AtSTP10, a previously uncharacterized member of the SUGAR TRANSPORT PROTEIN family. Heterologous expression of STP10 cDNA in yeast revealed that the encoded protein catalyses the high-affinity uptake of glucose, galactose and mannose. The transporter is sensitive to uncouplers of transmembrane proton gradients, indicating that the protein acts as a hexose-H(+)symporter. Analyses of STP10 mRNA and STP10 promoter-reporter gene studies revealed a sink-specific expression pattern of STP10 in primordia of lateral roots and in pollen tubes. This restriction to sink organs is mediated by intragenic regions of STP10 qPCR analyses with cDNA of in vitro grown pollen tubes showed that STP10 expression was down-regulated in the presence of 50mM glucose. However, in pollen tubes of glucose-insensitive plants, which lack the glucose sensor hexokinase1 (HXK1), no glucose-induced down-regulation of STP10 expression was detected. A stp10T-DNA insertion line developed normally, which may point towards functional redundancy. The data presented in this paper indicate that a high-affinity glucose uptake system is induced in growing pollen tubes under low glucose conditions and that this regulation may occur through the hexokinase pathway. PMID:26893494

  3. Identification of the High-affinity Substrate-binding Site of the Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) Family Transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Nie, Laiyin; Grell, Ernst; Malviya, Viveka Nand; Xie, Hao; Wang, Jingkang; Michel, Hartmut

    2016-07-22

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters exist in all three domains of life. They confer multidrug resistance by utilizing H(+) or Na(+) electrochemical gradients to extrude various drugs across the cell membranes. The substrate binding and the transport mechanism of MATE transporters is a fundamental process but so far not fully understood. Here we report a detailed substrate binding study of NorM_PS, a representative MATE transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri Our results indicate that NorM_PS is a proton-dependent multidrug efflux transporter. Detailed binding studies between NorM_PS and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) were performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectrofluorometry. Two exothermic binding events were observed from ITC data, and the high-affinity event was directly correlated with the extrusion of DAPI. The affinities are about 1 μm and 0.1 mm for the high and low affinity binding, respectively. Based on our homology model of NorM_PS, variants with mutations of amino acids that are potentially involved in substrate binding, were constructed. By carrying out the functional characterization of these variants, the critical amino acid residues (Glu-257 and Asp-373) for high-affinity DAPI binding were determined. Taken together, our results suggest a new substrate-binding site for MATE transporters. PMID:27235402

  4. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  5. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  6. Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program employs a heavily instrumented, B 737-100 as its Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TRSV). The TRSV has been used during the demonstration trials of the Time Reference Scanning Beam Microwave Landing System (TRSB MLS), the '4D flight-management' concept, ATC data links, and airborne windshear sensors. The credibility obtainable from successful flight test experiments is often a critical factor in the granting of substantial commitments for commercial implementation by the FAA and industry. In the case of the TRSB MLS, flight test demonstrations were decisive to its selection as the standard landing system by the ICAO.

  7. A Lyapunov method for stability analysis of piecewise-affine systems over non-invariant domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubagotti, Matteo; Zaccarian, Luca; Bemporad, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    This paper analyses stability of discrete-time piecewise-affine systems, defined on possibly non-invariant domains, taking into account the possible presence of multiple dynamics in each of the polytopic regions of the system. An algorithm based on linear programming is proposed, in order to prove exponential stability of the origin and to find a positively invariant estimate of its region of attraction. The results are based on the definition of a piecewise-affine Lyapunov function, which is in general discontinuous on the boundaries of the regions. The proposed method is proven to lead to feasible solutions in a broader range of cases as compared to a previously proposed approach. Two numerical examples are shown, among which a case where the proposed method is applied to a closed-loop system, to which model predictive control was applied without a-priori guarantee of stability.

  8. Mutational Analysis of the High-Affinity Zinc Binding Site Validates a Refined Human Dopamine Transporter Homology Model

    PubMed Central

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R.; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter‚s movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle. PMID:23436987

  9. Tether Transportation System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, M. E.; Lorenzini, E.; Vestal, L.

    1998-01-01

    The projected traffic to geostationary earth orbit (GEO) is expected to increase over the next few decades. At the same time, the cost of delivering payloads from the Earth's surface to low earth orbit (LEO) is projected to decrease, thanks in part to the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). A comparable reduction in the cost of delivering payloads from LEO to GEO is sought. The use of in-space tethers, eliminating the requirement for traditional chemical upper stages and thereby reducing the launch mass, has been identified as such an alternative. Spinning tethers are excellent kinetic energy storage devices for providing the large delta vee's required for LEO to GEO transfer. A single-stage system for transferring payloads from LEO to GEO was proposed some years ago. The study results presented here contain the first detailed analyses of this proposal, its extension to a two-stage system, and the likely implementation of the operational system.

  10. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  11. Constitutive expression of high-affinity sulfate transporter (HAST) gene in Indian mustard showed enhanced sulfur uptake and assimilation.

    PubMed

    Abdin, M Z; Akmal, M; Ram, M; Nafis, T; Alam, P; Nadeem, M; Khan, M A; Ahmad, A

    2011-07-01

    Lycopersicon esculantum sulfate transporter gene (LeST 1.1) encodes a high-affinity sulfate transporter (HAST) located in root epidermis. In this study, the LeST 1.1 gene was constitutively expressed in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea cv. Pusa Jai Kisan). Transgenic as well as untransformed plants were grown in sulfur-insufficient (25 and 50 μM) and sulfur-sufficient (1,000 μM) conditions for 30 days. Two-fold increase was noticed in the sulfate uptake rate of transgenic plants grown in both sulfur-insufficient and -sufficient conditions as compared to untransformed plants. The transgenic B. juncea plants were able to accumulate higher biomass and showed improved sulfur status even in sulfur-insufficient conditions when compared with untransformed plants. Chlorophyll content, ATP sulfurylase activity and protein content were also higher in transgenic plants than untranformed plants under sulfur-insufficient conditions. Our results, thus, clearly indicate that constitutive expression of LeST 1.1 gene in B. juncea had led to enhanced capacity of sulfur uptake and assimilation even in sulfur-insufficient conditions. This approach can also be used in other crops to enhance their sulfate uptake and assimilation potential under S-insufficient conditions. PMID:20938698

  12. New results on robust stability for differential-difference systems with affine linear parametric uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Gerardo; Díaz, Iván; Pérez, Irma; Guerrero, Alfredo; Lara, David; Rivera, José

    2013-01-01

    This article presents sufficient conditions to verify the robust stability property of convex combinations for quasipolynomials that represent the characteristic equation of differential-difference dynamics systems. It considers affine linear parametric uncertainty structure in the coefficients of quasipolynomials and also, interval uncertainty in the time delay. First of all, a transformation of the delay's operator is performed in order to get a two variable polynomial; after this, to obtain the robust stability property, a result based on the Hurwitz matrix is applied.

  13. Transport Systems in Halophilic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Plemenitaš, Ana; Konte, Tilen; Gostinčar, Cene; Cimerman, Nina Gunde

    2016-01-01

    Fungi that tolerate very high environmental NaCl concentrations are good model systems to study mechanisms that enable them to endure osmotic and salinity stress. The whole genome sequences of six such fungal species have been analysed: Hortaea werneckii, Wallemia ichthyophaga and four Aureobasidium spp.: A. pullulans, A. subglaciale, A. melanogenum and A. namibiae. These fungi show different levels of halotolerance, with the presence of numerous membrane transport systems uncovered here that are believed to maintain physiological intracellular concentrations of alkali metal cations. Despite some differences, the intracellular cation contents of H. werneckii, A. pullulans and W. ichthyophaga remain low even under extreme extracellular salinities, which suggests that these species have efficient cation transport systems. We speculate that cation transporters prevent intracellular accumulation of Na(+), and thus avoid the toxic effects that such Na(+) accumulation would have, while also maintaining the high K(+)/Na(+) ratio that is required for the full functioning of the cell - another crucial task in high-Na(+) environments. This chapter primarily summarises the cation transport systems of these selected fungi, and it also describes other membrane transporters that might be involved in their mechanisms of halotolerance.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae YOR071C encodes the high affinity nicotinamide riboside transporter Nrt1.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter A; Moga, Tiberiu G; Brenner, Charles

    2008-03-28

    NAD(+) is an essential coenzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+)-consuming enzymes. Nicotinamide riboside is a recently discovered eukaryotic NAD(+) precursor converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by nucleosidase activity and nicotinamide salvage. Nicotinamide riboside supplementation of yeast extends replicative life span on high glucose medium. The molecular basis for nicotinamide riboside uptake was unknown in any eukaryote. Here, we show that deletion of a single gene, YOR071C, abrogates nicotinamide riboside uptake without altering nicotinic acid or nicotinamide import. The gene, which is negatively regulated by Sum1, Hst1, and Rfm1, fully restores nicotinamide riboside import and utilization when resupplied to mutant yeast cells. The encoded polypeptide, Nrt1, is a predicted deca-spanning membrane protein related to the thiamine transporter, which functions as a pH-dependent facilitator with a K(m) for nicotinamide riboside of 22 microm. Nrt1-related molecules are conserved in particular fungi, suggesting a similar basis for nicotinamide riboside uptake. PMID:18258590

  15. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  16. Surveillance systems for intermodal transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Sergej; Voznak, Miroslav; Andziulis, Arunas

    2015-05-01

    Intermodal container monitoring is considered a major security issue in many major logistic companies and countries worldwide. Current representation of the problem, we face today, originated in 2002, right after the 9/11 attacks. Then, a new worldwide Container Security Initiative (CSI, 2002) was considered that shaped the perception of the transportation operations. Now more than 80 larger ports all over the world contribute to its further development and integration into everyday transportation operations and improve the regulations for the developing regions. Although, these new improvements allow us to feel safer and secure, constant management of transportation operations has become a very difficult problem for conventional data analysis methods and information systems. The paper deals with a proposal of a whole new concept for the improvement of the Containers Security Initiative (CSI) by virtually connecting safety, security processes and systems. A conceptual middleware approach with deployable intelligent agent modules is proposed to be used with possible scenarios and a testbed is used to test the solution. Middleware examples are visually programmed using National Instruments LabView software packages and Wireless sensor network hardware modules. An experimental software is used to evaluate he solution. This research is a contribution to the intermodal transportation and is intended to be used as a means or the development of intelligent transport systems.

  17. Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, V.T.

    1984-04-27

    The proven reserves of natural gas in Prudhoe Bay remain the single largest block of reserves under US control. The sponsors of the Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System, including The Williams Companies, remain convinced that Alaskan gas will be increasingly important to meet future needs here in the lower 48 states. Both Canada and the US will increasingly have to turn to more costly supplies of gas as the closer, traditional areas of gas supply are exhausted. A principal motivation for Canada's participation in the ANGTS was the prospect of a jointly sponsored pipeline through Canada which would facilitate bringing frontier gas to market - through the so-called Dempster lateral. The high cost of transportation systems in the Artic necessitates pipelines with large capacities in order to minimize the cost of transportation per unit of gas delivered. It is clear that Canada still strongly supports the ANGTS project as a means of opening up the frontier resources of both Alaska and Canada.

  18. Optimal concentrations in transport systems

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N. Michele; Bush, John W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt∼2αμ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow. PMID:23594815

  19. Role of the human high-affinity copper transporter in copper homeostasis regulation and cisplatin sensitivity in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Macus Tien; Fu, Siqing; Savaraj, Niramol; Chen, Helen H W

    2012-09-15

    The high-affinity copper transporter (Ctr1; SCLC31A1) plays an important role in regulating copper homeostasis because copper is an essential micronutrient and copper deficiency is detrimental to many important cellular functions, but excess copper is toxic. Recent research has revealed that human copper homeostasis is tightly controlled by interregulatory circuitry involving copper, Sp1, and human (hCtr1). This circuitry uses Sp1 transcription factor as a copper sensor in modulating hCtr1 expression, which in turn controls cellular copper and Sp1 levels in a 3-way mutual regulatory loop. Posttranslational regulation of hCtr1 expression by copper stresses has also been described in the literature. Because hCtr1 can also transport platinum drugs, this finding underscores the important role of hCtr1 in platinum-drug sensitivity in cancer chemotherapy. Consistent with this notion is the finding that elevated hCtr1 expression was associated with favorable treatment outcomes in cisplatin-based cancer chemotherapy. Moreover, cultured cell studies showed that elevated hCtr1 expression can be induced by depleting cellular copper levels, resulting in enhanced cisplatin uptake and its cell-killing activity. A phase I clinical trial using a combination of trientine (a copper chelator) and carboplatin has been carried out with encouraging results. This review discusses new insights into the role of hCtr1 in regulating copper homeostasis and explains how modulating cellular copper availability could influence treatment efficacy in platinum-based cancer chemotherapy through hCtr1 regulation.

  20. Lunar articulated remote transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The students of the Florida A&M/Florida State University College of Engineering continued their design from 1988 to 1989 on a first generation lunar transportation vehicle for use on the surface of the Moon between the years 2010 and 2020. Attention is focused on specific design details on all components of the Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS). The Lunar ARTS will be a three-cart, six-wheeled articulated vehicle. Its purpose will be the transportation of astronauts and/or materials for excavation purposes at a short distance from the base (37.5 km). The power system includes fuel cells for both the primary system and the back-up system. The vehicle has the option of being operated in a manned or unmanned mode. The unmanned mode includes stereo imaging with signal processing for navigation. For manned missions the display console is a digital readout displayed on the inside of the astronaut's helmet. A microprocessor is also on board the vehicle. Other components of the vehicle include a double wishbone/flexible hemispherical wheel suspension; chassis; a steering system; motors; seat retraints; heat rejection systems; solar flare protection; dust protection; and meteoroid protection. A one-quarter scale dynamic model has been built to study the dynamic behavior of the vehicle. The dynamic model closely captures the mechanical and electrical details of the total design.

  1. Lunar articulated remote transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey; Conley, Gerald; Diaz, Claudine; Dimella, Timothy; Dodson, Pete; Hykin, Jeff; Richards, Byron; Richardson, Kroy; Shetzer, Christie; Vandyke, Melissa

    1990-01-01

    A first generation lunar transportation vehicle was designed for use on the surface of the Moon between the years 2010 and 2020. Attention is focussed on specific design details on all components of the Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS). The Lunar ARTS will be a three cart, six-wheeled articulated vehicle. It's purpose will be for the transportation of astronauts and/or materials for excavation purposes at a short distance from the base (37.5 kilometers). The power system includes fuel cells for both the primary system and the back-up system. The vehicle has the option of being operated in a manned or unmanned mode. The unmanned mode includes stereo imaging with signal processing for navigation. For manned missions the display console is a digital readout displayed on the inside of the asronaut's helmet. A microprocessor is also on board the vehicle. Other components of the vehicle include: a double wishbone/flexible hemispherical wheel suspension; chassis; a steering system; motors; seat restraints, heat rejection systems; solar flare protection; dust protection; and meteoroid protection. A one-quarter scale dynamic model was built to study the dynamic behavior of the vehicle. The dynamic model closely captures the mechanical and electrical details of the total design.

  2. Integrated Intermodal Passenger Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klock, Ryan; Owens, David; Schwartz, Henry; Plencner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Modern transportation consists of many unique modes of travel. Each of these modes and their respective industries has evolved independently over time, forming a largely incoherent and inefficient overall transportation system. Travelers today are forced to spend unnecessary time and efforts planning a trip through varying modes of travel each with their own scheduling, pricing, and services; causing many travelers to simply rely on their relatively inefficient and expensive personal automobile. This paper presents a demonstration program system to not only collect and format many different sources of trip planning information, but also combine these independent modes of travel in order to form optimal routes and itineraries of travel. The results of this system show a mean decrease in inter-city travel time of 10 percent and a 25 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions over personal automobiles. Additionally, a 55 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions is observed for intra-city travel. A conclusion is that current resources are available, if somewhat hidden, to drastically improve point to point transportation in terms of time spent traveling, the cost of travel, and the ecological impact of a trip. Finally, future concepts are considered which could dramatically improve the interoperability and efficiency of the transportation infrastructure.

  3. On the existence of bifocal heteroclinic cycles in a class of four-dimensional piecewise affine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2016-05-01

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of heteroclinic cycles in a class of four-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  4. Role of Secondary Transporters and Phosphotransferase Systems in Glucose Transport by Oenococcus oeni ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok Bin; Richter, Hanno; Zaunmüller, Tanja; Graf, Sabrina; Unden, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Glucose uptake by the heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni B1 was studied at the physiological and gene expression levels. Glucose- or fructose-grown bacteria catalyzed uptake of [14C]glucose over a pH range from pH 4 to 9, with maxima at pHs 5.5 and 7. Uptake occurred in two-step kinetics in a high- and low-affinity reaction. The high-affinity uptake followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and required energization. It accumulated the radioactivity of glucose by a factor of 55 within the bacteria. A large portion (about 80%) of the uptake of glucose was inhibited by protonophores and ionophores. Uptake of the glucose at neutral pH was not sensitive to degradation of the proton potential, Δp. Expression of the genes OEOE_0819 and OEOE_1574 (here referred to as 0819 and 1574), coding for secondary transporters, was induced by glucose as identified by quantitative real-time (RT)-PCR. The genes 1574 and 0819 were able to complement growth of a Bacillus subtilis hexose transport-deficient mutant on glucose but not on fructose. The genes 1574 and 0819 therefore encode secondary transporters for glucose, and the transports are presumably Δp dependent. O. oeni codes, in addition, for a phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) (gene OEOE_0464 [0464] for the permease) with similarity to the fructose- and mannose-specific PTS of lactic acid bacteria. Quantitative RT-PCR showed induction of the gene 0464 by glucose and by fructose. The data suggest that the PTS is responsible for Δp-independent hexose transport at neutral pH and for the residual Δp-independent transport of hexoses at acidic pH. PMID:22020640

  5. Trypanosoma brucei aquaglyceroporin 2 is a high-affinity transporter for pentamidine and melaminophenyl arsenic drugs and the main genetic determinant of resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Eze, Anthonius A.; Baker, Nicola; Glover, Lucy; Clucas, Caroline; Aguinaga Andrés, David; Natto, Manal J.; Teka, Ibrahim A.; McDonald, Jennifer; Lee, Rebecca S.; Graf, Fabrice E.; Ludin, Philipp; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Turner, C. Michael R.; Tait, Andy; MacLeod, Annette; Mäser, Pascal; Barrett, Michael P.; Horn, David; De Koning, Harry P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Trypanosoma brucei drug transporters include the TbAT1/P2 aminopurine transporter and the high-affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1), but the genetic identity of HAPT1 is unknown. We recently reported that loss of T. brucei aquaglyceroporin 2 (TbAQP2) caused melarsoprol/pentamidine cross-resistance (MPXR) in these parasites and the current study aims to delineate the mechanism by which this occurs. Methods The TbAQP2 loci of isogenic pairs of drug-susceptible and MPXR strains of T. brucei subspecies were sequenced. Drug susceptibility profiles of trypanosome strains were correlated with expression of mutated TbAQP2 alleles. Pentamidine transport was studied in T. brucei subspecies expressing TbAQP2 variants. Results All MPXR strains examined contained TbAQP2 deletions or rearrangements, regardless of whether the strains were originally adapted in vitro or in vivo to arsenicals or to pentamidine. The MPXR strains and AQP2 knockout strains had lost HAPT1 activity. Reintroduction of TbAQP2 in MPXR trypanosomes restored susceptibility to the drugs and reinstated HAPT1 activity, but did not change the activity of TbAT1/P2. Expression of TbAQP2 sensitized Leishmania mexicana promastigotes 40-fold to pentamidine and >1000-fold to melaminophenyl arsenicals and induced a high-affinity pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1 by Km and inhibitor profile. Grafting the TbAQP2 selectivity filter amino acid residues onto a chimeric allele of AQP2 and AQP3 partly restored susceptibility to pentamidine and an arsenical. Conclusions TbAQP2 mediates high-affinity uptake of pentamidine and melaminophenyl arsenicals in trypanosomes and TbAQP2 encodes the previously reported HAPT1 activity. This finding establishes TbAQP2 as an important drug transporter. PMID:24235095

  6. Identification of high- and low-affinity NGF receptors during development of the chicken central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Escandon, E.; Chao, M.V. )

    1990-12-01

    In order to study regulation of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor during embryogenesis in chick brain, we have used affinity crosslinking of tissues with {sup 125}I-NGF. NGF interacts with high- and low-affinity receptors; high-affinity receptors are required for the majority of NGF's actions. Most measurements of receptor levels do not distinguish between high- and low-affinity forms of the receptor. We have used the lipophilic crosslinking agent HSAB to identify the high-affinity, functional receptor during development of the chicken central nervous system. A peak of expression during Embryonic Days 5-10 was detected in all regions of the chicken central nervous system, but, shortly after birth, only the cerebellar region displays significant levels of NGF receptor protein. The time course of expression confirms the dramatic regulation of the NGF receptor gene during defined embryonic periods. The detection of high-affinity NGF receptors in brain and neural retina provides strong evidence that NGF is involved in essential ontogenetic events in the development of the chicken central nervous system.

  7. The tandem affinity purification method: an efficient system for protein complex purification and protein interaction identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Yuan; Li, Yuhua; Chang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2010-08-01

    Isolation and identification of protein partners in multi-protein complexes are important in gaining further insights into the cellular roles of proteins and determining the possible mechanisms by which proteins have an effect in the molecular environment. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) method was originally developed in yeast for the purification of protein complexes and identification of protein-protein interactions. With modifications to this method and many variations in the original tag made over the past few years, the TAP system could be applied in mammalian, plant, bacteria and other systems for protein complex analysis. In this review, we describe the application of the TAP method in various organisms, the modification in the tag, the disadvantages, the developments and the future prospects of the TAP method. PMID:20399864

  8. Adaptive neural network control of unknown nonlinear affine systems with input deadzone and output constraint.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Dong, Yiting; Sun, Changyin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we aim to solve the control problem of nonlinear affine systems, under the condition of the input deadzone and output constraint with the external unknown disturbance. To eliminate the effects of the input deadzone, a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) is introduced to compensate for the negative impact of input deadzone. Meanwhile, we design a barrier Lyapunov function to ensure that the output parameters are restricted. In support of the barrier Lyapunov method, we build an adaptive neural network controller based on state feedback and output feedback methods. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven via the Lyapunov method and the performance of the expected effects is verified in simulation.

  9. Identification and affinity of very high affinity binding sites for the phenylalkylamine series of Ca/sup +/ channel blockers in the Drosophila nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Pauron, D.; Qar, J.; Barhanin, J.; Fournier, D.; Cuany, A.; Pralavorio, M.; Berge, J.B.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-10-06

    The interaction of putative Ca/sup 2 +/ channels of Drosophila head membranes with molecules of the phenylalkylamine series was studied from binding experiments using (-)-(/sup 3/H)D888 and (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)verapamil. These ligands recognize a single class of very high affinity binding sites. The most potent molecule in the phenylalkylamine series was (-)-verapamil with a K/sub d/ value as exceptional low as 4.7 pM. Molecules in the benzothiazepine and diphenylbutylpiperidine series of Ca/sup 2 +/ channel blockers as well as bepridil inhibited (-)-(/sup 3/H)D888 binding in a competitive way with K/sub d/ values between 12 and 190 nM, suggesting a close correlation, as in the mammalian system, between these receptor sites and those recognizing phenylalkylamines. A tritiated (arylazido)phenylalkylamine with high affinity for the Drosophila head membranes, phenylalkylamine receptor was used in photoaffinity experiments. A protein of M/sub r/ 135,000 +/- 5000 was specifically labeled after ultraviolet irradiation.

  10. Research on advanced transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Ryouhei; Nosaka, Masataka; Koyari, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshio; Noda, Keiichirou; Shinohara, Suetsugu; Itou, Tetsuichi; Etou, Takao; Kaneko, Yutaka

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the researches on advanced space transportation systems is presented. Conceptual study is conducted on fly back boosters with expendable upper stage rocket systems assuming a launch capacity of 30 tons and returning to the launch site by the boosters, and prospect of their feasibility is obtained. Reviews are conducted on subjects as follows: (1) trial production of 10 tons sub scale engines for the purpose of acquiring hardware data and picking up technical problems for full scale 100 tons thrust engines using hydrocarbon fuels; (2) development techniques for advanced liquid propulsion systems from the aspects of development schedule, cost; (3) review of conventional technologies, and common use of component; (4) oxidant switching propulsion systems focusing on feasibility of Liquefied Air Cycle Engine (LACE) and Compressed Air Cycle Engine (CACE); (5) present status of slosh hydrogen manufacturing, storage, and handling; (6) construction of small high speed dynamometer for promoting research on mini pump development; (7) hybrid solid boosters under research all over the world as low-cost and clean propulsion systems; and (8) high performance solid propellant for upper stage and lower stage propulsion systems.

  11. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  12. Assignment of the gene coding for the human high-affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1 to 9p24: Potential role in dicarboxylic aminoaciduria and neurodegenerative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.P.; Kanai, Y.; Stelzner, M.; Hediger, M.A.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-03-15

    Functional defects of high-affinity glutamate transporters have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In small intestine and kidney, in which the high-affinity glutamate transporter mediates net absorption of glutamate and aspartate across epithelial cells, an inborn error of glutamate transport is thought to cause dicarboxylic aminoaciduria. This disorder is characterized by increased urinary excretion of glutamate and aspartate and is, in general, associated with neurologic and developmental abnormalities. Recently, the authors isolated a cDNA encoding a high-affinity glutamate transporter (EAAC1) that also transports aspartate but not other amino acids. EAAC1 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, particularly in brain (neurons), intestine, and kidney. Here, the authors present mapping of the chromosome location of EAAC1 using Southern analysis of a panel of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Southern analysis of EcoRI-digested DNA gave bands at 6.5, 5.6, 5.1, and 1.2 kb for human genomic DNA; 7.5 kb for mouse genomic DNA; and 7.3, 3.2, and 1 kb for hamster genomic DNA. All four human EAAC1-specific bands were observed in the lane corresponding to the human/Chinese hamster hybrid containing chromosome 9 but not in lanes corresponding to any other hybrid. Because the human/Chinese hamster hybrid is the only one retaining chromosome 9, this result unambiguously assigns human EAAC1 to chromosome 9. For precise chromosome assignment of the human EAAC1 gene, they employed FISH. Map position of the EAAC1 probe was assigned by visual inspection of the fluorescent signal on the DAPI-stained metaphase chromosomes. The human EAAC1 gene was assigned to 9p24.

  13. Multiple sodium-dependent nucleoside transport systems in bovine renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T C; Jarvis, S M

    1991-01-01

    Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transport was examined in bovine renal brush-border membrane vesicles. Two separate Na+/nucleoside cotransporters were shown to be present: (1) a system specific for purine nucleosides and uridine, designated as the N1 carrier, and (2) an Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transporter that accepts pyrimidine nucleosides, adenosine and analogues of adenosine, designated as the N2 system. Both systems exhibit a high affinity for nucleosides (apparent Km values approximately 10 microM), are insensitive to inhibition by facilitated-diffusion nucleoside transport inhibitors, are rheogenic and exhibit a high specificity for Na+. Na+ increases the affinity of the influx of guanosine and thymidine, nucleosides that serve as model permeants for the N1 and N2 nucleoside transporters respectively. The Na+/nucleoside coupling stoichiometry is consistent with 1:1 for both carriers. PMID:2001243

  14. Development of an automated mid-scale parallel protein purification system for antibody purification and affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Long, Alexander M; Swalm, Brooke; Charest, Ken; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jiali; Schulz, Craig; Goetzinger, Wolfgang; Hall, Brian E

    2016-12-01

    Protein purification is often a bottleneck during protein generation for large molecule drug discovery. Therapeutic antibody campaigns typically require the purification of hundreds of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during the hybridoma process and lead optimization. With the increase in high-throughput cloning, faster DNA sequencing, and the use of parallel protein expression systems, a need for high-throughput purification approaches has evolved, particularly in the midsize range between 20 ml and 100 ml. To address this we modified a four channel Gilson solid phase extraction system (referred to as MG-SPE) with switching valves and sample holding loops to be able to perform standard affinity purification using commercially available columns and micro-titer format deep well blocks. By running 4 samples in parallel, the MG-SPE has the capacity to purify up to 24 samples of greater than 50 ml each using a single-step affinity purification protocol or a two-step protocol consisting of affinity chromatography followed by desalting/buffer exchange overnight (∼12 h run time). Our evaluation of affinity purification using mAbs and Fc-fusion proteins from mammalian cell supernatants demonstrates that the MG-SPE compared favorably with industry standard systems for both protein quality and yield. Overall the system is simple to operate and fills a void in purification processes where a simple, efficient, automated system is needed for affinity purification of midsize research samples. PMID:27498022

  15. Development of an automated mid-scale parallel protein purification system for antibody purification and affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Long, Alexander M; Swalm, Brooke; Charest, Ken; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jiali; Schulz, Craig; Goetzinger, Wolfgang; Hall, Brian E

    2016-12-01

    Protein purification is often a bottleneck during protein generation for large molecule drug discovery. Therapeutic antibody campaigns typically require the purification of hundreds of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during the hybridoma process and lead optimization. With the increase in high-throughput cloning, faster DNA sequencing, and the use of parallel protein expression systems, a need for high-throughput purification approaches has evolved, particularly in the midsize range between 20 ml and 100 ml. To address this we modified a four channel Gilson solid phase extraction system (referred to as MG-SPE) with switching valves and sample holding loops to be able to perform standard affinity purification using commercially available columns and micro-titer format deep well blocks. By running 4 samples in parallel, the MG-SPE has the capacity to purify up to 24 samples of greater than 50 ml each using a single-step affinity purification protocol or a two-step protocol consisting of affinity chromatography followed by desalting/buffer exchange overnight (∼12 h run time). Our evaluation of affinity purification using mAbs and Fc-fusion proteins from mammalian cell supernatants demonstrates that the MG-SPE compared favorably with industry standard systems for both protein quality and yield. Overall the system is simple to operate and fills a void in purification processes where a simple, efficient, automated system is needed for affinity purification of midsize research samples.

  16. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transport trailer system

    SciTech Connect

    Ard, K.E.; King, D.A.; Leigh, H.; Satoh, J.A.

    1995-01-20

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System (System 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations}, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  17. Vesicular transport systems in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Canonical and unconventional mechanisms of secretion in many eukaryotic cells are relatively well known. In contrast to the situation in animal cells, mechanisms of secretion in fungi must include the capacity for trans-cell wall passage of macromolecules to the extracellular space. Although these mechanisms remain somewhat elusive, several studies in recent years have suggested that vesicular transport is required for trans-cell wall secretion of large molecules. Several fungal molecules, including proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and pigments, are released to the extracellular space in vesicles. In pathogenic fungi, a number of these vesicular components are associated with fungal virulence. Indeed, extracellular vesicles produced by fungi can interfere with the immunomodulatory activity of host cells. Fungal vesicles share many functional aspects with mammalian exosomes and extracellular vesicles produced by bacteria, plants and protozoa, but their cellular origin remains unknown. Here, we discuss the involvement of vesicular transport systems in fungal physiology and pathogenesis, making parallels with the mammalian, bacterial, protozoan and plant cell literature. PMID:22082294

  18. Effect of P Availability on Temporal Dynamics of Carbon Allocation and Glomus intraradices High-Affinity P Transporter Gene Induction in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Hansson, Maria C.; Burleigh, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi depend on a C supply from the plant host and simultaneously provide phosphorus to the colonized plant. We therefore evaluated the influence of external P on C allocation in monoxenic Daucus carota-Glomus intraradices cultures in an AM symbiosis. Fungal hyphae proliferated from a solid minimal medium containing colonized roots into a C-free liquid minimal medium with high or low P availability. Roots and hyphae were harvested periodically, and the flow of C from roots to fungus was measured by isotope labeling. We also measured induction of a G. intraradices high-affinity P transporter to estimate fungal P demand. The prevailing hypothesis is that high P availability reduces mycorrhizal fungal growth, but we found that C flow to the fungus was initially highest at the high P level. Only at later harvests, after 100 days of in vitro culture, were C flow and fungal growth limited at high P availability. Thus, AM fungi can benefit initially from P-enriched environments in terms of plant C allocation. As expected, the P transporter induction was significantly greater at low P availability and greatest in very young mycelia. We found no direct link between C flow to the fungus and the P transporter transcription level, which indicates that a good C supply is not essential for induction of the high-affinity P transporter. We describe a mechanism by which P regulates symbiotic C allocation, and we discuss how this mechanism may have evolved in a competitive environment. PMID:16751522

  19. Reinforcement learning controller design for affine nonlinear discrete-time systems using online approximators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinmin; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, reinforcement learning state- and output-feedback-based adaptive critic controller designs are proposed by using the online approximators (OLAs) for a general multi-input and multioutput affine unknown nonlinear discretetime systems in the presence of bounded disturbances. The proposed controller design has two entities, an action network that is designed to produce optimal signal and a critic network that evaluates the performance of the action network. The critic estimates the cost-to-go function which is tuned online using recursive equations derived from heuristic dynamic programming. Here, neural networks (NNs) are used both for the action and critic whereas any OLAs, such as radial basis functions, splines, fuzzy logic, etc., can be utilized. For the output-feedback counterpart, an additional NN is designated as the observer to estimate the unavailable system states, and thus, separation principle is not required. The NN weight tuning laws for the controller schemes are also derived while ensuring uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system using Lyapunov theory. Finally, the effectiveness of the two controllers is tested in simulation on a pendulum balancing system and a two-link robotic arm system.

  20. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  1. Cardiovascular afferents cause the release of 5-HT in the nucleus tractus solitarii; this release is regulated by the low- (PMAT) not the high-affinity transporter (SERT)

    PubMed Central

    Hosford, Patrick S; Millar, Julian; Ramage, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Key points The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) integrates visceral afferent information essential for cardiovascular haemostasis. Using fast-cyclic voltammetry in anaesthetized rats, 5-HT (serotonin) release was detected in NTS in response to activation of these afferents. Removal of 5-HT from the extracellular space is usually regulated by the low-capacity, high-affinity 5-HT transporter (5-HTT/SERT). The present data demonstrate that 5-HT removal in the NTS is regulated by the plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT), a high-capacity, low-affinity transporter. The present data also demonstrate that the 5-HT released by afferent activation comes from at least two different sources. It is suggested that one of these sources is the afferents themselves. These results demonstrate a physiological role for the low-affinity uptake transporter in the regulation of 5-HT concentration in NTS. Abstract The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) integrates inputs from cardiovascular afferents and thus is crucial for cardiovascular homeostasis. These afferents primarily release glutamate, although 5-HT has also been shown to play a role in their actions. Using fast-cyclic voltammetry, an increase in 5-HT concentrations (range 12–50 nm) could be detected in the NTS in anaesthetized rats in response to electrical stimulation of the vagus and activation of cardiopulmonary, chemo- and baroreceptor reflexes. This 5-HT signal was not potentiated by the serotonin transporter (SERT) or the noradrenaline transporter (NET) inhibitors citalopram and desipramine (1 mg kg−1). However, decynium-22 (600 μg kg−1), an organic cation 3 transporter (OCT3)/plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) inhibitor, increased the 5-HT signal by 111 ± 21% from 29 ± 10 nm. The effectiveness of these inhibitors was tested against the removal time of 5-HT and noradrenaline applied by microinjection to the NTS. Citalopram and decynium-22 attenuated the removal of 5-HT but not

  2. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  3. Classical transport in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  4. Manned transportation system study - Evaluation of candidate transportation architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nicholas; Klemer, R.; Sooter, C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall evaluation process, the tool developed to perform the evaluation, and the evaluation results in determining the right approach to meet the nation's mannned transportation needs are presented. To address the various considerations, architecture sets consisting of the candidate transportation systems are constructed. As this methodology results in multiple architectures to examine, an architecture evaluation tool was developed to facilitate the evaluation of the architecture attribute values from the system values of the attributes.

  5. Sustainability Analysis of Innovative Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiere, Ieva; Bazbauers, Gatis

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the research is to develop a new approach to transport solution based on the use of a conveyortype system and to compare the environmental impact of the new system with the existing ones. The new transport system consists of a conveyor driven by an electric motor, with a wind power plant supplying electricity, hydrogen storage and a fuel cell for matching the wind power production with the motor load. The research tasks included the evaluation of the consumption of fossil fuels and the associated environmental impact of existing transport system and a comparison with energy consumption and associated environmental impact of the new system. The energy balance of the conveyor transport system was modelled on an hourly basis by using the EnergyPLAN computer program [1] which allows to analyze a combination of intermittent renewable energy technologies, storage and transport systems. The results show that the existing transport system has greater impact on the environment than the proposed one.

  6. Integral reinforcement learning for continuous-time input-affine nonlinear systems with simultaneous invariant explorations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Young; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on a class of reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms, named integral RL (I-RL), that solve continuous-time (CT) nonlinear optimal control problems with input-affine system dynamics. First, we extend the concepts of exploration, integral temporal difference, and invariant admissibility to the target CT nonlinear system that is governed by a control policy plus a probing signal called an exploration. Then, we show input-to-state stability (ISS) and invariant admissibility of the closed-loop systems with the policies generated by integral policy iteration (I-PI) or invariantly admissible PI (IA-PI) method. Based on these, three online I-RL algorithms named explorized I-PI and integral Q -learning I, II are proposed, all of which generate the same convergent sequences as I-PI and IA-PI under the required excitation condition on the exploration. All the proposed methods are partially or completely model free, and can simultaneously explore the state space in a stable manner during the online learning processes. ISS, invariant admissibility, and convergence properties of the proposed methods are also investigated, and related with these, we show the design principles of the exploration for safe learning. Neural-network-based implementation methods for the proposed schemes are also presented in this paper. Finally, several numerical simulations are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  7. Transport in closed nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushong, Neil

    2005-03-01

    An alternative way to describe electrical transport in nanoscale systems has been recently proposed where two large but finite charged electrodes discharge across a nanoscale junction (M. Di Ventra and T. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004)). We have applied this concept to describe the dynamics of a finite quasi-one dimensional gold wire using both a simple tight-binding model and time-dependent density-functional theory. After an initial transient, a quasi-steady state sets in whose lifetime increases with system size. This quasi-steady state is due to the wave properties of the electron wavefunctions and the resultant uncertainty principle and is established without inelastic effects. The corresponding current-voltage characteristics at steady state are in very good agreement with those calculated from the static scattering approach. We discuss local electron distributions, electrostatic potentials, and local resistivity dipoles formed at the quasi-steady state and compare these findings with the static open-boundary problem. A relation between information entropy and electron dynamics is discussed. Work supported by NSF.

  8. Sulfated Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls Are High-Affinity Ligands for the Thyroid Hormone Transport Protein Transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian A.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; He, Xianran; Robertson, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The displacement of l-thyroxine (T4) from binding sites on transthyretin (TTR) is considered a significant contributing mechanism in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced thyroid disruption. Previous research has discovered hydroxylated PCB metabolites (OH-PCBs) as high-affinity ligands for TTR, but the binding potential of conjugated PCB metabolites such as PCB sulfates has not been explored. Objectives: We evaluated the binding of five lower-chlorinated PCB sulfates to human TTR and compared their binding characteristics to those determined for their OH-PCB precursors and for T4. Methods: We used fluorescence probe displacement studies and molecular docking simulations to characterize the binding of PCB sulfates to TTR. The stability of PCB sulfates and the reversibility of these interactions were characterized by HPLC analysis of PCB sulfates after their binding to TTR. The ability of OH-PCBs to serve as substrates for human cytosolic sulfotransferase 1A1 (hSULT1A1) was assessed by OH-PCB–dependent formation of adenosine-3´,5´-diphosphate, an end product of the sulfation reaction. Results: All five PCB sulfates were able to bind to the high-affinity binding site of TTR with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd values) in the low nanomolar range (4.8–16.8 nM), similar to that observed for T4 (4.7 nM). Docking simulations provided corroborating evidence for these binding interactions and indicated multiple high-affinity modes of binding. All OH-PCB precursors for these sulfates were found to be substrates for hSULT1A1. Conclusions: Our findings show that PCB sulfates are high-affinity ligands for human TTR and therefore indicate, for the first time, a potential relevance for these metabolites in PCB-induced thyroid disruption. PMID:23584369

  9. A National MagLev Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The case for a national high-speed magnetic-levitation (MagLev) transportation system is presented. Focus is on current issues facing the country, such as national security, the economy, transportation, technology, and the environment. NASA s research into MagLev technology for launch assist is also highlighted. Further, current socio-cultural norms regarding motor-vehicle-based transportation systems are questioned in light of the problems currently facing the U.S. The multidisciplinary benefits of a long-distance MagLev system support the idea that such a system would be an important element of a truly multimodal U.S. transportation infrastructure.

  10. Intelligent transportation systems applications to transportation demand management. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, C.E.; Kilpatrick, A.K.; Schneider, K.R.

    1996-04-01

    The primary focus of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) is on traffic management systems, advanced traveler information systems, and so forth. Further, ITS is most readily identified with such systems urban areas because the majority of transportation management infrastructures and traffic congestion exist in these densely populated areas. ITS however, must not be restricted to supply-side options. Transportation demand management (TDM) can potentially have a significant impact on congestion, energy conservation and the environment. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of ITS implications for TDM. It reports on a number of related projects undertaken around the U.S. and in Canada. It offers recommendations for expanding ITS involvement in TDM.

  11. Gγ recruitment systems specifically select PPI and affinity-enhanced candidate proteins that interact with membrane protein targets.

    PubMed

    Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Fukuda, Nobuo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-19

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are crucial for the vast majority of biological processes. We previously constructed a Gγ recruitment system to screen PPI candidate proteins and desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. The methods utilized a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking the ability to localize to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, the previous systems were adapted to use only soluble cytosolic proteins as targets. Recently, membrane proteins have been found to form the principal nodes of signaling involved in diseases and have attracted a great deal of interest as primary drug targets. Here, we describe new protocols for the Gγ recruitment systems that are specifically designed to use membrane proteins as targets to overcome previous limitations. These systems represent an attractive approach to exploring novel interacting candidates and affinity-altered protein variants and their interactions with proteins on the inner side of the plasma membrane, with high specificity and selectivity.

  12. Gγ recruitment systems specifically select PPI and affinity-enhanced candidate proteins that interact with membrane protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Fukuda, Nobuo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are crucial for the vast majority of biological processes. We previously constructed a Gγ recruitment system to screen PPI candidate proteins and desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. The methods utilized a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking the ability to localize to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, the previous systems were adapted to use only soluble cytosolic proteins as targets. Recently, membrane proteins have been found to form the principal nodes of signaling involved in diseases and have attracted a great deal of interest as primary drug targets. Here, we describe new protocols for the Gγ recruitment systems that are specifically designed to use membrane proteins as targets to overcome previous limitations. These systems represent an attractive approach to exploring novel interacting candidates and affinity-altered protein variants and their interactions with proteins on the inner side of the plasma membrane, with high specificity and selectivity. PMID:26581329

  13. Synthesis of new bivalent peptides for applications in the Affinity Enhancement System.

    PubMed

    Morandeau, L; Benoist, E; Loussouarn, A; Ouadi, A; Lesaec, P; Mougin, M; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Le Boterff, J; Chatal, J F; Barbet, J; Gestin, J F

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of two-step radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of cancer by the Affinity Enhancement System (AES) has been demonstrated in experimental and clinical studies. This technique, associating a bispecific antibody and a bivalent peptide radiolabeled with iodine-131, has been developed to reduce toxicity and to improve therapeutic efficacy compared to one-step targeting methods. The use of AES with different beta-emitters such as rhenium-188, samarium-153, or lutetium-177 or alpha-emitters such as actinium-225 or bismuth-213 is now considered. Thus three new peptides, designed to allow for the coupling of a variety of bifunctional chelating agents BCA, were synthesized by associating two glycyl-succinyl-histamine (GSH) arms, which are recognized by the 679 monoclonal antibody (mAb-679), with different binding agents, such as p-nitrophenylalanine or N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)-4-N'-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)aminobenzylamine. Immunoreactivity and serum stability evaluation were performed for each synthesized peptide. One of the three peptides (LM218) proved to be more stable than the others, and three different BCAs were coupled to LM218 (CITC-DTPA, CITC-TTHA, and CITC-CHXA''DTPA). One of these products, LM218-BzTTHA was radiolabeled with indium-111 without loss of immunoreactivity toward the mAb-679. These new peptides will allow pretargeted RIT with a large variety of radionuclides, to adapt the choice of the radionuclide (LET, half-life, penetrating emission) to the nature and size of targeted tumors. PMID:15656590

  14. Asymmetry in inward- and outward-affinity constant of transport explain unidirectional lysine flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Frans; Klooster, Joury S van 't; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Luck, Katja; Pols, Tjeerd; Urbatsch, Ina L; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The import of basic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be unidirectional, which is not typical of how secondary transporters work. Since studies of energy coupling and transport kinetics are complicated in vivo, we purified the major lysine transporter (Lyp1) of yeast and reconstituted the protein into lipid vesicles. We show that the Michaelis constant (KM) of transport from out-to-in is well in the millimolar range and at least 3 to 4-orders of magnitude higher than that of transport in the opposite direction, disfavoring the efflux of solute via Lyp1. We also find that at low values of the proton motive force, the transport by Lyp1 is comparatively slow. We benchmarked the properties of eukaryotic Lyp1 to that of the prokaryotic homologue LysP and find that LysP has a similar KM for transport from in-to-out and out-to-in, consistent with rapid influx and efflux. We thus explain the previously described unidirectional nature of lysine transport in S. cerevisiae by the extraordinary kinetics of Lyp1 and provide a mechanism and rationale for previous observations. The high asymmetry in transport together with secondary storage in the vacuole allow the cell to accumulate basic amino acids to very high levels. PMID:27550794

  15. Asymmetry in inward- and outward-affinity constant of transport explain unidirectional lysine flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Frans; Klooster, Joury S. van ‘t; Ruiz, Stephanie J.; Luck, Katja; Pols, Tjeerd; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The import of basic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be unidirectional, which is not typical of how secondary transporters work. Since studies of energy coupling and transport kinetics are complicated in vivo, we purified the major lysine transporter (Lyp1) of yeast and reconstituted the protein into lipid vesicles. We show that the Michaelis constant (KM) of transport from out-to-in is well in the millimolar range and at least 3 to 4-orders of magnitude higher than that of transport in the opposite direction, disfavoring the efflux of solute via Lyp1. We also find that at low values of the proton motive force, the transport by Lyp1 is comparatively slow. We benchmarked the properties of eukaryotic Lyp1 to that of the prokaryotic homologue LysP and find that LysP has a similar KM for transport from in-to-out and out-to-in, consistent with rapid influx and efflux. We thus explain the previously described unidirectional nature of lysine transport in S. cerevisiae by the extraordinary kinetics of Lyp1 and provide a mechanism and rationale for previous observations. The high asymmetry in transport together with secondary storage in the vacuole allow the cell to accumulate basic amino acids to very high levels. PMID:27550794

  16. Partial purification of the 5-hydroxytryptophan-reuptake system from human blood platelets using a citalopram-derived affinity resin

    SciTech Connect

    Biessen, E.A.L; Horn, A.S.; Robillard, G.T. )

    1990-04-03

    This paper describes a procedure for the synthesis and application of a citalopram-derived affinity resin in purifying the 5HT-reuptake system from human blood platelets. A two-step scheme has been developed for partial purification, based on wheat germ agglutinin-lectin (WGA) affinity and citalopram affinity chromatographies. Upon solubilization of the carrier with 1% digitonin, a 50-70-fold increase in specific ({sup 3}H) imipramine binding activity with a 70% recovery could be accomplished through WGA-lectin chromatography. The WGA pool was then subjected to affinity chromatography on citalopram-agarose. At least 90% of the binding capacity adsorbed to the column. Specific elution using 10 {mu}M citalopram resulted in a 22% recovery of binding activity. A 10,000-fold overall purification was obtained by using this two-step procedure. Analysis of the fractions on SDS-PAGE after {sup 125}I labeling revealed specific elution of 78- and 55-kDa proteins concomitant with the appearance of ({sup 3}H) imipramine binding activity. The pharmacological profile of the partially purified reuptake system correlated well with that derived from the crude membrane-bound reuptake system, suggesting a copurification of the 5HT binding activity and ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding activity.

  17. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Min; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} The AtCCX5 protein coding a putative cation calcium exchanger was characterized. {yields} AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. {yields} AtCCX5 protein did not show the same transport properties as the CAXs. {yields} AtCCX5 protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake in yeast. {yields} AtCCX5 protein also involves in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. -- Abstract: The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Li{sup +}) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K{sup +} and Na{sup +} in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn{sup 2+}. The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K{sup +} (0.5 mM), and also suppressed its Na{sup +} sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and was also involved in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast.

  18. Stereoselective Binding of Chiral Ligands to Single Nucleotide Polymorphs (SNPs) of the Human Organic Cation Transporter-1 Determined Using Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Moaddel, R.; Bighi, F.; Yamaguchi, R.; Patel, S.; Ravichandran, S.; Wainer, I.W.

    2010-01-01

    Membranes from stably transfected cell lines that expresses two point mutations of the human organic cation 1 transporter (hOCT1), R488M and G465R, have been immobilized on the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) liquid chromatographic stationary phase to form the Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography (CMAC) (hOCT1G465R) and CMAC(hOCT1R488M). Columns were created using both stationary phases and frontal displacement chromatography experiments were conducted using [3H]-methyl phenyl pyridinium, [3H]-MPP+, as the marker ligand and various displacers, including the single enantiomers of verapamil, fenoterol and isoproterenol. The chromatographic data obtained was used to refine a previously developed pharmacophore for the hOCT1 transporter. PMID:20206116

  19. Synthesis of 8-thiabicyclo[3.2.1]octanes and their binding affinity for the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Pham-Huu, Duy-Phong; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Liu, Shanghao; Madras, Bertha K; Meltzer, Peter C

    2007-01-15

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system. Its reinforcing and stimulant properties have been associated with inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on presynaptic neurons. In the search for medications for cocaine abuse, we have prepared 2-carbomethoxy-3-aryl-8-thiabicyclo[3.2.1]octane analogues of cocaine. We report that this class of compounds provides potent and selective inhibitors of the DAT and SERT. The selectivity resulted from reduced activity at the SERT. The 3beta-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) analogue inhibits the DAT and SERT with a potency of IC(50)=5.7 nM and 8.0 nM, respectively. The 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-2,3-unsaturated analogue inhibits the DAT potently (IC(50)=4.5 nM) and selectively (>800-fold vs SERT). Biological enantioselectivity of DAT inhibition was limited for both the 3-aryl-2,3-unsaturated and the 3alpha-aryl analogues (2-fold), but more robust (>10-fold) for the 3beta-aryl analogues. The (1R)-configuration provided the eutomers. PMID:17070057

  20. Synthesis of 8-thiabicyclo[3.2.1]octanes and their binding affinity for the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Pham-Huu, Duy-Phong; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Liu, Shanghao; Madras, Bertha K; Meltzer, Peter C

    2007-01-15

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system. Its reinforcing and stimulant properties have been associated with inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on presynaptic neurons. In the search for medications for cocaine abuse, we have prepared 2-carbomethoxy-3-aryl-8-thiabicyclo[3.2.1]octane analogues of cocaine. We report that this class of compounds provides potent and selective inhibitors of the DAT and SERT. The selectivity resulted from reduced activity at the SERT. The 3beta-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) analogue inhibits the DAT and SERT with a potency of IC(50)=5.7 nM and 8.0 nM, respectively. The 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-2,3-unsaturated analogue inhibits the DAT potently (IC(50)=4.5 nM) and selectively (>800-fold vs SERT). Biological enantioselectivity of DAT inhibition was limited for both the 3-aryl-2,3-unsaturated and the 3alpha-aryl analogues (2-fold), but more robust (>10-fold) for the 3beta-aryl analogues. The (1R)-configuration provided the eutomers.

  1. Metal transport in the boreal landscape-the role of wetlands and the affinity for organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lidman, Fredrik; Köhler, Stephan J; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2014-04-01

    Stream water concentrations of 13 major and trace elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, La, Mg, Na, Ni, Si, Sr, U, Y) were used to estimate fluxes from 15 boreal catchments. All elements displayed a significant negative correlation to the wetland coverage, but the influence of wetlands was stronger for organophilic metals; 73% of the spatial differences in the normalized element fluxes could be explained based only on the wetland coverage and the affinity for organic matter, which was quantified using thermodynamic modeling. When the analysis was restrained to the smaller streams (<10 km(2)) the explanatory power increased to 88%. The results suggest that wetlands may decrease the fluxes of metals from boreal forests to downstream recipients by up to 40% at otherwise similar runoff. We suggest that the decrease in element fluxes is caused by a combination of low weathering in peat soils and accumulation of organophilic metals in peat. The model could not explain the spatial patterns for some metals with low affinity for organic matter, some redox-sensitive metals, and some metals with exceptionally high atmospheric deposition, but the results still demonstrate that wetlands play an important role for the biogeochemical cycling of many metals in the boreal landscape.

  2. STARS: The Space Transportation Architecture Risk System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Joel S.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the need to perform comparisons between transportation systems that are likely to have significantly different levels of risk, both because of differing degrees of freedom in achieving desired performance levels and their different states of development and utilization, an approach has been developed for performing early comparisons of transportation architectures explicitly taking into account quantitative measures of uncertainty and resulting risk. The approach considers the uncertainty associated with the achievement of technology goals, the effect that the achieved level of technology will have on transportation system performance and the relationship between transportation system performance/capability and the ability to accommodate variations in payload mass. The consequences of system performance are developed in terms of expected values and associated standard deviations of nonrecurring, recurring and the present value of transportation system life cycle cost. Typical results are presented to illustrate the application of the methodology.

  3. Zero-sum two-player game theoretic formulation of affine nonlinear discrete-time systems using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Mehraeen, Shahab; Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, S; Crow, Mariesa L

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the nearly optimal solution for discrete-time (DT) affine nonlinear control systems in the presence of partially unknown internal system dynamics and disturbances is considered. The approach is based on successive approximate solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI) equation, which appears in optimal control. Successive approximation approach for updating control and disturbance inputs for DT nonlinear affine systems are proposed. Moreover, sufficient conditions for the convergence of the approximate HJI solution to the saddle point are derived, and an iterative approach to approximate the HJI equation using a neural network (NN) is presented. Then, the requirement of full knowledge of the internal dynamics of the nonlinear DT system is relaxed by using a second NN online approximator. The result is a closed-loop optimal NN controller via offline learning. A numerical example is provided illustrating the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:24273142

  4. The transportation operations system: A description

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L.; Dixon, L.D.; Peterson, R.W. ); Pope, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the system for transporting radioactive waste that may be deployed to accomplish the assigned system mission, which includes accepting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from waste generator sites and transporting them to the FWMS destination facilities. The system description presented here contains, in part, irradiated fuel and waste casks, ancillary equipments, truck, rail, and barge transporters, cask and vehicle traffic management organizations, maintenance facilities, and other operations elements. The description is for a fully implemented system, which is not expected to be achieved, however, until several years after initial operations. 6 figs.

  5. Interval-type and affine arithmetic-type techniques for handling uncertainty in expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberio, Martine; Kreinovich, Vladik; Chopra, Sanjeev; Longpre, Luc; Nguyen, Hung T.; Ludascher, Bertram; Baral, Chitta

    2007-02-01

    Expert knowledge consists of statements Sj (facts and rules). The facts and rules are often only true with some probability. For example, if we are interested in oil, we should look at seismic data. If in 90% of the cases, the seismic data were indeed helpful in locating oil, then we can say that if we are interested in oil, then with probability 90% it is helpful to look at the seismic data. In more formal terms, we can say that the implication "if oil then seismic" holds with probability 90%. Another example: a bank A trusts a client B, so if we trust the bank A, we should trust B too; if statistically this trust was justified in 99% of the cases, we can conclude that the corresponding implication holds with probability 99%. If a query Q is deducible from facts and rules, what is the resulting probability p(Q) in Q? We can describe the truth of Q as a propositional formula F in terms of Sj, i.e., as a combination of statements Sj linked by operators like &, [logical or], and [not sign]; computing p(Q) exactly is NP-hard, so heuristics are needed. Traditionally, expert systems use technique similar to straightforward interval computations: we parse F and replace each computation step with corresponding probability operation. Problem: at each step, we ignore the dependence between the intermediate results Fj; hence intervals are too wide. Example: the estimate for P(A[logical or][not sign]A) is not 1. Solution: similar to affine arithmetic, besides P(Fj), we also compute P(Fj&Fi) (or P(Fj1&...&Fjd)), and on each step, use all combinations of l such probabilities to get new estimates. Results: e.g., P(A[logical or][not sign]A) is estimated as 1.

  6. Systems Studies of DDT Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, H. L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Major consequences of present and additional environmental quantities of DDT pesticide are predictable by mathematical models of transport, accumulation and concentration mechanisms in the Wisconsin regional ecosystem. High solubility and stability produce increased DDT concentrations at high organism trophic levels within world biosphere…

  7. Slc5a8, a Na+-coupled high-affinity transporter for short-chain fatty acids, is a conditional tumour suppressor in colon that protects against colitis and colon cancer under low-fibre dietary conditions.

    PubMed

    Gurav, Ashish; Sivaprakasam, Sathish; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Boettger, Thomas; Singh, Nagendra; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian colon harbours trillions of bacteria under physiological conditions; this symbiosis is made possible because of a tolerized response from the mucosal immune system. The mechanisms underlying this tolerogenic phenomenon remain poorly understood. In the present study we show that Slc5a8 (solute carrier gene family 5a, member 8), a Na(+)-coupled high-affinity transporter in colon for the bacterial fermentation product butyrate, plays a critical role in this process. Among various immune cells in colon, dendritic cells (DCs) are unique not only in their accessibility to luminal contents but also in their ability to induce tolerogenic phenotype in T-cells. We found that DCs exposed to butyrate express the immunosuppressive enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A2 (Aldh1A2), promote conversion of naive T-cells into immunosuppressive forkhead box P3(+) (FoxP3(+)) Tregs (regulatory T-cells) and suppress conversion of naive T-cells into pro-inflammatory interferon (IFN)-γ-producing cells. Slc5a8-null DCs do not induce IDO1 and Aldh1A2 and do not generate Tregs or suppress IFN-γ-producing T-cells in response to butyrate. We also provide in vivo evidence for an obligatory role for Slc5a8 in suppression of IFN-γ-producing T-cells. Furthermore, Slc5a8 protects against colitis and colon cancer under conditions of low-fibre intake but not when dietary fibre intake is optimal. This agrees with the high-affinity nature of the transporter to mediate butyrate entry into cells. We conclude that Slc5a8 is an obligatory link between dietary fibre and mucosal immune system via the bacterial metabolite butyrate and that this transporter is a conditional tumour suppressor in colon linked to dietary fibre content.

  8. Transportation Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chastain, Gary K.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-semester or 1-year course in transportation provides activities that show and explain many of the occupations, devices, and systems that are related to transportation on land, water, air, and space. The guide contains competencies (task lists), student competency records, and management sheets. Management sheets,…

  9. Structural interaction with transportation and handling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Problems involved in the handling and transportation of finished space vehicles from the factory to the launch site are presented, in addition to recommendations for properly accounting for in space vehicle structural design, adverse interactions during transportation. Emphasis is given to the protection of vehicle structures against those environments and loads encountered during transportation (including temporary storage) which would exceed the levels that the vehicle can safely withstand. Current practices for verifying vehicle safety are appraised, and some of the capabilities and limitations of transportation and handling systems are summarized.

  10. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  11. [Structure-functional organization of eukaryotic high-affinity copper importer CTR1 determines its ability to transport copper, silver and cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Skvortsov, A N; Zatulovskiĭ, E A; Puchkova, L V

    2012-01-01

    It was shown recently, that high affinity Cu(I) importer eukaryotic protein CTR1 can also transport in vitro abiogenic Ag(I) ions and anticancer drug cisplatin. At present there is no rational explanation how CTR1 can transfer platinum group, which is different by coordination properties from highly similar Cu(I) and Ag(I). To understand this phenomenon we analyzed 25 sequences of chordate CTR1 proteins, and found out conserved patterns of organization of N-terminal extracellular part of CTR1 which correspond to initial metal binding. Extracellular copper-binding motifs were qualified by their coordination properties. It was shown that relative position of Met- and His-rich copper-binding motifs in CTR1 predisposes the extracellular CTR1 part to binding of copper, silver and cisplatin. Relation between tissue-specific expression of CTR1 gene, steady-state copper concentration, and silver and platinum accumulation in organs of mice in vivo was analyzed. Significant positive but incomplete correlation exists between these variables. Basing on structural and functional peculiarities of N-terminal part of CTR1 a hypothesis of coupled transport of copper and cisplatin has been suggested, which avoids the disagreement between CTR1-mediated cisplatin transport in vitro, and irreversible binding of platinum to Met-rich peptides.

  12. Repression of the Low Affinity Iron Transporter Gene FET4: A NOVEL MECHANISM AGAINST CADMIUM TOXICITY ORCHESTRATED BY YAP1 VIA ROX1.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Soraia M; Menezes, Regina; Amaral, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Pimentel, Catarina

    2015-07-24

    Cadmium is a well known mutagenic metal that can enter cells via nonspecific metal transporters, causing several cellular damages and eventually leading to death. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap1 plays a key role in the regulation of several genes involved in metal stress response. We have previously shown that Yap1 represses the expression of FET4, a gene encoding a low affinity iron transporter able to transport metals other than iron. Here, we have studied the relevance of this repression in cell tolerance to cadmium. Our results indicate that genomic deletion of Yap1 increases FET4 transcript and protein levels. In addition, the cadmium toxicity exhibited by this strain is completely reversed by co-deletion of FET4 gene. These data correlate well with the increased intracellular levels of cadmium observed in the mutant yap1. Rox1, a well known aerobic repressor of hypoxic genes, conveys the Yap1-mediated repression of FET4. We further show that, in a scenario where the activity of Yap1 or Rox1 is compromised, cells activate post-transcriptional mechanisms, involving the exoribonuclease Xrn1, to compensate the derepression of FET4. Our data thus reveal a novel protection mechanism against cadmium toxicity mediated by Yap1 that relies on the aerobic repression of FET4 and results in the impairment of cadmium uptake.

  13. High-affinity transporters for NAD+ precursors in Candida glabrata are regulated by Hst1 and induced in response to niacin limitation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Domergue, Renee; Rigby, Tracey; Whiteway, Malcolm; Johnson, David; Cormack, Brendan P

    2009-08-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata is an opportunistic pathogen of humans. C. glabrata is a NAD(+) auxotroph, and its growth depends on the availability of niacin (environmental vitamin precursors of NAD(+)). We have previously shown that a virulence-associated adhesin, encoded by EPA6, is transcriptionally induced in response to niacin limitation. Here we used transcript profiling to characterize the transcriptional response to niacin limitation and the roles of the sirtuins Hst1, Hst2, and Sir2 in mediating this response. The majority of genes transcriptionally induced by niacin limitation are regulated by Hst1, suggesting that it is the primary sensor of niacin limitation in C. glabrata. We show that three highly induced genes, TNA1, TNR1, and TNR2, encode transporters which are necessary and sufficient for high-affinity uptake of NAD(+) precursors. Strikingly, if a tna1 tnr1 tnr2 mutant is starved for niacin, it exhibits an extended lag phase, suggesting a central role for the transporters in restoring NAD(+) homeostasis after niacin limitation. Lastly, we had previously shown that the adhesin encoded by EPA6 is induced during experimental urinary tract infection (UTI); we show here that EPA6 transcriptional induction during UTI is strongly enhanced in the tna1 tnr1 tnr2 mutant strain, implicating the transporters in the growth of C. glabrata during infection.

  14. Propulsion system for research VTOL transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsma, L. W.; Zigan, S.

    1973-01-01

    In anticipation of an eventual VTOL requirement for civil aviation, NASA has been conducting studies directed toward determining and developing the technology required for a commercial VTOL transport. In this paper, the commercial transport configurations are briefly reviewed; the propulsion system specifications and components developed by the engine study contractor are presented and described; and methods for using the lift-propulsion system for aircraft attitude control are discussed.

  15. The German Saenger space transportation system concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, D. E.; Kuczera, H.; Hoegenauer, E.

    The vehicle configuration, performance criteria, and technological problems of the Saenger space transportation system are reviewed. The vehicle consists of a two-stage system, including a hypersonic first stage employing turboramjet propulsion. The cruise speed is Mach 4.4, with the capability to accelerate to Mach 6.8 prior to separation of the upper stage. Two different upper stages are proposed to fulfull the different requirements of manned space flight and unmanned payload transportation.

  16. Systemic Analysis Approaches for Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional operations research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be used with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. However, air transportation has proven itself an extensive, complex system whose behavior is difficult to describe, no less predict. There is a wide range of system analysis techniques available, but some are more appropriate for certain applications than others. Specifically in the area of complex system analysis, the literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful. This paper discusses the theoretical basis for each approach in these applications, and explores their historic and potential further use for air transportation analysis.

  17. Minimization of the root of a quadratic functional under a system of affine equality constraints with application to portfolio management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zinoviy

    2008-10-01

    We present an explicit closed form solution of the problem of minimizing the root of a quadratic functional subject to a system of affine constraints. The result generalizes Z. Landsman, Minimization of the root of a quadratic functional under an affine equality constraint, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 2007, to appear, see , articles in press, where the optimization problem was solved under only one linear constraint. This is of interest for solving significant problems pertaining to financial economics as well as some classes of feasibility and optimization problems which frequently occur in tomography and other fields. The results are illustrated in the problem of optimal portfolio selection and the particular case when the expected return of finance portfolio is certain is discussed.

  18. The WIPP transportation system: Dedicated to safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.; McFadden, M.

    1993-12-01

    When developing a transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely-dispersed generator sites, the Department of Energy (DOE) recognized and addressed many challenges. Shipments of waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were to cover a twenty-five year period and utilize routes covering over twelve thousand miles in twenty-three states. Enhancing public safety by maximizing the payload, thus reducing the number of shipments, was the primary objective. To preclude the requirement for overweight permits, the DOE started with a total shipment weight limit of 80,000 pounds and developed an integrated transportation system consisting of a Type ``B`` package to transport the material, a lightweight tractor and trailer, stringent driver requirements, and a shipment tracking system referred to as ``TRANSCOM``.

  19. The transmembrane tyrosines Y56, Y91 and Y167 play important roles in determining the affinity and transport rate of the rabbit proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Myrtani; Gan, Christine; Bailey, Patrick; Meredith, David

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1 is widely accepted as the major route of uptake for dietary nitrogen, as well as being responsible for the oral absorption of a number of classes of drugs, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Using site-directed mutagenesis and zero-trans transport assays, we investigated the role of conserved tyrosines in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) of rabbit PepT1 as predicted by hydropathy plots. All the individual TMD tyrosines were substituted with phenylalanine and shown to retain the ability to traffic to the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes. These single substitutions of TMD tyrosines by phenylalanine residues did not affect the proton dependence of peptide uptake, with all retaining wild-type PepT1-like pH dependence. Individual mutations of four of the nine TMD residue tyrosines (Y64, Y287, Y345 and Y587) were without measurable effect on PepT1 function, whereas the other five (Y12, Y56, Y91, Y167 and Y345) were shown to result in altered transport function compared to the wild-type PepT1. Intriguingly, the affinity of Y56F-PepT1 was found to be dramatically increased (approximately 100-fold) in comparison to that of the wild-type rabbit PepT1. Y91 mutations also affected the substrate affinity of the transporter, which increased in line with the hydrophilicity of the substituted amino acid (F>Y>Q>R). Y167 was demonstrated to play a pivotal role in rabbit PepT1 function since Y167F, Y167R and Y167Q demonstrated very little transport function. These results are discussed with regard to a proposed mechanism for PepT1 substrate binding.

  20. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database in which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  1. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    DOE PAGES

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database inmore » which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  2. Functional Expression of Sinorhizobium meliloti BetS, a High-Affinity Betaine Transporter, in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110

    PubMed Central

    Boscari, Alexandre; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Among the Rhizobiaceae, Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 appears to be extremely salt sensitive, and the presence of glycine betaine cannot restore its growth in medium with an increased osmolarity (E. Boncompagni, M. Østerås, M. C. Poggi, and D. Le Rudulier, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:2072-2077, 1999). In order to improve the salt tolerance of B. japonicum, cells were transformed with the betS gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti. This gene encodes a major glycine betaine/proline betaine transporter from the betaine choline carnitine transporter family and is required for early osmotic adjustment. Whereas betaine transport was absent in the USDA110 strain, such transformation induced glycine betaine and proline betaine uptake in an osmotically dependent manner. Salt-treated transformed cells accumulated large amounts of glycine betaine, which was not catabolized. However, the accumulation was reversed through rapid efflux during osmotic downshock. An increased tolerance of transformant cells to a moderate NaCl concentration (80 mM) was also observed in the presence of glycine betaine or proline betaine, whereas the growth of the wild-type strain was totally abolished at 80 mM NaCl. Surprisingly, the deleterious effect due to a higher salt concentration (100 mM) could not be overcome by glycine betaine, despite a significant accumulation of this compound. Cell viability was not significantly affected in the presence of 100 mM NaCl, whereas 75% cell death occurred at 150 mM NaCl. The absence of a potential gene encoding Na+/H+ antiporters in B. japonicum could explain its very high Na+ sensitivity. PMID:15466533

  3. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  4. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  5. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  6. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  7. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  8. Influence of B-ring modifications on proton affinity, transmembrane anion transport and anti-cancer properties of synthetic prodigiosenes.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Estelle; Rastogi, Soumya; Thompson, Alison; Davis, Jeffery T

    2014-10-14

    Prodigiosin is the parent compound of the tripyrrolic natural products known as the prodigiosenes. Some of these natural products and their synthetic analogs show anti-cancer, immunosuppressive and antimicrobial actions, amongst other biological activities. One mechanism put forth to explain their biological activity is that since prodigiosenes are typically protonated at physiological pH they can alter intracellular pH via HCl co-transport (or Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange) across cell membranes. In this study we synthesized a series of prodigiosene analogs with different -O-aryl substituents attached to the B-ring of the tripyrrolic skeleton. NMR studies showed that these analogs can exist as a mixture of two stable α and β conformers in acidic solution, and that both conformers can bind anions in solution. We found that the electronic nature of the O-aryl substituent on the B-ring influences the rate at which these prodigiosenes catalyze transmembrane anion transport, i.e. the prodigiosenes with the higher pKa had greater Cl(-)/NO3(-) exchange rates. Four of the synthetic prodigiosenes were tested for their in vitro anti-cancer activities in the NCI60 human tumour panel. Despite their promising in vitro anti-cancer activity (GI50 values ranging from 18 to 74 nM), there was no evidence that this activity is influenced by the extent of protonation of these synthetic prodigiosenes.

  9. The Prostaglandin Transporter: Eicosanoid Reuptake, Control of Signaling, and Development of High-Affinity Inhibitors as Drug Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Victor L.; Chi, Yuling; Lu, Run

    2015-01-01

    We discovered the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and cloned the human cDNA and gene. PGT transports extracellular prostaglandins (PGs) into the cytoplasm for enzymatic inactivation. PGT knockout mice have elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and neonatal patent ductus arteriosus, which reflects PGT's control over PGE2 signaling at EP1/EP4 cell-surface receptors. Interestingly, rescued PGT knockout pups have a nearly normal phenotype, as do human PGT nulls. Given the benign phenotype of PGT genetic nulls, and because PGs are useful medicines, we have approached PGT as a drug target. Triazine library screening yielded a lead compound of inhibitory constant 50% (IC50) = 3.7 μM, which we developed into a better inhibitor of IC50 378 nM. Further structural improvements have yielded 26 rationally designed derivatives with IC50 < 100 nM. The therapeutic approach of increasing endogenous PGs by inhibiting PGT offers promise in diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and obesity. PMID:26330684

  10. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaravelu, A.; Goddard, H.; Gold, R.; Greenwell, S.; Lander, J.; Nordell, B.; Stepp, K.; Styer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a good transportation infrastructure is a major requirement for the establishment of a permanent lunar base. Transportation is characterized by the technology available in a specific time frame and the need to transport personnel and cargo between Earth and Moon, and between lunar bases. In our study, attention was first focused on developing a transportation system for the first generation lunar base. As a first step, a tracked-type multipurpose lunar transportation vehicle was considered as a possible mode of transportation and a detailed study was conducted on the various aspects of the vehicle. Since the vehicle is composed of many moving parts, exposing it to the environment of the Moon, where fine dust particles are prevalent, can cause problems associated with lubrication and friction. The vehicle also posed problems concerning weight and power. Hence, several modifications were made to the above design ideas conceptually, and a Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS) is proposed as a more effective alternative with the following objectives: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from Earth or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light-weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetic levitation using superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e., high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, lower gravity, etc. To achieve the above objectives of designing transportation systems from concept to operation, the project was planned in three phases: (1) conceptual design; (2) detailed analysis and synthesis; and (3) construction, testing, evaluation, and operation. In this project, both phases 1 and 2 have been carried out and work on phase 3 is in progress. In this paper, the details of the Lunar ARTS are discussed and the future work on the vehicle are

  11. Hyperspectral imaging utility for transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgelall, Raj; Rafert, J. Bruce; Tolliver, Denver

    2015-03-01

    The global transportation system is massive, open, and dynamic. Existing performance and condition assessments of the complex interacting networks of roadways, bridges, railroads, pipelines, waterways, airways, and intermodal ports are expensive. Hyperspectral imaging is an emerging remote sensing technique for the non-destructive evaluation of multimodal transportation infrastructure. Unlike panchromatic, color, and infrared imaging, each layer of a hyperspectral image pixel records reflectance intensity from one of dozens or hundreds of relatively narrow wavelength bands that span a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Hence, every pixel of a hyperspectral scene provides a unique spectral signature that offers new opportunities for informed decision-making in transportation systems development, operations, and maintenance. Spaceborne systems capture images of vast areas in a short period but provide lower spatial resolution than airborne systems. Practitioners use manned aircraft to achieve higher spatial and spectral resolution, but at the price of custom missions and narrow focus. The rapid size and cost reduction of unmanned aircraft systems promise a third alternative that offers hybrid benefits at affordable prices by conducting multiple parallel missions. This research formulates a theoretical framework for a pushbroom type of hyperspectral imaging system on each type of data acquisition platform. The study then applies the framework to assess the relative potential utility of hyperspectral imaging for previously proposed remote sensing applications in transportation. The authors also introduce and suggest new potential applications of hyperspectral imaging in transportation asset management, network performance evaluation, and risk assessments to enable effective and objective decision- and policy-making.

  12. [Transport systems for carbonate in the extremely natronophilic cyanobacterium Euhalothece sp].

    PubMed

    Mikhodiuk, O S; Zavarzin, G A; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2008-01-01

    The effect of carbonate concentration, pH of the medium, and illumination intensity on the major physiological characteristics (growth rate and the intensities of CO2 assimilation and oxygen photoproduction) of the natronophilic cyanobacterium Euhalothece sp. Z-M001 have been studied. It was established that the investigated microorganism has at least two transport systems (TS) for CO2, which differ in both the pH optimum and substrate affinity: TS I has a pH, 9.4-9.5 and a K(S) 0.5 of 13-17 mM, whereas TS II has a pH(opt) 9.9-10.2 and a K(S) 0.5 of 600-800 mM. The substrate affinity of these transport systems is several orders of magnitude lower than the substrate affinity of the transport systems of freshwater cyanobacteria. It is suggested that they are unique for extremely alkaliphilic cyanobacteria and reflect their adaptation to the seasonal cycles of the lake hydrochemistry. PMID:18825972

  13. Bacteriophage Tailspikes and Bacterial O-Antigens as a Model System to Study Weak-Affinity Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Gohlke, Ulrich; Engström, Olof; Hamark, Christoffer; Scheidt, Tom; Kunstmann, Sonja; Heinemann, Udo; Widmalm, Göran; Santer, Mark; Barbirz, Stefanie

    2016-07-27

    Understanding interactions of bacterial surface polysaccharides with receptor protein scaffolds is important for the development of antibiotic therapies. The corresponding protein recognition domains frequently form low-affinity complexes with polysaccharides that are difficult to address with experimental techniques due to the conformational flexibility of the polysaccharide. In this work, we studied the tailspike protein (TSP) of the bacteriophage Sf6. Sf6TSP binds and hydrolyzes the high-rhamnose, serotype Y O-antigen polysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacterium Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri) as a first step of bacteriophage infection. Spectroscopic analyses and enzymatic cleavage assays confirmed that Sf6TSP binds long stretches of this polysaccharide. Crystal structure analysis and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy using an enhanced method to interpret the data permitted the detailed description of affinity contributions and flexibility in an Sf6TSP-octasaccharide complex. Dodecasaccharide fragments corresponding to three repeating units of the O-antigen in complex with Sf6TSP were studied computationally by molecular dynamics simulations. They showed that distortion away from the low-energy solution conformation found in the octasaccharide complex is necessary for ligand binding. This is in agreement with a weak-affinity functional polysaccharide-protein contact that facilitates correct placement and thus hydrolysis of the polysaccharide close to the catalytic residues. Our simulations stress that the flexibility of glycan epitopes together with a small number of specific protein contacts provide the driving force for Sf6TSP-polysaccharide complex formation in an overall weak-affinity interaction system. PMID:27045683

  14. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  15. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Finnveden, Göran Åkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  16. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Human Transportation System (HTS) study: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Advanced secondary power system for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. C.; Hansen, I. G.; Beach, R. F.; Plencner, R. M.; Dengler, R. P.; Jefferies, K. S.; Frye, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A concept for an advanced aircraft power system was identified that uses 20-kHz, 440-V, sin-wave power distribution. This system was integrated with an electrically powered flight control system and with other aircraft systems requiring secondary power. The resulting all-electric secondary power configuration reduced the empty weight of a modern 200-passenger, twin-engine transport by 10 percent and the mission fuel by 9 percent.

  19. Alternative battery systems for transportation uses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Thackeray

    2012-07-25

    Argonne Distinguished Fellow Michael Thackeray highlights the need for alternative battery systems for transportation uses. Such systems will not only need to be smaller, lighter and more energy dense, but also able to make electric vehicles more competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles.

  20. Monte Carlo Nucleon Meson Transport Code System.

    2000-11-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAERI97 is an upgraded version of the code system NMTC/JAERI, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAERI97 simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nucleon-meson transport processes.

  1. Alternative battery systems for transportation uses

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Thackeray

    2016-07-12

    Argonne Distinguished Fellow Michael Thackeray highlights the need for alternative battery systems for transportation uses. Such systems will not only need to be smaller, lighter and more energy dense, but also able to make electric vehicles more competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles.

  2. Cloning and functional identification of slc5a12 as a sodium-coupled low-affinity transporter for monocarboxylates (SMCT2)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We report in the present paper, on the isolation and functional characterization of slc5a12, the twelfth member of the SLC5 gene family, from mouse kidney. The slc5a12 cDNA codes for a protein of 619 amino acids. Heterologous expression of slc5a12 cDNA in mammalian cells induces Na+-dependent transport of lactate and nicotinate. Several other short-chain monocarboxylates compete with nicotinate for the cDNA-induced transport process. Expression of slc5a12 in Xenopus oocytes induces electrogenic and Na+-dependent transport of lactate, nicotinate, propionate and butyrate. The substrate specificity of slc5a12 is similar to that of slc5a8, an Na+-coupled transporter for monocarboxylates. However, the substrate affinities of slc5a12 were much lower than those of slc5a8. slc5a12 mRNA is expressed in kidney, small intestine and skeletal muscle. In situ hybridization with sagittal sections of mouse kidney showed predominant expression of slc5a12 in the outer cortex. This is in contrast with slc5a8, which is expressed in the cortex as well as in the medulla. The physiological function of slc5a12 in the kidney is likely to mediate the reabsorption of lactate. In the intestinal tract, slc5a12 is expressed in the proximal parts, whereas slc5a8 is expressed in the distal parts. The expression of slc5a12 in the proximal parts of the intestinal tract, where there is minimal bacterial colonization, suggests that the physiological function of slc5a12 is not to mediate the absorption of short-chain monocarboxylates derived from bacterial fermentation but rather to mediate the absorption of diet-derived short-chain monocarboxylates. Based on the functional and structural similarities between slc5a8 and slc5a12, we suggest that the two transporters be designated as SMCT1 (sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1) and SMCT2 respectively. PMID:16104846

  3. Determination of the kinetic rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems by high-performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwen; Li, Haiyan; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Caifen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of the association and dissociation are fundamental kinetic processes for the host-guest interactions (such as the drug-target and drug-excipient interactions) and the in vivo performance of supramolecules. With advantages of rapid speed, high precision and ease of automation, the high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is one of the best techniques to measure the interaction kinetics of weak to moderate affinities, such as the typical host-guest interactions of drug and cyclodextrins by using a cyclodextrin-immobilized column. The measurement involves the equilibration of the cyclodextrin column, the upload and elution of the samples (non-retained substances and retained solutes) at different flow rates on the cyclodextrin and control column, and data analysis. It has been indicated that cyclodextrin-immobilized chromatography is a cost-efficient high-throughput tool for the measurement of (small molecule) drug-cyclodextrin interactions as well as the dissociation of other supramolecules with relatively weak, fast, and extensive interactions. PMID:25749964

  4. The Integrated Air Transportation System Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Hees, Jing; Villani, James A.; Yackovetsky, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout U.S. history, our nation has generally enjoyed exceptional economic growth, driven in part by transportation advancements. Looking forward 25 years, when the national highway and skyway systems are saturated, the nation faces new challenges in creating transportation-driven economic growth and wealth. To meet the national requirement for an improved air traffic management system, NASA developed the goal of tripling throughput over the next 20 years, in all weather conditions while maintaining safety. Analysis of the throughput goal has primarily focused on major airline operations, primarily through the hub and spoke system.However, many suggested concepts to increase throughput may operate outside the hub and spoke system. Examples of such concepts include the Small Aircraft Transportation System, civil tiltrotor, and improved rotorcraft. Proper assessment of the potential contribution of these technologies to the domestic air transportation system requires a modeling capability that includes the country's numerous smaller airports, acting as a fundamental component of the National Air space System, and the demand for such concepts and technologies. Under this task for NASA, the Logistics Management Institute developed higher fidelity demand models that capture the interdependence of short-haul air travel with other transportation modes and explicitly consider the costs of commercial air and other transport modes. To accomplish this work, we generated forecasts of the distribution of general aviation based aircraft and GA itinerant operations at each of nearly 3.000 airport based on changes in economic conditions and demographic trends. We also built modules that estimate the demand for travel by different modes, particularly auto, commercial air, and GA. We examined GA demand from two perspectives: top-down and bottom-up, described in detail.

  5. A Robust Scalable Transportation System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew; DeLaurentis, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the 2005 Revolutionary System Concept for Aeronautics (RSCA) study entitled "A Robust, Scalable Transportation System Concept". The objective of the study was to generate, at a high-level of abstraction, characteristics of a new concept for the National Airspace System, or the new NAS, under which transportation goals such as increased throughput, delay reduction, and improved robustness could be realized. Since such an objective can be overwhelmingly complex if pursued at the lowest levels of detail, instead a System-of-Systems (SoS) approach was adopted to model alternative air transportation architectures at a high level. The SoS approach allows the consideration of not only the technical aspects of the NAS", but also incorporates policy, socio-economic, and alternative transportation system considerations into one architecture. While the representations of the individual systems are basic, the higher level approach allows for ways to optimize the SoS at the network level, determining the best topology (i.e. configuration of nodes and links). The final product (concept) is a set of rules of behavior and network structure that not only satisfies national transportation goals, but represents the high impact rules that accomplish those goals by getting the agents to "do the right thing" naturally. The novel combination of Agent Based Modeling and Network Theory provides the core analysis methodology in the System-of-Systems approach. Our method of approach is non-deterministic which means, fundamentally, it asks and answers different questions than deterministic models. The nondeterministic method is necessary primarily due to our marriage of human systems with technological ones in a partially unknown set of future worlds. Our goal is to understand and simulate how the SoS, human and technological components combined, evolve.

  6. Evaluation of a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry System for the Analysis of Surface Deposited and Affinity Captured Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Ford, Michael J; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Kennel, Steve J

    2006-01-01

    A combined self-aspirating electrospray emitter/surfacing-sampling probe coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used to sample and mass analyze proteins from surfaces. The sampling probe mass spectrometer system was used to sample and detect lysozyme that had been deposited onto a glass slide using a piezoelectric spotter or murine gamma-interferon affinity captured on a glass slide using surface-immobilized anti-gamma-interferon antibody. The detection level for surface-deposited lysozyme (spot size {le}200 {micro}m) was approximately 1.0 fmol ({approx}100 fmol/mm{sup 2}) as determined from the ability to measure accurately the protein molecular mass from the mass spectrum acquired by sampling the deposit. These detection limits may be sufficient for certain applications in which protein fractions from a separation method are collected onto a surface. Radiolabeled proteins were used to quantify the surface density of immobilized antibody and the efficiency of capture of the gamma-interferon on glass and higher surface area ceramic supports. The capture density of gamma-interferon at surface saturation ranged from about 23 to 50 fmol/mm{sup 2} depending on the capture surface. Nonetheless, mass spectrometric detection of affinity capture protein was successful in some cases, but the results were not reproducible. Thus, improvement of the sampling system, ionization efficiency and/or capture density will be necessary for practical sampling of affinity-captured proteins. The means to accomplish improved sampling system detection limits and to increase the absolute amounts of protein captured per unit area are discussed.

  7. An improved LMI-based approach for stability of piecewise affine time-delay systems with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Shiming; Ni, Jun; Galip Ulsoy, A.

    2012-09-01

    The stability problem for uncertain piecewise affine (PWA) time-delay systems is investigated in this article. It is assumed that there exists a known constant time delay in the system and the uncertainly is norm-bounded. Sufficient conditions for the stability of nominal systems and the stability of systems subject to uncertainty are derived using the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional with a triple integration term. This approach handles switching based on the delayed states (in addition to the states) for a PWA time-delay system, considers structured as well as unstructured uncertainty and reduces the conservativeness of previous approaches. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated by comparing with the existing methods through numerical examples.

  8. Bacterial ferrous iron transport: the Feo system.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cheryl K Y; Krewulak, Karla D; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-03-01

    To maintain iron homeostasis within the cell, bacteria have evolved various types of iron acquisition systems. Ferric iron (Fe(3+)) is the dominant species in an oxygenated environment, while ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) is more abundant under anaerobic conditions or at low pH. For organisms that must combat oxygen limitation for their everyday survival, pathways for the uptake of ferrous iron are essential. Several bacterial ferrous iron transport systems have been described; however, only the Feo system appears to be widely distributed and is exclusively dedicated to the transport of iron. In recent years, many studies have explored the role of the FeoB and FeoA proteins in ferrous iron transport and their contribution toward bacterial virulence. The three-dimensional structures for the Feo proteins have recently been determined and provide insight into the molecular details of the transport system. A highly select group of bacteria also express the FeoC protein from the same operon. This review will provide a comprehensive look at the structural and functional aspects of the Feo system. In addition, bioinformatics analyses of the feo operon and the Feo proteins have been performed to complement our understanding of this ubiquitous bacterial uptake system, providing a new outlook for future studies.

  9. Acoustic system for material transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An object within a chamber is acoustically moved by applying wavelengths of different modes to the chamber to move the object between pressure wells formed by the modes. In one system, the object is placed in one end of the chamber while a resonant mode, applied along the length of the chamber, produces a pressure well at the location. The frequency is then switched to a second mode that produces a pressure well at the center of the chamber, to draw the object. When the object reaches the second pressure well and is still traveling towards the second end of the chamber, the acoustic frequency is again shifted to a third mode (which may equal the first model) that has a pressure well in the second end portion of the chamber, to draw the object. A heat source may be located near the second end of the chamber to heat the sample, and after the sample is heated it can be cooled by moving it in a corresponding manner back to the first end of the chamber. The transducers for levitating and moving the object may be all located at the cool first end of the chamber.

  10. The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.W.; Hassberger, J.A.; Smith, C.; Carelli, M.; Greenspan, E.; Peddicord, K.L.; Stroh, K.; Wade, D.C.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-05-27

    The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) system is a development architecture for implementing a small nuclear power system, specifically aimed at meeting the growing energy needs of much of the developing world. It simultaneously provides very high standards for safety, proliferation resistance, ease and economy of installation, operation, and ultimate disposition. The STAR system accomplishes these objectives through a combination of modular design, factory manufacture, long lifetime without refueling, autonomous control, and high reliability.

  11. Nitrate Transport System in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Schloemer, Robert H.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    Nitrate uptake in Neurospora crassa has been investigated under various conditions of nitrogen nutrition by measuring the rate of disappearance of nitrate from the medium and by determining mycelial nitrate accumulation. The nitrate transport system is induced by either nitrate or nitrite, but is not present in mycelia grown on ammonia or Casamino Acids. The appearance of nitrate uptake activity is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The induced nitrate transport system displays a Km for nitrate of 0.25 mM. Nitrate uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. Furthermore, mycelia can concentrate nitrate 50-fold. Ammonia and nitrite are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to nitrate, with Ki values of 0.13 and 0.17 mM, respectively. Ammonia does not repress the formation of the nitrate transport system. In contrast, the nitrate uptake system is repressed by Casamino Acids. All amino acids individually prevent nitrate accumulation, with the exception of methionine, glutamine, and alanine. The influence of nitrate reduction and the nitrate reductase protein on nitrate transport was investigated in wild-type Neurospora lacking a functional nitrate reductase and in nitrate non-utilizing mutants, nit-1, nit-2, and nit-3. These mycelia contain an inducible nitrate transport system which displays the same characteristics as those found in the wild-type mycelia having the functional nitrate reductase. These findings suggest that nitrate transport is not dependent upon nitrate reduction and that these two processes are separate events in the assimilation of nitrate. PMID:4274457

  12. A Mars/phobos Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A transportation system will be necessary to support construction and operation of bases on Phobos and Mars beginning in the year 2020 or later. An approach to defining a network of vehicles and the types of vehicles which may be used in the system are presented. The network will provide a convenient, integrated means for transporting robotically constructed bases to Phobos and Mars. All the technology needed for the current plan is expected to be available for use at the projected date of cargo departure from the Earth system. The modular design of the transportation system provides easily implemented contingency plans, so that difficulties with any one vehicle will have a minimal effect on the progress of the total mission. The transportation network proposed consists of orbital vehicles and atmospheric entry vehicles. Initially, only orbital vehicles will participate in the robotic construction phase of the Phobos base. The Interplanetary Transfer Vehicle (ITV) will carry the base and construction equipment to Phobos where the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicles (OMV's) will participate in the initial construction of the base. When the Mars base is ready to be sent, one or more ITV's will be used to transport the atmospheric entry vehicles from Earth. These atmospheric vehicles are the One Way Landers (OWL's) and the Ascent/Descent Vehicles (ADV's). They will be used to carry the base components and/or construction equipment. The OMV's and the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV's) will assist in carrying the atmospheric entry vehicles to low Martian orbit where the OWL's or ADV's will descent to the planet surface. The ADV's were proposed to accommodate expansion of the system. Additionally, a smaller version of the ADV class is capable of transporting personnel between Mars and Phobos.

  13. Transportation systems analyses. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The principal objective is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform crew delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery and return, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include: the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationship between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. Conceptual studies of transportation elements contribute to the systems approach by identifying elements (such as ETO node and transfer/excursion vehicles) needed in current and planned transportation systems. These studies are also a mechanism to integrate the results of relevant parallel studies.

  14. C-X...H contacts in biomolecular systems: how they contribute to protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunxiang; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zhijian; Yan, Xiuhua; Luo, Xiaoming; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Weiliang

    2009-09-17

    The hydrogen bond acceptor capability of halogens has long been underappreciated in the field of biology. In this work, we have surveyed structures of protein complexes with halogenated ligands to characterize geometrical preferences of C-X...H contacts and contributions of such interactions to protein-ligand binding affinity. Notably, F...H interactions in biomolecules exhibit a remarkably different behavior as compared to three other kinds of X...H (X = Cl, Br, I) interactions, which has been rationalized by means of ab initio calculations using simple model systems. The C-X...H contacts in biological systems are characterized as weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Furthermore, the electrophile "head on" and nucleophile "side on" interactions of halogens have been extensively investigated through the examination of interactions in protein structures and a two-layer ONIOM-based QM/MM method. In biomolecular systems, C-X...H contacts are recognized as secondary interaction contributions to C-X...O halogen bonds that play important roles in conferring specificity and affinity for halogenated ligands. The results presented here are within the context of their potential applications in drug design, including relevance to the development of accurate force fields for halogens.

  15. Crew Transportation System Design Reference Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Contains summaries of potential design reference mission goals for systems to transport humans to andfrom low Earth orbit (LEO) for the Commercial Crew Program. The purpose of this document is to describe Design Reference Missions (DRMs) representative of the end-to-end Crew Transportation System (CTS) framework envisioned to successfully execute commercial crew transportation to orbital destinations. The initial CTS architecture will likely be optimized to support NASA crew and NASA-sponsored crew rotation missions to the ISS, but consideration may be given in this design phase to allow for modifications in order to accomplish other commercial missions in the future. With the exception of NASA’s mission to the ISS, the remaining commercial DRMs are notional. Any decision to design or scar the CTS for these additional non-NASA missions is completely up to the Commercial Provider. As NASA’s mission needs evolve over time, this document will be periodically updated to reflect those needs.

  16. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  17. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  18. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  19. Regulation of Sugar Transport Systems in Fusarium oxysporum var. lini

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Rogélio L.; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.

    1990-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum var. lini (ATCC 10960) formed a facilitated diffusion system for glucose (Ks, about 10 mM) when grown under repressed conditions. Under conditions of derepression, the same system was present together with a high-affinity (Ks, about 40 μM) active system. The maximum velocity of the latter was about 5% of that of the facilitated diffusion system. The high-affinity system was under the control of glucose repression and glucose inactivation. When lactose was the only carbon source in the medium, a facilitated diffusion system for lactose was found (Ks, about 30 mM). PMID:16348256

  20. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  1. A systematic analysis reveals an essential role for high-affinity iron uptake system, haemolysin and CFEM domain-containing protein in iron homoeostasis and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Suneetha, Korivi Jyothiraj; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms and human pathogens employ a battery of factors to scavenge iron from the high-affinity iron-binding host proteins. In the present study, we have elucidated, via a candidate gene approach, major iron acquisition and homoeostatic mechanisms operational in an opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Phenotypic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a set of 13 C. glabrata strains, deleted for proteins potentially implicated in iron metabolism, revealed that the high-affinity reductive iron uptake system is required for utilization of alternate carbon sources and for growth under both in vitro iron-limiting and in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the cysteine-rich CFEM (common in fungal extracellular membranes) domain-containing cell wall structural protein, CgCcw14, and a putative haemolysin, CgMam3, are essential for maintenance of intracellular iron content, adherence to epithelial cells and virulence. Consistent with their roles in iron homoeostasis, mitochondrial aconitase activity was lower and higher in mutants disrupted for high-affinity iron transport, and haemolysin respectively. Additionally, we present evidence that the mitochondrial frataxin, CgYfh1, is pivotal to iron metabolism. Besides yielding insights into major in vitro and in vivo iron acquisition strategies, our findings establish high-affinity iron uptake mechanisms as critical virulence determinants in C. glabrata.

  2. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  3. Transportation systems analyses: Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform man delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationships between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. This executive summary of the transportation systems analyses (TSM) semi-annual report addresses the SSF logistics resupply. Our analysis parallels the ongoing NASA SSF redesign effort. Therefore, there could be no SSF design to drive our logistics analysis. Consequently, the analysis attempted to bound the reasonable SSF design possibilities (and the subsequent transportation implications). No other strategy really exists until after a final decision is rendered on the SSF configuration.

  4. Future space transportation systems analysis study. Phase 1 extension: Transportation systems reference data, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Transportation mass requirements are developed for various mission and transportation modes based on vehicle systems sized to fit the exact needs of each mission. The parametric data used to derive the mass requirements for each mission and transportation mode are presented to enable accommodation of possible changes in mode options or payload definitions. The vehicle sizing and functional requirements used to derive the parametric data are described.

  5. Effect of Reactor Turbulence on the Binding-Protein-Mediated Aspartate Transport System in Thin Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T. Taylor; Bishop, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    This research documents an effect of reactor turbulence on the ability of gram-negative wastewater biofilm bacteria to actively transport l-aspartate via a binding-protein-mediated transport system. Biofilms which were not preadapted to turbulence and which possessed two separate and distinct aspartate transport systems (systems 1 and 2) were subjected to a turbulent flow condition in a hydrodynamically defined closed-loop reactor system. A shear stress treatment of 3.1 N · m−2 for 10 min at a turbulent Reynolds number (Re = 11,297) inactivated the low-affinity, high-capacity binding-protein-mediated transport system (system 2) and resolved the high-affinity, low-capacity membrane-bound proton symport system (system 1). The Kt and Vmax values for the resolved system were statistically similar to Kt and Vmax values for system 1 when system 2 was inactivated either by osmotic shock or arsenate, two treatments which are known to inactivate binding-protein-mediated transport systems. We hypothesize that shear stress disrupts system 2 by deforming the outer membranes of the firmly adhered gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16346830

  6. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC. PMID:23974027

  7. Overexpressing of OsAMT1-3, a High Affinity Ammonium Transporter Gene, Modifies Rice Growth and Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Status

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Aili; Liang, Zhijun; Zhao, Zhuqing; Cai, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    AMT1-3 encodes the high affinity NH4+ transporter in rice roots and is predominantly expressed under nitrogen starvation. In order to evaluate the effect of AMT1-3 gene on rice growth, nitrogen absorption and metabolism, we generated AMT1-3-overexpressing plants and analyzed the growth phenotype, yield, carbon and nitrogen metabolic status, and gene expression profiles. Although AMT1-3 mRNA accumulated in transgenic plants, these plants displayed significant decreases in growth when compared to the wild-type plants. The nitrogen uptake assay using a 15N tracer revealed poor nitrogen uptake ability in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants. We found significant decreases in AMT1-3-overexpressing plant leaf carbon and nitrogen content accompanied with a higher leaf C/N ratio. Significant changes in soluble proteins and carbohydrates were also observed in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants. In addition, metabolite profile analysis demonstrated significant changes in individual sugars, organic acids and free amino acids. Gene expression analysis revealed distinct expression patterns of genes that participate in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Additionally, the correlation between the metabolites and gene expression patterns was consistent in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants under both low and high nitrogen growth conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that the carbon and nitrogen metabolic imbalance caused by AMT1-3 overexpressing attributed to the poor growth and yield of transgenic plants. PMID:25915023

  8. DNA-affinity-purified chip (DAP-chip) method to determine gene targets for bacterial two component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-07-21

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

  9. Genomic organization, promoter analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for the mouse glial high-affinity glutamate transporter Slc1a3

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kohichi; Maeno-Hikichi, Yuka

    1996-05-01

    The mouse gene encoding glial high-affinity, Na -dependent glutamate transporter Slcla3 (GluT-1/GLAST) was isolated, and its structural organization was characterized. The gene appeared to exist as a single copy in the mouse genome and comprised 10 exons spanning more than 56 kilobases. The transcription initiation sites were mapped to positions 503, which is the first transcriptional point (defined as +1), 128 (+376), and 64 (+440) basepairs upstream of the 3{prime}-end of exon 1 by primer extension. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the mouse GluT-1 gene had a typical CCAAT box and a GC box but lacked at TATA box. These features of the promoter region were characteristic of housekeeping genes. The fusion plasmids containing approximately 4 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region (-3830 to +450) and the firefly luciferase gene induced a significant luciferase activity when transfected into COS-1 cells. Distal deletion of the 5{prime}-flanking region, leaving 619 bp (-169 to +450), resulted in a marked decrease in luciferase activity in COS-1 cells, suggesting that a CCAAT box, which was positioned at -200, is necessary for the expression of this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene to mouse chromosome 15A2. These structural features will lead to a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the expression of the GluT-1 gene by ischemia and will also provide a basis for future evolutionary comparisons with other neurotransmitter transporters. 40 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Rice High-Affinity Potassium Transporter1;1 Is Involved in Salt Tolerance and Regulated by an MYB-Type Transcription Factor1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Jing, Wen; Jin, Yakang; Shen, Like

    2015-01-01

    Sodium transporters play key roles in plant tolerance to salt stress. Here, we report that a member of the High-Affinity K+ Transporter (HKT) family, OsHKT1;1, in rice (Oryza sativa ‘Nipponbare’) plays an important role in reducing Na+ accumulation in shoots to cope with salt stress. The oshkt1;1 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivity to salt stress. They contained less Na+ in the phloem sap and accumulated more Na+ in the shoots compared with the wild type. OsHKT1;1 was expressed mainly in the phloem of leaf blades and up-regulated in response to salt stress. Using a yeast one-hybrid approach, a novel MYB coiled-coil type transcription factor, OsMYBc, was found to bind to the OsHKT1;1 promoter. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation and in vitro electrophoresis mobility shift assays demonstrated that OsMYBc binds to AAANATNC(C/T) fragments within the OsHKT1;1 promoter. Mutation of the OsMYBc-binding nucleotides resulted in a decrease in promoter activity of OsHKT1;1. Knockout of OsMYBc resulted in a reduction in NaCl-induced expression of OsHKT1;1 and salt sensitivity. Taken together, these results suggest that OsHKT1;1 has a role in controlling Na+ concentration and preventing sodium toxicity in leaf blades and is regulated by the OsMYBc transcription factor. PMID:25991736

  11. Space Transportation System (STS): Emergency support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoski, T.; Nicholson, L.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for emergency support of the Space Transportation System (STS) are summarized. Coverage would be provided by the DSN during emergencies that would prevent communications between the shuttle and the White Sands TDRSS receiving station. The DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  12. Online adaptive policy learning algorithm for H∞ state feedback control of unknown affine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaguang; Qin, Chunbin; Jiang, Bin; Luo, Yanhong

    2014-12-01

    The problem of H∞ state feedback control of affine nonlinear discrete-time systems with unknown dynamics is investigated in this paper. An online adaptive policy learning algorithm (APLA) based on adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) is proposed for learning in real-time the solution to the Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI) equation, which appears in the H∞ control problem. In the proposed algorithm, three neural networks (NNs) are utilized to find suitable approximations of the optimal value function and the saddle point feedback control and disturbance policies. Novel weight updating laws are given to tune the critic, actor, and disturbance NNs simultaneously by using data generated in real-time along the system trajectories. Considering NN approximation errors, we provide the stability analysis of the proposed algorithm with Lyapunov approach. Moreover, the need of the system input dynamics for the proposed algorithm is relaxed by using a NN identification scheme. Finally, simulation examples show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25095274

  13. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fire worthiness of air transport interiors was evaluated. The effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in an uncontrolled transport aircraft fire is addressed. Modification of aircraft interior subsystem components which provide improvements in aircraft fire safety are examined. Three specific subsystem components, interior panels, seats and windows, offer the most immediate and highest payoff by modifying interior materials of existing aircrafts. It is shown that the new materials modifications reduce the fire hazards because of significant reduction in their characteristic flame spread, heat release, and smoke and toxic gas emissions.

  14. Secondary amine analogues of 3 beta-(4'-substituted phenyl)tropane-2 beta-carboxylic acid esters and N-norcocaine exhibit enhanced affinity for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.

    PubMed

    Boja, J W; Kuhar, M J; Kopajtic, T; Yang, E; Abraham, P; Lewin, A H; Carroll, F I

    1994-04-15

    N-Norcocaine (2) and six N-nor-3 beta-(4'-substituted phenyl)tropane-2 beta-carboxylic acid esters (4a-f) were synthesized by N-demethylation of cocaine (1) and the appropriate 3 beta-(substituted phenyl)-tropane analogues (3a-f) with alpha-chloroethyl chloroformate. Radioligand binding affinities of 2 and 4a-f at the DA, 5-HT, and NE transporter were measured and compared to those of 1 and 3a-f. N-Demethylation produced relatively small effects at the DA transporter. In contrast, 4-19-fold and 2-44-fold enhanced affinity at the serotonin and norepinephrine transporter resulted from demethylation. N-Nor-3 beta-(4'-iodophenyl)tropane-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester (4d) with an IC50 = 0.36 nM showed the greatest affinity for the serotonin transporter. However, N-nor-3 beta-(4'-ethylphenyl)tropane-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester (4e) showed the greatest selectivity for the serotonin transporter.

  15. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  16. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  17. The Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, P.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper describes, for purposes of the Department of Energy (DoE) Hydrogen Program Review, Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period January through June 1996. This period represents the first six months of the three year project. The estimated cost over three years is $3.9M, $1.859M of which is funded by the DoE ($600 k for fiscal year 1996). The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project will demonstrate the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as vehicle power plants. This transportation system will be developed in the City of Palm Desert in southern California and will include a fleet of 8 fuel cell powered vehicles, solar and wind powered hydrogen generating facilities, a consumer-ready refueling station, and a service infrastructure. The system holds the promise of a clean environment and an energy supply that is predictable, domestic, safe, and abundant. During, the first part of 1996 SERC has nearly completed building a fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle, which features an upgraded safety and computer system; they have designed and built a test bench that is able to mimic golf cart loads and test fuel cell system auxiliary components; they have begun the design of the solar hydrogen generating station; they have worked with Sandia National Laboratory on an advanced metal hydride storage system; they have increased the power density of the SERC fuel cell by as much as 50%; and they have reached out to the rest of the world with a new fact sheet, world wide web pages, a press release, video footage for a television program. and instruction within the community.

  18. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  19. Optimal control of unknown affine nonlinear discrete-time systems using offline-trained neural networks with proof of convergence.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Travis; Thumati, Balaje T; Jagannathan, S

    2009-01-01

    The optimal control of linear systems accompanied by quadratic cost functions can be achieved by solving the well-known Riccati equation. However, the optimal control of nonlinear discrete-time systems is a much more challenging task that often requires solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. In the recent literature, discrete-time approximate dynamic programming (ADP) techniques have been widely used to determine the optimal or near optimal control policies for affine nonlinear discrete-time systems. However, an inherent assumption of ADP requires the value of the controlled system one step ahead and at least partial knowledge of the system dynamics to be known. In this work, the need of the partial knowledge of the nonlinear system dynamics is relaxed in the development of a novel approach to ADP using a two part process: online system identification and offline optimal control training. First, in the system identification process, a neural network (NN) is tuned online using novel tuning laws to learn the complete plant dynamics so that a local asymptotic stability of the identification error can be shown. Then, using only the learned NN system model, offline ADP is attempted resulting in a novel optimal control law. The proposed scheme does not require explicit knowledge of the system dynamics as only the learned NN model is needed. The proof of convergence is demonstrated. Simulation results verify theoretical conjecture. PMID:19596551

  20. Thermal protection systems for hypersonic transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, G.; Hinger, J.; Huchler, M.

    1990-07-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic transport vehicles are described and evaluated. During the flight through the atmosphere moderate to high aerodynamic heating rates with corresponding high surface temperatures are generated. Therefore, a reliable light-weight but effective TPS is required, that limits the heat transfer into the central fuselage with the liquid hydrogen tank and that prevents the penetration of the temperature peak during stage separation to the load carrying structure. The heat transfer modes in the insulation are solid conduction, gas convection and radiation. Thermal protection systems based on different phenomena to reduce the heat transfer, like vacuum shingles, inert gas filled shingles, microporous insulations and multiwall structures, are described. It is demonstrated that microporous and multiwall insulations are efficient, light weight and reliable TPSs for future hypersonic transportation systems.

  1. DTS: The NOAO Data Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Semple, T.

    2014-05-01

    The NOAO Data Transport System (DTS) provides high-throughput, reliable, data transfer between telescopes, pipelines and archive centers located in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. It is a distributed application using XML-RPC for command and control, and either parallel-TCP or UDT protocols for bulk data transport. The system is data-agnostic, allowing arbitrary files or directories to be moved using the same infrastructure. Data paths are configurable in the system by connecting nodes as the source or destination of data in a queue. Each leg of a data path may be configured independently based on the network environment between the sites. A queueing model is currently implemented to manage the automatic movement of data, a streaming model is planned to support arbitrarily large transfers (e.g. as in a disk recovery scenario) or to provide a 'pass-thru' interface to minize overheads. A web-based monitor allows anyone to get a graphical overview of the DTS system as it runs, operators will be able to control individual nodes in the system. Through careful tuning of the network paths DTS is able to achieve in excess of 80-percent of the nominal wire speed using only commodity networks, making it ideal for long-haul transport of large volumes of data.

  2. Automatic braking system modification for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Transportation Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coogan, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications were designed for the B-737-100 Research Aircraft autobrake system hardware of the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Program at Langley Research Center. These modifications will allow the on-board flight control computer to control the aircraft deceleration after landing to a continuously variable level for the purpose of executing automatic high speed turn-offs from the runway. A bread board version of the proposed modifications was built and tested in simulated stopping conditions. Test results, for various aircraft weights, turnoff speed, winds, and runway conditions show that the turnoff speeds are achieved generally with errors less than 1 ft/sec.

  3. Interaction of uncharged bile salt derivatives with the ileal bile salt transport system.

    PubMed

    Bundy, R; Mauskopf, J; Walker, J T; Lack, L

    1977-05-01

    Two series of uncharged conjugated bile salt derivatives, N-conjugates of ethanolamine and 3-amino-1,2-propanediol were studied for interaction with the ileal bile salt transport system. Evidence for interaction is threefold. 1) In everted gut sac experiments more material was removed from the mucosal compartment when ileal sacs were used. 2) These derivatives inhibited the in vitro transport of taurocholate. 3) In vivo intestinal perfusion demonstrated greater absorption from ileum than from jejunum. Number three demonstrates that such interactions are followed by transmucosal movement. Their uphill transport was less than taurocholate transport. The Na(+) requirement for cholyl-3-amino-1,2-propanediol interaction with the system was greater than for taurocholate. This observation is similar to that previously observed with taurodehydrocholate, which had a greater Na(+) requirement for transport than taurocholate. Therefore removal of the anionic charge, as well as distortion of steroid shape, increases the Na(+) requirement for substrate interaction with the transport system. These observations support our hypothesis that this interaction involves two recognition components; one includes the steroid moiety, the other a coulombic interaction between the anionic bile salt and a cationic membrane site. Additionally the membrane would have an anionic group to accomodate the Na(+). Both factors (steroidal and coulombic) operate for optimal substrate attachment. Simultaneously the system's affinity for Na(+) increases and active transport then proceeds.

  4. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Fractional Occupation Systems: Applications to Ionization Potential and Electron Affinity Calculations.

    PubMed

    Su, Neil Qiang; Xu, Xin

    2016-05-10

    Recently, we have developed an integration approach for the calculations of ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of molecular systems at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) (Su, N. Q.; Xu, X. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4677, 2015), where the full MP2 energy gradient with respect to the orbital occupation numbers was derived but only at integer occupations. The theory is completed here to cover the fractional occupation systems, such that Slater's transition state concept can be used to have accurate predictions of IPs and EAs. Antisymmetrized Goldstone diagrams have been employed for interpretations and better understanding of the derived equations, where two additional rules were introduced in the present work specifically for hole or particle lines with fractional occupation numbers.

  5. Band gaps, ionization potentials, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems via the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Egor; Betzinger, Markus; Blügel, Stefan; Görling, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    An approach to calculate fundamental band gaps, ionization energies, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems is explored. Starting from total energies obtained with the help of the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem, these physical observables are calculated according to their basic definition by differences of the total energies of the N -, (N -1 ) -, and (N +1 ) -electron system. The response functions entering the ACFD theorem are approximated here by the direct random phase approximation (dRPA). For a set of prototypical semiconductors and insulators it is shown that even with this quite drastic approximation the resulting band gaps are very close to experiment and of a similar quality to those from the computationally more involved G W approximation. By going beyond the dRPA in the future the accuracy of the calculated band gaps may be significantly improved further.

  6. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Fractional Occupation Systems: Applications to Ionization Potential and Electron Affinity Calculations.

    PubMed

    Su, Neil Qiang; Xu, Xin

    2016-05-10

    Recently, we have developed an integration approach for the calculations of ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of molecular systems at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) (Su, N. Q.; Xu, X. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4677, 2015), where the full MP2 energy gradient with respect to the orbital occupation numbers was derived but only at integer occupations. The theory is completed here to cover the fractional occupation systems, such that Slater's transition state concept can be used to have accurate predictions of IPs and EAs. Antisymmetrized Goldstone diagrams have been employed for interpretations and better understanding of the derived equations, where two additional rules were introduced in the present work specifically for hole or particle lines with fractional occupation numbers. PMID:27010405

  7. Small Aircraft Transportation System Concept and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Durham, Michael H.; Tarry, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes both the vision and the early public-private collaborative research for the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). The paper outlines an operational definition of SATS, describes how SATS conceptually differs from current air transportation capabilities, introduces four SATS operating capabilities, and explains the relation between the SATS operating capabilities and the potential for expanded air mobility. The SATS technology roadmap encompasses on-demand, widely distributed, point-to-point air mobility, through hired-pilot modes in the nearer-term, and through self-operated user modes in the farther-term. The nearer-term concept is based on aircraft and airspace technologies being developed to make the use of smaller, more widely distributed community reliever and general aviation airports and their runways more useful in more weather conditions, in commercial hired-pilot service modes. The farther-term vision is based on technical concepts that could be developed to simplify or automate many of the operational functions in the aircraft and the airspace for meeting future public transportation needs, in personally operated modes. NASA technology strategies form a roadmap between the nearer-term concept and the farther-term vision. This paper outlines a roadmap for scalable, on-demand, distributed air mobility technologies for vehicle and airspace systems. The audiences for the paper include General Aviation manufacturers, small aircraft transportation service providers, the flight training industry, airport and transportation authorities at the Federal, state and local levels, and organizations involved in planning for future National Airspace System advancements.

  8. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  9. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the Human Transportation System Study. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems (e.g., Shuttle, Titan, etc. ) as well as proposed systems (e.g., PLS, Single-Stage-to-Orbit, etc.) to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  10. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-10-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the Human Transportation System Study. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems (e.g., Shuttle, Titan, etc. ) as well as proposed systems (e.g., PLS, Single-Stage-to-Orbit, etc.) to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  11. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  12. Controlled ecological life support system: Transportation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustan, E.; Vinopal, T.

    1982-01-01

    This report discusses a study utilizing a systems analysis approach to determine which NASA missions would benefit from controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) technology. The study focuses on manned missions selected from NASA planning forecasts covering the next half century. Comparison of various life support scenarios for the selected missions and characteristics of projected transportation systems provided data for cost evaluations. This approach identified missions that derived benefits from a CELSS, showed the magnitude of the potential cost savings, and indicated which system or combination of systems would apply. This report outlines the analytical approach used in the evaluation, describes the missions and systems considered, and sets forth the benefits derived from CELSS when applicable.

  13. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  14. Cargo transportation by airships: A systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Dalton, C.

    1976-01-01

    A systems engineering study of a lighter than air airship transportation system was conducted. The feasibility of the use of airships in hauling cargo was demonstrated. Social, legal, environmental and political factors were considered as well as the technical factors necessary to design an effective airship transportation system. In order to accomplish an effective airship transportation program two phases of implementation were recommended. Phase I would involve a fleet of rigid airships of 3.5 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying 25 tons of cargo internal to the helium-filled gas bag. The Phase I fleet would demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of modern-day airships while providing a training capability for the construction and operation of larger airships. The Phase II portion would be a fleet of rigid airships of 12 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying a cargo of 100 tons a distance of 2,000 miles at a cruising speed of 60 mph. An economic analysis is given for a variety of missions for both Phase I and Phase II airships.

  15. The Palm Desert renewable [hydrogen] transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, C.E.; Lehman, P.

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period June 1997 through May 1998. The project began in March 1996. The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project demonstrates the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a vehicle power system. The project includes designing and building 4 fuel cell powered vehicles, a solar hydrogen generating and refueling station, and a fuel cell vehicle diagnostic center. Over this last year, SERC has built a fuel cell powered neighborhood electric vehicle and delivered it to the City of Palm Desert. The design of the hydrogen refueling station is near completion and it is anticipated that construction will be complete in the fall of 1998. The vehicles are currently being refueled at a temporary refueling station. The diagnostic center is being designed and maintenance procedures as well as computer diagnostic programs for the fuel cell vehicles are being developed. City employees are driving the vehicles daily and monitoring data are being collected. The drivers are pleased with the performance of the vehicles.

  16. Visualizing Mobility of Public Transportation System.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Fu, Chi-Wing; Arisona, Stefan Müller; Erath, Alexander; Qu, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    Public transportation systems (PTSs) play an important role in modern cities, providing shared/massive transportation services that are essential for the general public. However, due to their increasing complexity, designing effective methods to visualize and explore PTS is highly challenging. Most existing techniques employ network visualization methods and focus on showing the network topology across stops while ignoring various mobility-related factors such as riding time, transfer time, waiting time, and round-the-clock patterns. This work aims to visualize and explore passenger mobility in a PTS with a family of analytical tasks based on inputs from transportation researchers. After exploring different design alternatives, we come up with an integrated solution with three visualization modules: isochrone map view for geographical information, isotime flow map view for effective temporal information comparison and manipulation, and OD-pair journey view for detailed visual analysis of mobility factors along routes between specific origin-destination pairs. The isotime flow map linearizes a flow map into a parallel isoline representation, maximizing the visualization of mobility information along the horizontal time axis while presenting clear and smooth pathways from origin to destinations. Moreover, we devise several interactive visual query methods for users to easily explore the dynamics of PTS mobility over space and time. Lastly, we also construct a PTS mobility model from millions of real passenger trajectories, and evaluate our visualization techniques with assorted case studies with the transportation researchers.

  17. Identification of a high-affinity phosphate transporter gene in a prasinophyte alga, Tetraselmis chui, and its expression under nutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Ching; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L; Chang, Jeng

    2003-02-01

    A high-affinity phosphate transporter gene, TcPHO, was isolated from a growth-dependent subtracted cDNA library of the marine unicellular alga Tetraselmis chui. The full-length cDNA of TcPHO obtained by 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends was 1,993 bp long and encoded an open reading frame consisting of 610 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of TcPHO exhibited 51.6 and 49.8% similarity to the amino acid sequences of PHO89 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and PHO4 from Neurospora crassa, respectively. In addition, hydrophobicity and secondary structure analyses revealed 12 conserved transmembrane domains that were the same as those found in PHO89 and PHO4. The expression of TcPHO mRNA was dependent on phosphate availability. With a low-phosphate treatment, the TcPHO mRNA concentration increased sharply to 2.72 fmol micro g of total RNA(-1) from day 1 to day 2 and remained at this high level from days 2 to 4. Furthermore, rescue treatment with either phosphate or p-nitrophenyl phosphate effectively inhibited TcPHO mRNA expression. In contrast, TcPHO mRNA expression stayed at a low level (range, 0.25 to 0.28 fmol micro g of total RNA(-1)) under low-nitrate conditions. The expression pattern suggests that TcPHO can be used as a molecular probe for monitoring phosphorus stress in T. chui. PMID:12570992

  18. High-affinity nitrate/nitrite transporter genes (Nrt2) in Tisochrysis lutea: identification and expression analyses reveal some interesting specificities of Haptophyta microalgae.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Aurélie; Bérard, Jean-Baptiste; Bougaran, Gaël; Carrier, Grégory; Lukomska, Ewa; Schreiber, Nathalie; Fournier, Flora; Charrier, Aurélie F; Rouxel, Catherine; Garnier, Matthieu; Cadoret, Jean-Paul; Saint-Jean, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae have a diversity of industrial applications such as feed, food ingredients, depuration processes and energy. However, microalgal production costs could be substantially improved by controlling nutrient intake. Accordingly, a better understanding of microalgal nitrogen metabolism is essential. Using in silico analysis from transcriptomic data concerning the microalgae Tisochrysis lutea, four genes encoding putative high-affinity nitrate/nitrite transporters (TlNrt2) were identified. Unlike most of the land plants and microalgae, cloning of genomic sequences and their alignment with complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences did not reveal the presence of introns in all TlNrt2 genes. The deduced TlNRT2 protein sequences showed similarities to NRT2 proteins of other phyla such as land plants and green algae. However, some interesting specificities only known among Haptophyta were also revealed, especially an additional sequence of 100 amino acids forming an atypical extracellular loop located between transmembrane domains 9 and 10 and the function of which remains to be elucidated. Analyses of individual TlNrt2 gene expression with different nitrogen sources and concentrations were performed. TlNrt2.1 and TlNrt2.3 were strongly induced by low NO3 (-) concentration and repressed by NH4 (+) substrate and were classified as inducible genes. TlNrt2.2 was characterized by a constitutive pattern whatever the substrate. Finally, TlNrt2.4 displayed an atypical response that was not reported earlier in literature. Interestingly, expression of TlNrt2.4 was rather related to internal nitrogen quota level than external nitrogen concentration. This first study on nitrogen metabolism of T. lutea opens avenues for future investigations on the function of these genes and their implication for industrial applications.

  19. Next generation: In-space transportation system(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Fredrick; Redus, Jerry; Kelley, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the next generation In-Space Transportation System presents a unique challenge to the design of a propulsion system for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Never before have the requirements for long-life, multiple mission use, space basing, high reliability, man-rating, and minimum maintenance come together with performance in one system that must protect the lives of space travelers, support the mission logistics needs, and do so at an acceptable cost. The challenge that is presented is to quantify the bounds of these requirements. The issue is one of degree. The length of acceptable life in space, the time it takes for reuse to pay off, and the degree to which space basing is practical (full, partial, or expended) are the issues that determine the reusable bounds of a design and include dependability, contingency capabilities, resilency, and minimum dependence on a maintenance node in preparation for and during a mission. Missions to planet earth, other non-NASA missions, and planetary missions will provide important but less demanding requirements for the transportation systems of the future. The mission proposed for the SEI require a family of transportation vehicles to meet the requirements for establishing a permanent human presence on the Moon and eventually on Mars. Specialized vehicles are needed to accomplish the different phases of each mission. These large scale missions require assembly in space and will provide the greatest usage of the planned integrated transportation system. The current approach to defining the In-Space Transportation System for the SEI Moon missions with later Mars mission applications is presented. Several system development options, propulsion concepts, current/proposed activities are reviewed, and key propulsion design criteria, issues, and technology challenges for the next generation In-Space Transportation System(s) are outlined.

  20. AMP/GMP Analogs as Affinity ESIPT Probes for Highly Selective Sensing of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Living Systems.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Li, Peng; Han, Keli

    2015-11-01

    Current probes for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) detection had been developed mainly by adding a phosphate group to a dye, which would lead to indistinct performance when implemented in a living system as several phosphatases exist together. In this study, the nucleotides adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP) were introduced into 2'-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole-based probes, and highly fluorescent turn-on probes with good selectivity towards ALP over several phosphatases, as well as high affinity and low toxicity were obtained. In the presence of L-phenylalanine, an ALP inhibitor, a strong decrease in fluorescence recovery was observed. These probes allowed for real-time imaging of endogenous ALP activity in living cells as well as in a zebrafish model.

  1. Robust fuzzy output feedback controller for affine nonlinear systems via T-S fuzzy bilinear model: CSTR benchmark.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, M; Hamdan, I

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a robust H∞ fuzzy output feedback controller is designed for a class of affine nonlinear systems with disturbance via Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy bilinear model. The parallel distributed compensation (PDC) technique is utilized to design a fuzzy controller. The stability conditions of the overall closed loop T-S fuzzy bilinear model are formulated in terms of Lyapunov function via linear matrix inequality (LMI). The control law is robustified by H∞ sense to attenuate external disturbance. Moreover, the desired controller gains can be obtained by solving a set of LMI. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), which is a benchmark problem in nonlinear process control, is discussed in detail to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach with a comparative study.

  2. High Energy Particle Transport Code System.

    2003-12-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAM is an upgraded version of the code CCC-694/NMTC-JAERI97, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAM simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nuclear meson transport processes. The applicable energy range of NMTC/JAM was extended in principle up to 200 GeV for nucleons and mesons by introducing the high energy nuclear reaction code Jet-Aa Microscopic (JAM) for the intra-nuclear cascade part. For the evaporation andmore » fission process, a new model, GEM, can be used to describe the light nucleus production from the excited residual nucleus. According to the extension of the applicable energy, the nucleon-nucleus non-elastic, elastic and differential elastic cross section data were upgraded. In addition, the particle transport in a magnetic field was implemented for beam transport calculations. Some new tally functions were added, and the format of input and output of data is more user friendly. These new calculation functions and utilities provide a tool to carry out reliable neutronics study of a large scale target system with complex geometry more accurately and easily than with the previous model. It implements an intranuclear cascade model taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects and the preequilibrium calculation model based on the exciton one. For treating the nucleon transport process, the nucleon-nucleus cross sections are revised to those derived by the systematics of Pearlstein. Moreover, the level density parameter derived by Ignatyuk is included as a new option for particle evaporation calculation. A geometry package based on the Combinatorial Geometry with multi-array system and the importance sampling technique is implemented in the code. Tally function is also employed for obtaining such physical quantities as neutron energy spectra, heat deposition and nuclide yield without editing a history file. The code can simulate both the primary spallation reaction and the

  3. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  4. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  5. Hyperspectral range imaging for transportation systems evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgelall, Raj; Rafert, J. B.; Atwood, Don; Tolliver, Denver D.

    2016-04-01

    Transportation agencies expend significant resources to inspect critical infrastructure such as roadways, railways, and pipelines. Regular inspections identify important defects and generate data to forecast maintenance needs. However, cost and practical limitations prevent the scaling of current inspection methods beyond relatively small portions of the network. Consequently, existing approaches fail to discover many high-risk defect formations. Remote sensing techniques offer the potential for more rapid and extensive non-destructive evaluations of the multimodal transportation infrastructure. However, optical occlusions and limitations in the spatial resolution of typical airborne and space-borne platforms limit their applicability. This research proposes hyperspectral image classification to isolate transportation infrastructure targets for high-resolution photogrammetric analysis. A plenoptic swarm of unmanned aircraft systems will capture images with centimeter-scale spatial resolution, large swaths, and polarization diversity. The light field solution will incorporate structure-from-motion techniques to reconstruct three-dimensional details of the isolated targets from sequences of two-dimensional images. A comparative analysis of existing low-power wireless communications standards suggests an application dependent tradeoff in selecting the best-suited link to coordinate swarming operations. This study further produced a taxonomy of specific roadway and railway defects, distress symptoms, and other anomalies that the proposed plenoptic swarm sensing system would identify and characterize to estimate risk levels.

  6. An overview of European space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    With the completion of the launch rocket series Ariane 1 to 4, Europe will have reached the same capacity to transport commercial payloads as the USA has with the Space Shuttle and the kick stages which are presently operative. The near term development of these capacities would require Europe to develop a larger launch rocket, Araine 5. Further motivations for this rocket are access to manned spaceflight, the development of an European space station, and the demand for shuttle technology. Shuttle technology is the subject of research being done in France on the winged re-entry vehicle Hermes. Operation of the European space station Columbus will require development of an interorbital transport system to facilitate traffic between the various segments of the space station. All European space transportation systems will have to match their quality to that of the other countries involve in space flight. All areas of development are marked not only by possible cooperation but also by increased competition because of increasing commercialization of space flight.

  7. National Space Transportation System (NSTS) technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, David L.; Ulrich, Kimberly K.

    1990-01-01

    The National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is one of the Nation's most valuable resources, providing manned transportation to and from space in support of payloads and scientific research. The NSTS program is currently faced with the problem of hardware obsolescence, which could result in unacceptable schedule and cost impacts to the flight program. Obsolescence problems occur because certain components are no longer being manufactured or repair turnaround time is excessive. In order to achieve a long-term, reliable transportation system that can support manned access to space through 2010 and beyond, NASA must develop a strategic plan for a phased implementation of enhancements which will satisfy this long-term goal. The NSTS program has initiated the Assured Shuttle Availability (ASA) project with the following objectives: eliminate hardware obsolescence in critical areas, increase reliability and safety of the vehicle, decrease operational costs and turnaround time, and improve operational capability. The strategy for ASA will be to first meet the mandatory needs - keep the Shuttle flying. Non-mandatory changes that will improve operational capability and enhance performance will then be considered if funding is adequate. Upgrade packages should be developed to install within designated inspection periods, grouped in a systematic approach to reduce cost and schedule impacts, and allow the capability to provide a Block 2 Shuttle (Phase 3).

  8. Ether modifications to 1-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (SA4503): effects on binding affinity and selectivity for sigma receptors and monoamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Lord, Sarah A; Peterson, Ryan M; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Lever, John R; Lever, Susan Z

    2015-01-01

    Two series of novel ether analogs of the sigma (σ) receptor ligand 1-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (SA4503) have been prepared. In one series, the alkyl portion of the 4-methoxy group was replaced with allyl, propyl, bromoethyl, benzyl, phenethyl, and phenylpropyl moieties. In the second series, the 3,4-dimethoxy was replaced with cyclic methylenedioxy, ethylenedioxy and propylenedioxy groups. These ligands, along with 4-O-des-methyl SA4503, were evaluated for σ1 and σ2 receptor affinity, and compared to SA4503 and several known ether analogs. SA4503 and a subset of ether analogs were also evaluated for dopamine transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT) affinity. The highest σ1 receptor affinities, Ki values of 1.75-4.63 nM, were observed for 4-O-des-methyl SA4503, SA4503 and the methylenedioxy analog. As steric bulk increased, σ1 receptor affinity decreased, but only to a point. Allyl, propyl and bromoethyl substitutions gave σ1 receptor Ki values in the 20-30 nM range, while bulkier analogs having phenylalkyl, and Z- and E-iodoallyl, ether substitutions showed higher σ1 affinities, with Ki values in the 13-21 nM range. Most ligands studied exhibited comparable σ1 and σ2 affinities, resulting in little to no subtype selectivity. SA4503, the fluoroethyl analog and the methylenedioxy congener showed modest six- to fourteen-fold selectivity for σ1 sites. DAT and SERT interactions proved much more sensitive than σ receptor interactions to these structural modifications. For example, the benzyl congener (σ1Ki=20.8 nM; σ2Ki=16.4 nM) showed over 100-fold higher DAT affinity (Ki=121 nM) and 6-fold higher SERT affinity (Ki=128nM) than the parent SA4503 (DAT Ki=12650 nM; SERT Ki=760 nM). Thus, ether modifications to the SA4503 scaffold can provide polyfunctional ligands having a broader spectrum of possible pharmacological actions.

  9. Generalized hamilton-jacobi-bellman formulation -based neural network control of affine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the use of nonlinear networks towards obtaining nearly optimal solutions to the control of nonlinear discrete-time (DT) systems. The method is based on least squares successive approximation solution of the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (GHJB) equation which appears in optimization problems. Successive approximation using the GHJB has not been applied for nonlinear DT systems. The proposed recursive method solves the GHJB equation in DT on a well-defined region of attraction. The definition of GHJB, pre-Hamiltonian function, HJB equation, and method of updating the control function for the affine nonlinear DT systems under small perturbation assumption are proposed. A neural network (NN) is used to approximate the GHJB solution. It is shown that the result is a closed-loop control based on an NN that has been tuned a priori in offline mode. Numerical examples show that, for the linear DT system, the updated control laws will converge to the optimal control, and for nonlinear DT systems, the updated control laws will converge to the suboptimal control. PMID:18269941

  10. Technological Support for Logistics Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, Andrzej; Śliwa, Zdzisław; Gębczyńska, Alicja

    The modern world is changing introducing robots, remotely controlled vehicles and other crewless means of transportation to reduce people's mistakes, as the main cause of incidents and crashes during traffic. New technologies are supporting operators and drivers, and according to some studies they can even replace them. Such programs as: AHS, UAH, IVBSS or MTVR are under development to improve traffic flow and its safety, to reduce traffic hazards and crashes. It is necessary to analyze such concepts and implement them boldly, including Polish logistics' companies, new programs, highways' system etc., as they will be applied in the future, so it is necessary to prepare logistics infrastructure ahead of time in order to capitalize on these improvements. The problem is quite urgent as transportation in the country must not be outdated to meet clients' expectations and to keep pace with competing foreign companies.

  11. Design of Large Momentum Acceptance Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Douglas

    2005-05-01

    The use of energy recovery to enable high power linac operation often gives rise to an attendant challenge--the transport of high power beams subtending large phase space volumes. In particular applications--such as FEL driver accelerators--this manifests itself as a requirement for beam transport systems with large momentum acceptance. We will discuss the design, implementation, and operation of such systems. Though at times counterintuitive in behavior (perturbative descriptions may, for example, be misleading), large acceptance systems have been successfully utilized for generations as spectrometers and accelerator recirculators [1]. Such systems are in fact often readily designed using appropriate geometric descriptions of beam behavior; insight provided using such a perspective may in addition reveal inherent symmetries that simplify construction and improve operability. Our discussion will focus on two examples: the Bates-clone recirculator used in the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR U pgrade FEL (which has an observed acceptance of 10% or more) and a compaction-managed mirror-bend achromat concept with an acceptance ranging from 50 to 150 MeV.

  12. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Wu, Si; Zhao, Rui; Zink, Erika M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Meng, Da; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-05

    Enrichment of bacterial phosphopeptides is an essential step prior to bottom-up mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome, which is fundamental to understanding the role of phosphoproteins in cell signaling and regulation of protein activity. We developed an automated IMAC system to enrich strong cation exchange-fractionated phosphopeptides from the soluble proteome of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown on minimal medium. Initial demonstration of the system resulted in identification of 75 phosphopeptides covering 52 phosphoproteins. Consistent with previous studies, many of these phosphoproteins are involved in the carbohydrate portion of central metabolism. The automated system utilizes a large capacity IMAC column that can effectively enrich phosphopeptides from a bacterial sample by increasing peptide loading and reducing the wash time. An additional benefit of the automated IMAC system is reduced labor and associated costs.

  13. Data-based fault-tolerant control for affine nonlinear systems with actuator faults.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chun-Hua; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the fault-tolerant control (FTC) problem for unknown nonlinear systems with actuator faults including stuck, outage, bias and loss of effectiveness. The upper bounds of stuck faults, bias faults and loss of effectiveness faults are unknown. A new data-based FTC scheme is proposed. It consists of the online estimations of the bounds and a state-dependent function. The estimations are adjusted online to compensate automatically the actuator faults. The state-dependent function solved by using real system data helps to stabilize the system. Furthermore, all signals in the resulting closed-loop system are uniformly bounded and the states converge asymptotically to zero. Compared with the existing results, the proposed approach is data-based. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:27180025

  14. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  15. Two plant bacteria, S. meliloti and Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, share functional znuABC homologues that encode for a high affinity Zinc uptake system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Znu system, encoded for by znuABC, can be found in multiple genera of bacteria and has been shown to be responsible for the import of zinc under low zinc conditions. Although this high-affinity uptake system is known to be important for both growth and/or pathogenesis in bacteria, it has not bee...

  16. Neural network-based finite-horizon optimal control of uncertain affine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiming; Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the finite-horizon optimal control design for nonlinear discrete-time systems in affine form is presented. In contrast with the traditional approximate dynamic programming methodology, which requires at least partial knowledge of the system dynamics, in this paper, the complete system dynamics are relaxed utilizing a neural network (NN)-based identifier to learn the control coefficient matrix. The identifier is then used together with the actor-critic-based scheme to learn the time-varying solution, referred to as the value function, of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation in an online and forward-in-time manner. Since the solution of HJB is time-varying, NNs with constant weights and time-varying activation functions are considered. To properly satisfy the terminal constraint, an additional error term is incorporated in the novel update law such that the terminal constraint error is also minimized over time. Policy and/or value iterations are not needed and the NN weights are updated once a sampling instant. The uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is verified by standard Lyapunov stability theory under nonautonomous analysis. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25720005

  17. Characterization and astrocytic modulation of system L transporters in brain microvasculature endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh; Ahmadian, Somaieh; Heidari, Hamid Reza; Gumbleton, Mark

    2008-04-01

    Brain trafficking of amino acids is mainly mediated by amino acids transport machineries of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where astrocytes play a key maintenance role. However, little is known about astrocytes impacts on such transport systems, in particular system L that consists of large and small neutral amino acids (NAAs) transporters, that is, LAT1/4F2hc and LAT2/4F2hc, respectively. In the current investigation, functionality and expression of system L were studied in the immortalized mouse brain microvascular endothelial b.End3 cells cocultured with astrocytes or treated with astrocyte-conditioned media (ACM). LAT2/4F2hc mediated luminal uptake of L-phenylalanine and L-leucine resulted in significantly decreased affinity of system L in b.End3 cells treated with ACM, while LAT2/4F2hc mediated luminal uptake of L-alanine remained unchanged. Gene expression analysis revealed marked upregulation of LAT1 and 4F2hc, but downregulation of LAT2 in b.End3 cells cultured with ACM. The basal to apical transport of L-phenylalanine and L-alanine appeared to be significantly greater than that of the apical to basal direction in b.End3 cells indicating an efflux functionality of system L. No marked influence was observed for transport of L-phenylalanine in b.End3 cells cocultured with astrocytes, while a slight decrease was seen for L-alanine in the basal to apical direction. Based on our findings, we propose that system L functions as influx and/or efflux transport machinery displaying a greater propensity for the outward transport of large and small NAAs. Astrocytes appeared to modulate the transcriptic expression and uptake functionalities of system L, but not the transport activities. PMID:18210381

  18. Chemically generated convective transport in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    High precision manipulation of small volumes of fluid, containing suspended micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules, is one of the main goals in designing modern lab-on-a-chip devices which can find a variety of chemical and biological applications. To transport the cargo toward sensing elements, typical microfluidic devices often use pressure driven flows. Here, we propose to use enzymatic chemical reactions which decompose reagent into less dense products and generate flows that can transport particles. Density variations that lead to flow in the assigned direction are created between the place where reagent is fed into the solution and the location where it is decomposed by enzymes attached to the surface of the microchannel. When the reagent is depleted, the fluid motion stops and particles sediment to the bottom. We demonstrate how the choice of chemicals, leading to specific reaction rates, can affect the transport properties. In particular, we show that the intensity of the fluid flow, the final location of cargo, and the time for cargo delivery are controlled by the amount and type of reagent in the system.

  19. Global multi-method analysis of affinities and cooperativity in complex systems of macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Cooperativity, multisite, and multicomponent interactions are hallmarks of biological systems of interacting macromolecules. Their thermodynamic characterization is often very challenging due to the notoriously low information content of binding isotherms. We introduce a strategy for the global multimethod analysis of data from multiple techniques (GMMA) that exploits enhanced information content emerging from the mutual constraints of the simultaneous modeling of orthogonal observables from calorimetric, spectroscopic, hydrodynamic, biosensing, or other thermodynamic binding experiments. We describe new approaches to address statistical problems that arise in the analysis of dissimilar data sets. The GMMA approach can significantly increase the complexity of interacting systems that can be accurately thermodynamically characterized.

  20. Saenger space transportation system - Progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, Dietrich E.; Kuczera, Heribert

    1992-10-01

    The first part of the Saenger System Definition Study within the German National Hypersonics Technology Program (1988 to 1992) was completed by mid-1990. This paper summarizes the progress made and the status of the project as of that milestone which was formally completed by the System Study Presentation in July 1990. For the second phase of the study (mid-1990 to end 1992) the original philosophy of different upper stages for manned space operations and for unmanned cargo/payloads transportation is being maintained, however, a winged unmanned Horus-C version has been found to be a better solution than the originally conceived expendable ballistic stage Cargus. The advantage of this twin-Horus Concept is the greater commonality of both upper stages as well as the new return capability of payloads up to 7 Mg. The maximum payload capability of the expendable stage was of course higher, but it is assumed that for larger payloads a complementary launch vehicle (i.e. Ariane 5) will be further available. The paper also presents new data about the Horus return flight trajectories as well as on the aerothermodynamic studies and experimental work. Finally, aspects of mission operations and economics are discussed which are of special importance for such an advanced reusable space transportation system.

  1. Conceptual design of a Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and several major aerospace corporations the University of Minnesota has developed a scenario to place humans on Mars by the year 2016. The project took the form of a year-long design course in the senior design curricula at the University's Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department. Students worked with the instructor, teaching assistants and engineers in industry to develop a vehicle and the associated mission profile to fulfill the requirements of the Mars Transportation System. This report is a summary of the final design and the process though which the final product was developed.

  2. A space transportation system operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a description of a computer program which permits assessment of the operational support requirements of space transportation systems functioning in both a ground- and space-based environment. The scenario depicted provides for the delivery of payloads from Earth to a space station and beyond using upper stages based at the station. Model results are scenario dependent and rely on the input definitions of delivery requirements, task times, and available resources. Output is in terms of flight rate capabilities, resource requirements, and facility utilization. A general program description, program listing, input requirements, and sample output are included.

  3. Mars integrated transportation system multistage Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the objective of the Mars Integrated Transport System (MITS) program, the Multistage Mars Mission (MSMM) design team developed a profile for a manned mission to Mars. The purpose of the multistage mission is to send a crew of five astronauts to the martian surface by the year 2019. The mission continues man's eternal quest for exploration of new frontiers. This mission has a scheduled duration of 426 days that includes experimentation en route as well as surface exploration and experimentation. The MSMM is also designed as a foundation for a continuing program leading to the colonization of the planet Mars.

  4. Space transportation system biomedical operations support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    The shift of the Space Transportation System (STS) flight tests of the orbiter vehicle to the preparation and flight of the payloads is discussed. Part of this change is the transition of the medical and life sciences aspects of the STS flight operations to reflect the new state. The medical operations, the life sciences flight experiments support requirements and the intramural research program expected to be at KSC during the operational flight period of the STS and a future space station are analyzed. The adequacy of available facilities, plans, and resources against these future needs are compared; revisions and/or alternatives where appropriate are proposed.

  5. Future Intelligent Transportation Systems and Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Akio

    A road vehicle traffic contributes to the social improvement greatly, but it has big problems such as safety, congestion, environment, energy, elder people driving and adaptation to information society. ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) is expected as a direction solving these. The intellectual function about a road vehicle traffic depended on most of human beings. ITS helps intellectual functions such as information sensing, situation recognition, judgment, planning and operation. A sensor detecting information is an important key in ITS. I describe expectation to a sensor in ITS.

  6. Operating systems in the air transportation environment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Consideration of the problems facing air transport at present, and to be expected in the future. In the Northeast Corridor these problems involve community acceptance, airway and airport congestion and delays, passenger acceptance, noise reduction, and improvements in low-density short-haul economics. In the development of a superior short-haul operating system, terminal-configured vs cruise-configured vehicles are evaluated. CTOL, STOL, and VTOL aircraft of various types are discussed. In the field of noise abatement, it is shown that flight procedural techniques are capable of supplementing ?quiet engine' technology.

  7. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The STS 41-C National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the eleventh Shuttle flight and fifth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Also summarized are the significant problems that occurred during STS 41-C, and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight. The major objectives of flight STS 41-C were to successfully deploy the LDEF (long duration exposure facility) and retrieve, repair and redeploy the SMM (Solar Maximum Mission) spacecraft, and perform functions of IMAX and Cinema 360 cameras.

  8. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of certain aspects of the evaluation of the fireworthiness of transport aircraft interiors. First, it addresses the key materials question concerning the effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in the case of an uncontrolled fire. Second, it examines some technical opportunities that are available today through the modification of aircraft interior subsystem components, modifications that may reasonably by expected to provide improvements in aircraft fire safety. Cost and risk benefits still remain to be determined.

  9. In Vivo Analysis of HPr Reveals a Fructose-Specific Phosphotransferase System That Confers High-Affinity Uptake in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Parche, Stephan; Kamionka, Annette; Titgemeyer, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    HPr, the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS), serves multiple functions in carbohydrate uptake and carbon source regulation in low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria and in gram-negative bacteria. To assess the role of HPr in the high-G+C-content gram-positive organism Streptomyces coelicolor, the encoding gene, ptsH, was deleted. The ptsH mutant BAP1 was impaired in fructose utilization, while growth on other carbon sources was not affected. Uptake assays revealed that BAP1 could not transport appreciable amounts of fructose, while the wild type showed inducible high-affinity fructose transport with an apparent Km of 2 μM. Complementation and reconstitution experiments demonstrated that HPr is indispensable for a fructose-specific PTS activity. Investigation of the putative fruKA gene locus led to identification of the fructose-specific enzyme II permease encoded by the fruA gene. Synthesis of HPr was not specifically enhanced in fructose-grown cells and occurred also in the presence of non-PTS carbon sources. Transcriptional analysis of ptsH revealed two promoters that are carbon source regulated. In contrast to what happens in other bacteria, glucose repression of glycerol kinase was still operative in a ptsH background, which suggests that HPr is not involved in general carbon regulation. However, fructose repression of glycerol kinase was lost in BAP1, indicating that the fructose-PTS is required for transduction of the signal. This study provides the first molecular genetic evidence of a physiological role of the PTS in S. coelicolor. PMID:12533468

  10. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  11. High-affinity glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase content in longissimus dorsi and adipose tissues of growing Angus steers differs among suckling, weanling, backgrounding, and finishing production stages.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J C; Huang, J; Rentfrow, G

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle and adipose tissues play important roles in maintaining whole-body Glu and N homeostasis by the uptake of Glu and release of Gln. To test the hypothesis that expression of high-affinity Glu transporters (GLAST1, EAAT4, EAAC1, GLT-1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) would increase in longissimus dorsi and adipose tissue of newborn Angus steers randomly assigned ( = 6) to develop through suckling (S; 32 d) and/or weanling (W; 184 d), backgrounding (B; 248 d), and finishing (F; 423 d) production stages. Carcass quality was determined at slaughter to verify shifts in adipose and lean deposition with development. Expression of mRNA (RT-PCR/Southern) and relative protein abundance (Western analysis) were determined in tissue homogenates isolated from longissimus dorsi, and kidney and subcutaneous adipose. The effect of production stage or tissue type on carcass and protein abundance was assessed by 1-way ANOVA using the GLM procedure of SAS, and Fisher's protected LSD procedure was used to separate data means. Neither GLAST1 nor EAAT4 mRNA or protein was detected. EAAC1, GLT-1, and GS mRNA were identified in all tissues, but GLT-1 and GS protein were not detected in kidney or subcutaneous adipose, and GS protein was not detected in longissimus dorsi. The EAAC1 content of subcutaneous ( = 0.06) and kidney ( = 0.02) adipose was 2 times greater in B and F than W steers, whereas GS was 5 times greater ( < 0.07) in B than F steers (B = W > F). For longissimus dorsi, EAAC1 ( < 0.01) and GLT-1 ( < 0.04) content decreased with development (S > W > B = F, S = W > B = F, respectively). Within F steers, EAAC1 and GLT-1 mRNA was expressed by subcutaneous, kidney, omental, mesenchymal, and intramuscular adipose tissues, whereas GS mRNA was expressed by all except for intramuscular. Only EAAC1 protein was detected in any adipose tissue, with EAAC1 content being 104% and 112% greater ( < 0.01) in intramuscular than in kidney or subcutaneous adipose, respectively, and not

  12. High-affinity glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase content in longissimus dorsi and adipose tissues of growing Angus steers differs among suckling, weanling, backgrounding, and finishing production stages.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J C; Huang, J; Rentfrow, G

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle and adipose tissues play important roles in maintaining whole-body Glu and N homeostasis by the uptake of Glu and release of Gln. To test the hypothesis that expression of high-affinity Glu transporters (GLAST1, EAAT4, EAAC1, GLT-1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) would increase in longissimus dorsi and adipose tissue of newborn Angus steers randomly assigned ( = 6) to develop through suckling (S; 32 d) and/or weanling (W; 184 d), backgrounding (B; 248 d), and finishing (F; 423 d) production stages. Carcass quality was determined at slaughter to verify shifts in adipose and lean deposition with development. Expression of mRNA (RT-PCR/Southern) and relative protein abundance (Western analysis) were determined in tissue homogenates isolated from longissimus dorsi, and kidney and subcutaneous adipose. The effect of production stage or tissue type on carcass and protein abundance was assessed by 1-way ANOVA using the GLM procedure of SAS, and Fisher's protected LSD procedure was used to separate data means. Neither GLAST1 nor EAAT4 mRNA or protein was detected. EAAC1, GLT-1, and GS mRNA were identified in all tissues, but GLT-1 and GS protein were not detected in kidney or subcutaneous adipose, and GS protein was not detected in longissimus dorsi. The EAAC1 content of subcutaneous ( = 0.06) and kidney ( = 0.02) adipose was 2 times greater in B and F than W steers, whereas GS was 5 times greater ( < 0.07) in B than F steers (B = W > F). For longissimus dorsi, EAAC1 ( < 0.01) and GLT-1 ( < 0.04) content decreased with development (S > W > B = F, S = W > B = F, respectively). Within F steers, EAAC1 and GLT-1 mRNA was expressed by subcutaneous, kidney, omental, mesenchymal, and intramuscular adipose tissues, whereas GS mRNA was expressed by all except for intramuscular. Only EAAC1 protein was detected in any adipose tissue, with EAAC1 content being 104% and 112% greater ( < 0.01) in intramuscular than in kidney or subcutaneous adipose, respectively, and not

  13. Characterization of the high affinity binding of epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens to the renal system.

    PubMed

    Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Blasi, Juan

    2012-05-25

    Epsilon toxin (ε-toxin), produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, causes fatal enterotoxaemia in livestock. In the renal system, the toxin binds to target cells before oligomerization, pore formation and cell death. Still, there is little information about the cellular and molecular mechanism involved in the initial steps of the cytotoxic action of ε-toxin, including the specific binding to the target sensitive cells. In the present report, the binding step of ε-toxin to the MDCK cell line is characterized by means of an ELISA-based binding assay with recombinant ε-toxin-green fluorescence protein (ε-toxin-GFP) and ε-prototoxin-GFP. In addition, different treatments with Pronase E, detergents, N-glycosidase F and beta-elimination on MDCK cells and renal cryosections have been performed to further characterize the ε-toxin binding. The ELISA assays revealed a single binding site with a similar dissociation constant (K(d)) for ε-toxin-GFP and ε-prototoxin-GFP, but a three-fold increase in B(max) levels in the case of ε-toxin-GFP. Double staining on kidney cryoslices with lectins and ε-prototoxin-GFP revealed specific binding to distal and collecting tubule cells. In addition, experiments on kidney and bladder cryoslices demonstrated the specific binding to distal tubule of a range of mammalian renal systems. Pronase E and beta-elimination treatments on kidney cryoslices and MDCK cells revealed that the binding of ε-toxin in renal system is mediated by a O-glycoprotein. Detergent treatments revealed that the integrity of the plasma membrane is required for the binding of ε-toxin to its receptor.

  14. A study of characteristics of intercity transportation systems. Phase 1: Definition of transportation comparison methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. M.; Smith, J. L.; Lifson, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine a unified methodological framework for the comparison of intercity passenger and freight transportation systems; (2) to review the attributes of existing and future transportation systems for the purpose of establishing measures of comparison. These objectives were made more specific to include: (1) development of a methodology for comparing long term transportation trends arising from implementation of various R&D programs; (2) definition of value functions and attribute weightings needed for further transportation goals.

  15. Risk management model in road transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhapov, R. L.; Nikolaeva, R. V.; Gatiyatullin, M. H.; Makhmutov, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of a study of road safety indicators that influence the development and operation of the transport system. Road safety is considered as a continuous process of risk management. Authors constructed a model that relates the social risks of a major road safety indicator - the level of motorization. The model gives a fairly accurate assessment of the level of social risk for any given level of motorization. Authors calculated the dependence of the level of socio-economic costs of accidents and injured people in them. The applicability of the concept of socio-economic damage is caused by the presence of a linear relationship between the natural and economic indicators damage from accidents. The optimization of social risk is reduced to finding the extremum of the objective function that characterizes the economic effect of the implementation of measures to improve safety. The calculations make it possible to maximize the net present value, depending on the costs of improving road safety, taking into account socio-economic damage caused by accidents. The proposed econometric models make it possible to quantify the efficiency of the transportation system, allow to simulate the change in road safety indicators.

  16. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  17. Sensor system for fuel transport vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; West, David L.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary sensor system for a fuel transport vehicle can comprise a fuel marker sensor positioned between a fuel storage chamber of the vehicle and an access valve for the fuel storage chamber of the vehicle. The fuel marker sensor can be configured to measure one or more characteristics of one or more fuel markers present in the fuel adjacent the sensor, such as when the marked fuel is unloaded at a retail station. The one or more characteristics can comprise concentration and/or identity of the one or more fuel markers in the fuel. Based on the measured characteristics of the one or more fuel markers, the sensor system can identify the fuel and/or can determine whether the fuel has been adulterated after the marked fuel was last measured, such as when the marked fuel was loaded into the vehicle.

  18. Transport systems research vehicle color display system operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, Wesley C.; Johnson, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center has resulted in an all-glass panel in the research flight deck. Eight ARINC-D size CRT color displays make up the panel. A major goal of the display upgrade effort was ease of operation and maintenance of the hardware while maintaining versatility needed for flight research. Software is the key to this required versatility and will be the area demanding the most detailed technical design expertise. This document is is intended to serve as a single source of quick reference information needed for routine operation and system level maintenance. Detailed maintenance and modification of the display system will require specific design documentation and must be accomplished by individuals with specialized knowledge and experience.

  19. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  20. A study of characteristics of intercity transportation systems. Phase 1: Definition of transportation comparison methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. M.; Smith, J. L.; Lifson, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    Decision making in early transportation planning must be responsive to complex value systems representing various policies and objectives. The assessment of alternative transportation concepts during the early initial phases of the system life cycle, when supportive research and technology development activities are defined, requires estimates of transportation, environmental, and socio-economic impacts throughout the system life cycle, which is a period of some 40 or 50 years. A unified methodological framework for comparing intercity passenger and freight transportation systems is described and is extended to include the comparison of long term transportation trends arising from implementation of the various R & D programs. The attributes of existing and future transportation systems are reviewed in order to establish measures for comparison, define value functions, and attribute weightings needed for comparing alternative policy actions for furthering transportation goals. Comparison criteria definitions and an illustrative example are included.

  1. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  2. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  3. Future space transportation system architecture avionics requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Howard; Engelund, Walt

    1993-12-01

    NASA began a multi-center study in January 1993 to examine options for providing the most cost effective space transportation system in the future. The key advanced avionics requirements for these vehicle concepts are envisioned to provide significantly improved operational efficiency and effectiveness. It is very desirable to have adaptive guidance, navigation, and control approaches that will allow launch and return in almost any weather condition. The vehicles must be able to accommodate atmospheric density variations and winds without software changes. The flight operations must become much more autonomous in all flight regimes like an aircraft, and preflight checkout should make use of the onboard systems. When the vehicle returns to the launch site, subsystem health must be known and maintenance tasks scheduled accordingly. Ground testing of most subsystems must be eliminated. Also, the health monitoring system must be designed to enhance the ability to abort the mission significantly and save the crew and the vehicle. The displays and controls must be much less complex than current systems and must significantly reduce pilot work load. It is important to have low power, light weight displays and controls. Rendezvous and docking and all flight phases must have autopilot capability to reduce pilot work load for routine operations and in abort situations. The vehicles must have the demonstrated ability to return to the launch site. Abort from all mission phases can put additional demands on the communications system.

  4. Immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning, a method combining metal-protein interaction and partitioning of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Vijayalakshmi, M A; Stigbrand, T; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-02-22

    Immobilized metal ions were used for the affinity extraction of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran or PEG and salt. Soluble chelating polymers were prepared by covalent attachment of metal-chelating groups to PEG. The effect on the partitioning of proteins of such chelating PEG derivatives coordinated with different metal ions is demonstrated. The proteins studied were alpha 2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, superoxide dismutase and monoclonal antibodies. The results indicate that immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning provides excellent potential for the extraction of proteins. PMID:1710621

  5. Report on Bureau of Pupil Transportation Contract Busing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savitz, Reuven; And Others

    This report outlines the process and events related to the implementation of a new student bus transportation contract system for New York City schools and presents data on numbers of vehicles used, number of students transported, and costs. The revised system, which sought to attract new companies to the school bus transportation business, is…

  6. Code System To Analyze Radiological Impact From Radwaste Transportation.

    1988-05-01

    Version 00 RADSHIP-2 is a computer code system used to analyze the environmental impact of radwaste transportation in Taiwan. The specific transport scheme including the land transport by truck and sea transport by ship or barge were considered in the analysis for normal transport and transport accident conditions. The code combines meteorological, population, health physics, transportation, packaging and material factors and has the capability to obtain the results of the expected annual population radiation exposure,more » the expected number of annual latent cancer fatalities and the annual probability of a given number of early fatalities.« less

  7. Simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01

    A simulation framework has been developed for a large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed for running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems, but can run on standalone workstations for smaller simulations. The simulator currently models instrumented smart vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factors studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver personality and behavior, and vehicle type. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of the approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  8. NASA's advanced space transportation system launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1991-01-01

    Some insight is provided into the advanced transportation planning and systems that will evolve to support long term mission requirements. The general requirements include: launch and lift capacity to low earth orbit (LEO); space based transfer systems for orbital operations between LEO and geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), the Moon, and Mars; and Transfer vehicle systems for long duration deep space probes. These mission requirements are incorporated in the NASA Civil Needs Data Base. To accomplish these mission goals, adequate lift capacity to LEO must be available: to support science and application missions; to provide for construction of the Space Station Freedom; and to support resupply of personnel and supplies for its operations. Growth in lift capacity must be time phased to support an expanding mission model that includes Freedom Station, the Mission to Planet Earth, and an expanded robotic planetary program. The near term increase in cargo lift capacity associated with development of the Shuttle-C is addressed. The joint DOD/NASA Advanced Launch System studies are focused on a longer term new cargo capability that will significantly reduce costs of placing payloads in space.

  9. MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of contaminant transport through soil to groundwater to a receptor requires that consideration be given to the many processes which control the transport and fate of chemical constituents in the subsurface environment. These processes include volatilization, degradation,...

  10. Combustion experimentation aboard the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the preliminary concept, specifications, and general requirements of a proposed Combustion Facility (CF) for the Spacelab payload of the Space Transportation System. The CF will permit an experimenter to use suitably contained liquid, gas, or solid fuels. He can specify and establish the composition and pressure level of the atmosphere in which the combustion will take place. It will be possible to characterize the experiment with common types of instrumentation as well as selected specialized equipment, to study the combustion process visually by direct observation and by motion picture coverage, and to obtain time histories of pertinent experimental parameters. During an experimental period, the CF will depend on Spacelab resources for power, heat rejection, and vacuum. Activating the CF and preparing it for the various experiments, performing the experiments, and shutting down the facility will be largely manual operations performed by flight personnel.

  11. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-09-28

    A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

  12. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Krumpelt, Michael; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

  13. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The key materials question is addressed concerning the effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in the case of an uncontrolled transport aircraft fire. Technical opportunities are examined which are available through the modification of aircraft interior subsystem components, modifications that may reasonably be expected to provide improvements in aircraft fire safety. Subsystem components discussed are interior panels, seats, and windows. By virtue of their role in real fire situations and as indicated by the results of large scale simulation tests, these components appear to offer the most immediate and highest payoff possible by modifying interior materials of existing aircraft. These modifications have the potential of reducing the rate of fire growth, with a consequent reduction of heat, toxic gas, and smoke emission throughout the habitable interior of an aircraft, whatever the initial source of the fire.

  14. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  15. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  16. New Regulators of a High Affinity Ca2+ Influx System Revealed through a Genome-wide Screen in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D. Christian; Kim, Hyemin; Mackin, Nancy A.; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Evangelista, Carlos C.; Beaudry, Veronica G.; Dudgeon, Drew D.; Naiman, Daniel Q.; Erdman, Scott E.; Cunningham, Kyle W.

    2011-01-01

    The bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes a high affinity Ca2+ influx system (HACS) to survive assaults by mating pheromones, tunicamycin, and azole-class antifungal agents. HACS consists of two known subunits, Cch1 and Mid1, that are homologous and analogous to the catalytic α-subunits and regulatory α2δ-subunits of mammalian voltage-gated calcium channels, respectively. To search for additional subunits and regulators of HACS, a collection of gene knock-out mutants was screened for abnormal uptake of Ca2+ after exposure to mating pheromone or to tunicamycin. The screen revealed that Ecm7 is required for HACS function in most conditions. Cycloheximide chase experiments showed that Ecm7 was stabilized by Mid1, and Mid1 was stabilized by Cch1 in non-signaling conditions, suggesting they all interact. Ecm7 is a member of the PMP-22/EMP/MP20/Claudin superfamily of transmembrane proteins that includes γ-subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels. Eleven additional members of this superfamily were identified in yeast, but none was required for HACS activity in response to the stimuli. Remarkably, many dozens of genes involved in vesicle-mediated trafficking and protein secretion were required to prevent spontaneous activation of HACS. Taken together, the findings suggest that HACS and calcineurin monitor performance of the membrane trafficking system in yeasts and coordinate compensatory processes. Conservation of this quality control system in Candida glabrata suggests that many pathogenic species of fungi may utilize HACS and calcineurin to resist azoles and other compounds that target membrane biosynthesis. PMID:21252230

  17. The air transportation/energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The changing pattern of transportation is discussed, and the energy intensiveness of various modes of transportation is also analyzed. Sociopsychological data affecting why people travel by air are presented, along with governmental regulation and air transportation economics. The aviation user tax structure is shown in tabular form.

  18. Role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na{sup +}-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. {yields} It is suggested that Na{sup +} binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na{sup +} dependence of [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na{sup +} removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only

  19. Argonne simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Canfield, T.; Brown-VanHoozer, A.; Tentner, A.

    1996-04-01

    A simulation framework has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed to run on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems; however, a version for a stand alone workstation is also available. The ITS simulator includes an Expert Driver Model (EDM) of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units. The EDM is capable of performing optimal route planning and communicating with Traffic Management Centers (TMC). A dynamic road map data base is sued for optimum route planning, where the data is updated periodically to reflect any changes in road or weather conditions. The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces that includes human-factors studies to support safety and operational research. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factor studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver`s personality and behavior and vehicle type. The simulator has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers, but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of the developed simulator is that vehicles will be represented by autonomous computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. Vehicle processes interact with each other and with ITS components by exchanging messages. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  20. Identification of the LIV-I/LS system as the third phenylalanine transporter in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the active transport of phenylalanine is considered to be performed by two different systems, AroP and PheP. However, a low level of accumulation of phenylalanine was observed in an aromatic amino acid transporter-deficient E. coli strain (DeltaaroP DeltapheP Deltamtr Deltatna DeltatyrP). The uptake of phenylalanine by this strain was significantly inhibited in the presence of branched-chain amino acids. Genetic analysis and transport studies revealed that the LIV-I/LS system, which is a branched-chain amino acid transporter consisting of two periplasmic binding proteins, the LIV-binding protein (LIV-I system) and LS-binding protein (LS system), and membrane components, LivHMGF, is involved in phenylalanine accumulation in E. coli cells. The K(m) values for phenylalanine in the LIV-I and LS systems were determined to be 19 and 30 micro M, respectively. Competitive inhibition of phenylalanine uptake by isoleucine, leucine, and valine was observed for the LIV-I system and, surprisingly, also for the LS system, which has been assumed to be leucine specific on the basis of the results of binding studies with the purified LS-binding protein. We found that the LS system is capable of transporting isoleucine and valine with affinity comparable to that for leucine and that the LIV-I system is able to transport tyrosine with affinity lower than that seen with other substrates. The physiological importance of the LIV-I/LS system for phenylalanine accumulation was revealed in the growth of phenylalanine-auxotrophic E. coli strains under various conditions.

  1. Systematic Development of Intelligent Systems for Public Road Transport.

    PubMed

    García, Carmelo R; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Cristóbal, Teresa; Padrón, Gabino; Alayón, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture model for the development of intelligent systems for public passenger transport by road. The main objective of our proposal is to provide a framework for the systematic development and deployment of telematics systems to improve various aspects of this type of transport, such as efficiency, accessibility and safety. The architecture model presented herein is based on international standards on intelligent transport system architectures, ubiquitous computing and service-oriented architecture for distributed systems. To illustrate the utility of the model, we also present a use case of a monitoring system for stops on a public passenger road transport network. PMID:27438836

  2. Systematic Development of Intelligent Systems for Public Road Transport

    PubMed Central

    García, Carmelo R.; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Cristóbal, Teresa; Padrón, Gabino; Alayón, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture model for the development of intelligent systems for public passenger transport by road. The main objective of our proposal is to provide a framework for the systematic development and deployment of telematics systems to improve various aspects of this type of transport, such as efficiency, accessibility and safety. The architecture model presented herein is based on international standards on intelligent transport system architectures, ubiquitous computing and service-oriented architecture for distributed systems. To illustrate the utility of the model, we also present a use case of a monitoring system for stops on a public passenger road transport network. PMID:27438836

  3. Intelligent transportation infrastructure deployment analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, A.K.; Harding, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    Much of the work on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to date has emphasized technologies, standards/protocols, architecture, user services, core infrastructure requirements, and various other technical and institutional issues. ITS implementations in the United States and elsewhere in the world have demonstrated benefits in the areas of safety, productivity, efficiency, and environmental impact. However, quantitative benefits and satisfactory cost estimates are not available or cannot be derived for many components of the ITS, whether deployed individually or in some integrated fashion. The limitations of existing analysis and evaluation capabilities coupled with the lack of strong empirical evidence presents a major knowledge and data gap for infrastructure investment decisions involving ITS alternatives. This paper describes the over-arching issues and requirements associated with the analysis capabilities required for a systematic, faithful, and rigorous evaluation of the impacts of deploying ITS in a metropolitan area. It then describes the conceptual framework of a modeling system that will provide a preliminary analysis capability to support ITS deployment analysis and evaluation.

  4. Advanced space transportation systems, BARGOUZIN booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prampolini, Marco; Louaas, Eric; Prel, Yves; Kostromin, Sergey; Panichkin, Nickolay; Sumin, Yuriy; Osin, Mikhail; Iranzo-Greus, David; Rigault, Michel; Beaurain, André; Couteau, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of Advanced Space Transportation Systems Studies sponsored by CNES in 2006, a study called "BARGOUZIN" was performed by a joint team led by ASTRIUM ST and TSNIIMASH. Beyond these leaders, the team comprised MOLNIYA, DASSAULT AVIATION and SNECMA as subcontractors. The "BARGOUZIN" concept is a liquid fuelled fly-back booster (LFBB), mounted on the ARIANE 5 central core stage in place of the current solid rocket booster. The main originality of the concept lies in the fact that the "BARGOUZIN" features a cluster of VULCAIN II engines, similar to the one mounted on the central core stage of ARIANE 5. An astute permutation strategy, between the booster engines and central core engine is expected to lead to significant cost reductions. The following aspects were addressed during the preliminary system study: engine number per booster trade-off/abort scenario analysis, aerodynamic consolidation, engine reliability, ascent controllability, ground interfaces separation sequence analysis, programmatics. These topics will be briefly presented and synthesized in this paper, giving an overview of the credibility of the concept.

  5. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  6. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The 515-41B National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the sixth operational Shuttle flight and fourth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Since this flight was the first to land at Kennedy Space Center, the vehicle was towed directly to the OPF (Orbiter Processing Facility) where preparations for flight STS-41C, scheduled for early April 1984, began immediately. The significant problems that occurred during STS-41B are summarized and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight is given. None of the problems will affect the STS 41C flight. The major objectives of flight STS-41B were to successfully deploy the Westar satellite and the Indonesian Communications Satellite-B2 (PALAPA-B2); to evaluate the MMU (Manned Maneuvering Unit) support for EVA (Extravehicular Activities); to exercise the MFR (Manipulator Foot Restraint); to demonstrate a closed loop rendezvous; and to operate the M.R (Monodisperse Latex Reactor), the ACES (Acoustic Containerless Experiment System) and the IEF (Isoelectric Focusing) in cabin experiments; and to obtain photographs with the Cinema 360 Cameras.

  7. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-08-15

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of a riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with K(m) and V(max) values of 19 ± 3 μM and 0.235 ± 0.012 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca(++)/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-riboflavin clearly indicates that a riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to a riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration.

  8. Engineering a reversible, high-affinity system for efficient protein purification based on the cohesin-dockerin interaction.

    PubMed

    Karpol, Alon; Kantorovich, Lia; Demishtein, Alik; Barak, Yoav; Morag, Ely; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2009-01-01

    Efficient degradation of cellulose by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, is carried out by the multi-enzyme cellulosome complex. The enzymes on the complex are attached in a calcium-dependent manner via their dockerin (Doc) module to a cohesin (Coh) module of the cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit. In this study, we have optimized the Coh-Doc interaction for the purpose of protein affinity purification. A C. thermocellum Coh module was thus fused to a carbohydrate-binding module, and the resultant fusion protein was applied directly onto beaded cellulose, thereby serving as a non-covalent "activation" procedure. A complementary Doc module was then fused to a model protein target: xylanase T-6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, the binding to the immobilized Coh was only partially reversible upon treatment with EDTA, and only negligible amounts of the target protein were eluted from the affinity column. In order to improve protein elution, a series of truncated Docs were designed in which the calcium-coordinating function was impaired without appreciably affecting high-affinity binding to Coh. A shortened Doc of only 48 residues was sufficient to function as an effective affinity tag, and highly purified target protein was achieved directly from crude cell extracts in a single step with near-quantitative recovery of the target protein. Effective EDTA-mediated elution of the sequestered protein from the column was the key step of the procedure. The affinity column was reusable and maintained very high levels of capacity upon repeated rounds of loading and elution. Reusable Coh-Doc affinity columns thus provide an efficient and attractive approach for purifying proteins in high yield by modifying the calcium-binding loop of the Doc module. PMID:18979459

  9. TransportDB: a relational database of cellular membrane transport systems.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qinghu; Kang, Katherine H; Paulsen, Ian T

    2004-01-01

    TransportDB (http://www.membranetransport.org) is a relational database designed for describing the predicted cellular membrane transport proteins in organisms whose complete genome sequences are available. For each organism, the complete set of membrane transport systems was identified and classified into different types and families according to putative membrane topology, protein family, bioenergetics and substrate specificities. Web pages were created to provide user-friendly interfaces to easily access, query and download the data. Additional features, such as a BLAST search tool against known transporter protein sequences, comparison of transport systems from different organisms and phylogenetic trees of individual transporter families are also provided. TransportDB will be regularly updated with data obtained from newly sequenced genomes.

  10. Diacylglycerol-induced translocation of diacylglycerol kinase: use of affinity-purified enzyme in a reconstitution system.

    PubMed

    Besterman, J M; Pollenz, R S; Booker, E L; Cuatrecasas, P

    1986-12-01

    Diacylglycerol-induced translocation of diacylglycerol kinase (ATP:1,2-diacylglycerol 3-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.107) from the soluble to the membrane-bound compartments was demonstrated both in crude tissue homogenates and in a reconstituted enzyme-membrane model system. In homogenates of either rat brain or liver, incubation with diacylglycerol or phospholipase C, but not phospholipase A2 or phospholipase D, resulted in the translocation of diacylglycerol kinase activity from the soluble to the particulate fraction. This observation formed the basis for the first step in a two-step purification of diacylglycerol kinase. Enzyme extracted in 1 M salt from membranes of rat brain homogenates made in the presence of phospholipase C was purified further by affinity chromatography on a column containing phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol immobilized in polyacrylamide. This step yielded an enzyme preparation (step 2 enzyme) that was 500- to 750-fold purified (relative to the tissue homogenate) and required phosphatidylserine for stability. All other lipids tested failed to stabilize the enzyme. The properties of the enzyme preparation were similar to those of mammalian diacylglycerol kinases described by others. Reconstitution experiments showed that the soluble step 2 enzyme bound to inside-out vesicles of human erythrocytes only in the presence of diacylglycerol or phospholipase C but not phospholipase A2 or D. Redistribution of the kinase from soluble to vesicle-bound forms occurred rapidly and was dependent on the concentration of phospholipase C used to treat the vesicles. Physiological concentrations of calcium (50-1000 nM) did not enhance the phospholipase C-mediated translocation of the kinase. Thus, diacylglycerol kinase can translocate from cytosol to membranes in a manner dependent on the content of membrane-bound diacylglycerol but independent of the ambient concentration of calcium.

  11. Road transportable analytical laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Remediation of DOE contaminated areas requires extensive sampling and analysis. Reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site a full range of analyses meeting high levels of quality assurance and control, would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of cleanup and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping, and manpower associated with sample shipments. Goals of RTAL are to meet the needs of DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. The system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or together, to meet specific site needs: radioanalytical lab, organic chemical analysis lab, inorganic chemical analysis lab, aquatic biomonitoring lab, field analytical lab, robotics base station, decontamination/sample screening module, and operations control center. Goal of this integrated system is a sample throughput of 20 samples/day, providing a full range of accurate analyses on each sample within 16 h (after sample preparation), compared with the 45- day turnaround time in commercial laboratories. A prototype RTAL consisting of 5 modules was built and demonstrated at Fernald(FEMP)`s OU-1 Waste Pits, during the 1st-3rd quarters of FY96 (including the `96 Blizzard). All performance and operational goals were met or exceeded: as many as 50 sample analyses/day were achieved, depending on the procedure, sample turnaround times were 50-67% less than FEMP`s best times, and RTAL costs were projected to be 30% less than FEMP costs for large volume analyses in fixed laboratories.

  12. Integrated mass transportation system study/definition/implementation program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Deptula, D. A.; Yorke, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Specific actions needed to plan and effect transportation system improvements are identified within the constraints of limited financial, energy and land use resources, and diverse community requirements. A specific program is described which would develop the necessary generalized methodology for devising improved transportation systems and evaluate them against specific criteria for intermodal and intramodal optimization. A consistent, generalized method is provided for study and evaluation of transportation system improvements.

  13. The SIMPSONS project: An integrated Mars transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Matthew; Carlson, Eric; Bradfute, Sherie; Allen, Kent; Duvergne, Francois; Hernandez, Bert; Le, David; Nguyen, Quan; Thornhill, Brett

    In response to the Request for Proposal (RFP) for an integrated transportation system network for an advanced Martian base, Frontier Transportation Systems (FTS) presents the results of the SIMPSONS project (Systems Integration for Mars Planetary Surface Operations Networks). The following topics are included: the project background, vehicle design, future work, conclusions, management status, and cost breakdown. The project focuses solely on the surface-to-surface transportation at an advanced Martian base.

  14. The SIMPSONS project: An integrated Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Matthew; Carlson, Eric; Bradfute, Sherie; Allen, Kent; Duvergne, Francois; Hernandez, Bert; Le, David; Nguyen, Quan; Thornhill, Brett

    1992-01-01

    In response to the Request for Proposal (RFP) for an integrated transportation system network for an advanced Martian base, Frontier Transportation Systems (FTS) presents the results of the SIMPSONS project (Systems Integration for Mars Planetary Surface Operations Networks). The following topics are included: the project background, vehicle design, future work, conclusions, management status, and cost breakdown. The project focuses solely on the surface-to-surface transportation at an advanced Martian base.

  15. A complementary method to CD4 counting: measurement of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio in a tandem affinity microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjie; Gao, Yan; Pappas, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    We describe a tandem affinity microfluidic separation that measures the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes from blood samples. It is performed by injecting 2 μL of lysed blood samples at 1800-2700 cells μL(-1) into a microfluidic device containing two serially linked affinity regions, followed with a stop flow incubation that captures CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes on the corresponding affinity regions. Fluorophore conjugated antibodies are then injected at a controlled shear stress of 1.7 dyn cm(-2) to label target cells while eluting non-specific cells; and at last the CD4/CD8 ratio is calculated after the cell enumeration. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes achieved by our tandem affinity microfluidic system was in close agreement with that performed using conventional flow cytometry (R (2)  = 0.97) over a wide range (0.4-2.5) that covered the reference values from immune deficient patients to healthy people. This approach may represent an inexpensive and powerful tool in diagnosis of immunodeficiency disorders including HIV or mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Recovery of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from 4 commercially available transport systems.

    PubMed

    Papp, John R; Henning, Tara; Khubbar, Manjeet; Kalve, Valdis; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Travanty, Emily; Xavier, Karen; Jones, Kelly; Rudrik, James T; Gaynor, Anne; Hagan, Celia

    2016-10-01

    Four commercial transport systems for the recovery of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were evaluated in support of the need to obtain culture isolates for the detection of antimicrobial resistance. Bacterial recovery from the InTray GC system was superior with minimal loss of viability in contrast to non-nutritive transport systems. PMID:27489119

  17. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  18. A functional-phylogenetic classification system for transmembrane solute transporters.

    PubMed

    Saier, M H

    2000-06-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  19. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding /sup 14/C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30/sup 0/C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of (/sup 14/C)IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant.

  20. Regulation of the transferrin-independent iron transport system in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J; Jordan, I; Sturrock, A

    1991-02-15

    Mammalian cells accumulate iron via the binding of transferrin to high affinity surface receptors, or through a transferrin-independent pathway which involves the uptake of iron-organic anion chelates by a membrane-based transport system. Previously we determined that the transferrin-independent transport system was present on a wide variety of cultured cells (Sturrock, A., Alexander, J., Lamb, J., Craven, C. M., and Kaplan, J. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 3139-3145). In this communication we demonstrate that the transferrin-independent iron uptake system is regulated differently than the transferrin-mediated pathway. The activity of the transferrin-independent system was unaffected by changes in cellular growth rate, induction of DNA synthesis and cell division, or depletion of cellular iron. Exposure of cells to ferric or ferrous iron, however, resulted in a time-dependent increase in transport activity, due to a change in Vmax with no change in Km. Increased transport activity was seen in a variety of cultured cell types, occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, and persisted for hours after removal of iron. The ability of other transition metals to induce changes in transport, or to compete with iron for accumulation by the transferrin-independent uptake system, was critically dependent on the composition of the media in which the cells were incubated. Metals such as Cu2+ or Zn2+, but not Cd2+ or Mn2+, when dissolved in a balanced salt solution buffered with 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid, induced changes in the transferrin-independent iron transport system. The same metals which induced changes in transport were ineffective in media containing amino acids, ascorbate, or N-[2-hydroxy-1,1-bis(hydroxymethyl)ethyl]glycine. The Vmax of the transferrin-independent iron transport system was also elevated by increases in intracellular Ca2+. The effect of iron on transport activity, however, did not result from an iron-induced release of

  1. Transportation system requirements document. Revision 1 DCN01. Supplement

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The original Transportation System Requirements Document described the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of that document was to define the system-level requirements. These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presented an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. This revision of the document contains only the pages that have been modified.

  2. A Flexible Reusable Space Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrobon, S. S.

    A crewless reusable vertical take-off horizontal landing space transportation system is investigated. The single stage launch vehicle goes into a very low orbit around the Earth. At burnout, the payload is deployed. At apogee, the upper stage fires to put the payload into its desired orbit. The launch vehicle continues in a single orbit of the Earth, re-entering the atmosphere and returning to the launch site. We call this near single stage to orbit (NSTO). For satellite payloads, the satellite and upper stage are carried in a reusable pod attached to the top of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, the pod is replaced by a small winged vehicle which can be used for crew transfer and rescue from the International Space Station. This allows the launch vehicle to use a common bulkhead between the fuel and oxidiser tanks, further reducing launch vehicle mass. A number of propellant combinations are investigated. Computer simulations indicate that liquid oxygen with quadricyclene promises to give the largest payload mass for similar size vehicles. The launch vehicle can also be modified to be a fly- back booster for a heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV). In this case the upper stage and payload are replaced with jet engines and kerosene fuel tanks. A pod is used to recover the second stage engines for reuse.

  3. Developing Intelligent Transportation Systems in an Integrated Systems Analysis Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Paddack, E

    2002-01-15

    We are working on developing an Integrated Systems Analysis Environment (ISAE) for application to analysis and optimization of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). ISAE is based on the concept of Co-simulation, which allows the modeling of complex systems with extreme flexibility. Co-simulation allows the development of virtual ITS systems that can be analyzed and optimized as an overall integrated system. The virtual ITS system is defined by selecting different components from a component library. System component models can be written in multiple programming languages running on different computer platforms. At the same time, ISAE provides full protection for proprietary models. Co-simulation is a cost-effective alternative to competing methodologies, such as developing a translator or selecting a single programming language for all system components. Co-simulation has been recently demonstrated using an example of an automotive system. The demonstration was successfully performed. The paper describes plans on how to implement ISAE and Co-simulation to ITS, and the great advantages that this implementation would represent.

  4. Highly reusable space transportation system study

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    To significantly increase demand for launch services by stimulating existing and planned markets as well as enabling new markets, the cost to orbit needs to be reduced a factor of ten below projected Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) goals. This will place the recurring operations cost around {dollar_sign}200 per payload pound to low earth orbit (LEO). Methods for reducing the cost include: increasing relative vehicle performance, increasing vehicle reusability, and decreasing recurring operations. A study was conducted for NASA in support of its Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) initiative to identify for further assessment and development, those launch strategies that hold the greatest potential with respect to meeting this goal. During this study a number of candidate strategies were evaluated associated with access to space. Both technical and cost trades were performed, and concluded that there are two airbreathing propulsion concepts utilizing launch assist that appear promising in achieving the HRST-cost goals. These concepts employ both turbine based combine cycle (TBCC) and rocket based combine cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. The launch assist selected uses electromagnetic propulsion and a guideway to provide both delta velocity and altitude. A first order investigation of system level requirements associated with HRST launch assist for a magnetically launched vehicle including guideway concept and requirements as well as magnetic levitation and propulsion concepts and requirements were also conducted. This study concluded that the HRST goals of total recurring operations cost of {dollar_sign}200 per payload pound to Low Earth Orbit based on a ten year operational period were feasible if the required technology was matured. The most promising concept to achieve these goals is based on a RBCC powered vehicle with electromagnetic launch assist. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Highly reusable space transportation system study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    To significantly increase demand for launch services by stimulating existing and planned markets as well as enabling new markets, the cost to orbit needs to be reduced a factor of ten below projected Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) goals. This will place the recurring operations cost around 200 per payload pound to low earth orbit (LEO). Methods for reducing the cost include: increasing relative vehicle performance, increasing vehicle reusability, and decreasing recurring operations. A study was conducted for NASA in support of its Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) initiative to identify for further assessment and development, those launch strategies that hold the greatest potential with respect to meeting this goal. During this study a number of candidate strategies were evaluated associated with access to space. Both technical and cost trades were performed, and concluded that there are two airbreathing propulsion concepts utilizing launch assist that appear promising in achieving the HRST-cost goals. These concepts employ both turbine based combine cycle (TBCC) and rocket based combine cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. The launch assist selected uses electromagnetic propulsion and a guideway to provide both delta velocity and altitude. A first order investigation of system level requirements associated with HRST launch assist for a magnetically launched vehicle including guideway concept and requirements as well as magnetic levitation and propulsion concepts and requirements were also conducted. This study concluded that the HRST goals of total recurring operations cost of 200 per payload pound to Low Earth Orbit based on a ten year operational period were feasible if the required technology was matured. The most promising concept to achieve these goals is based on a RBCC powered vehicle with electromagnetic launch assist.

  6. A Segway RMP-based robotic transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Kogut, Greg; Barua, Ripan; Burmeister, Aaron; Pezeshkian, Narek; Powell, Darren; Farrington, Nathan; Wimmer, Matt; Cicchetto, Brett; Heng, Chana; Ramirez, Velia

    2004-12-01

    In the area of logistics, there currently is a capability gap between the one-ton Army robotic Multifunction Utility/Logistics and Equipment (MULE) vehicle and a soldier"s backpack. The Unmanned Systems Branch at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR Systems Center, or SSC), San Diego, with the assistance of a group of interns from nearby High Tech High School, has demonstrated enabling technologies for a solution that fills this gap. A small robotic transport system has been developed based on the Segway Robotic Mobility Platform (RMP). We have demonstrated teleoperated control of this robotic transport system, and conducted two demonstrations of autonomous behaviors. Both demonstrations involved a robotic transporter following a human leader. In the first demonstration, the transporter used a vision system running a continuously adaptive mean-shift filter to track and follow a human. In the second demonstration, the separation between leader and follower was significantly increased using Global Positioning System (GPS) information. The track of the human leader, with a GPS unit in his backpack, was sent wirelessly to the transporter, also equipped with a GPS unit. The robotic transporter traced the path of the human leader by following these GPS breadcrumbs. We have additionally demonstrated a robotic medical patient transport capability by using the Segway RMP to power a mock-up of the Life Support for Trauma and Transport (LSTAT) patient care platform, on a standard NATO litter carrier. This paper describes the development of our demonstration robotic transport system and the various experiments conducted.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of Cl- transport by the renal Na(+)-K(+)-Cl- cotransporter. Identification of an intracellular locus that may form part of a high affinity Cl(-)-binding site.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Edith; Bergeron, Marc J; Brunet, Geneviève M; Daigle, Nikolas D; Simard, Charles F; Isenring, Paul

    2004-02-13

    The 2nd transmembrane domain (tm) of the secretory Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) and of the kidney-specific isoform (NKCC2) has been shown to play an important role in cation transport. For NKCC2, by way of illustration, alternative splicing of exon 4, a 96-bp sequence from which tm2 is derived, leads to the formation of the NKCC2A and F variants that both exhibit unique affinities for cations. Of interest, the NKCC2 variants also exhibit substantial differences in Cl- affinity as well as in the residue composition of the first intracellular connecting segment (cs1a), which immediately follows tm2 and which too is derived from exon 4. In this study, we have prepared chimeras of the shark NKCC2A and F (saA and saF) to determine whether cs1a could play a role in Cl- transport; here, tm2 or cs1a in saF was replaced by the corresponding domain from saA (generating saA/F or saF/A, respectively). Functional analyses of these chimeras have shown that cs1a-specific residues account for most of the A-F difference in Cl- affinity. For example, Km(Cl-)s were approximately 8 mm for saF/A and saA, and approximately 70 mm for saA/F and saF. Intriguingly, variant residues in cs1a also affected cation transport; here, Km(Na+)s for the chimeras and for saA were all approximately 20 mM, and Km(Rb+) all approximately 2 mM. Regarding tm2, our studies have confirmed its importance in cation transport and have also identified novel properties for this domain. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that an intracellular loop in NKCC contributes to the transport process perhaps by forming a flexible structure that positions itself between membrane spanning domains. PMID:14645215

  8. Development trends in space transportation systems: From Hermes to Saenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vontein, Volker; Koelle, Dietrich E.

    The criteria for the development of future space transportation systems are given. A trend in reducing transportation costs by reutilizing transportation systems is outlined. The European Hermes project represents a first step towards reutilization and manned winged apparatus. The technological and organizational requirements and the German participation in this project are described. The Saenger concept is shown as a logical advancement of this project, and of the corresponding technology. It consists of a two stage winged space tug with horizontal launch. A space transportation system with low launching costs, higher safety, and mission flexibility is expected. It should complete cargo rocket Ariane 5.

  9. The F130S point mutation in the Arabidopsis high-affinity K+ transporter AtHAK5 increases K+ over Na+ and Cs+ selectivity and confers Na+ and Cs+ tolerance to yeast under heterologous expression

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Fernando; Caballero, Fernando; Ródenas, Reyes; Rivero, Rosa M.; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth, development and high yield production of crops. Members of group I of the KT/HAK/KUP family of transporters, such as HAK5, are key components for K+ acquisition by plant roots at low external K+ concentrations. Certain abiotic stress conditions such as salinity or Cs+-polluted soils may jeopardize plant K+ nutrition because HAK5-mediated K+ transport is inhibited by Na+ and Cs+. Here, by screening in yeast a randomly-mutated collection of AtHAK5 transporters, a new mutation in AtHAK5 sequence is identified that greatly increases Na+ tolerance. The single point mutation F130S, affecting an amino acid residue conserved in HAK5 transporters from several species, confers high salt tolerance, as well as Cs+ tolerance. This mutation increases more than 100-fold the affinity of AtHAK5 for K+ and reduces the Ki values for Na+ and Cs+, suggesting that the F130 residue may contribute to the structure of the pore region involved in K+ binding. In addition, this mutation increases the Vmax for K+. All this changes occur without increasing the amount of the AtHAK5 protein in yeast and support the idea that this residue is contributing to shape the selectivity filter of the AtHAK5 transporter. PMID:25228905

  10. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  11. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  12. Transport in small and/or random systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lax, M.

    1987-05-14

    This report discusses: transport in small systems; electron-phonon interactions in quantum wells; noise in small systems; laser propagation in the atmosphere; laser-aerosol interactions; transport properties of carriers in semiconductor quantum wells; light transmission in a particulate medium; and laser generation of shock waves in droplets. (LSP)

  13. Peri-implant and systemic effects of high-/low-affinity bisphosphonate-hydroxyapatite composite coatings in a rabbit model with peri-implant high bone turnover

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings composed with bisphosphonates (BPs) which have high mineral-binding affinities have been confirmed to successfully enhance implant stability. However, few previous studies focused on HA coatings composed with low-affinity BPs or on systemic effects of locally released BPs. Methods In this long-term study, we developed two kinds of BP-HA composite coatings using either high-affinity BP (alendronate, ALN) or low-affinity BP (risedronate, RIS). Thirty-six rabbits were divided into three groups according to different coating applications (group I: HA, group II: ALN-HA, and group III: RIS-HA). Implants were inserted into the proximal region of the medullary cavity of the left tibiay. At insertion, 2 × 108 wear particles were injected around implants to induce a peri-implant high bone turnover environment. Both local (left tibias) and systemic (right tibias and lumbar vertebrae) inhibitory effect on bone resorption were compared, including bone-implant integration, bone architecture, bone mineral density (BMD), implant stability, and serum levels of bone turnover markers. Results The results indicated that ALN-HA composite coating, which could induce higher bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio, bone mass augmentation, BMD, and implant stability in the peri-implant region, was more potent on peri-implant bone, while RIS-HA composite coating, which had significant systemic effect, was more potent on non-peri-implant bone, especially lumbar vertebrae. Conclusions It is instructive and meaningful to further clinical studies that we could choose different BP-HA composite coatings according to the patient’s condition. PMID:22686414

  14. [Evaluation of the binding affinity and RNA interference of low-molecular-weight chitosan/siRNA complexes using an imaging system].

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yasuhisa; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ban, Tatsunori; Danjo, Kazumi; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2009-04-01

    Chitosan is one of the attractive non-viral carriers for gene delivery including siRNA. However, common chitosan, which has a relatively high molecular weight, is insoluble in water, which might make it difficult to apply clinically. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of low-molecular-weight chitosan (LMWC), which is soluble in water, as a carrier for siRNA delivery. To evaluate the binding affinity and RNA interference (RNAi) of LMWC/siRNA complexes, a multi-well imaging system (IVIS) was adapted. CT26 cells stably expressing firefly luciferase (CT26/Luc cells) were established to evaluate RNAi. Evaluation of RNAi using lipofectamine(TM) 2000 was carried out by employing a luminometer with cell lysis and IVIS without cell lysis. The results were closely correlated, suggesting the advantages of the multi-well imaging system regarding screening, the visualization of results, and nondestructive evaluation. Fluorescence generated by ethidium bromide intercalated in the double strand of siRNA was markedly quenched at a higher ratio of LMWC to siRNA (N/P) and lower pH. Evaluation of the particle size and zeta potential of LMWC/siRNA complexes also indicated the higher binding affinity of LMWC with siRNA. At N/P=300 and pH 6.5, which satisfied the high-level binding affinity of LMWC with siRNA, significantly lower luminescence was detected in CT26/Luc cells treated with LMWC/siRNA compared with those treated with LMWC alone, suggesting the presence of RNAi. These results suggested that LMWC may be an effective carrier for siRNA delivery, and that the multi-well imaging system may be a powerful tool to evaluate the binding affinity and RNAi.

  15. Molybdate binding by ModA, the periplasmic component of the Escherichia coli mod molybdate transport system.

    PubMed

    Imperial, J; Hadi, M; Amy, N K

    1998-03-13

    ModA, the periplasmic-binding protein of the Escherichia coli mod transport system was overexpressed and purified. Binding of molybdate and tungstate to ModA was found to modify the UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the protein. Titration of these changes showed that ModA binds molybdate and tungstate in a 1:1 molar ratio. ModA showed an intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum attributable to its three tryptophanyl residues. Molybdate binding caused a conformational change in the protein characterized by: (i) a shift of tryptophanyl groups to a more hydrophobic environment; (ii) a quenching (at pH 5.0) or enhancement (at pH 7.8) of fluorescence; and (iii) a higher availability of tryptophanyl groups to the polar quencher acrylamide. The tight binding of molybdate did not allow an accurate estimation of the binding constants by these indirect methods. An isotopic binding method with 99MoO42- was used for accurate determination of KD (20 nM) and stoichiometry (1:1 molar ratio). ModA bound tungstate with approximately the same affinity, but did not bind sulfate or phosphate. These KDs are 150- to 250-fold lower than those previously reported, and compatible with the high molybdate transport affinity of the mod system. The affinity of ModA for molybdate was also determined in vivo and found to be similar to that determined in vitro.

  16. Characterization of methylaminoisobutyric acid transport by system A in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Tovar, A R; Avila, E; DeSantiago, S; Torres, N

    2000-07-01

    During lactation, the mammary gland has a large demand for amino acids for the synthesis of milk proteins and fatty acids. Arteriovenous differences in amino acids across the mammary gland show an elevated uptake of small neutral amino acids that are mainly transported via system A. The purpose of this study was to characterize the transport of methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), an amino acid analog used to model transport by system A in lactating rat mammary gland explants. MeAIB accumulation in mammary gland cells increased steadily, and after 3 hours of incubation, the intracellular concentration of the analog was 8-fold higher than the concentration in the medium. MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants showed a Km of 3.3 +/- 0.4 mmol/L and a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 555 +/- 23 pmol/microL intracellular fluid (ICF) x min, indicating a system with high capacity but low affinity for its substrate. MeAIB transport into mammary tissue depended highly on Na+, and the uptake was inhibited by addition of natural and analog small neutral amino acids. Cationic, anionic, and large neutral amino acids did not reduce MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants. Preincubation of mammary gland explants in an amino acid-free medium stimulated MeAIB transport, suggesting an adaptive regulation. The addition of an equimolar mixture of alanine, glycine, and serine to the preincubation medium inhibited stimulation of MeAIB transport. Furthermore, stimulation of MeAIB uptake by amino acid starvation was also prevented by the addition of actinomycin D, cycloheximide, tunicamycin, and colchicine. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increased MeAIB uptake, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) did not stimulate MeAIB transport. During the first postweaning days, kinetic analyses showed a decrease of 27% in the Vmax. Injection of rat lactating mammary gland mRNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes induced expression of the MeAIB transport system; however, the

  17. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  18. Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

    2010-01-01

    A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near

  19. Choline transporter-targeting and co-delivery system for glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guo, Yubo; Kuang, Yuyang; An, Sai; Ma, Haojun; Jiang, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy is a promising approach for glioma therapy. In this study, a co-delivery system of plasmid encoding human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail) and doxorubicin (DOX) has been simply constructed in two steps. Firstly, DOX was intercalated into Trail to form a stable complex. Secondly, DOX-Trail complex was condensed by Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) to form a nanoscaled co-delivery system. Choline transporters are both expressed on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioma, Herein, a choline derivate with high choline transporter affinity was chosen as BBB and glioma dual targeting ligand. Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system showed higher cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than unmodified co-delivery system in U87 MG cells. In comparison with single medication or unmodified delivery system, Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system induced more apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy on U87 MG bearing xenografts further confirmed the predominance of this dual targeting and co-delivery system.

  20. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows high binding affinity towards lectins on a self-assembled monolayer system.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-03-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are glycolipid biosurfactants secreted by the Pseudozyma yeasts, show not only excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions including antitumor and cell-differentiation activities. In order to address the biochemical actions, interactions between MEL-A, the major component of MEL, and different lectins were investigated using the surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The monolayer of MEL-A showed high binding affinity to concanavalin A (ConA) and Maackia amurensis lectin-I (MAL-I). The observed affinity constants for ConA and MAL-I were estimated to be 9.48 +/- 1.31 x 10(6) and 3.13 +/- 0.274 x 10(6) M(-1), respectively; the value was comparable to that of Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3)Man, which is one of the most specific probe to ConA. Significantly, alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside (1 mM) exhibited no binding inhibition between MEL-A and ConA. MEL-A is thus likely to self-assemble to give a high affinity surface, where ConA binds to the hydrophilic headgroup in a different manner from that generally observed in lectin-saccharide interactions. The binding manner should be related with the biochemical actions of MEL toward mammalian cells via protein-carbohydrate interactions. PMID:17205206

  1. Transport processes in biological systems: Tumoral cells and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The entropy generation approach has been developed for the analysis of complex systems, with particular regards to biological systems, in order to evaluate their stationary states. The entropy generation is related to the transport processes related to exergy flows. Moreover, cancer can be described as an open complex dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, it is used as an example useful to evaluate the different thermo-chemical quantities of the transport processes in normal and in tumoral cells systems.

  2. TransportDB: a comprehensive database resource for cytoplasmic membrane transport systems and outer membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qinghu; Chen, Kaixi; Paulsen, Ian T

    2007-01-01

    TransportDB (http://www.membranetransport.org/) is a comprehensive database resource of information on cytoplasmic membrane transporters and outer membrane channels in organisms whose complete genome sequences are available. The complete set of membrane transport systems and outer membrane channels of each organism are annotated based on a series of experimental and bioinformatic evidence and classified into different types and families according to their mode of transport, bioenergetics, molecular phylogeny and substrate specificities. User-friendly web interfaces are designed for easy access, query and download of the data. Features of the TransportDB website include text-based and BLAST search tools against known transporter and outer membrane channel proteins; comparison of transporter and outer membrane channel contents from different organisms; known 3D structures of transporters, and phylogenetic trees of transporter families. On individual protein pages, users can find detailed functional annotation, supporting bioinformatic evidence, protein/DNA sequences, publications and cross-referenced external online resource links. TransportDB has now been in existence for over 10 years and continues to be regularly updated with new evidence and data from newly sequenced genomes, as well as having new features added periodically.

  3. Ampicillin/penicillin-binding protein interactions as a model drug-target system to optimize affinity pull-down and mass spectrometric strategies for target and pathway identification.

    PubMed

    von Rechenberg, Moritz; Blake, Brian Kelly; Ho, Yew-Seng J; Zhen, Yuejun; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Richardson, Bonnie E; Xu, Nafei; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of active compounds identified in cell-based assays is an important step in preclinical drug development. New analytical approaches that combine drug affinity pull-down assays with mass spectrometry (MS) could lead to the identification of new targets and druggable pathways. In this work, we investigate a drug-target system consisting of ampicillin- and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) to evaluate and compare different amino-reactive resins for the immobilization of the affinity compound and mass spectrometric methods to identify proteins from drug affinity pull-down assays. First, ampicillin was immobilized onto various amino-reactive resins, which were compared in the ampicillin-PBP model with respect to their nonspecific binding of proteins from an Escherichia coli membrane extract. Dynal M-270 magnetic beads were chosen to further study the system as a model for capturing and identifying the targets of ampicillin, PBPs that were specifically and covalently bound to the immobilized ampicillin. The PBPs were identified, after in situ digestion of proteins bound to ampicillin directly on the beads, by using either one-dimensional (1-D) or two-dimensional (2-D) liquid chromatography (LC) separation techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. Alternatively, an elution with N-lauroylsarcosine (sarcosyl) from the ampicillin beads followed by in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis identified proteins potentially interacting noncovalently with the PBPs or the ampicillin. The in situ approach required only little time, resources, and sample for the analysis. The combination of drug affinity pull-down assays with in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis is a useful tool in obtaining complex information about a primary drug target as well as its protein interactors. PMID:15761956

  4. Genetics and environmental regulation of Shigella iron transport systems.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Boulette, Megan L; Payne, Shelley M

    2009-02-01

    Shigella spp. have transport systems for both ferric and ferrous iron. The iron can be taken up as free iron or complexed to a variety of carriers. All Shigella species have both the Feo and Sit systems for acquisition of ferrous iron, and all have at least one siderophore-mediated system for transport of ferric iron. Several of the transport systems, including Sit, Iuc/IutA (aerobactin synthesis and transport), Fec (ferric di-citrate uptake), and Shu (heme transport) are encoded within pathogenicity islands. The presence and the genomic locations of these islands vary considerably among the Shigella species, and even between isolates of the same species. The expression of the iron transport systems is influenced by the concentration of iron and by environmental conditions including the level of oxygen. ArcA and FNR regulate iron transport gene expression as a function of oxygen tension, with the sit and iuc promoters being highly expressed in aerobic conditions, while the feo ferrous iron transporter promoter is most active under anaerobic conditions. The effects of oxygen are also seen in infection of cultured cells by Shigella flexneri; the Sit and Iuc systems support plaque formation under aerobic conditions, whereas Feo allows plaque formation anaerobically.

  5. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Bearden, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a ``DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special ``double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained ``bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  7. Neuronal and glial localization of GAT-1, a high-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acid plasma membrane transporter, in human cerebral cortex: with a note on its distribution in monkey cortex.

    PubMed

    Conti, F; Melone, M; De Biasi, S; Minelli, A; Brecha, N C; Ducati, A

    1998-06-22

    High-affinity gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) plasma membrane transporters (GATs) influence the action of GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cerebral cortex. In this study, the cellular expression of GAT-1, the main cortical GABA transporter, was investigated in the human cerebral cortex by using immunocytochemistry with affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies directed to the C-terminus of rat GAT-1. In temporal and prefrontal association cortex (Brodmann's areas 21 and 46) and in cingulofrontal transition cortex (area 32), specific GAT-1 immunoreactivity (ir) was localized to numerous puncta and fibers in all cortical layers. GAT-1+ puncta were distributed homogeneously in all cortical layers, although they were slightly more numerous in layers II-IV, and appeared to have a preferential relationship to the somata and proximal dendrites of unlabeled pyramidal cells, even though, in many cases, they were also observed around nonpyramidal cells. Electron microscopic observations showed that GAT-1+ puncta were axon terminals that formed exclusively symmetric synapses. In addition, some distal astrocytic processes also contained immunoreaction product. Analysis of the patterns of GAT-1 labeling in temporal and prefrontal association areas (21 and 46), in cingulofrontal transition areas (32), and in somatic sensory and motor areas (1 and 4) of the monkey cortex revealed that its distribution varies according to the type of cortex examined and indicated that the distribution of GAT-1 is similar in anatomically corresponding areas of different species. The present study demonstrates that, in the human homotypical cortex, GAT-1 is expressed by both inhibitory axon terminals and astrocytic processes. This localization of GAT-1 is compatible with a major role for this transporter in GABA uptake at GABAergic synapses and suggests that GAT-1 may contribute to determining GABA levels in the extracellular space.

  8. Control of machine functions or transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, M.D.; Lee, M.J.; Jaeger, J.; King, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer code, COMFORT, has been developed at SLAC for on-line calculation of the strengths of magnetic elements in an electron storage ring or transport beam line, subject to first order fitting constraints on the ring or beam line parameters. This code can also be used off-line as an interactive lattice or beam line design tool.

  9. Intelligent transportation systems and intermodal freight transportation. Final report, May-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Aylward, A.D.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the various advanced technologies already in use in the intermodal freight transportation industry and addresses the opportunity for improved communication between the public and private sector regarding technology applications to the freight transportation system that could enhance the capacity of the system as a whole. The current public interest in freight transportation policy creates an opportunity to develop a shared vision of the future needs of international intermodal freight transportation in the United States. The Federal government can impact this vision by taking action in the following areas: Provide Infrastructure Funding to Support Efficiency and Global Competitiveness; Support Regional and Corridor Efforts; Understand the Freight Sector and Develop a Shared Vision of Technology Benefits; Lead Transportation Technology Efforts of Federal Agencies; and Maintain Commitment to Open ITS Architecture.

  10. A 10-Gbps optical WiMAX transport system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Pyng; Lu, Hai-Han; Wu, Po-Yi; Chen, Chia-Yi; Jhang, Tai-Wei; Ruan, Sheng-Siang; Wu, Kuan-Hung

    2014-02-10

    A 10-Gbps optical worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) transport system employing vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and spatial light modulator (SLM) with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulating signal is proposed. With the assistance of equalizer and low noise amplifier (LNA) at the receiving site, good bit error rate (BER) performance, clear constellation map, and clear eye diagram are achieved in the proposed systems. An optical WiMAX transport system, transmitting 16-QAM-OFDM signal over a 6-m free-space link, with a data rate of 10 Gbps is successfully demonstrated. Such a 10-Gbps optical WiMAX transport system would be attractive for providing services including Internet and telecommunication services. Our proposed system is suitable for the free-space lightwave transport system in visible light communication (VLC) application. PMID:24663567

  11. A 10-Gbps optical WiMAX transport system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Pyng; Lu, Hai-Han; Wu, Po-Yi; Chen, Chia-Yi; Jhang, Tai-Wei; Ruan, Sheng-Siang; Wu, Kuan-Hung

    2014-02-10

    A 10-Gbps optical worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) transport system employing vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and spatial light modulator (SLM) with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulating signal is proposed. With the assistance of equalizer and low noise amplifier (LNA) at the receiving site, good bit error rate (BER) performance, clear constellation map, and clear eye diagram are achieved in the proposed systems. An optical WiMAX transport system, transmitting 16-QAM-OFDM signal over a 6-m free-space link, with a data rate of 10 Gbps is successfully demonstrated. Such a 10-Gbps optical WiMAX transport system would be attractive for providing services including Internet and telecommunication services. Our proposed system is suitable for the free-space lightwave transport system in visible light communication (VLC) application.

  12. High-affinity nitrate/nitrite transporters NrtA and NrtB of Aspergillus nidulans exhibit high specificity and different inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naureen; Karabika, Eugenia; Kinghorn, James R.; Glass, Anthony D.M.; Unkles, Shiela E.

    2015-01-01

    The NrtA and NrtB nitrate transporters are paralogous members of the major facilitator superfamily in Aspergillus nidulans. The availability of loss-of-function mutations allowed individual investigation of the specificity and inhibitor sensitivity of both NrtA and NrtB. In this study, growth response tests were carried out at a growth-limiting concentration of nitrate (1 mM) as the sole nitrogen source, in the presence of a number of potential nitrate analogues at various concentrations, to evaluate their effect on nitrate transport. Both chlorate and chlorite inhibited fungal growth, with chlorite exerting the greater inhibition. The main transporter of nitrate, NrtA, proved to be more sensitive to chlorate than the minor transporter, NrtB. Similarly, the cation caesium was shown to exert differential effects, strongly inhibiting the activity of NrtB, but not NrtA. In contrast, no inhibition of nitrate uptake by NrtA or NrtB transporters was observed in either growth tests or uptake assays in the presence of bicarbonate, formate, malonate or oxalate (sulphite could not be tested in uptake assays owing to its reaction with nitrate), indicating significant specificity of nitrate transport. Kinetic analyses of nitrate uptake revealed that both chlorate and chlorite inhibited NrtA competitively, while these same inhibitors inhibited NrtB in a non-competitive fashion. The caesium ion appeared to inhibit NrtA in a non-competitive fashion, while NrtB was inhibited uncompetitively. The results provide further evidence of the distinctly different characteristics as well as the high specificity of nitrate uptake by these two transporters. PMID:25855763

  13. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  14. Immobilized metal-ion affinity partitioning of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases in poly(ethylene glycol)-dextran two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Pesliakas, H; Zutautas, V; Baskeviciute, B

    1994-08-26

    Affinity partitioning of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), lactate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle (MLDH) and lactate and malate dehydrogenases from pig heart (HLDH and HMDH, respectively) were studied in aqueous two-phase systems containing metal ions (Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+) chelated by iminodiacetate-poly(ethylene glycol) (IDA-PEG). The partitioning behaviour of the enzymes in the presence of Cu(II)-IDA-PEG was studied as a function of the concentration of NaCl, the pH of the medium and the concentration of added selected agents. It was demonstrated that the partition effect (delta log K) of dehydrogenases in the presence of Cu(II)-IDA-PEG and the affinity of enzymes for immobilized Cu2+ ions increases in the order MLDH > YADH > HMDH > or = HLDH. It was shown that the determined variations in the enzyme affinities for Cu(II)-IDA-PEG might be related to the differences in the content of histidine residues accessible to the solvent.

  15. Human behavior research and the design of sustainable transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, James J.

    2011-09-01

    Transport currently represents approximately 19% of the global energy demand and accounts for about 23% of the global carbon dioxide emissions (IEA 2009). As the demand for mobility is expected to continue to increase in the coming decades, the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will require the evolution of transport, along with power generation, building design and manufacturing. The continued development of these sectors will need to include changes in energy sources, energy delivery, materials, infrastructure and human behavior. Pathways to reducing carbon from the transport sector have unique challenges and opportunities that are inherent to the human choices and behavioral patterns that mold the transportation systems and the associated energy needs. Technology, government investment, and regulatory policies have a significant impact on the formulation of transportation infrastructure; however, the role of human behavior and public acceptance on the efficiency and effectiveness of transport systems should not be underestimated. Although developed, rapidly developing, and underdeveloped nations face different challenges in the establishment of transport infrastructure that can meet transport needs while achieving sustainable carbon dioxide emissions, the constraints that establish the domain of possibilities are closely related for all nations. These constraints include capital investment, fuel supplies, power systems, and human behavior. Throughout the world, there are considerable efforts directed at advancing and optimizing the financing of sustainable infrastructures, the production of low carbon fuels, and the production of advanced power systems, but the foundational work on methods to understand human preferences and behavior within the context of transport and the valuation of reductions in carbon dioxide emissions is greatly lagging behind. These methods and the associated understanding of human behavior and the willingness to pay for

  16. Electrical Power Systems for NASA's Space Transportation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lollar, Louis F.; Maus, Louis C.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) lead center for space transportation systems development. These systems include earth to orbit launch vehicles, as well as vehicles for orbital transfer and deep space missions. The tasks for these systems include research, technology maturation, design, development, and integration of space transportation and propulsion systems. One of the key elements in any transportation system is the electrical power system (EPS). Every transportation system has to have some form of electrical power and the EPS for each of these systems tends to be as varied and unique as the missions they are supporting. The Preliminary Design Office (PD) at MSFC is tasked to perform feasibility analyses and preliminary design studies for new projects, particularly in the space transportation systems area. All major subsystems, including electrical power, are included in each of these studies. Three example systems being evaluated in PD at this time are the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB) system, the Human Mission to Mars (HMM) study, and a tether based flight experiment called the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS). These three systems are in various stages of definition in the study phase.

  17. Natural hazard impacts on transport systems: analyzing the data base of transport accidents in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    We consider a transport accident as any accident that occurs during transportation of people and goods. It comprises of accidents involving air, road, rail, water, and pipeline transport. With over 1.2 million people killed each year, road accidents are one of the world's leading causes of death; another 20-50 million people are injured each year on the world's roads while walking, cycling, or driving. Transport accidents of other types including air, rail, and water transport accidents are not as numerous as road crashes, but the relative risk of each accident is much higher because of the higher number of people killed and injured per accident. Pipeline ruptures cause large damages to the environment. That is why safety and security are of primary concern for any transport system. The transport system of the Russian Federation (RF) is one of the most extensive in the world. It includes 1,283,000 km of public roads, more than 600,000 km of airlines, more than 200,000 km of gas, oil, and product pipelines, 115,000 km of inland waterways, and 87,000 km of railways. The transport system, especially the transport infrastructure of the country is exposed to impacts of various natural hazards and weather extremes such as heavy rains, snowfalls, snowdrifts, floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, snow avalanches, debris flows, rock falls, fog or icing roads, and other natural factors that additionally trigger many accidents. In June 2014, the Ministry of Transport of the RF has compiled a new version of the Transport Strategy of the RF up to 2030. Among of the key pillars of the Strategy are to increase the safety of the transport system and to reduce negative environmental impacts. Using the data base of technological accidents that was created by the author, the study investigates temporal variations and regional differences of the transport accidents' risk within the Russian federal regions and a contribution of natural factors to occurrences of different

  18. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of ribosomes in a eukaryotic system: Is there a facilitated transport process

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna-Gupta, A.; Ware, V.C. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have examined the kinetics of the process by which ribosomes are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm using Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected into the germinal vesicle with radiolabeled ribosomes or ribosomal subunits from X. laevis, Tetrahymena thermophila, or Escherichia coli. Microinjected eukaryotic mature ribosomes are redistributed into the oocyte cytoplasm by an apparent carrier-mediated transport process that exhibits saturation kinetics as increasing amounts of ribosomes are injected. T. thermophila ribosomes are competent to traverse the Xenopus nuclear envelope, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying ribosome transport is evolutionarily conserved. Microinjected E. coli ribosomes are not transported in this system, indicating that prokaryotic ribosomes lack the signals required for transport. Surprisingly, coinjected small (40S) and large (60S) subunits from T. thermophila are transported significantly faster than individual subunits. These observations support a facilitated transport model for the translocation of ribosomal subunits as separate units across the nuclear envelope whereby the transport rate of 60S or 40S subunits is enhanced by the presence of the partner subunit. Although the basic features of the transport mechanism have been preserved through evolution, other aspects of the process may be mediated through species-specific interactions. They hypothesize that a species-specific nuclear 40S-60S subunit association may expedite the transport of individual subunits across the nuclear envelope.

  19. Proton-linked sugar transport systems in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Henderson, P J

    1990-08-01

    The cell membranes of various bacteria contain proton-linked transport systems for D-xylose, L-arabinose, D-galactose, D-glucose, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, lactose, and melibiose. The melibiose transporter of E. coli is linked to both Na+ and H+ translocation. The substrate and inhibitor specificities of the monosaccharide transporters are described. By locating, cloning, and sequencing the genes encoding the sugar/H+ transporters in E. coli, the primary sequences of the transport proteins have been deduced. Those for xylose/H+, arabinose/H+, and galactose/H+ transport are homologous to each other. Furthermore, they are just as similar to the primary sequences of the following: glucose transport proteins found in a Cyanobacterium, yeast, alga, rat, mouse, and man; proteins for transport of galactose, lactose, or maltose in species of yeast; and to a developmentally regulated protein of Leishmania for which a function is not yet established. Some of these proteins catalyze facilitated diffusion of the sugar without cation transport. From the alignments of the homologous amino acid sequences, predictions of common structural features can be made: there are likely to be twelve membrane-spanning alpha-helices, possibly in two groups of six; there is a central hydrophilic region, probably comprised largely of alpha-helix; the highly conserved amino acid residues (40-50 out of 472-522 total) form discrete patterns or motifs throughout the proteins that are presumably critical for substrate recognition and the molecular mechanism of transport. Some of these features are found also in other transport proteins for citrate, tetracycline, lactose, or melibiose, the primary sequences of which are not similar to each other or to the homologous series of transporters. The glucose/Na+ transporter of rabbit and man is different in primary sequence to all the other sugar transporters characterized, but it is homologous to the proline/Na+ transporter of E. coli, and there is evidence

  20. Crawler Transporter Steering and Jel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    The transporter weighing 2.8 million kilograms (6.3 million pounds) was used to lift a 5.7-million-kilogram (12.6-million-pound) combination of mobile launcher and space vehicle, transfer this load approximately 5.6 kilometers (3.5 miles) from its point of assembly, negotiate curves of 152-meter (500-foot) mean radius, climb a 5-percent grade while maintaining the 122-meter (400-foot) structure in a vertical position within 10 minutes of arc, and smoothly position this huge structure to within plus or minus 5.1 centimeters (plus or minus 2 inches) on support pedestals at the launch pad. The crawler-transporter is described in detail.

  1. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  2. Use of MPEG transport stream in TV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Sam

    1995-12-01

    This tutorial contribution covers the use of International Standard IS 13818-1 (MPEG-2 Systems) Transport Stream in Digital TV systems with main emphasis on broadcast systems. The Transport stream was developed by Working Group II of ISO/IEC JTC1 as a means for multiplexing and synchronizing multiple video and audio data as well as for transmission in a non-error resilient environment. This paper describes some salient features of the Transport Stream and details of how it is used to implement a complete end to end digital TV broadcast service with examples of functionality to support data, channel acquisition, navigation and near video on demand services.

  3. A Numbering System for MFS Transporter Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Sands, Zara A.; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest classes of secondary active transporters and is widely expressed in many domains of life. It is characterized by a common 12-transmembrane helix motif that allows the selective transport of a vast range of diverse substrates across the membrane. MFS transporters play a central role in many physiological processes and are increasingly recognized as potential drug targets. Despite intensive efforts, there are still only a handful of crystal structures and therefore homology modeling is likely to be a necessary process for providing models to interpret experiments for many years to come. However, the diversity of sequences and the multiple conformational states these proteins can exist in makes the process significantly more complicated, especially for sequences for which there is very little sequence identity to known templates. Inspired by the approach adopted many years ago for GPCRs, we have analyzed the large number of MFS sequences now available alongside the current structural information to propose a series of conserved contact points that can provide additional guidance for the homology modeling process. To enable cross-comparison across MFS models we also present a numbering scheme that can be used to provide a point of reference within each of the 12 transmembrane regions. PMID:27314000

  4. Systems evaluation of low density air transportation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, R. W.; Webb, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    Methods were studied for improving air transportation to low-density population regions in the U.S. through the application of new aeronautical technology. The low-density air service concepts are developed for selected regions, and critical technologies that presently limit the effective application of low-density air transportation systems are identified.

  5. Automated transportation management system (ATMS) software project management plan (SPMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, R.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-20

    The Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Software Project Management plan (SPMP) is the lead planning document governing the life cycle of the ATMS and its integration into the Transportation Information Network (TIN). This SPMP defines the project tasks, deliverables, and high level schedules involved in developing the client/server ATMS software.

  6. Pyrrolidine analogs of lobelane: Relationship of affinity for the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site with function of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2)

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Ashish P.; Nickell, Justin R.; Chagkutip, Jaturaporn; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Ring size reduction of the central piperidine ring of lobelane yielded pyrrolidine analogs that showed marked inconsistencies in their ability to bind to the dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding site on the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) and their ability to inhibit VMAT2 function. The structure activity relationships indicate that structural modification within the pyrrolidine series resulted in analogs that interact with two different sites, i.e., the DTBZ binding site and an alternative site on VMAT2 to inhibit transporter function. PMID:19691331

  7. Pyrrolidine analogues of lobelane: relationship of affinity for the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site with function of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2).

    PubMed

    Vartak, Ashish P; Nickell, Justin R; Chagkutip, Jaturaporn; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2009-12-10

    Ring size reduction of the central piperidine ring of lobelane yielded pyrrolidine analogues that showed marked inconsistencies in their ability to bind to the dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding site on the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) and their ability to inhibit VMAT2 function. The structure-activity relationships indicate that structural modification within the pyrrolidine series resulted in analogues that interact with two different sites, i.e., the DTBZ binding site and an alternative site on VMAT2 to inhibit transporter function.

  8. Conceptual design of an RTG Facility Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.J.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Lujan, R.E.

    1994-06-03

    The conceptual design of an Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Facility Transportation System which is part of the overall RTG Transportation System has been completed and is described in detail. The Facility Transportation System serves to provide locomotion, cooling, shock protection and data acquisition for the RTG package during loading and unloading sequences. The RTG Facility Transportation System consists of a Transporter Subsystem, a Package Cooling Subsystem, and a Shock Limiting Transit Device Subsystem. The Transporter Subsystem is a uniquely designed welded steel cart combined with a pneumatically-driven hand tug for locomotion. The Package Cooling Subsystem provides five kilowatts of active liquid cooling via an on-board refrigeration system. The Shock limiting Transit Device Subsystem consists of a consumable honeycomb transit frame which provides shock protection for the 3855 kg (8500 LB) RTG package. These subsystems have been combined into an integrated system which will facilitate the unloading and loading of the RTG , of the Transport Trailer as well as meet ALARA radiation Package into and out exposure guidelines.

  9. Principles of Design of Fluid Transport Systems in Zoology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarbera, Michael

    1990-08-01

    Fluid transport systems mediate the transfer of materials both within an organism and between an organism and its environment. The architecture of fluid transport systems is determined by the small distances over which transfer processes are effective and by hydrodynamic and energetic constraints. All fluid transport systems within organisms exhibit one of two geometries, a simple tube interrupted by a planar transfer region or a branched network of vessels linking widely distributed transfer regions; each is determined by different morphogenetic processes. By exploiting the signal inherent in local shear stress on the vessel walls, animals have repeatedly evolved a complex branching hierarchy of vessels approximating a globally optimal system that minimizes the costs of the construction and maintenance of the fluid transport system.

  10. Economic analysis of new space transportation systems: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An economic analysis of alternative space transportation systems is presented. Results indicate that the expendable systems represent modest investments, but the recurring costs of operation would remain high. The space shuttle and tug system requires a substantial investment, but would substantially reduce the recurring costs of operation. Economic benefits and costs of the different systems are also analyzed. Findings are summarized.

  11. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  12. Biologically mediated transport of contaminants to aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Blais, Jules M; Macdonald, Robie W; Mackay, Donald; Webster, Eva; Harvey, Colin; Smol, John P

    2007-02-15

    The prevailing view is that long-range transport of semivolatile contaminants is primarily conducted by the physical system (e.g., winds, currents), and biological transport is typically ignored. Although this view may be correct in terms of bulk budgets and fluxes, it neglects the potential of animals to focus contaminants into foodwebs due to their behaviors and lifecycles. In particular, gregarious animals that biomagnify and bioaccumulate certain contaminants and then migrate and congregate can become the predominant pathway for contaminants in many circumstances. Fish and birds provide prominent examples for such behavior. This review examines the potential for biovector transport to expose populations to contaminants. In addition, we apply a modeling approach to compare the potential of biovector transport to other physical transport pathways for a hypothetical lake receiving large numbers of fish. We conclude that biovector transport should not be neglected when considering environmental risks of biomagnifying contaminants.

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell L-proline transport by inducing system A amino acid transporter 2 (SAT2) gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ensenat, D; Hassan, S; Reyna, S V; Schafer, A I; Durante, W

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta 1) is a multifunctional cytokine that contributes to arterial remodelling by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) growth and collagen synthesis at sites of vascular injury. Since l-proline is essential for the synthesis of collagen, we examined whether TGF-beta 1 regulates the transcellular transport of l-proline by vascular SMCs. l-Proline uptake by vascular SMCs was primarily sodium-dependent, pH-sensitive, blocked by neutral amino acids and alpha-(methylamino)isobutyric acid, and exhibited trans-inhibition. Treatment of SMCs with TGF-beta 1 stimulated l-proline transport in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The TGF-beta 1-mediated l-proline uptake was inhibited by cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Kinetic studies indicated that TGF-beta 1-induced l-proline transport was mediated by an increase in transport capacity independent of any changes in the affinity for l-proline. TGF-beta 1 stimulated the expression of system A amino acid transporter 2 (SAT2) mRNA in a time-dependent fashion that paralleled the increase in l-proline transport. Reverse transcriptase PCR failed to detect the presence of SAT1 or amino acid transporter 3 (ATA3) in either untreated or TGF-beta 1-treated SMCs. These results demonstrate that l-proline transport by vascular SMCs is mediated predominantly by the SAT and that TGF-beta 1 stimulates SMC l-proline uptake by inducing the expression of the SAT2 gene. The ability of TGF-beta 1 to induce SAT2 expression may function to provide SMCs with the necessary levels of l-proline required for collagen synthesis and cell growth. PMID:11716780

  14. The Raf-like Kinase ILK1 and the High Affinity K+ Transporter HAK5 Are Required for Innate Immunity and Abiotic Stress Response1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Elizabeth K.; Ahsan, Nagib; Kato, Naohiro; Coluccio, Alison E.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and other environmental stresses trigger transient ion fluxes at the plasma membrane. Apart from the role of Ca2+ uptake in signaling, the regulation and significance of PAMP-induced ion fluxes in immunity remain unknown. We characterized the functions of INTEGRIN-LINKED KINASE1 (ILK1) that encodes a Raf-like MAP2K kinase with functions insufficiently understood in plants. Analysis of ILK1 mutants impaired in the expression or kinase activity revealed that ILK1 contributes to plant defense to bacterial pathogens, osmotic stress sensitivity, and cellular responses and total ion accumulation in the plant upon treatment with a bacterial-derived PAMP, flg22. The calmodulin-like protein CML9, a negative modulator of flg22-triggered immunity, interacted with, and suppressed ILK1 kinase activity. ILK1 interacted with and promoted the accumulation of HAK5, a putative (H+)/K+ symporter that mediates a high-affinity uptake during K+ deficiency. ILK1 or HAK5 expression was required for several flg22 responses including gene induction, growth arrest, and plasma membrane depolarization. Furthermore, flg22 treatment induced a rapid K+ efflux at both the plant and cellular levels in wild type, while mutants with impaired ILK1 or HAK5 expression exhibited a comparatively increased K+ loss. Taken together, our results position ILK1 as a link between plant defense pathways and K+ homeostasis. PMID:27208244

  15. Toward a leaner and greener transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1993-04-01

    Transportation is responsible for 25% of CO{sub 2} emissions in the U.S. and is largely responsible for excessive ozone or carbon monoxide in several metropolitan areas. In turns out that emissions from new cars are much higher in use than laboratory tests and standards would appear to suggest. Transportation is also responsible for the lion`s share of U.S. petroleum consumption; and, although growth in the use of petroleum has been constrained by improvements in fuel economy, it is set to start again as the benefits of the CAFE standards are fully exploited, and travel continues to increase. In the short term, more efficient petroleum-fueled vehicles, based, e.g., on lean burn engines, sophisticated transmission management, idle off, efficient accessories and more light materials, would help. In the medium term, natural gas vehicles might provide a lower-emissions alternative with good performance and costs, and, if vehicle efficiency is high, good range. In the long term, fuel cells appear very attractive, and might profit from experience with a gaseous fuel. There are of course other interesting possibilities. R & D challenges will be discussed. One need is support for fundamental research at universities. Policies to encourage adoption of such technologies will also be addressed, including the issue of excessive reliance on regulations that are based on vehicle tests. To improve the environmental performance of such a pervasive activity as transportation a multifaceted package of policies is needed including correcting policies on the books that encourage automotive travel.

  16. Mass transport in annular spherical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helmut F.

    The mass transport between two concentric spheres with inlet and outlet at the poles was determined for ideal liquid flow (plug flow) and laminar flow for constant concentration at the spherical walls and constant concentration at the inlet. Velocity distribution and local concentration profiles were determined analytically for various widths of the annular spherical conduit and various diffusive flow parameters. It is found that with the increase of this parameter, the decay becomes quite rapid and that the same effect occurs for increasing diameter ratio of the spheres. This configuration may possibly be used as a basic element of an artificial kidney.

  17. 20-Gbps optical LiFi transport system.

    PubMed

    Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Chun-Jen; Peng, Peng-Chun; Ho, Wen-Jeng

    2015-07-15

    A 20-Gbps optical light-based WiFi (LiFi) transport system employing vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and external light injection technique with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulating signal is proposed. Good bit error rate (BER) performance and clear constellation map are achieved in our proposed optical LiFi transport systems. An optical LiFi transport system, delivering 16-QAM-OFDM signal over a 6-m free-space link, with a data rate of 20 Gbps, is successfully demonstrated. Such a 20-Gbps optical LiFi transport system provides the advantage of a free-space communication link for high data rates, which can accelerate the visible laser light communication (VLLC) deployment. PMID:26176448

  18. Transportation System After Next & Comments on AvSTAR Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to define and identify: the role of transportation in supporting future US needs, trends, system after next, supporting research and education, priority investments, and barriers.

  19. Study of aircraft in intraurban transportation systems. Volume 4: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, E. G.; Kesling, P. H.; Matteson, H. C.; Sherwood, D. E.; Tuck, W. R., Jr.; Vaughn, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    An appendix of the supporting data leading to conclusions and recommendations for an effective intraurban transportation system from volumes 1, 2, and 3 is presented. The data are given in tables and graphs.

  20. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  1. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  2. Substrate affinities for membrane transport proteins determined by 13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G; Brough, Adrian R; Herbert, Richard B; Rajakarier, J Anton; Henderson, Peter J F; Middleton, David A

    2004-03-17

    We have devised methods in which cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR is exploited to measure rigorous parameters for binding of (13)C-labeled substrates to membrane transport proteins. The methods were applied to two proteins from Escherichia coli: a nucleoside transporter, NupC, and a glucuronide transporter, GusB. A substantial signal for the binding of methyl [1-(13)C]-beta-d-glucuronide to GusB overexpressed in native membranes was achieved with a sample that contained as little as 20 nmol of GusB protein. The data were fitted to yield a K(D) value of 4.17 mM for the labeled ligand and 0.42 mM for an unlabeled ligand, p-nitrophenyl beta-d-glucuronide, which displaced the labeled compound. CP-MAS was also used to measure binding of [1'-(13)C]uridine to overexpressed NupC. The spectrum of NupC-enriched membranes containing [1'-(13)C]uridine exhibited a large peak from substrate bound to undefined sites other than the transport site, which obscured the signal from substrate bound to NupC. In a novel application of a cross-polarization/polarization-inversion (CPPI) NMR experiment, the signal from undefined binding was eliminated by use of appropriate inversion pulse lengths. By use of CPPI in a titration experiment, a K(D) value of 2.6 mM was determined for uridine bound to NupC. These approaches are broadly applicable to quantifying binding of substrates, inhibitors, drugs, and antibiotics to numerous membrane proteins. PMID:15012136

  3. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  4. Arrow 227: Air transport system design simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bontempi, Michael; Bose, Dave; Brophy, Georgeann; Cashin, Timothy; Kanarios, Michael; Ryan, Steve; Peterson, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    The Arrow 227 is a student-designed commercial transport for use in a overnight package delivery network. The major goal of the concept was to provide the delivery service with the greatest potential return on investment. The design objectives of the Arrow 227 were based on three parameters; production cost, payload weight, and aerodynamic efficiency. Low production cost helps to reduce initial investment. Increased payload weight allows for a decrease in flight cycles and, therefore, less fuel consumption than an aircraft carrying less payload weight and requiring more flight cycles. In addition, fewer flight cycles will allow a fleet to last longer. Finally, increased aerodynamic efficiency in the form of high L/D will decrease fuel consumption.

  5. Workshop on technology issues of superconducting Maglev transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wegrzyn, J.E. ); Shaw, D.T. )

    1991-09-27

    There exists a critical need in the United States to improve its ground transportation system. One suggested system that offers many advantages over the current transportation infrastructure is Maglev. Maglev represents the latest evolution in very high and speed ground transportation, where vehicles are magnetically levitated, guided, and propelled over elevated guideways at speeds of 300 miles per hour. Maglev is not a new concept but is, however, receiving renewed interest. The objective of this workshop was to further promote these interest by bringing together a small group of specialists in Maglev technology to discuss Maglev research needs and to identify key research issues to the development of a successful Maglev system. The workshop was organized into four sessions based on the following technical areas: Materials, Testing, and Shielding; Magnet Design and Cryogenic Systems; Propulsion and Levitation Systems; and, System Control and Integration.

  6. Security plan for the Automated Transportation Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) is an unclassified non-sensitive system consisting of hardware and software designed to facilitate the shipment of goods for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The system is secured against waste, fraud, abuse, misuse, and programming errors through a series of security measures that are discussed in detail in this document.

  7. Passive vapor transport solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

  8. Advanced Vehicle system concepts. [nonpetroleum passenger transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, K. S.; Langendoen, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Various nonpetroleum vehicle system concepts for passenger vehicles in the 1990's are being considered as part of the Advanced Vehicle (AV) Assessment at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The vehicle system and subsystem performance requirements, the projected characteristics of mature subsystem candidates, and promising systems are presented. The system candidates include electric and hybrid vehicles powered by electricity with or without a nonpetroleum power source. The subsystem candidates include batteries (aqueous-mobile, flow, high-temperature, and metal-air), fuel cells (phosphoric acid, advanced acids, and solid polymer electrolyte), nonpetroleum heat engines, advanced dc and ac propulsion components, power-peaking devices, and transmissions.

  9. An analytical fuzzy-based approach to ?-gain optimal control of input-affine nonlinear systems using Newton-type algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milic, Vladimir; Kasac, Josip; Novakovic, Branko

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with ?-gain optimisation of input-affine nonlinear systems controlled by analytic fuzzy logic system. Unlike the conventional fuzzy-based strategies, the non-conventional analytic fuzzy control method does not require an explicit fuzzy rule base. As the first contribution of this paper, we prove, by using the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, that the proposed fuzzy system without rule base is universal approximator. The second contribution of this paper is an algorithm for solving a finite-horizon minimax problem for ?-gain optimisation. The proposed algorithm consists of recursive chain rule for first- and second-order derivatives, Newton's method, multi-step Adams method and automatic differentiation. Finally, the results of this paper are evaluated on a second-order nonlinear system.

  10. Finite-Time Transport in Aperiodic Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosovsky, Brock A.

    In this dissertation, we consider the problem of quantifying finite-time transport in aperiodic dynamical systems. To address this problem, we concentrate primarily on a class of aperiodic systems that we call "transitory." These systems exhibit time-dependent behavior only on a compact time interval, and we present a new method for quantifying transport between isolated coherent structures of such systems, in the globally Liouville case. Both 2D and 3D examples are given. Moreover, our treatment of the 3D case represents the first quantitative analysis of transport between Lagrangian coherent structures in fully 3D aperiodic flows. We also present a numerical method that facilitates the application of our transport formulas to systems defined by discrete velocity data. In each case we consider, transport is quantified by computing the areas (or volumes in dimensions greater than two) of lobes bounded by codimension-one objects that are past or future invariant, and our method is Lagrangian, in the sense that it relies only on knowing certain key trajectories. These trajectories form a codimension-two set at the intersections of lobe boundary components. Thus, our transport computations require little Lagrangian information relative to various other methods involving finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) or distinguished hyperbolic trajectories. To show this, we compare our method to one that identifies coherent structures as regions bounded by ridges of the FTLE field, and additionally present a new computational method for efficiently extracting such ridges.

  11. Transport Information System using Query Centric Cyber Physical Systems (QCPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundra, Ankit; Rathee, Geetanjali; Chawla, Meenu; Soni, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    To incorporate the computation and communication with the physical world, next generation architecture i.e. CPS is viewed as a new technology. To improve the better interaction with the physical world or to perk up the electricity delivery usage, various CPS based approaches have been introduced. Recently several GPS equipped smart phones and sensor based frameworks have been proposed which provide various services i.e. environment estimation, road safety improvement but encounter certain limitations like elevated energy consumption and high computation cost. To meet the high reliability and safety requirements, this paper introduces a novel approach based on QCPS model which provides several users services (discussed in this paper). Further, this paper proposed a Transport Information System (TIS), which provide the communication with lower cost overhead by arranging the similar sensors in the form of grids. Each grid has a coordinator which interacts with cloud to process the user query. In order to evaluate the performance of proposed approach we have implemented a test bed of 16 wireless sensor nodes and have shown the performance in terms of computation and communication cost.

  12. Organelle-localized potassium transport systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Shin; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-15

    Some intracellular organelles found in eukaryotes such as plants have arisen through the endocytotic engulfment of prokaryotic cells. This accounts for the presence of plant membrane intrinsic proteins that have homologs in prokaryotic cells. Other organelles, such as those of the endomembrane system, are thought to have evolved through infolding of the plasma membrane. Acquisition of intracellular components (organelles) in the cells supplied additional functions for survival in various natural environments. The organelles are surrounded by biological membranes, which contain membrane-embedded K(+) transport systems allowing K(+) to move across the membrane. K(+) transport systems in plant organelles act coordinately with the plasma membrane intrinsic K(+) transport systems to maintain cytosolic K(+) concentrations. Since it is sometimes difficult to perform direct studies of organellar membrane proteins in plant cells, heterologous expression in yeast and Escherichia coli has been used to elucidate the function of plant vacuole K(+) channels and other membrane transporters. The vacuole is the largest organelle in plant cells; it has an important task in the K(+) homeostasis of the cytoplasm. The initial electrophysiological measurements of K(+) transport have categorized three classes of plant vacuolar cation channels, and since then molecular cloning approaches have led to the isolation of genes for a number of K(+) transport systems. Plants contain chloroplasts, derived from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria. A novel K(+) transport system has been isolated from cyanobacteria, which may add to our understanding of K(+) flux across the thylakoid membrane and the inner membrane of the chloroplast. This chapter will provide an overview of recent findings regarding plant organellar K(+) transport proteins.

  13. Manifold Coal-Slurry Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Estus, J. M.; Lavin, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding several slurry pipes into main pipeline reduces congestion in coal mines. System based on manifold concept: feeder pipelines from each working entry joined to main pipeline that carries coal slurry out of panel and onto surface. Manifold concept makes coal-slurry haulage much simpler than existing slurry systems.

  14. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOEpatents

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1992-07-07

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  15. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Program cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes Rockwell International's cost analysis results of manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to low earth orbit during the basic and option 1 period of performance for contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies. Vehicles analyzed include the space shuttle, personnel launch system (PLS) with advanced launch system (ALS) and national launch system (NLS) boosters, foreign launch vehicles, NLS-2 derived launch vehicles, liquid rocket booster (LRB) derived launch vehicle, and cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV).

  16. A Configurable, Object-Oriented, Transportation System Software Framework

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY,SUZANNE M.; MYRE,JOHN W.; PRICE,MARK H.; RUSSELL,ERIC D.; SCOTT,DAN W.

    2000-08-01

    The Transportation Surety Center, 6300, has been conducting continuing research into and development of information systems for the Configurable Transportation Security and Information Management System (CTSS) project, an Object-Oriented Framework approach that uses Component-Based Software Development to facilitate rapid deployment of new systems while improving software cost containment, development reliability, compatibility, and extensibility. The direction has been to develop a Fleet Management System (FMS) framework using object-oriented technology. The goal for the current development is to provide a software and hardware environment that will demonstrate and support object-oriented development commonly in the FMS Central Command Center and Vehicle domains.

  17. The Arabidopsis ATP-binding Cassette Protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 Is a High Affinity Inositol Hexakisphosphate Transporter Involved in Guard Cell Signaling and Phytate Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Réka; Grob, Hanne; Weder, Barbara; Green, Porntip; Klein, Markus; Frelet-Barrand, Annie; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Brearley, Charles; Martinoia, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis possesses a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Among these, the multidrug resistance-associated protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 regulates stomatal aperture and controls plasma membrane anion channels of guard cells. Remarkably, despite the prominent role of AtMRP5 in conferring partial drought insensitivity upon Arabidopsis, we know little of the biochemical function of AtMRP5. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that AtMRP5 is closely related to maize MRP4, mutation of which confers a low inositol hexakisphosphate kernel phenotype. We now show that insertion mutants of AtMRP5 display a low inositol hexakisphosphate phenotype in seed tissue and that this phenotype is associated with alterations of mineral cation and phosphate status. By heterologous expression in yeast, we demonstrate that AtMRP5 encodes a specific and high affinity ATP-dependent inositol hexakisphosphate transporter that is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC transporters. Moreover, complementation of the mrp5-1 insertion mutants of Arabidopsis with the AtMRP5 cDNA driven from a guard cell-specific promoter restores the sensitivity of the mutant to abscisic acid-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening. Additionally, we show that mutation of residues of the Walker B motif prevents restoring the multiple phenotypes associated with mrp5-1. Our findings highlight a novel function of plant ABC transporters that may be relevant to other kingdoms. They also extend the signaling repertoire of this ubiquitous inositol polyphosphate signaling molecule. PMID:19797057

  18. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  19. [Role of drug transporters in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Temesszentandrási-Ambrus, Csilla; Beéry, Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Although the presence of blood-brain barrier in the mammalian organisms was discovered in the early 1900s, its precise structure and the drug transporter proteins localized in the blood-brain barrier were identified only in the last decades. Beside the ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins responsible for the protection of the brain, the Solute Carrier transporters play also an important role in the function of the central nervous system by its feeding, energy supply and cleaning function during the metabolism. This review provides an overview on the main types of transporters located in the brain, on their localization in different cell types and the main techniques for their investigation. In the second part of this article various neurodegenerative disorders and the pathology-related transporter proteins are presented. In the light of recent experimental results new therapeutic strategies may come into the focus of research for the treatment of disorders currently without effective therapy. PMID:26920327

  20. A flexible micro fluid transport system featuring magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrooz, Majid; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a flexible magnetically-actuated micro fluid transport system utilizing an isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE). Theoretical modeling and analysis of this system is presented for a two-dimensional model. This fluid transport system can propel the fluid by applying a fluctuating magnetic field on the MRE. The magneto-fluid-structure interaction analysis is employed to determine movement of the solid domain and the velocity of the fluid under a controllable magnetic field. The effects of key material, geometric, and magnetic parameters on the behavior of this system are examined. It is demonstrated that the proposed system can propel the fluid unidirectionally, and the volume of the transported fluid is significantly affected by some of the design parameters.

  1. Characterisation of [11C]PR04.MZ in Papio anubis baboon: A selective high-affinity radioligand for quantitative imaging of the dopamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Riss P. J.; Fowler J.; Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.M.; Shea, C.; Xu, Y.; Carter, P.; Warner, D.; Ferrari V.; Kim, S.W.; Aigbirhio, F.I.; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2011-10-25

    N-(4-fluorobut-2-yn-1-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4{prime}-tolyl)nortropane (PR04.MZ, 1) is a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of the function of the cerebral dopamine transporter (DAT). A reliable automated process for routine production of the carbon-11 labelled analogue [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ ([{sup 11}C]-1) has been developed using GMP compliant equipment. An adult female Papioanubis baboon was studied using a test-retest protocol with [{sup 11}C]-1 in order to assess test-retest reliability, metabolism and CNS distribution profile of the tracer in non-human primates. Blood sampling was performed throughout the studies for determination of the free fraction in plasma (fP), plasma input functions and metabolic degradation of the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-1. Time-activity curves were derived for the putamen, the caudate nucleus, the ventral striatum, the midbrain and the cerebellum. Distribution volumes (VT) and non-displaceable binding potentials (BPND) for various brain regions and the blood were obtained from kinetic modelling. [{sup 11}C]-1 shows promising results as aselective marker of the presynaptic dopamine transporter. With the reliable visualisation of the extra-striatal dopaminergic neurons and no indication on labelled metabolites, the tracer provides excellent potential for translation into man.

  2. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurance, Dennis; Kimball, Foster; Rix, Craig

    1995-01-01

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  3. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lieurance, D.; Kimball, F.; Rix, C.

    1994-12-31

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  4. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The establishment of lunar bases is the next logical step in the exploration of space. Permanent lunar bases will support scientific investigation, the industrialization of space, and the development of self-sufficiency on the Moon. Scientific investigation and research and development would lead to applications utilizing lunar material resources. By utilizing these resources, the industrialization of space can become a reality. The above two factors coupled with the development of key and enabling technologies would lead to achievement of self-sufficiency of the lunar base. Attention was focused on specific design(s) to be pursued during subsequent stages in advanced courses. Some of the objectives in the project included: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from earth, or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetically levitated, or superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e. high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, zero wind forces, and lower gravity, etc.

  5. Superconducting magnet for the Maglev transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi

    1994-07-01

    Magnetically levitated vehicles (Maglev) using superconducting magnets have been under development in Japan for the past 23 years. The superconducting magnets for the Maglev system are used in a special environment compared to other applications. They have to work stably subject to both mechanical and electromagnetic disturbances. The brief history of the Maglev development in Japan, the planning of new test line, the superconducting magnet's stability and the on-board refrigeration system will be presented.

  6. Online optimal control of affine nonlinear discrete-time systems with unknown internal dynamics by using time-based policy update.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation is solved forward-in-time for the optimal control of a class of general affine nonlinear discrete-time systems without using value and policy iterations. The proposed approach, referred to as adaptive dynamic programming, uses two neural networks (NNs), to solve the infinite horizon optimal regulation control of affine nonlinear discrete-time systems in the presence of unknown internal dynamics and a known control coefficient matrix. One NN approximates the cost function and is referred to as the critic NN, while the second NN generates the control input and is referred to as the action NN. The cost function and policy are updated once at the sampling instant and thus the proposed approach can be referred to as time-based ADP. Novel update laws for tuning the unknown weights of the NNs online are derived. Lyapunov techniques are used to show that all signals are uniformly ultimately bounded and that the approximated control signal approaches the optimal control input with small bounded error over time. In the absence of disturbances, an optimal control is demonstrated. Simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the approach. The end result is the systematic design of an optimal controller with guaranteed convergence that is suitable for hardware implementation. PMID:24807137

  7. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B.; Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L.; Dixon, L.D.; Jones, R.H.; Klimas, M.J.; Peterson, R.W.

    1992-03-01

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  8. The Small Aircraft Transportation System Project: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.

    2006-01-01

    To all peoples in all parts of the world throughout history, the ability to move about easily is a fundamental element of freedom. The American people have charged NASA to increase their freedom and that of their children knowing that their quality of life will improve as our nation s transportation systems improve. In pursuit of this safe, reliable, and affordable personalized air transportation option, in 2000 NASA established the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Project. As the name suggests personalized air transportation would be built on smaller aircraft than those used by the airlines. Of course, smaller aircraft can operate from smaller airports and 96% of the American population is within thirty miles of a high-quality, underutilized community airport as are the vast majority of their customers, family members, and favorite vacation destinations.

  9. Multirate Transport of Natural Tracers in a Fractured System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.; Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.; Robinson, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Flow and transport in fractured systems is important in both groundwater applications and low-permeability hydrocarbon systems. We apply the multirate solute transport model to the flow of single-phase natural tracers in low-permeability hydrocarbon source rocks. We explore the effects of fracture and domain geometry, reservoir boundary conditions, and initial conditions of both the flow and transport problems using analytical and semi-analytical solutions. The flow and transport solutions will be combined to optimize reservoir characterization using a Bayesian framework. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect

    C.A Kouts

    2006-11-22

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

  11. Radionuclide transport through engineered barrier system alteration products

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B.E.; Torretto, P.C.; Matzen, S.L.

    1997-12-01

    The primary rationale for studying the transport behavior of radionuclides through the Engineered Barrier system / Near Field Environment (EBS/NFE) is to ascertain whether the material properties of the introduced and altered host rock can significantly affect the transport of radionuclides from the waste container to the far field. The intent of this report is to present data and modeling results that can be used to assess the importance of canister corrosion products and cementitious materials to transport of radionuclides to the far field.

  12. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation for Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Karl

    2000-01-01

    Current system simulations are mature, difficult to modify, and poorly documented. Probabilistic life prediction techniques for space applications are in their early application stage. Many parts of the full system, variable fidelity simulation, have been demonstrated individually or technology is available from aeronautical applications. A 20% reduction in time to design with improvements in performance and risk reduction is anticipated. GRC software development will proceed with similar development efforts in aeronautical simulations. Where appropriate, parallel efforts will be encouraged/tracked in high risk areas until success is assured.

  13. Study of aircraft in intraurban transportation systems, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, E. G.; Kesling, P. H.; Matteson, D. E.; Sherwood, D. E.; Tuck, W. R., Jr.; Vaughn, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of three aircraft concepts, deflected slipstream STOL, helicopter VTOL, and fixed wing STOL, is presented. An attempt was made to determine the best concept for the intraurban transportation system. Desirability of the concept was based on ease of maintenance, development timing, reliability, operating costs, and the noise produced. Indications are that the deflected slipstream STOL is best suited for intraurban transportation. Tables and graphs are included.

  14. A beam transport system for an intense He(-) beam source.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Kikuchi, M; Nagamura, T; Sugawara, H; Takeuchi, S; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Shinto, K; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Wada, M

    2008-02-01

    We have been developing a test stand for fast He(0) beam production. One of the major issues is how to transport effectively the He(+) and He(-) beams from which the He(0) beam is produced. The beam should be focused in two transverse focal points, the center of the charge exchange cell and the electrostatic accelerator. We studied the beam transport system and effect of space charge neutralization in the test stand by experiments and calculation.

  15. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) sample pig transport system

    SciTech Connect

    MCCOY, J.C.

    1999-03-16

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides a technical evaluation of the Sample Pig Transport System as compared to the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1, Change 1, Chapter III. The evaluation concludes that the package is acceptable for the onsite transport of Type B, fissile excepted radioactive materials when used in accordance with this document.

  16. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  17. Miniaturized reaction vessel system, method for performing site-specific biochemical reactions and affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Lysov, Yuri Petrovich; Dubley, Svetlana A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  18. [The diseases of circulatory system in employees of railway transport].

    PubMed

    Molodtsov, R N; Shemetova, G N

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the epidemiologic and medical social aspects of diseases of circulatory system in employees of railway transport in 2000-2010 exemplified by Privolzhskiy railroad. The established tendencies in prevalence of pathology of cardio-vascular system in railroad workers makes the issues of practical implementation of priority of prevention in the organization of medical care to this group of patients to come to foreground. The main directions for complex prevention of diseases of circulatory system in employees of railway transport are presented.

  19. Designing a beam transport system for RHIC's electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We designed two electron lenses to apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC; they will be installed near IP10. The electron-beam transport system is an important subsystem of the entire electron-lens system. Electrons are transported from the electron gun to the main solenoid and further to the collector. The system must allow for changes of the electron beam size inside the superconducting magnet, and for changes of the electron position by 5 mm in the horizontal- and vertical-planes.

  20. Transformations in Air Transportation Systems For the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    Globally, our transportation systems face increasingly discomforting realities: certain of the legacy air and ground infrastructures of the 20th century will not satisfy our 21st century mobility needs. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity for those nations unable to transform from the 20th to 21st century systems. Clearly, new thinking is required regarding business models that cater to consumers value of time, airspace architectures that enable those new business models, and technology strategies for innovating at the system-of-networks level. This lecture proposes a structured way of thinking about transformation from the legacy systems of the 20th century toward new systems for the 21st century. The comparison and contrast between the legacy systems of the 20th century and the transformed systems of the 21st century provides insights into the structure of transformation of air transportation. Where the legacy systems tend to be analog (versus digital), centralized (versus distributed), and scheduled (versus on-demand) for example, transformed 21st century systems become capable of scalability through technological, business, and policy innovations. Where air mobility in our legacy systems of the 20th century brought economic opportunity and quality of life to large service markets, transformed air mobility of the 21st century becomes more equitable available to ever-thinner and widely distributed populations. Several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems create new foundations for 21st thinking about air transportation. One of the technological developments of importance arises from complexity science and modern network theory. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of robustness

  1. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance.

  2. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance. PMID:25262536

  3. Space Transportation Systems Life Cycle Cost Assessment and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, John W.; Rhodes, Russell E.; Zapata, Edgar; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Donahue, Benjaamin B.; Knuth, William

    2008-01-01

    Civil and military applications of space transportation have been pursued for just over 50 years and there has been, and still is, a need for safe, dependable, affordable, and sustainable space transportation systems. Fully expendable and partially reusable space transportation systems have been developed and put in operation that have not adequately achieved this need. Access to space is technically achievable, but presently very expensive and will remain so until there is a breakthrough in the way we do business. Since 1991 the national Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) has reviewed and assessed the lessons learned from the major U.S. space programs of the past decades focusing on what has been learned from the assessment and control of Life Cycle Cost (LCC) from these systems. This paper presents the results of a selected number of studies and analyses that have been conducted by the SPST addressing the need, as well as the solutions, for improvement in LCC. The major emphasis of the SPST processes is on developing the space transportation system requirements first (up front). These requirements must include both the usual system flight performance requirements and also the system functional requirements, including the infrastructure on Earth's surface, in-space and on the Moon and Mars surfaces to determine LCC. This paper describes the development of specific innovative engineering and management approaches and processes. This includes a focus on flight hardware maturity for reliability, ground operations approaches, and business processes between contractor and government organizations. A major change in program/project cost control is being proposed by the SPST to achieve a sustainable space transportation system LCC - controlling cost as a program metric in addition to the existing practice of controlling performance and weight. Without a firm requirement and methodically structured cost control, it is unlikely that an affordable and sustainable space

  4. Transportation routing analysis geographic information system -- TRAGIS, a multimodal transportation routing tool

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    Over 15 years ago, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed two transportation routing models: HIGHWAY, which predicts truck transportation routes, and INTERLINE, which predicts rail transportation routes. Subsequent modifications have been made to enhance each of these models. Some of these changes include population density information for routes, HM-164 routing regulations for highway route controlled quantities of radioactive materials (RAM) truck shipments, and inclusion of waterway routing into INTERLINE. The AIRPORT model, developed 2 years after the HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models, serves as an emergency response tool. This model identifies the nearest airports from a designated location. Currently, the AIRPORT model is inactive. The Transportation Management Division of the US Department of Energy held a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models in April 1994 to bring together many users of these models and other experts in the transportation routing field to discuss these models and to decide on the capabilities that needed to be added. Of the many needs discussed, the primary one was to have the network databases within a geographic information system (GIS). As a result of the Baseline Requirements Session, the development of a new GIS model has been initiated. This paper will discuss the development of the new Transportation Routing Analysis GIS (TRAGIS) model at ORNL.

  5. Copper transport systems are involved in multidrug resistance and drug transport.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Akiyama, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    metabolism modulate drug transport appears to involve modulation of drug cellular localization via modulation of the vesicle transport system. In ATP7A overexpressing cells, Dox accumulates in the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, in the parental cells, Dox is localized in the nuclei, where the target molecules of Dox, topoisomerase II and DNA, are found. Disruption of the intracellular vesicle transport system with monensin, a Na+/H+ ionophore, induced the relocalization of Dox from the Golgi apparatus to the nuclei in the ATP7A overexpressing cells. These data suggested that ATP7A-related drug transport is dependent on the vesicle transport system. Thus copper transport systems play important roles in drug transport as well as in copper metabolism. Components of copper metabolism are therefore likely to include target molecules for the modulation of drug potency of not only anti-cancer agents but also of other drugs.

  6. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further

  7. Modeling Reactive Transport in Coupled Groundwater-Conduit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiessl, S. M.; Sauter, M.; Zheng, C.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling reactive transport in coupled groundwater-conduit systems requires consideration of two transport time scales in the flow and transport models. Consider for example a subsurface mine consisting of a network of highly conductive shafts, drifts or ventilation raises (i.e., conduits) within the considerably less permeable ore material (i.e., matrix). In the conduits, potential contaminants can travel much more rapidly than in the background aquifer (matrix). Since conduits cannot necessarily be regarded as a continuum, double continuum models are only of limited use for simulation of contaminant transport in such coupled groundwater-conduit systems. This study utilizes a "hybrid" flow and transport model in which contaminants can in essence be transported at a slower time scale in the matrix and at a faster time scale in the conduits. The hybrid flow model uses an approach developed by Clemens et al. (1996), which is based on the modelling of flow in a discrete pipe network, coupled to a continuum representing the low-permeability inter-conduit matrix blocks. Laminar or turbulent flow can be simulated in the different pipes depending on the flow conditions in the model domain. The three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW (Harbaugh and McDonald, 1996) is used to simulate flow in the continuum. Contaminant transport within the matrix is simulated with a continuum approach using the three-dimensional multi-species solute transport model MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999), while that in the conduit system is simulated with a one-dimensional advective transport model. As a first step for reactive transport modeling in such systems, only equilibrium reactions among multiple species are considered by coupling the hybrid transport model to a geochemical speciation package. An idealized mine network developed by Viswanathan and Sauter (2001) is used as a test problem in this study. The numerical experiment is based on reference date collected from

  8. Radiosynthesis binding affinity and biodistribution of 3-[F-18]fluoro-N-({alpha},{alpha},{alpha}-trifluoro-m-tolyl)piperazine (FTFMPP), a radioligand for the Serotonin system

    SciTech Connect

    Mishani, E.; Cristel, M.E.; McCarthy, T.J.; Welch, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    The serotonin agonist N({alpha},{alpha},{alpha}-trifluoro-m-tolyl)piperazine (TFMPP) is a potent ligand for the serotonin system. Angelini and co-workers previously synthesized the c.a [F-18]TFMPP but the low specific activity (less than 0.2GBq/mmol) limited the application of this ligand. We have recently reported the formation of phenylpiperazines by a novel alumina supported bis-alkylation. We report the application of this method and biological evaluation of 3-[F-18]FTFMPP, a fluoro derivative of TFMPP. Reaction of [F-18]fluoride with 3,5-dinitrobenzotrifluoride gave the 3-[F-18]fluoro-5-nitrobenzotrifluoride in 70% yield. Reduction of the nitro group with Raney nickel and hydrazine hydrate gave the [F-18]aniline derivative in 70% yield. Finally, the phenylpiperazine was constructed by reaction of the [F-18]aniline derivative with bis-2-bromoethyl-N-(ethoxy carbonyl)amine on basic alumina (pH=9) as a solid support. After extraction of the activity with basic MeOH and HPLC purification on normal phase the final product- [F-18]FTFMPP was obtained in 50% yield (98% radiochemical purity). The specific activity of the final product was 100GBq/mmol. The binding affinity of FTFMPP to 5-HT receptor was determined (Ki = 80-100 nM) and found to be similar to the binding affinity of the TFMPP (160-180 nM). The biodistribution of [F-18]FTFMPP was performed in rats.

  9. Inhibition of system xc− transporter attenuates autoimmune inflammatory demyelination1

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Ryan E.; Moseley, Carson E.; Sestero, Christine M.; Johnston, Bryce P.; De Sarno, Patrizia; Tang, Andrew; Gembitsky, Igor; Hewett, Sandra J.; Weaver, Casey T.; Raman, Chander; DeSilva, Tara M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) is a significant underlying pathogenesis in autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Several lines of evidence suggest that glutamate dysregulation in the CNS is an important consequence of immune cell infiltration in neuroinflammatory demyelinating diseases; yet, the causal link between inflammation and glutamate dysregulation is not well understood. A major source of glutamate release during oxidative stress is the system xc− transporter, however, this mechanism has not been tested in animal models of autoimmune inflammatory demyelination. We find that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of system xc− attenuates chronic and relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Remarkably, pharmacological blockade of system xc− seven days after induction of EAE attenuated T cell infiltration into the CNS, but not T cell activation in the periphery. Mice harboring a Slc7a11 (xCT) mutation that inactivated system xc− were resistant to EAE, corroborating a central role for system xc− in mediating immune cell infiltration. We next examined the role of the system xc− transporter in the CNS after immune cell infiltration. Pharmacological inhibitors of the system xc− transporter administered during the first relapse in a SJL animal model of relapsing-remitting EAE abrogated clinical disease, inflammation, and myelin loss. Primary co-culture studies demonstrate that myelin-specific CD4+ T helper type 1 (Th1) cells provoke microglia to release glutamate via the system xc− transporter causing excitotoxic death to mature myelin-producing OLs. Taken together these studies support a novel role for the system xc− transporter in mediating T cell infiltration into the CNS as well as promoting myelin destruction after immune cell infiltration in EAE. PMID:26071560

  10. GPS and GPRS Based Telemonitoring System for Emergency Patient Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, K.; Sarma, A. D.; Sravan, J.; Malini, M.; Venkateswarlu, G.

    2013-01-01

    Telemonitoring during the golden hour of patient transportation helps to improve medical care. Presently there are different physiological data acquisition and transmission systems using cellular network and radio communication links. Location monitoring systems and video transmission systems are also commercially available. The emergency patient transportation systems uniquely require transmission of data pertaining to the patient, vehicle, time of the call, physiological signals (like ECG, blood pressure, a body temperature, and blood oxygen saturation), location information, a snap shot of the patient, and voice. These requirements are presently met by using separate communication systems for voice, physiological data, and location that result in a lot of inconvenience to the technicians, maintenance related issues, in addition to being expensive. This paper presents design, development, and implementation of such a telemonitoring system for emergency patient transportation employing ARM 9 processor module. This system is found to be very useful for the emergency patient transportation being undertaken by organizations like the Emergency Management Research Institute (EMRI). PMID:27019844

  11. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions.

  12. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Solving transportation problems; Automated monitoring system provides valuable information

    SciTech Connect

    Dillavou, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. is a public utility with electric and natural gas distribution systems. Its natural gas distribution operation serves more than 175,000 customers in a 168,000-sq-mile service area. Serving such a large geographical area with the required daily nomination and usage reporting conditions of the transportation contracts posed many potential problems from an operation point of view. MDU solved these problems by implementing a fully automated system. The Metretek data collection system is described in this paper. It provides MDU with the volume information required to balance and bill the transportation accounts as well as monitor end-use transportation customer requirements on a timely basis.

  15. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  16. Development of an in vitro model system for studying the interaction of Equus caballus IgE with its high-affinity receptor FcεRI

    PubMed Central

    Sabban, Sari; Ye, Hongtu; Helm, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of IgE with its high-affinity Fc receptor (FcεRI) followed by an antigenic challenge is the principal pathway in IgE mediated allergic reactions. As a consequence of the high affinity binding between IgE and FcεRI, along with the continuous production of IgE by B cells, allergies usually persist throughout life, with currently no permanent cure available. Horses, especially race horses, which are commonly inbred, are a species of mammals that are very prone to the development of hypersensitivity responses, which can seriously affect their performance. Physiological responses to allergic sensitization in horses mirror that observed in humans and dogs. In this paper we describe the development of an in situ assay system for the quantitative assessment of the release of mediators of the allergic response pertaining to the equine system. To this end, the gene encoding equine FcεRIα was transfected into and expressed onto the surface of parental Rat Basophil Leukemia (RBL-2H3.1) cells. The gene product of the transfected equine α-chain formed a functional receptor complex with the endogenous rat β- and γ-chains 1. The resultant assay system facilitated an assessment of the quantity of mediator secreted from equine FcεRIα transfected RBL-2H3.1 cells following sensitization with equine IgE and antigenic challenge using β-hexosaminidase release as a readout 2, 3. Mediator release peaked at 36.68% ± 4.88% at 100 ng ml-1 of antigen. This assay was modified from previous assays used to study human and canine allergic responses 4, 5. We have also shown that this type of assay system has multiple applications for the development of diagnostic tools and the safety assessment of potential therapeutic intervention strategies in allergic disease 6, 2, 3. PMID:25406512

  17. Inhibition of System Xc(-) Transporter Attenuates Autoimmune Inflammatory Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Baker, Brandi J; Doyle, Ryan E; Moseley, Carson E; Sestero, Christine M; Johnston, Bryce P; De Sarno, Patrizia; Tang, Andrew; Gembitsky, Igor; Hewett, Sandra J; Weaver, Casey T; Raman, Chander; DeSilva, Tara M

    2015-07-15

    T cell infiltration into the CNS is a significant underlying pathogenesis in autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Several lines of evidence suggest that glutamate dysregulation in the CNS is an important consequence of immune cell infiltration in neuroinflammatory demyelinating diseases; yet, the causal link between inflammation and glutamate dysregulation is not well understood. A major source of glutamate release during oxidative stress is the system Xc(-) transporter; however, this mechanism has not been tested in animal models of autoimmune inflammatory demyelination. We find that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of system Xc(-) attenuates chronic and relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Remarkably, pharmacological blockade of system Xc(-) 7 d after induction of EAE attenuated T cell infiltration into the CNS, but not T cell activation in the periphery. Mice harboring a Slc7a11 (xCT) mutation that inactivated system Xc(-) were resistant to EAE, corroborating a central role for system Xc(-) in mediating immune cell infiltration. We next examined the role of the system Xc(-) transporter in the CNS after immune cell infiltration. Pharmacological inhibitors of the system Xc(-) transporter administered during the first relapse in a SJL animal model of relapsing-remitting EAE abrogated clinical disease, inflammation, and myelin loss. Primary coculture studies demonstrate that myelin-specific CD4(+) Th1 cells provoke microglia to release glutamate via the system Xc(-) transporter, causing excitotoxic death to mature myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Taken together, these studies support a novel role for the system Xc(-) transporter in mediating T cell infiltration into the CNS as well as promoting myelin destruction after immune cell infiltration in EAE.

  18. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity: [ 3H]GABA and L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake, exocytosis and efflux mediated by high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Himmelreich, N. H.

    The effects of centrifuge-induced hypergravity on the presynaptic events have been investigated in order to provide further insight into regulation of glutamate and GABA neurotransmission and correlation between excitatory and inhibitory responses under artificial gravity conditions. Exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10 G for 1 h) has been found to cause changes in the synaptic processes of brain, in particular neurotransmitter release and uptake in rat brain synaptosomes. Hypergravity loading resulted in more than two-fold enhancement of GABA transporter activity ( Vmax increased from 1.4 ± 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for the animals exposed to hypergravity ( P ⩽ 0.05)). The maximal velocity of L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein under artificial gravity conditions. Depolarization-evoked exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters has also changed in response to hypergravity. It increased for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11.74 ± 1.2% of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively ( P ⩽ 0.05)), but reduced for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%, for control and hypergravity, respectively). Thus, comparative analysis of the neurotransmitter uptake and release has demonstrated that short-term centrifuge-induced 10 G hypergravity loading intensified inhibitory and attenuated excitatory processes in nerve terminals. The activation or reduction of neurotransmitter uptake appeared to be coupled with similarly directed alterations of the neurotransmitter release.

  19. Development of an analysis capability for the National Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, D.; Nelson, R.

    1997-10-24

    The purpose of this report is to examine the Department of Transportation`s (DOT) National Transportation System (NTS) initiative, to document what has been learned, and to outline a National Transportation Network Analysis Capability (NTNAC) based on a ``TRANSIMS-like`` approach. This study was conducted over a two month period at the end of FY1997. The scope of the effort was carefully defined to accommodate the short time horizon and to provide focus to a very large analytical problem. The objectives were to: (1) define the NTS and the NTS problem; (2) identify problem characteristics; (3) describe an analytical solution based on the TRANSIMS approach; (4) identify data requirements and availability; (5) develop criteria for a scenario to be used in a prototype demonstration; and (6) select a scenario for the prototype demonstration.

  20. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDRAE, R. W.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  1. Simulation of a Production Facility with an Automated Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    ABRAMCZYK, GLENN

    2004-04-07

    A model was needed to assess material throughput and validate the conceptual design of a production facility, including equipment lists and layout. The initial desire was to use a commercially available discrete event simulation package. However, the available software was found to be too limited in capability. Database interface software was used to develop autonomous intelligent manufacturing workstations and material transporters. The initial Extend model used to assess material throughput and develop equipment lists for the preconceptual design effort was upgraded with software add-ons from Simulation Dynamics, Inc. (SDI). Use of the SDI database interface allowed the upgraded model to include: 1. a material mass balance at any level of detail required by the user, and 2. a transport system model that includes all transport system movements, time delays, and transfers between systems. This model will assist in evaluating transport system capacity, sensitive time delays in the system, and optimal operating strategies. An additional benefit of using the SDI database interface is dramatically improved run time performance. This allows significantly more runs to be completed to provide better statistics for overall plant performance. The model has all system and process parameters entered into sub-component accessible tables. All information for the manufactured items and process data is automatically generated and written to the database. The standard software is used for the movement of manufactured items between workstations, and for sequence and timing functions. Use of the database permits almost unlimited process control and data collection with an insignificant effect on run time.

  2. Transportation and Climate Change: The Potential for Hydrogen Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geffen, Charlette A.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.

    2004-03-31

    New technologies are being developed to serve the growing energy needs of the transportation sector without the environmental impacts observed with conventional technologies. In a world where emissions of carbon are severely constrained, hydrogen-powered vehicles (using fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or other) may be the best alternative for meeting societal needs. Programs to develop these technologies have emerged as high priorities for the automotive and energy industries, as well as governments worldwide. There are a number of challenges that must be faced, however, before we can effectively transition the current fossil fuel based system to a future hydrogen (H2) based system for the mobility industry. Full conversion of the existing transportation system will require concurrent availability of appropriate fuel sources and related infrastructure at acceptable costs and with a clear understanding of their environmental implications. This paper provides a framework for evaluating the challenges and potential pathways for the transition from our current petroleum-based energy sources for transportation systems to a future hydrogen-based system. A preliminary evaluation of the implications of moving to a hydrogen-based transportation system was conducted using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) integrated assessment model that evaluates the economic and environmental implications of various technology options. Future research activities will focus on alternative development pathways that consider infrastructure requirements and impacts as well as sequential, complementary and competitive technology development interactions.

  3. Transportation and operations aspects of space energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1989-01-01

    A brief comparative analysis was made for three concepts of supplying large-scale electrical energy to Earth from space. The concepts were: (1) mining helium-3 on the Moon and returning it to Earth; (2) constructing solar power satellites in geosynchronous orbit from lunar materials (the energy is beamed by microwave to receivers on Earth); and (3) constructing power collection and beaming systems on the Moon itself and transmitting the energy to Earth by microwave. This analysis concerned mainly space transportation and operations, but each of the systems is briefly characterized to provide a basis for space transportation and operations analysis.

  4. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  5. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  6. Transportable TT&C terminals - Conceptual systems design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannard, K. B.

    The design features, performance requirements and applications of future transportable telemetry, tracking and control ground terminals are examined. The terminals must be transportable to function in areas of natural and man-made disasters, as well as in jamming environments. Similarly, the units must be capable of rapid deactivation, erection and autonomous operation. The terminals would provide ephemeris, status and control support to satellites. A sample design is described, including antenna and RF systems and backup software for mission critical operations, automated testing and testing instrumentation. The importance of interface capabilities among various satellite systems and high reliability is emphasized.

  7. Side-mounted monorail transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A monorail transit system is described comprising: a beam adapted to be supported on a ground-supported foundation, the beam having two opposite sides, at least one of which has respective truck means provided thereon; a transit car body; at least one transit car truck and a transit car guide means for each transit car body; each transit car truck and each transit car guide means comprising a frame having first wheel means mounted thereon for rotation and disposed in rolling engagement with the track means for providing vertical support, and second and third wheel means mounted thereon for rotation and disposed in rolling engagement with the track means for providing horizontal support; each transit car truck and the transit car guide means further including an arm based on the respective the frame and arching upwardly and outwardly therefrom to an upper outer end at which a respective first securement means is provided; each transit car truck and transit car guide means for each car body being spaced from one another longitudinally of the respective track means.

  8. HOV facilities and transportation-systems management, 1991. Transportation Research Record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The papers in the Record are related by their focus on either high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) systems or transportation systems management (TSM). The reports evaluate the effectiveness in reducing delay to through-moving vehicles of left-turn bypass lanes at two-lane, rural T-intersections; examines the viability of advanced technology traffic management systems to provide solutions to the future traffic needs of New York City; summarizes the results of an extensive parking demand study of neighborhood and community shopping centers in northern Virginia; and examines various aspects of HOV systems.

  9. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  10. An adaptive robust controller for time delay maglev transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Reza Hamidi; Zarabadipour, Hassan; Shahnazi, Reza

    2012-12-01

    For engineering systems, uncertainties and time delays are two important issues that must be considered in control design. Uncertainties are often encountered in various dynamical systems due to modeling errors, measurement noises, linearization and approximations. Time delays have always been among the most difficult problems encountered in process control. In practical applications of feedback control, time delay arises frequently and can severely degrade closed-loop system performance and in some cases, drives the system to instability. Therefore, stability analysis and controller synthesis for uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems are important both in theory and in practice and many analytical techniques have been developed using delay-dependent Lyapunov function. In the past decade the magnetic and levitation (maglev) transportation system as a new system with high functionality has been the focus of numerous studies. However, maglev transportation systems are highly nonlinear and thus designing controller for those are challenging. The main topic of this paper is to design an adaptive robust controller for maglev transportation systems with time-delay, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. In this paper, an adaptive robust control (ARC) is designed for this purpose. It should be noted that the adaptive gain is derived from Lyapunov-Krasovskii synthesis method, therefore asymptotic stability is guaranteed.

  11. 49 CFR 37.27 - Transportation for elementary and secondary education systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transportation for elementary and secondary education systems. 37.27 Section 37.27 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.27 Transportation...

  12. Regulation of Glutamine Transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R C; Iwata, K K; Furlong, C E

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the high-affinity (Km equal to 0.2 muM) L-glutamine transport system of Escherichia coli strain 7 (Lin) appears to be subject to the same major control as the glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) of this gram-negative organism. Culture of cells under nitrogen-limited conditions provides maximum derepression of both the glutamine synthetase and the glutamine transport system. Nutritional conditions providing a rich supply of ammonium salts or available sources of nitrogen, i.e., conditions which repress the formation of glutamine synthetase, provide three- and 20-fold repression, respectively, of the glutamine transport system. Culture of cells with glutamine supplements of 2 mM does not increase the repression of high-affinity glutamine transport system beyond the level observed in the absence of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine uptake is observed in cells cultured with a glutamine-depleted nutrient broth. This second component is associated with the appearance of glutaminase A (EC 3.5.1.2) and asparaginase I (EC 3.5.1.1), a periplasmic enzyme. Parallel changes were observed in the levels of the high-affinity glutamine transport system and the glutamine synthetase when cells were cultured with the carbon sources: glucose, glycerol, or succinate. PMID:238938

  13. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, Harold T. Wight, Gregory Dreier, Ken Borland, Nicholas

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable

  14. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  15. Transportation systems analyses. Volume 2: Technical/programmatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform man delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationships between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. This report documents the three principal transportation systems analyses (TSA) efforts during the period 7 November 92 - 6 May 93. The analyses are as follows: Mixed-Fleet (STS/ELV) strategies for SSF resupply; Transportation Systems Data Book - overview; and Operations Cost Model - overview/introduction.

  16. Viability of a Reusable In-Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Sharon A.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Nufer, Brian M.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Merrill, Raymond G.; North, David D.; Martin, John G.; Komar, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing options for an Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) that expands human presence from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) into the solar system and to the surface of Mars. The Hybrid in-space transportation architecture is one option being investigated within the EMC. The architecture enables return of the entire in-space propulsion stage and habitat to cis-lunar space after a round trip to Mars. This concept of operations opens the door for a fully reusable Mars transportation system from cis-lunar space to a Mars parking orbit and back. This paper explores the reuse of in-space transportation systems, with a focus on the propulsion systems. It begins by examining why reusability should be pursued and defines reusability in space-flight context. A range of functions and enablers associated with preparing a system for reuse are identified and a vision for reusability is proposed that can be advanced and implemented as new capabilities are developed. Following this, past reusable spacecraft and servicing capabilities, as well as those currently in development are discussed. Using the Hybrid transportation architecture as an example, an assessment of the degree of reusability that can be incorporated into the architecture with current capabilities is provided and areas for development are identified that will enable greater levels of reuse in the future. Implications and implementation challenges specific to the architecture are also presented.

  17. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation systemmore » components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.« less

  18. The manned transportation system study - Defining human pathways into space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nick; Geyer, Mark S.; Gaunce, Michael T.; Anson, H. W.; Bienhoff, D. G.; Carey, D. A.; Emmett, B. R.; Mccandless, B.; Wetzel, E. D.

    1992-01-01

    Substantiating data developed by a NASA-industry team (NIT) for subsequent NASA decisions on the 'right' set of manned transportation elements needed for human access to space are discussed. Attention is given to the framework for detailed definition of these manned transportation elements. Identifying and defining architecture evaluation criteria, i.e., attributes, specified the amount and type of data needed for each concept under consideration. Several architectures, each beginning with today's transportation systems, were defined using representative systems to explore future options and address specific questions currently being debated. The present solutions emphasize affordability, safety, routineness, and reliability. Key issues associated with current business practices were challenged and the impact associated with these practices quantified.

  19. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) space transportation cost analysis and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A picture of Space Power Systems space transportation costs at the present time is given with respect to accuracy as stated, reasonableness of the methods used, assumptions made, and uncertainty associated with the estimates. The approach used consists of examining space transportation costs from several perspectives to perform a variety of sensitivity analyses or reviews and examine the findings in terms of internal consistency and external comparison with analogous systems. These approaches are summarized as a theoretical and historical review including a review of stated and unstated assumptions used to derive the costs, and a performance or technical review. These reviews cover the overall transportation program as well as the individual vehicles proposed. The review of overall cost assumptions is the principal means used for estimating the cost uncertainty derived. The cost estimates used as the best current estimate are included.

  20. GD-aided IOL (input-output linearisation) controller for handling affine-form nonlinear system with loose condition on relative degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunong; Chen, Dechao; Jin, Long; Zhang, Yinyan; Yin, Yonghua

    2016-04-01

    Input-output linearisation (IOL) may encounter a singularity problem when applied to the tracking control of affine-form nonlinear system (AFNS), which may not have a well-defined relative degree. The singularity problem has occurred in the area of control for decades. In this paper, we incorporate the gradient dynamics (GD) into IOL, which leads to the GD-aided IOL method to solve the singularity problem, with the proposition of the loose condition on relative degree. Moreover, detailed theoretical analyses on tracking-error bound and convergence performance of the corresponding GD-aided IOL controller are presented. Simulations and comparisons substantiate that the proposed GD-aided IOL method is capable of completing the tracking-control task and conquering the singularity encountered in the AFNS.